Pattern in Pattern - Make Stacked Pattern Swatches in Photoshop to Sell & for Spoonflower | Helen Bradley | Skillshare
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Pattern in Pattern - Make Stacked Pattern Swatches in Photoshop to Sell & for Spoonflower

teacher avatar Helen Bradley, Graphic Design for Lunch™

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Introduction to Making a Pattern in Pattern Effect in Photoshop

      0:55

    • 2.

      Pt 1 - Why are we doing this?

      3:20

    • 3.

      Pt 2 - Make the Gingham Check

      6:38

    • 4.

      Pt 3 - Make the Flower

      9:32

    • 5.

      Pt 4 - Create the Flower Pattern Test and Edit It

      10:13

    • 6.

      Pt 5 - Put the Patterns together

      4:52

    • 7.

      Pt 6 - Make additional colour ways

      3:11

    • 8.

      Pt 7 - Save the Patterns

      2:58

    • 9.

      Pt 8 - Planning a more complex design

      3:36

    • 10.

      Pt 9 - Assemble a Draft of the Pattern

      8:16

    • 11.

      Pt 10 - Perfecting the Design

      5:54

    • 12.

      Pt 11 - Create the Geometric Pattern and put everything together

      12:22

    • 13.

      Pt 12 - Put together already created patterns

      12:41

    • 14.

      Pt 13 - Putting together uneven size patterns

      6:49

    • 15.

      Pt 14 - Put Together the Uneven Size Patterns

      6:21

    • 16.

      Project and Wrapup

      1:08

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About This Class

Learn to make "Pattern in Pattern" or "Stacked Pattern Swatches" in Photoshop. If  you are selling patterns or uploading designs to Spoonflower you may want to combine two patterns such as a geometric with a floral pattern. The issue is that you can't upload two patterns to Spoonflower and have the site stack them for you. Instead you have to create the double layer or pattern in pattern effect yourself and then upload the resulting combined pattern. Of course, that pattern, itself, also needs to be a seamless repeat! There are some tricks and techniques you can use to make these stacked patterns and you will learn these in this class. You will learn to make stacked patterns from scratch and also how to combine two existing patterns into one single swatch for sale or upload to sites that require pattern swatches (rather than objects filled wit a pattern).

When you have completed this class you will be able to combine two patterns into one seamless repeating pattern swatch and you will have some patterns already created and ready for sale. And, as with all Graphic Design for Lunch™ classes you will have added new skills to your Photoshop toolkit that you can use every day.  

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Meet Your Teacher

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Helen Bradley

Graphic Design for Lunch™

Top Teacher

Helen teaches the popular Graphic Design for Lunch™ courses which focus on teaching Adobe® Photoshop®, Adobe® Illustrator®, Procreate®, and other graphic design and photo editing applications. Each course is short enough to take over a lunch break and is packed with useful and fun techniques. Class projects reinforce what is taught so they too can be easily completed over a lunch hour or two.

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Level: Intermediate

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Transcripts

1. Introduction to Making a Pattern in Pattern Effect in Photoshop: Hello and welcome to this class on creating a pattern in pattern or double layer pattern in Adobe Photoshop. My name is Helen Bradley and I'm a Skillshare top teacher. I have over 270 courses here on Skillshare and over 165 thousand student enrollments. In this class, we will look at how to combine two patterns in Photoshop to make a single pattern swatch that includes both patterns at different scales. We'll look at the process of doing this from scratch and then look at the somewhat tricky process for doing it with existing patterns. By the time you finish this course, you'll have a couple of jeweler pattern swatches. And as with every graphic design for lunch class, you'll have a range of new Photoshop tools and techniques that you can put to work in your everyday workflow. So without further ado, let's get started making pattern in pattern or double layer patterns in Adobe Photoshop. 2. Pt 1 - Why are we doing this?: Before we get started on the technicalities of how we're actually going to build these multilayer patterns. Let's have a look and see what it is that we're looking at and why this is important. So here I have two patterns. Let's just switch to the two individual layers. So I have a floral pattern and I have a Gangnam check pattern. And they're being put together into a single pattern. But you'll see that the Gangnam checks, which are actually just these four little squares here, repeat far more quickly than the flowers do. So I've created these as two separate patterns and layer them on top of each other. The result is this. This is just a single pattern. Everything is put together in a permanent presentation. This technique varies in importance from nice-to-have to absolutely critical. So let's talk Spoonflower. Spoonflower is a site where you upload a pattern swatch, just one pattern swatch for one piece of fabric. Spoonflower requires the pattern swatch because of the technicalities. So impaired doesn't know whether you want to make a billboard, a piece of wallpaper, or just a fat quarter. And so Spoonflower wants the actual pattern swatch, so then they can repeat it over and over and over again. Fill whatever size document it is that you want. You can't send two patterns to Spoonflower and ask them to just line them up on top of each other. That's not how Spoonflower works. If you're making designs in Photoshop that you want to sell on Spoonflower, then you have to know this. If you want these sorts of multilayer designs, There's nothing that you can do to avoid this. Now, if you're selling patterns, you probably also want to know this because you want to be able to give your buyer the pattern for the flowers. You want to be able to give them the pattern for the gang. And because that's what they might want to use, then you also want to give them the one pattern that you've designed where everything is put together at a scale that works, that's pleasing to the eye that you as the designer have determined this is what you want to sell. You're going to get a lot less pushback from buyers. If you sell them the pattern already assembled, then if you sell them to individual patterns and suggest that they might stack them on top of each other. So I think that this is worth it to understand from the point of view of a pattern seller. And in this class I'm going to be creating a lot of scrapbook size images just to showcase how a design might look at scrapbook paper size. But of course you're going to be having a look at it through your own lens. You might be a fabric designer and so you're looking at it from the point of view of printing onto fabric or whatever. But if you're selling on Spoonflower and you want to create these kind of patterns, then the only way to do that is to understand how you can put them together so that they will repeat seamlessly as a single pattern, because that's all you can upload to Spoonflower. Now that you know what it is that we're aiming for to put two patterns together so that they repeat and so that they're not seams and it's not all wonky. Then let's go ahead and we're first of all going to create this one. And then we're going to move through some successively more difficult processes developing these patterns. 3. Pt 2 - Make the Gingham Check: To get started with our design, we're first going to create a tagging them check. Now the important thing to consider at this point is that we don't want to have to apologize later on if we can possibly help, but I'm making things bigger in Photoshop is fraught with difficulty because you're likely to get some pixelization. So we want to start out the way we want to end up if you like. And so what I'm going to do is I'm going to create a Gangnam check and I'm going to do it with a document that's 200 pixels by 200 pixels. We'll talk about that in just a second. So 200 pixels by 200 pixels, I'm making sure that art boards here is disabled in the most recent versions of Photoshop, I just want to be working with a single art board. The resolution doesn't really matter too much. And as for the background contents, well, I'm going to make it transparent so we can build up the pattern from scratch. So I'll just click Create. Let's talk about what a 200 pixel by 200 pixel design is. Ideally for sites like Spoonflower or any online printing side. And indeed for scrapbook paper, most people are looking at something that's going to print at 300 DPI. Now, there's times 300 DPI and 300 ppi. And for our purposes, they're interchangeable. They're not the same, but just think of them as being the exact same thing for this purpose of getting our designs correct. So if we're printing at 300 DPI or PPI, I've got a document here that is 200 pixels wide. So that means that printing, it's going to be about two-thirds of an inch. And if you're working in centimeters, then it's going to be something like about 1.75 centimeters. So that's the repeat. That's what our Gangnam check is going to look like one complete pattern. So thinking about this before you actually start is really important. How big do I want my Gangnam? Do I want a kingdom check that's eight inches wide for a single check willing to start off with a document that's going to work for that. I'm starting with one that is going to be the equivalent of about two-thirds of an inch wide, something like about one and three-quarters centimeters. So I'm going to start out with the rectangle tool because it's fairly easy to do. I'm going to drag over here and looking at my little tool tips. I want to stop when I get to 100 by 200. That's half this document. So I've got a selection here that is half of the document. Let's change the color of our kingdom. Check this time, and let's do a purplish kingdom check. Gonna go for something color. I'll click. Okay, so it's set as my foreground color here. If I press Alt and Backspace, that would be option. Delete on the Mac, I can fill that rectangle, selected rectangle with my color. Now if you miss that keyboard shortcut or you want to do it a different way, you can go and get the paint bucket tool and just drop the paint in there. And then we're going to choose, select and deselect and learn as we do. That's Control or Command D. In our Layers panel, you'll see that we've got a layer that is half purple and half Nothing. Well, we're going to duplicate it, so I'm just going to drag it onto the plus symbol at the bottom of the screen. I'm going to rotate it. So I'm going to click on adhere, have the Move tool in hand, and I'm just going to hold the Shift key as I rotate it around. So it's constrained to moving in set numbers of degrees. And I want to stop when I get it about 90 degrees around. And I'm just placing it in the top here, and I'll just click the check mark. Now I need some white in here, so I'm going to add a new layer, and I'm just going to drop it down at the bottom here. Let's go and fill it with white. So let's use the paint bucket this time. Now, the problem with our pattern so far is that we don't have the kingdom check. We don't have light here, light here and darker over here. But if I select these two layers and decrease the opacity, then we are going to have that. I'm just going to slide down the opacity to about 50 per cent and just check that as I go. Now what I'm using here are what are called scrubby sliders. Typically in Photoshop, anytime you see a word, you can adjust the slider by just dragging on it so you don't have to drop this down and try and find 50 per cent here, if you prefer, you can just drag over the slider. So I'm just looking for something that is an attractive sort of Gangnam check. This is all I need to make, making them check. So I'm going to choose Edit and Define Pattern. I'm going to call this purple kingdom. Now that I've created my pattern, I'm going to put it into a working document so I can see how everything's working as we go ahead. I'll choose File and then New this time we're going to do a working document that's 3600. By 3600, I'm going to make it at a resolution of 300 because this is scrapbook paper size. And if you weren't creating scrapbook paper, you could create a different size document. Want to make sure that everything's looking pretty good as I go for the purpose for which I want to use this particular pattern, I'll click Create, and now we're going to fill it. So to fill it, and we want to fill it at its current size. So I'm just going to use edit and fill. Now the trick here is to work out where your pattern is because Photoshop does a few really weird things these days with patterns. So you're going to find your pattern at the very bottom of the patterns dialogue. So in contents we've got pattern selected here. And then we've got a custom pattern which will be set to something. And then you're going to come down here to the end. And this is my purple pattern in the interim, I'm just going to remove these so they don't get in our way. So let's just click, Okay. This is what our pattern is going to look like on a sheet of scrapbook paper. Now at this point, if you think it's too big, you would go and resize it. Now we could scale it down at this point, but I'm happy with this right now. If you want it to be bigger than you're going to need to create your document at a bigger size. We could actually resize this one, increase the size of it. It wouldn't matter here because it's squares. But typically with other patterns, resizing is going to be a problem. So we've got our working document, we've got arguing them. Check in the next video, we're going to create the flowers at a scale that's going to be different to the kingdom check. So they're going to work really well together. 4. Pt 3 - Make the Flower: Now that we've got our gang and pattern here, I'm just going to click the plus sign and I just want to get a brush with some color on it. So let's just go and get something that's going to contrast highly with what we've got in the kingdom. Check. What I wanted to do is work out roughly how my flowers are going to work. So I was thinking something about 600 by 600 pixels, which would mean it would be the equivalent of about three of these Kingdom checks. So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to have a flower in here. And then over here I'm going to have a flower here. And approximately over here, I'm going to have a flower now. I'm doing an offset pattern, so I'm going to have a flower bed here, one here. And I'm just looking at the relative scale of this to see if it's actually going to work for me. And if it's not going to work for me, then I'm going to rethink my process at this point. I'm going to show you a little bit later as to how you can mock this up to get an idea of how things are going to look. But I had thought that this design might look good. And I'm looking at right now, I'm thinking, yep, that's going to work for me. So let's just trash out working elements if you like, and let's go and create the document that would support what it was that I just design. And what I want is something that's 600 by 600. Doesn't matter the resolution that's immaterial right now. It does need to be transparent because it's going to go over the genome if you make white going to get into all sorts of trouble at this point, and we'll click Create. Now before we go further, let's note that initially we made this document 200 by 200, and this document is 600 by 600. So it's easy for us to divide two hundred and six hundred. It goes three times. So if we were to fill this document with our pattern, Let's just go and do that. You'll see that it evenly fills it. And that's critical for this process to work. Things have to scale within themselves. We have to be able to drop this kingdom patterning and it has to be a perfect repeat inside this shape. And we've just proven that it is, so I'm just going to undo that. So let's have a look and say now how are we going to create this flower? And for the flower, I'm going to use a brush. So let's just go and see the brush that I'm using. I want it to be relatively hard, so I'm going to wind up my hardness as to the size. I can change that on the fly. I wanted to work with black, so I'm going to press D to get the default colors to make the brush smaller, I'm going to use the open square bracket. Close square bracket would make it larger. And so I'm just going to create my basic flower shape. And for this I'm going to start with a circle in the middle and then I'm just going to add some elements around it. Now this flower shape is really simple to create, but it does end up looking pretty good. I'm just doing this with a mouse. It doesn't have to be perfect. In fact, the design is going to work better if it's not perfect. But what you do want to do is you want to make sure that the ends overlap. So you don't want to do this and leave something with a gap in it that's not going to help in just a minute. So let's just do a few more of these. And when you're done with the flower, you can add some leaves. Again, you want these to connect with each other. I'm not concerned that the veins and the leaves are not reaching the edge here, but I am concerned that the middle element is reaching the edge. Now I'm going to bring this down a little bit more centrally into the document to add our color, I'm going to add a layer beneath the dark line layer. I'm going to make a selection. I'm using the Magic Wand Tool. Now, the magic wand tool has something called tolerance. And that says that not only are we going to pick up transparent pixels, but we're also going to pick up a little bit of the edge detail because I used a semi hard brush. You can see that there are some fluffy edges in this design that's by design. But what we want to do is when we actually select these areas in here that we pick up into the gray area. In fact, we could increase that tolerance a little bit if we wanted to. It's on a scale of 0 to 255. So something like 50 is probably a reasonably good value. Let's make sure that we're on the layer that we're actually working on that has the line work on it. And I'm going to select some of these elements. You can see I'm not selecting it particularly well. I'm going to solve that a different way in just a minute. I am working on contiguous. You do need to have contiguous checked. That means that we're isolating the selection to just the area that has a border around it. And that's why we created borders. I'm going to hold the Shift key and add to my selection. I'm going to add these outer leaves to my selection. Now because my selection was a little bit on the small size, I'm going to expand it. I'll go to Select and then modify. And I'll go to expand. And I'm thinking that I probably want to expand it by about four pixels. That's going to eat into this black area. So I'll click Okay. It's eight and into the black area really nicely. I don't want to put my color with my line work. I'm going to put my color on the layer underneath. So I'm selecting the layer underneath. Let's go and find a color to use knowing that we had a purple kingdom. So I'm going to choose something in the pinks here. I'm going to use dark colors on the outside and lighter pink towards the middle. So now I've got my selection, I've got my empty layer, and I've got my color. Again, we're going to do the same thing. Alt, Backspace, option Delete to fill that selected area with the color and then select, de-select. So that's the reason why we really probably want to learn these keystrokes. So we're going back to this layer that has the black on it, going back to the Magic Wand Tool, going back to select the next set of leaves. Because we're going to be doing this a few times. What I'm gonna do is I'm going to make a very quick action. So I'm going to Window and then Actions. I'm going to click here to make a new action. And I'm going to call this expand by four pixels. And click Record. So I've got my selection in place. All I want to do is go through that expansion, Select, Modify, Expand four pixels. Click, Okay, while I'm at it, Let's go and select the layer that we're actually going to be putting the color on it. Now I've got my action recorded. I need to stop the action. So let's go back to the Actions panel. You can see I've got my Expand select layer two. Now I need to just stop recording. So I'm going to click here on stopped playing recording. I've done it for this particular sets are more ready to add the colors. So let's go back and add the color. And then the next one we're going to actually use our action. So I've selected my color, Alt Backspace option Delete to fill it with the color. Then we'll just do select, de-select. I'm going to use the keyboard shortcuts. Next up. Let's go back to layer with the black on it. Shift. Click on these leaves. Let's go to our Actions and let's just run our action. So I'm selecting expand by four pixels and just running it. You'll say that the action has done the expansion at all. So I moved us to the correct layer. Whenever you are doing something that is slightly repetitive like this, it's a really good idea to make an action for a couple of reasons. One is because you'll get plenty of practice making actions. And you'll find that they can be really valuable for speeding things up and just making sure that you don't dump your color on the wrong layer. For example, let's go to this one. Let's run our action. Let's go and select that color. I'm going to do a yellow center of my flower or Backspace option Delete. I don't really even need to look at the labs because I know that the action is going to make sure that I do it perfectly every single time. Let's go back. Though. I do need to look at the layers in terms of making sure I select the right colors here or the right color area. So I'm selecting one side of the leaves. Go back to our actions, run our action. Let's go and get some green color for one side of the leaves. And then we're going to do the last bit. Select over it, just make sure we've got all that error. If you need to add to it with the Shift key, press down, you can just click to add to it. So here our actions. Got that selected. I'm gonna go for a slightly lighter color on the leaves. At this point, alt backspace option, delete, and then de-select. I'm finished with my actions. Now, this is my basic flower shape. I'm going to have a flower here. I'm going to have a quarter of an up here, quarter of an up here, quarter here, and a quarter of it here. But we've started in the process of creating the flower that's going to be incorporated with our kingdom pattern in the next video. 5. Pt 4 - Create the Flower Pattern Test and Edit It: Now that we've created the elements for our pattern, it's time to go and make the pattern. Now there's a couple of things to think about here. One of them is how easy this is going to be. The second one is how flexible can we make it? So I'm going to go for ease rather than flexibility. So what I'm gonna do is I'm going to jam together the black and the color. So they put together on a single layer. It's going to make, making a pattern more simple. And so if you're new to making patterns in Photoshop this way, That's exactly what I would do, but you'll see that I've already saved this as flour layered. So that means that by saving it as flower bled, I've got these layers saved independently. So if I ever wanted to get back to that, I could. But for now, I'm going to grab these two layers, right-click and choose Merge Layers. So that gives me a single flower on a layout, so everything's jammed together. One of the things that potentially you might look at doing, I'm just going to undo this for a minute. In terms of being a little bit more creative, is I've got the colors selected here. So if I did this, I would be able to create a pattern that has a color offset where the colors are moving a little bit away from the lines. That's a really attractive whimsical result. By merging these two layers together when they were perfectly lined up. I've made it a lot more difficult for myself and getting that sort of look to my flower later on. So yeah, that's what I mean by losing flexibility. There's a whole lot of flexibility that we're going to compromise by sandwiching these layers together. I think in terms of making the pattern. But at least the first pattern we're making here, a little more simply than jamming them together is a good idea, but make sure you save the layers so that you could come back and do something a little bit different later on. So we've got one flower in the middle here. I'm going to select on this flower and I'm going to check and see how big it is. I'm going to the Properties panel and I'm looking here and it is to 78 by 328, which tells me that this is true even numbers. Now, if it was not even numbers, what I would do is make sure that when I hover over this, it says maintain aspect ratio. So that tells me that right now the aspect ratio is not being maintained. What I would do is I would round it up to the next even number. I'm actually going to round this up to different numbers here. So I'm taking it up to 280 by 330. It's marginally increasing the size. It's not compromising the look of this shape at all. But it does mean that it's even numbers. And in terms of even numbers, that means placing the center of this shape over these corners is going to be dead accurate. If you're half a pixel out, it's going to be curtains, your patterns not going to line up. And it's going to be really quite obvious that it's not lining up. So the first thing that you need to do before you start on your pattern is to make sure that the element that is going to be the repeat is an even number of pixels wide and tall. And we've made sure that it is. So let's go and get this and drag it onto the plus symbol here. So that means we've got two copies of it with the topmost brand new copy selected. I'm going to take it to roughly where it needs to be and that is the top corner of this document. I'm going to try and place that in the top corner. If I miss out, that's fine. We're going to solve that. So I'm going to press Control or Command T to get these free transform tools. You may find that this little check mark up here is not selected while you want to select it. And you want to make sure that all of these nine little boxes, the middle one is selected. So that means that all those values are referenced to the center of our flower shape. And we're going to make sure that the x and y as zeros 0, which they are, that's fine. We'll just click the check mark. If they were not zeros 0, then we would make them 00. I'm going to take this shape and I'm going to drag it onto the new icon so I get another copy. Let's take it over here. Let's drop it into position, but let's not get it in exactly the right position. So I can show you how you will control or command T. We're going up here, you'll see that this setting is sticky. So once you set it on, it's going to be on. This should be at 6000. It's, neither of those values are correct, so let's make it 600 by just typing on top of it. Be better if I selected everything before I did that, 600, and this is going to be 0. So we now know that the center of this shape, this combined shape, is exactly over the top corner of the document. Perfect. Let's click the check mark. Now we're going to take both these flowers with us this time. So I'm going to select the two top ones. I'm going to drag them onto the new icon that deselects the set underneath and just leave selected my brand new copies. I want to move them down. I'm going to, with the move tool here, start moving them down and I'm adding the Shift key because that means that they're going in a perfect vertical direction. So I know that the alignment, one of these alignments is going to be correct. The 2 May 1 not be. Let's just drop them there and then let's look at each of them individually. I'm looking at this one now. Control or command T. Well, the 600s, correct, but this should be 600 as well and it's not. So let's just select it and type 600 and click the check mark. And then we'll go back to this other one because if the first one was wrong, then this one's going to be wrong and it is 600. If you're making patterns, this accuracy has to be pixel perfect. Because if you don't do that, it's just not going to work. So we now have the pattern element that is going to be our design. So I'm going to choose Edit and Define Pattern. I'm going to call this pink flower. Now, I may go ahead and save this, giving it a different name. So I do File and then Save As and give it a different name. So I'm not overwriting my flower layered, but this is going to be perhaps my pattern master. But let's go and test it out on our sample document because it may not work. I'm going to choose Layer, New Fill Layer, and then Pattern. I'm going to click Okay. Now it's going to default to this set of leaves, but we're just going down to the very bottom of the pattern dialogue here. Click on the flower and click Okay, and just make sure that it looks okay. Well, this time it has worked Photoshop these days, has a rather nasty habit of doing things a little bit weirdly when you've got elements that are over the edge of the document, but that hasn't caused us issues here. This is what our pattern is going to look like. This is a basic pattern. There are some things that we can do to it that are going to improve its lock. One of them is perhaps to rotate the flower that's in the middle of these four, so that we have a sort of alternating flower that's going in a different direction. And we could also change the middle of this flower so it looks a little bit different. So let's have a look and say how we would do that. So we can get some elements that we could use to create a little bit more of an interesting design. So what I'm gonna do here is grabbed this one because this is the easiest to rotate if we were rotating the outside ones where it's just going to be a nightmare. So don't touch the outside ones, they're working perfectly. I'm going to hold the Shift key. As I rotate this around, I'm going to find a slightly new position for this. I'm going to click the check mark and I just might rearrange its position relative to the ones in the corner. Again, I don't want to touch any of these in the corner because that's where the pattern is going to break. But I can do anything I like with this one in the middle. And what I'm looking for is roughly even spacing around here. So I think it didn't need to be moved a little bit. So let's save this as another pattern I'm going to call this pink flowers rotated. Go back to this document now the reason why I used a pattern fill out and didn't just fill the law was because I can double-click on this, go to the flyout menu here, and just click my new pattern. So it just makes working with these patterns when you're looking at the result, I'm trying to see whether you could improve it just that little bit easier. I'm liking this. I think this could be a pattern, but let's have a look at the alternatives for re-coloring the middle one of these flowers. So let's go back to our flower or elements again, I don't want to touch the ones on the outside, but I can touch this one here. I'm going to choose Image adjustments and I'll go to Hue Saturation. Now here what I wanna do is I just want to change the pink so I don't want the leaves to change, but I would like my flower to change. So I'm going to isolate the channel in which I think these pink colors are. My guess is that they're probably a bit more magenta than they are red. I'm going to select magenta. And now I'm going to walk this color around. And if I select it correctly, then the color should change and it is changing. So what I'm thinking of is something a little bit more orange here. So I've got pink flowers and orange flowers. But you can see that the leaves haven't changed because I isolated all my color change to the magenta channel. If I'd gone with the basic RGB channel, the, all the channels together, then moving the color around for the flower would also have taken the leaves with me. Didn't wanna do that, so I'll just click. Okay. So now we have multicolored flowers, Edit, Define Pattern, multicolored flowers. Back to the document in which we're assembling our pattern just to see how things are looking. Open up this panel, go to the flowers and click Okay and check and see what it looks like. I'm happy with this. It's still not a single pattern, it's still two patterns on top of each other. In the next video, we're going to put it all together into a single repeat. 6. Pt 5 - Put the Patterns together: So we now have some designs that we like in terms of creating this as a combined pattern. But as I said, it's not a combined pattern yet, the flowers or a pattern, the gang as a pattern. Let's put them both together. We're going to do that in a document that is the same size as the flower pattern, the larger of the two. This pattern was 600 by 600. This pattern is 200 by 200. It fits exactly inside this document. So let's do File New and we're going to create a pattern assembly document of 600 by 600. Again, the resolution doesn't matter because that's an output resolution. It's not going to change the document stage. Let's click Create. I'm going to bring in my genome pattern. So I'm going to choose, edit and fill and bringing my gang and pattern, select pattern here, make sure that the custom pattern is set to my kingdom and fill it. I'm going to add a brand new layer, and I'm going to fill it with the flower, Edit, Fill going to the flower. And for this one, I'm going to choose the multicolored flower. This is a repeat pattern swatch. The whole of it put together is a repeat pattern swatch. So let's go and make it a repeat pattern swatch, Edit, Define Pattern, kingdom and flowers, gangnam and multicolored flowers. Click Okay, we need to test it because you have to test this to make sure that they're working. And I suggest that you test them as you build them just in case there's a problem. Double-click on this, go back to the flyout menu. Here is our pattern. Click on it, click Okay, and make sure that it's repeating and it doesn't have any fracture lines in it. So let's go in here and have a look. There are no fracture lines, there's no pixel or two pixels out here. Everything is looking perfect. So what we have now is a pattern that has both elements together. It's got the kingdom and it's got the flowers. Now at this point, we might also say, you know what, those pink flowers, when they were just pink flowers was really good too. So let's go and make one with just the pink flowers. So I'm going to trash this. I'm going to add a new layer and fill it with just the pink flowers. Edit, Fill. This is the one that's got the middle flower that is rotated. These are different. You can say that the flower leaves go in this direction for one of the flowers and in a different direction here. This is now a pattern. If we choose Edit and Define Pattern, I'm going to do Kingdom and pink flowers. Let's go back and test it. Double-click here, go down. It's going to be the last pattern in the box here. This has kingdom and pink flowers. We can test it. Make sure that it is working perfectly, which it is. I'm not going to make the Gangnam with the flower where they're all pointing in the same direction. Don't like that pattern. Don't think it's sophisticated enough for this purpose. Just going to settle for these. So we've now got some patterns swatches that combined both elements. So I'm going to my patterns panel, which you can get to by choosing Window and then patterns. And down the very bottom of this panel are the patterns I've just created. So there's the basic king and pattern. If I hover over it, you will see that there's a tool tip that says purple, give them 200 by 200 pixels. It's got its size and what its name was. This is the single pink flower. Don't really want that. So I could actually at this point remove it. So it's just not getting in the way because it's not the sophisticated pattern that I want it. So I'm going to delete that. But this one is good. This is the one that has the flower rotated. It's a pink flowers rotated at 600 by 600 pixels. This is the multicolored flowers, again, 600 by 600 pixels. This is the first of our patterns. The completed put both together patterns. This one is a Gangnam and the multicolored flowers. And then we have the kingdom and the pink flowers. So we've now got five patterns. And that's without making any changes at all to the color of the kingdom. For example, if we change the color of the gingiva, we could end up with a totally different set of patterns. We're going to do that and then we'll go ahead and create a different pattern using a different process for creating the pattern itself. 7. Pt 6 - Make additional colour ways: I mentioned earlier when we were putting these flowers together and sandwiching them into a single layer that it was going to make life potentially a little bit difficult later on for creating some different elements. But because this gangnam is a separate layer, I could make some changes to the Gangnam. I'm going to choose Image and then adjustments. I'm going back to Hue Saturation. I'm using the master channel, which is the RGB channel. And I'm going to look at what this would look like with a different color, Gangnam, for example, a blogging. And I like this way of changing colors because we can see it in situ. We're not just creating a kingdom and going well, I hope that works. But in actual fact here where able to look at the impact of changing the Gangnam color and see how it might impact the image itself. I could increase the saturation or I could decrease that. So you get a chance to work with saturation and also lightness here too. I'm just looking for something that is going to work for me. The pink on pink is kind of nice. So let's just make that into a pattern. I'm going to choose Edit and then Define Pattern. I'm going to do this pink on pink flowers. Then because Murphy's Law, which says that if something can go wrong, it will go wrong. Let's go back to our master document and let's make sure that it's going to work. So this is our 3600 by 3600 document. I'm going back to make sure that this pattern that I just created still works, that there's no problems with it. There is another pattern that we can use. We can go back into our gang and we could change it again. Image adjustments, hue, saturation. Let's see it with a blue background here. Blogging, I'm looking perilously like my old school uniform. Let's go to Edit, Define Pattern blogging and pink flowers. Again, we're going to test it because we need to make sure before we ship it out that it is going to be perfect and nothing has gone wrong with it. Blogging them pink flowers. We're building up a whole collection of different patterns using the elements that we started with. We're now up to seven patterns, the individual flowers and then these combination designs, and we haven't used this multicolored flower yet. So we could have done that with the pink and the blue. And then we would have had two more patterns. We've now built up these seven patterns. And because of the way that Photoshop behaves, these patterns are going to be available inside Photoshop next time we open it up and it's going to be available for every document that we make until the day that they're not. Because it can happen that you'll lose your patterns in Photoshop. There are some scenarios in which they are guaranteed to disappear. So we need to protect this work so that we would have it saved away and out of Photoshop so that if you were to lose your patterns in Photoshop, you would still have a backup copy. That's the topic of the next video. 8. Pt 7 - Save the Patterns: To protect ourselves in case we lose the patterns from inside Photoshop, we're going to save them to an external file. We do that by choosing window and then patterns. Now this is the new patterns dialogue in Adobe Photoshop. If you're using an older version of the patterns, that's gonna be done in a different way. But let's look at the new version first. I'm going to select my pattern. So I'm clicking on the last one and I'm shift clicking on the first one here. So that's selecting all of these. If we wanted to do it individually, I would be Control or Command clicking to select the ones that I wanted, leaving out the ones that I simply didn't want to save. But here I'm selecting them all. You can say that I've also changed my document and the process that's immaterial right now. I'm going to the flyout menu and I'm going to choose Export Selected Patterns. This is going to take me to the place where Photoshop expects to find these patterns. If later we needed to re-establish them inside the pattern's dialog. Now, you may or may not want to put them here. You could put them in a separate patterns folder because for example, if you wanted to sell them, you're going to have to extract them out into this PAT Patterns file so that you could sell them to somebody else. So make a decision, probably for me, I would do it twice. So I would call this kingdom and flowers and click save. So now I've got them where my version of Photoshop expects to find them if they disappear from this dialogue. But for sale, I'm going to again export these patterns and I'm going to put them somewhere where I could sell them for argument's sake, let's put them on the desktop. And I'm going to call these kingdom and plows. Because on the desktop now I have a set of these patterns that's in a package that would be suitable for sharing with somebody else, easy to find. But I do want those two copies. I want my copy where my version of Photoshop is going to look for them. If I lose them out of this patterns dialogue, it's going to be very easy for me to get them back. Let's just see how easy that is. I've removed them. So let's go and get them back. I'm going to import patterns here. Photoshops gone to where it expected my patterns to be. And here they are, I'll just click load. And they're going to be here in a little collection of kingdom and flowers so I can get them back for my own purposes. I've got a set that I can easily give to somebody else in an easy place to find. This is really important because at some stage I might say, you know what they're getting and pattern. I'd like to use that with some kitchen utensils as a design so I don't have to go and recreate the kingdom pattern that's already created. I just need to go and create the extra elements so you want to protect your own work as well as have things prepared in a way that's going to be easy for you to share them with other people or to sell them obviously. 9. Pt 8 - Planning a more complex design: The next pattern we're going to create is a level more sophisticated than the one we just created. In this case, we're going to be using some vintage flower elements that are free to download. And so we're going to overlap, but the vintage flower elements over the top of a very simple geometric grid. And putting those two together is going to give us this more sophisticated pattern. So to locate these elements, we're going to start out on the web. And I'm going to give you a link to download these elements now, these are free for download and they're also free to use in commercial projects. There's a license in the file, so these are a really, really good set of illustrations to use. And you'll see here that there are actually nine flowers in this collection. They are high res Ping images. So all the cutouts been done for us. These are just exquisite elements. So I think that you're going to really like going to this heritage type website and looking in their free downloads. But this is the one that we're going to use for this particular project. So you're going to come here and downloaded. Then because it's a zip file, you are going to expand it so that you have access to all the PNG images so that we can use them. The next thing we're going to look at is how we're going to put this thing together. So this is my plan. I've got a plan where I can use eight of these images. So each of these in the middle here is going to be a whole flower in the swatch that we're going to create. So this would be the swatch, the area that is covered by the gray box. We're going to have flowers on the side here. We're going to have half of the flower on either side of the design. When the design is tiled, it's going to line up perfectly. And we're going to have half a flower at the top and the bottom. Then the flat and the corner is going to be a quarter of the flower. So when we put the four quarters together, we're going to have a single flower. And if you have a look here, then we've got eight flowers in total. So out of the nine flowers that we just downloaded, we're going to use eight of them. When we take this basic swatch and put it all together into a larger document, this is what it would look like. Here is the swatch we're going to have. For example, if we were creating a sheet of scrapbook paper, potentially we would have three of these flowers across the top. So there's going to be multiple ones of each of these flowers to fill the entire document. So it's going to look rich and really, really attractive. Now, I'm gonna give you these images because this will help you plan out your designs. So you could see that this is how you would arrange eight elements to make a seamless repeating pattern. For example, here's my plan inside Photoshop. I'm going to create a document that's 1200 by 1200. And I'm going to mark out a grid so that I can line up my flowers. These are going to be the positions for the whole flask. There's going to be five of them. There's a position here for each of the half flowers and a position here for each of the half flowers. And then a position in the corner for every one of those quarter plows. And if I set up a grid inside Photoshop, it's going to make it really easy for me to take the design that I had and move it across into Photoshop. And again, this is the document that I'm going to give you because it's a really nice way of working out how everything's going to fit. So now that we have a basic plan and an idea of what we're aiming for. We're going to head to Photoshop and put it all together. 10. Pt 9 - Assemble a Draft of the Pattern: So now we have a plan for what we're going to do. We're going to start by creating a file into which we can build our pattern. I'm going to create a document 1200 pixels by 1200 pixels. And I'm going to lay out that grid that we saw in the previous video. And for that I'm going to use those measurements of 1545751050 and they're going to be guides. I'll go to View and then New Guide. I'm going to start with the horizontals. I'm just going to type in 150 and press Enter for the second one, horizontal still selected. So we'll just type for 50 and I'll continue to make my horizontal guides. Having done the horizontal guides will do the vertical ones. With my guides in place. I could save this. So I could save this as a document that I could use in future as a template. So I won't have to re-create those guides. This would be an ideal template for a design where we wanted eight individual elements to be used in the design. So I've just gone ahead and save my document is 1200 by 1200 grid. Now we're ready to drop in our images. I've got my images in a folder there, nine images. I only want to use eight. So I'm going to select all of them and I'm going to Control click on the one I don't want to use. So here are the age. Because this window is open over my Photoshop document. I can just drag and drop the images into my document. And they're going to come in at one at a time. I'm just going to click the check mark. My eight images are now in place to make things a lot easier when I'm working in Photoshop now with the Move Tool selected, I'm going to make sure that I have auto select, selected because that means I can just drag any one of these images into position. I don't have to locate them in the layers palette. It's just going to save me a lot of time. And I'm going to move them roughly into position. Now this one is not in a position. I want it to be in. It's upside down, so I'm going to rotate it. Now. Had trouble with this in Photoshop today. I don't know why it's doing this, but every time I go to rotate it, it just skews out of alignment. So what I'm gonna do is just not do it that way. I'm going to press Control or Command T. And up here in the transform dialogue, I'm just going to set the angle to 180 and that just turns it up the right way. As I said, it may not happen to you, but certainly happening to me. So I'm going to position these flowers roughly where I want them to be. There's going to be a flower. I'm going to put those at the top, a flower in the center over here. There's going to be a flower over here. This glucose is going to be one in the corner. So let me go and put this one in the corner. Then there's one in each of these boxes. So I'm just looking at the pairings of the flowers here to see how they're looking. So very roughly this is what my pattern is going to look like, but we need to recreate the corner and the top ones. So to do this, I'm going to select this shape now in the Layers palette, I need to work out which one it is because I need a second one of these. So I'm going to drag and drop it onto the New Layer icon. Now you can move at a couple of ways. Either you can select it and add 1200 to its position to move it across here. Or you could do it using an offset filter. So I've got my one additional shape, the one that is an exact duplicate of the one underneath selected. I'll choose Filter and then Other and then Offset. For this, I don't want to move it vertically at all. It's in a perfect vertical position, so I'm just going to set that to 0. But as far as the horizontal is concerned, I wanted to move it all the way over to this side. So I'm going to type 1200. And when I do that, the duplicate flower is moved 1200 pixels across and that's over the edge of the document. It's perfectly aligned. So it's going to line up with this shape when they put together in a pattern. For this one, I'm going to do the same thing firstly, create a duplicate copy of it, making sure that I don't move it at all once I have created a duplicate, except focusing on doing it the right way, I'm going to choose Filter Other Offset. Now this time we do want to move it vertically, but we don't want to move it horizontally. So I'm going to set 0 for the horizontal and for vertical, I'm going to type 1200. And you can see the duplicates appearing down here. I'll click Okay. Now for this plot over here, it needs to appear in all four corners. We're going to do it a different way. I'm going to start it over in this top corner just because it's going to be a little bit easier to manage from here. I'm locating it here in the Layers palette, and I'm going to drag and drop it onto the New Layer icon. So this is the first of my copies. I'm going to press Control or Command T to get the transform tools up. I'm going to work from the middle of the shape. That's fine. You can work from any position. The x value is what we need to change. We need to move it across here. It's y-value can stay exactly where it is. And in actual fact, you shouldn't change its y value. You only going to change one value at a time. For x value, we're going to add 1200 to the current value. So it was 46. We're adding 1200 to it. So it's now 1246. You'll see on the layers palette that what happened previously when we were using the offset filter as we got a smart filter, because these shapes are coming in as smart objects when we just do the method that I've shown you here now we don't get those additional smart filters. It's six of 1.5 a dozen of the other to some extent. So just be aware of that. I'm going back to this one. This time. I'm going to make a duplicate of it to go down here. I'm going to drag it onto the New Layer icon here. I'm going to press Control or Command T for the duplicate. This time I want to change its y value and leave its X in place. I'm going to add 1200 to it. So at the moment it started out reading two pixels, it's now at 1202. Then I can take this one and move it across here. So I need to work out where it is. It's here, going to drag it onto the New Layer icon. So I've got a duplicate Robert Control or Command T. This time, we're happy with the y position. That's exactly where it should be, but the x needs to be 1200 more than it is. It started off at 46. So I'm going to make it 1246 and click the check mark. And so now this is the base pattern. I'm going to create a pattern from this. I'm going to choose edit, define pattern, and I'm going to call this first run. And click. Okay, we'll create a brand new document to test it in. We'll choose File and then New. I'm going to make a document 3600. By 3600, I'll click Create. I want it to be white as the background. I've got white as my background color here. I'm going to press Control Backspace. That would be command Delete on the Mac. Alternatively, you could just switch these colors and use the paint bucket tool to fill it to add our pattern the easiest way, their way that's going to be a little bit more flexible as we develop this pattern and make it look better is to go to layer new fill layer and then pattern. Click. Okay. Then from the drop-down list we're going to the last pattern here, which is the one that we just created. It's called first run. I'll click Okay. At this point we can have a look at our pattern and see what it is that we want to do in terms of making changes to it. We'll do that in the next video. 11. Pt 10 - Perfecting the Design: Now that we've got the first run of this pattern in place, we can have a look and see what it is that we want to change. I think these two flowers are a little bit close. I'm going to work on that. That's these two here. So I can simply move this one into a slightly different position. When you're working on this pattern, you want to avoid moving anything that's around the edge of the document, but the ones inside, you can certainly move those. I'm going to test this new rearrangement. In this document. When we open up the Layers palette, we can just double-click on the layer thumbnail here and just select our new pattern. Having it already in place just saves a little bit of effort. So I'm relatively happy with this, but I'd like some elements that are going to beef it up if you like. So let's go back into this design and let's see what we can borrow. I'm thinking that this leaf would be really nice to fill in some gaps. So I'm going to zoom in on that leaf. And we're also going to use the move tool to work out which layer I'm working on, which is this one here and it's now selected. I'm going to the lasso tool. I'm going to lasso around this leaf and take a little bit extra with me because it's going to be easy enough to remove it, really difficult to add it back in. I'll go to Layer and then New and I'm choosing Layer via Copy. That's really important because I want a duplicate of this leaf on a layer all by itself. I don't want to be removing the leaf from the actual plant. Moving this leaf out away from the original plant so I can see it and so I can work on it. I'm going to the eraser tool. I'm going to zoom in and I'm going to start erasing the excess that I brought with me. Most are looking at this leaf and it's got some blemishes on it. So I'm going to the spot healing brush tool here, going to make my brush a little bit larger. You can do that with the open and closed square bracket keys. You can change its size. I'm just going to click on some of these really yellow brown areas to remove those. Now as for the rest of the leaf, you can see that it's pretty yellow. So again, I'm going back to the Lasso tool. I'm going to lasso the bottom edge of these leaves. I'm going to image and then adjustments and I'm going to hue saturation. So this particular adjustment is going to be baked into these leaves. That's a very simple thing to do. Now I don't want to change the master channel because what's going to happen is that it's going to be really obvious what's happened here. But I do want to change the yellow channel because that's where this yellow color is. So I'm going to select yellows. And now I can move the slider around and I can remove some of the yellow from the leaves. I don't wanna go too far, but this is the before and this is the after. It just looks a little bit more attractive. I'm going to deselect my selection with select, de-select or control and Command D. I'm going back to the spot healing brush tool because there are some brown bits that's still need to be removed. So now I have my fixed up leave. So at this point, I can use the Alt drag command again to make some duplicates of this leaf to fill in the spaces near these plants. And provided I only work in the inside area and don't touch the flowers, let go of the edge. Everything's going to be pretty okay. I think I do need to add some leaves into this edge area. To do that, I'm going to Alt or Option drag leaf over here. And I'm going to have to do the same process as I did earlier to make a duplicate of the leaf over here on the very edge. So making sure I know which leaves this is, I'm going to drag it onto the New Layer icon. And I'm going to Control or Command T to get my Transform tools. I want to move it across here, which means I'm going to add 1200 to its x value, leaving its Y-value intact. So that's just going to take this up to 1200. Then if I want one down here, I'm going to have to do the same process, Alt or Option, drag one into position. This time I'm going to rotate it. Make a duplicate of it. Control or Command T to get the transform tools. And this time I'm going to move it across here. It's at a negative x value. So I'm going to need to move it just slightly less than 1200 pixels. I'm gonna get out my calculator. I'm going to type in 1200 and I'm going to subtract the current x value, which is 3.5 or it's negative 3.5. So that means I'm going to move it over 1.5196. You've got negative values. You probably will need to get your calculator out just to work out exactly what the value is, because you can't afford to be even a pixel off. At this point. If you wanted to add an extra layer, if you could, I'm going to call that good. And we're going on in the next video to create the geometric pattern, to put with this overall design to make our final combined pattern. 12. Pt 11 - Create the Geometric Pattern and put everything together: Now that we've created our floral pattern, we're ready to create the geometric design that will go with it. For this to work, the geometric design has to fit evenly inside our floral pattern. Floral pattern document is 1200 by 1200, that's as big as our swatches. So whatever we do in terms of our geometric pattern, the values of its width and height need to divide evenly into the width and height of our pattern, floral pattern. So they need to divide evenly so there no fractional parts left over. I'm going to create my geometric pattern as a square that will make things a little bit easier. My floral pattern is a square, so that makes things easy to, I need to come up with some dimensions for my square that will divide evenly into this design. The design being 1200 by 1200. Obviously 1200 would divide in there. We'd just go one time. 600 would go in there twice. So we get plenty of repeats. We get four repeats inside our floral pattern swatch. We could use 300 or 200 or 100, because each of those numbers divides into 1200, leaving no fractional part leftover, but so too will 50, and I'm going to use 50. I'm going to choose File and New. And I'm going to create a document 50 pixels by 50 pixels with a transparent background. That's really small. So I'm just going to enlarge it and little bit. This, I need a line, so I'm going to the line tool and I'm going to make sure that it has a black fill. So here's my black fill and I don't want it to have any stroke at all. So I'm going to remove the stroke. I want its width to be two pixels. And so I'm just going to draw my line. It needs to go over the edge of my shapes. So let's just draw it out. Now it's really important as I draw this line that I end up with a length that is an even number of pixels. If it's not an even number of pixels, then it's not going to line up perfectly. And that's always a struggle with these geometric designs. So I'm looking for a number here in my length. You can say that I've got a little pop-up here showing me how long it is. It's a 106 pixels long. That's an even number two will divide into it. And so I'm just going to let go and just settle for my 106 pixel line. Now it's height as reading off at one pixel. Fact, it is two pixels wide. So things are looking pretty good here right now. I want to line this up to the center of the document. So with my line selected, I'm going to press Control or Command T. Want to make sure that of these nine little boxes here I have the middle one selected. The very middle of a document that is 50 pixels by 50 pixels are going to be 25 pixels and 25 pixels now, it's not in the exact middle, so I'm going to make sure it is in the exact middle and click the check mark because that's one transformation that I want to set in concrete. Now I'm a bit concerned at this stage, this shape looks like it's only one pixel wide, so I am going to make it two pixels wide. Absolutely has to be two pixels wide. Let's just double-check its positioning in the middle of the document. It is positioned still in the middle of the document. So now I'm going to rotate it. I'll press Control or Command T. And I'm going to make sure that the middle selector is here, the middle of these nine boxes. And I'm going to rotate it through 45 degrees and click the check mark. Now, what we're looking for here is that this line goes right across these corners. If it doesn't go across the corners and it will be pretty obvious that it's not meeting in the corner. You want to undo it and start again and work out what went wrong because it's really easy for it to go wrong. And if it doesn't go perfectly across the corner, then it's just simply not going to work. So this one is working just fine. Let's go back to our layers. Let's re-select our line, which as you see is still a line and it's still going over the very edges of document. That's really important. I'm going to make a duplicate of this. I'm going to rotate it the other way. So with this line selected, I'm going to press Control or Command T again to bring up these transform handles. Again, make sure that everything is in reference to the center point on the line, which of course is lined up at the very center of the document. I want to bring it back the other way, so I'm just going to rotate it negative 90 degrees. Do a visual check on it. Looks just fine. Click the check mark Double-check to make sure that it's crossing in the corners, which it is, which tells me everything's going just fine. Going to add another layer. On this layer, I'm going to drag out a circle. So let's just go and get the ellipse tool. Again, I'm working with a black fill and no stroke and hold the Shift key as I drag out a circle. And then I'm just going to place it in the middle of the document. And of course, if we want to make sure it's in the middle of the document, we're going to press Control or Command T. We'll make sure that the middle of these nine boxes is selected to make sure that the reference point is the middle of this circle. Makes sure it's at 2525. If it's not, we're going to change those values and click the check mark. Now we've got a circle in the middle. We need to have a circle on the edges because ultimately these lines are going to intersect to another point. So let's go back to the layers. Let's take our ellipse and we're going to drag and drop it onto the New Layer icon. So we've got a duplicate ellipse. To throw this one into the corners. We're just going to rasterize. It's going to make life a little bit easier. I'll right-click it and choose Rasterize Layer. Then I'm going to apply a offset filter to it. So with this last selected, we'll go to Filter and then Other and then Offset. Now this filter, simplest filter to use, you're just going to take the dimensions of the document and divide them by two. So the dimensions of the document with 5050, so I'm going to set its horizontal to 2525. That just throws the object, that quarter of the object into each of these corners, I'll click, Okay, everything is perfect. At this point. I'm going to select, Edit, Define Pattern. I'm going to call this cross and dots. Now let's go and add it as a pattern to our project as it is so far. I'm going to click on the base layer because I want my new fill layer to go in underneath my flowers. I'll choose layer, new fill layer, and then pattern, click. Okay, and of course then we're going to the very last pattern, which is our design. Now let's just zoom in. I'm really happy with the pattern and its size. I think it looks great, but the color is way off. It's just way too dark. So let's go back to our document. I think at this point I'm just going to restaurants everything. So I'm going to select all the non rasterized layers, right-click and I'll choose rasterized layers. And I can also stick all those together if I want to. There's no point. Naught two. It's going to right-click and I'm going to merge all those layers into one. This allows me to now fill this design with a different color. So I'm going to click here on this lock pixels icon. So we're locking the transparent pixels. Now I can pick a gray because I think this is going to look better in a gray. I'm going to make it my foreground color. And the command that we have, fulfilling the current layer with the current foreground layer is Alt Backspace option Delete on the Mac. And so that just fills these pixels up with a lighter gray color. If it's not the right color, you can just change it so you could go back and say, You know what, It's not quite dark enough. Let's just go at that again. Alt Backspace to fill it with the current foreground color on the Mac, it's Option Delete. Happier with this, Let's go to Edit and Define Pattern, cross and circle gray. Go back to our master document, double-click on this pattern, fill layer and go and select the last pattern, which is this lighter gray color. Still think it's a bit too dark. So I'm going to work on that, just changing the color until I find something that suits me. I've gone and done just that. I've taken it down to be very light because as a geometric pattern that seems to be quite dark in the final design, even though the colors in this pattern are very light. So I'm happy with this. I'm happy with this being my final design, but of course it's not ready yet because it's still two layers of patterns. We're going back to the flower design and into this design, we need to add our pattern out, geometric pattern. Now, you can do this one of a number of ways. Probably what I would do is save this out as a design itself. So I'll choose File and then Save As, and I'm going to save it giving it a different name. So I've just called it flower complete. I've got the original with all these layers in it, but now I've got another version which is my completed design. What I'm going to do is I'm going to grab all of these layers. And I'm just going to merge them all together. I'm just clicking on Merge layers. Now I have a single layer that has my design in it. Not the sort of thing that you want to do if you want to be able to edit the patent later on, but I've already got my layered file elsewhere right now. All I want to do is to put this design and my geometric together. So I'm going to add a new layer with layer, new fill layer. I'm going to pattern, I'm going to add my geometric pattern. Of course, it's coming in on the top and I want it to be underneath. Now if I wanted to sell this as a pattern that had transparency in it, then I would go ahead and save the pattern swatch at this stage, but I want to sell this with a background. So I'm going to add my new layer and I'm going to fill it with white. White is my current background color, Control, Backspace command, Delete. So this is now the pattern swatch. This is what's going to give me a pattern repeat. So it's going to be a perfect repeat on all ages for not only the flower, but also the geometric. So let's go to edit, define pattern. We're going to call this flower and geometric completed. Of course we need to test it. So we're going back to our master document. I'm going to turn off these layers. Let's add a brand new layer, Layer, New Fill Layer Pattern. Click Okay, go and find the very last pattern, which is going to be our geometric. And you can see here that by turn the background layer off here, the geometric pattern is forming a perfect design underneath the flowers. And it's got its background with it. So this pattern contains not only the geometrics and the flowers, but also the white background. The final step in this process would be to pick up the flour and the geometric pattern and the combined pattern and make sure that we export those as a file so that we've always got them on our computer in case something happens. 13. Pt 12 - Put together already created patterns: It's time now to have a look at the situation where the patterns have already been created and we want to put two patterns together. So somebody else has made choices are about the size and the scale. And we're just left with the basics to put together into some semblance of order. So to do that, first of all, I'm going to create a new file. So my new file is going to be 36 by 3600 because that's going to give me a feel for how this thing is going to look at, at a size of 12 by 12. So the starting point is to look at the patterns we're going to use. I'm going to use one from the patterns selection in the newer versions of Photoshop. So I'm going to patterns and I'm going to water, and I'm going to use this water pattern here, this darker one. I'm going to choose layer, new fill layer and go to Pattern. I'll go to okay, I'm going to go down here and select the water pattern. And this is the one I'm looking at. The reason why I'm doing this through a new fill layer is because I can scale it. And that's pretty important because we want to get a feel for how big or small. Ultimately, we want this pattern to be. Now, so far is 12 by 12 is concerned. I'm thinking this pattern is a pretty good size at 100 per cent. Of course, we want to be really careful if we're going to scale it up because that's going to start to pixelate things. Although I think this pattern itself could probably take some scaling up because it is so detail we're not going to lose a lot of that detail. But you want to be critical about the choices you're making. If you're scaling things up, scaling things down, not nearly so much of a worry, but I'm saying to myself right now, yep, this one looks pretty good. The second pattern we're going to use, I'm going to give you for a few reasons. One of them is that it's going to give you a chance to import patterns into Photoshop. So we're going to go to the patterns dialogue which we can get to by choosing Window and then patterns here. I'm going to the flyout menu and I'm going to choose Import patterns. Now the pattern that I've got, I've put it on the desktop and it's ABAB quatro foil. It's saved as a PAT file. That's a Photoshop pattern file. That's what Photoshop expects to say in terms of importing patterns. I'm going to click on that and click load. And now we should see our Barb quatro foil. Here. It's being imported into a folder, the name of the file, and this is the pattern. There was only one pattern in there. So this is the pattern we're going to use. So again, I'm going to do it using a fill layer because I want to see what the pattern looks like at 100%. I also want the chance to scale up really easily if it's not right. So let's just go and do pattern fill. Let's go and get bob quatro foil. I'm looking at this and I'm saying to myself, I want to create this as a swatch for Spoonflower or I want to create this as scrapbook paper. What do I want it to look like? And 100 per cent is just not working for me. This is a really big pattern. So I'm going to scale it down to about 50 per cent and ask myself if that's looking a little bit better. I'm thinking that probably is I'm like go even a bit smaller, Let's go to 40 per cent. I'm a bit happier with that. So what we're looking at now is the water pattern is going in at a 100% size and there's barbed quatro foil is going in at about 40 per cent. Ultimately, what we want is something that looks a bit like this. At this point, that's all we're looking for, is how big do I want my pattern to look? What's the baseline of what I think this thing wants to look like? And then we're going to go and do the technical bits of putting it all together. And the first thing is to determine just what we're working with. So I'm going over here to the pattern's dialog and I'm looking here at the water pattern. I'm hovering over it, and it says water pool 946 by 946 pixels. Now, for this first exercise, I'm working with square documents because this is enough of a mathematical head spin without working with patterns that are not square. So this is 946. By 946, we need to write this down because we need to work with that. Let's go and see what the barb quatro foil is. Well, it's 490 and for 90 again it's square. And I chose that for this reason, gave it to you for this reason, we want to be working with square documents at this point. So that's what we're starting with. But we know that this Bob quatro foil, if we want to use it in our design. If we use the water at 100 per cent, the barb quatro foil needs to be down kyle down to about 40 per cent. So let's go and get a calculator. And let's go and say what for 90 looks like scaled down to about 40 per cent. So I'm going to type in for 90 and I'm going to multiply it by 40 per cent, which is 0.4. And I'll just press Enter. And we're looking here at what the resulting value is, n, it's 196. So 196 isn't going to divide into anything particularly easily. But I'm looking at it and thinking 196 isn't nearly 200 and that would be really good to 100. Two 100 size pattern will divide evenly into all sorts of things. And I'm also looking at my water pattern because I know that's 946. To stretch it out to say 1 thousand wouldn't be a big ask. So that's what I'm going to do. I'm going to enlarge the water pattern to one thousand, one thousand. I'm going to scale my barbed quatro foil so that it feels something that's 200 by 200. And then we're going to have exactly what we need. So let's go and do that. The first thing I'm going to do is to create a brand new file and I'm going to make it the size of the water pattern. The water pattern was 946 by 946. So if I create this document and if I fill it with the water pattern, select Pattern. Go down here to this water pattern and click Okay, this is one repeat. It's exactly one repeat. So it's going to line up absolutely perfectly. But it's 946 by 946, I would like it to be just a little bit bigger. Image, image size. I can scale it so that the width and height to change together because this is a square and I want to end up with a square. So I'm going to take it up to 1 thousand. I need to re-sample because you can't enlarge without re-sampling. I'm just going to use automatic. That should be pretty good. I'm going to click, Okay. And now I should end up with an image. And I can see down at the very bottom corner here that my document is a thousand by 1 thousand. This is still a repeat. It's just being enlarged a little bit by around seven or eight per cent, something like that. This is my new pattern. I'm going to have to save it because I need it saved at this size. So we're going to edit and we're going to define pattern. I'm going to call us water. And it's 1 thousand by one because I need to make sure that that is the patent that I use in a minute. So that's sorted out the water pattern problems. We'll close this document. Let's go and sort out the barbed quatro foil problems File New the Bob quatro foil. We had a look at it in the pattern's dialog and we determined that the original pattern size was for 90 by four ninety, four, ninety, four ninety and fill it with one instance of the barb quatro foil pattern. One exact pattern. It was for 90. We decided that we wanted to scale it down to 200 Image, Image Size. We can click on this icon here because again, we want it to end up to be a square document started off square. We want it to end up being a square for this west significantly reducing it. So we may want to use something like by cubic sharper because we can see here that it's recommended for reduction. If you were enlarging a lot, you would choose one of these enlargement options, but we're just reducing. But again, we are reducing by a lot. We Neely Having the size of this. So let's just click. Okay. I'm checking down the bottom to make sure I have a 200 by 200 pixel document, which I do. So now what I'm gonna do is save this pattern because I want it saved at this size. Quatro foil 200 by 200, again, marking this as the pattern that is sized correctly for our project. I'm going to close this document. I don't need it any longer. Now to create my pattern swatch, I need to fit everything in together. Five of my barbed quadrat foils at 200 pixels by 200 pixels are going to feed in my water pattern. They're going to fit horizontally and they're going to fit vertically. The water pattern that we have re-size is one thousand, one thousand. So we're going to create a document 1 thousand by 1 thousand because that's going to be the size of our pattern swatch. 1 thousand by 1 thousand. And enter that will fit one entire element of this water pattern. I'm going to choose edit and fill, and I'm just going to go and get the water pattern. And then I'm going to add a new layer and I'm going to fill this with my quatro foil. Fill this time, let's go for the quatro foil. We want this one, the one that is created at 200 by 200, if you're confused as to which is which just hover over them until the tool tip appears, but of course the tooltips not going to appear here. Yep, there it is. And we'll just click. Okay. So now I've got five by five of my Barb quatro foil. So you can see that the quadrat foils are repeating exactly. And we're trusting that the water pattern is repeating as well. We haven't actually tested that. We are about to in just a minute. At this point, I'm going to make a aesthetic choice because I think the barb quatro foil is way too dark. I'm going to take it down and change its opacity down a little bit. I'm also seeing a little bit of the water through there. I'm quite happy with that. I like this as a better result. This is going to feel a sheet of scrapbook paper. They're going to be about 3.5 of these vertically and horizontally. This is the pattern that we would send to Spoonflower. This is a single repeat that can go to spoon flour, but we need to save it of course. So we're going to Edit and Define Pattern. This is going to be water and quatro foil. Now let's go and test it because you want to test it before you go too far. I'm going to test it on something that is scrapbook paper size just to make sure it's working. I'm just going to use Edit fill and I'm going to choose my new combined pattern. What we wanna do is we want to look at where the seams potentially are, and that's in this area here. We already determined that we would fit three and a bit across and three and a bit down. So the first theme is likely to be in this area here. And I'm just looking to see if I can see any vertical seams and I can't I can't see it in the quatro foil that's as clear as can be. But I'm also not seeing it in the water pattern, that water pattern was a true repeat. It doesn't have sames in it. So that is working absolutely perfectly. So here we have a sheet of scrapbook paper. But inside the patterns dialogue, we have got a pattern that we could take to Spoonflower or any other site that requires the actual pattern swatch. And then at Spoonflower, we will be able to print it. Now, we've already looked at saving patterns in previous videos, but let's have a look and see how we would actually get this out to Spoonflower. And for Spoonflower, this is what we're going to use this as our mockup of our pattern. And this is a pattern swatch. So we would just export this as a high-quality JPEG and then send that to Spoonflower because this is the swatch That's Spoonflower requires. 14. Pt 13 - Putting together uneven size patterns: Let's now have a look at a slightly more difficult situation where one of the objects, one of the patterns we're working with is not square. I'm going to create a new file because I need to test this or that to see what sort of scale I want to work out. So I'm just using scrapbook paper because it's an easy enough size for me to be able to visualize. Now, I'm going to give you these two patterns. It's a herringbone pattern and a floral pattern, because we need to scale them at this stage, I'm going to use layer, new fill layer and then pattern. The first one is the geometric pattern. It's going at the back. This is a herringbone pattern right now, it's way too big. I'm thinking that the scale should probably be something like 30 per cent. Fact, I still think that that's a little bit big. Let's try for something more like 15 per cent. I think that's pretty good. I'll click. Okay. And now we're going to add another fill layer, Layer, New Fill Layer, and go to pattern again. This time we're going to use the floral pattern that I'm giving you. And you can see here that this is rectangular box one looks square, may not be, but this one's definitely rectangular. So I'm looking at the design here and thinking this is probably just a little bit too big. So I'm gonna make it 90%. I'm also looking at the herringbone and thinking that right now it's probably a little bit too dark. So if I bring down its opacity to, well, let's see what 90% looks like. I'm pretty happy with that. If I had a single pattern that produced an image like this, I would be happy. So we want to get to this stage before we do anything else. So you need to get everything sized and just get a really good picture as to where you're aiming for. And then you're going to reflect back to your high school math days and you going to remember those times when you thought, When am I ever going to use this math? And you're either going to be really pleased that you paid attention or you're going to think that you should have paid attention because now we're getting into the math. We need to do a bit of math to make sure that we scale these patterns so they're going to fit together. We need to end up with a seamless repeat. So I'm going to the patterns dialogue here. I'm going to hop over this pattern and I'm noting that it's nearly a square, but it's not a square. It's 383 by 384. We'll need to do something about that. And this one here, let's have a look and see how big it is. Well, it's 2161626. So the first thing I'm doing is writing down both these values. I'm going to do that on a sheet of paper. And I'm going back to my layer and I'm going to read off the percentage scale that I use. So if I reduced or increased these in any way, I need to know that as well. So this larger pattern I'm writing beside that 90%. And then the herringbone pattern, I'm writing 15 per cent because we need to know those values. Now we need to look at the mathematics of scaling this. We've got one pattern that's really big, that's the flower pattern. And we've got one pattern that's really small and that's the herringbone. So we want a certain number of the herringbone pattern to fit inside the flower pattern. And if we can get that to be nice, and even then we're going to end up with a seamless repeat. So the next thing to do is to get out a calculator. And we're going to assume that we can reduce the herringbone pattern to a square. That's like a gibbon. At the moment, it's 383. So let's just type in here 383. Now we know that we wanted to reduce that to 15 per cent. So we're going to multiply it by 15 per cent. So at some point, this pattern needs to be reduced in size to something around about 57 pixels. That's nearly 60. I'm holding that thought, but that will reduce it to about the size we're seeing here. So let's go and have a look at the larger pattern. So the larger pattern, one of the dimensions of that was 2160 and we needed to reduce that to 90 per cent. So I'm multiplying it by 90%. So somewhere along the way, the longer dimension of this pattern needs to be somewhere around about 1944 pixels. And we're going to do the same for the other dimension. So that was 1626. We're going to multiply it by 90% as well. So we need to reduce that one to somewhere around 1463. So I'm just writing these values down as whole numbers so that we can have a look at them. And quite obviously, the 57 by 57 herringbone pattern, if I took that up to 60, I'd have something that would divide evenly into sort of larger numbers. So I'm thinking that that's a gibbon, the herringbone pattern. If I take it to 60 by 60, it's not only going to be square, but it's also going to be pretty much the size that I see on the screen. So assuming that the herringbone pattern is 60, Let's go and grab the first of our larger measurements than 1944. I'm going to type that in and I'm going to divide it by 60 because I wanted to see how close we are. Well, it goes in 32 and a bit times, so I can choose 32 or 33, I'm going to say 32. So I'm going to change that measurement to 32 times 60. So let's go and do that. Let's calculate what that's going to be. If I make it 1920, then it will divide evenly by 60. It'll divide 32 times. So we could get 32 of the little herringbone patterns across that long side. So that's going to be perfect. Let's go and test out the other measurement, the shorter side, it was 1463. So we're going to divide that by 60 and see where we are. Well, it's 24 and a beat, 24 third, Let's go for 24. So let's calculate 24 by 60 because that's going to give us the length of that other side. So it needs to be 1920 by 1440. If we make the large pattern, 1920 by 1440 and the herringbone 60 by 60 be herringbone pattern is going to fit exactly inside the larger floral pattern. And it's going to do it evenly with no extra little bits over the edge. So we're going to make a seamless repeating pattern. So now that we've got the size of sorted out, we just need to go and create the elements at the right size so we can put them together. 15. Pt 14 - Put Together the Uneven Size Patterns: We already know what the pattern elements sizes need to be. So let's first create a document that will fit the floral pattern in it. And if we remember when we looked at it in the patterns dialogue, it was 2160. By 1626. I've created a document that is the exact size of the existing floral pattern. This is really critical. We've gone to all the work of working out the numbers. Now we have to squeeze these documents or enlarge or shrink them so they're the right size. So we're going to start off with something that will fit the entire pattern piece. I'm going to choose Edit fill and I'm going to choose that floral pattern. So I should have one repeat of this. I'm just checking visually that things look like they're going to line up and they do. So now I need to reduce this to the measurements that we decided on. So I'm choosing Image and then Image Size. The measurements we decided on where 1920 by 1440. I need to disable this option here. So make sure that these are not linked because the width and the height needs to be independently changed. Now, this is not going to be a really big re-sizing of this document. There's going to be a little bit of squishing in one direction. But these are hand-drawn flowers. We're not going to be making such a big change to it that is going to be visible at all. So let's just click. Okay. I'm checking down the bottom to make sure the size is correct. So this is what the pattern pace is going to look like. This is the floral bit. So we're going to save this now. Ultimately, this is also going to have the herringbone pattern in it. So it's going to be our pattern swatch. This would be a way of saving the pattern swatch. So when I say, but I'm going to call it herringbone and flowers. I've saved that part of the work. We now need to work on the herringbone. So I'm going to create a document that is the size of the original herringbone pattern. You remember it was slightly off being square. So it's 383 by 384. Then we're going to drop our herringbone into it. Then we're going to re-size it to the size that we determined, which was 60 by 60. Again, making sure that this was not locked because we're actually sizing it not in exactly the proportions. It was created at 60 by 60. Now for this, I'm going to set my re-sample option to by cubic sharper because we're reducing this shape. I'm reducing it quite significantly in size that it started out at nearly 400, it's ending up at 60. So that's a big resize. So I'm making sure that the algorithm that is going to compute that re-size is one that is supportive of reducing objects. I'll just click, Okay, and this is my pattern piece. I'm going to choose Edit and Define Pattern, and I'm going to recreate this herringbone. Now I can swing across to my herringbone and flowers design and I can add my herringbone Layer, Layer, New Fill Layer Pattern. I'm bringing in my herringbone, but I'm not going to change its proportion. That's really important. We want to make sure that we grabbed the 60 by 60 version and just click, Okay, now it's coming on top of the flower, so I'm just going to move it to behind the flowers. So this is a seamless repeat. So the edge pixels here, I'm going to line up with the edge pixels here. And the edge pixels here are going to line up with these, remembering that this looks really quite big right now, but it's just the pattern repeat, this is what we would send to Spoonflower for example. But of course we want to reduce the opacity down. I think what we used last time. Let me just check and see what it was. It was 90 per cent, so we know that that's going to work well when we actually get it put together. So I'm just going to set that to 90 per cent. This being my pattern swatch. I can now save it. And then we'll go and test it on our full size document. I'm going to turn these layers off and I'm going to add a new fill layer with my pattern in it. This is the pattern that we've created in use in a document. Of course, if we were going to spoon flour, this is what we would be sending to Spoonflower because this is a repeat. Drop it in and you could make a billboard size piece of paper or fabric or whatever. And this would be a seamless repeating pattern. So just being clear about what we've got here. Here it is at scrapbook paper size. Here it is ready for any site that requires a pattern swatch. And in the patterns dialogue, we've got the individual pieces. I've got the herringbone, I've got the final design, but I didn't ever save this one out at the correct size. If we hover over this, we'll say that it's not the correct size. So before we leave here, Let's just turn off the herringbone and let's say this one out as a pattern to just for the sake of completion. Rechecking the patterns dialogue. These are the three pieces that we would save out as a set. So this is the herringbone at the correct size. This is our final combination and this here is the resized one. This is the one we need some grabbing all three of them and I'm going to export them. This is the file here that I'm going to give to you. That's the unsized version so that you can practice with it. This is the completed version that has everything at the right size. So these are the patterns in a PHP file ready for me to share, sell, whatever I want to do. So there's lots of purposes for which we could use these patterns. We just need to be really clear in our planning as to what we want to use them for and how are we going to put this all together and how we're going to deliver it to our client in a meaningful way. 16. Project and Wrapup: We've now completed the video training portion of this course, so it's over to you. Your project for this class is to create a double layer pattern in Photoshop incorporating different scale repeat pattern elements. Post an image of your completed pattern as your class project. Now, I hope that you've enjoyed this course and that you've learned lots about making more complex patterns in Adobe Photoshop. If you did enjoy this course and when you see a prompt that asks if you would recommend this class to others, please. Would you do two things for me? Firstly, answer yes, that you do recommend this class. And secondly, write even just a few words about why you enjoyed the class. Your recommendations help other students to say this is a course that they too might enjoy and learn from. If you'd like to leave me a comment or a question, please do so. I read and respond to all of your comments and questions, and I look at and review all your class projects. My name's Helen Bradley. Thank you so much for joining me for this episode of graphic design for lunch, and I'll look forward to seeing you in another class here on Skillshare very soon.