Modular Crochet: Make A Colourful Scarf Using One Simple Square | Jane Snedden Peever | Skillshare
Drawer
Search

Playback Speed


  • 0.5x
  • 1x (Normal)
  • 1.25x
  • 1.5x
  • 2x

Modular Crochet: Make A Colourful Scarf Using One Simple Square

teacher avatar Jane Snedden Peever, Living the Creative Life

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Modular Crochet - Create a Colourful Scarf

      2:50

    • 2.

      Supplies and Class Layout - Both Hands

      6:23

    • 3.

      The Language of Crochet - Both Hands

      3:25

    • 4.

      Stitch Primer Right Hand

      11:55

    • 5.

      Foundation Right Hand

      3:20

    • 6.

      Round 1 Right Hand

      6:36

    • 7.

      Round 2 Right Hand

      8:41

    • 8.

      Round 3 Right Hand

      7:28

    • 9.

      Round 4 Right Hand

      5:36

    • 10.

      Round 5 Right Hand

      7:10

    • 11.

      Colour Combos - Right Hand

      2:45

    • 12.

      Darning The Ends - Right Hand

      10:35

    • 13.

      Sewing Together - Right Hand

      8:10

    • 14.

      Edging Rnd 1.1 Right Hand

      4:18

    • 15.

      Edging Rnd 1.2 Right Hand

      4:06

    • 16.

      Edging Rnd 1.3 Right Hand

      3:29

    • 17.

      Edging Rnd 2.1 Right Hand

      2:33

    • 18.

      Edging Rnd 2.2 Right Hand

      2:21

    • 19.

      Edging Rnd 2.3 Right Hand

      2:39

    • 20.

      Fringe - Right Hand

      10:10

    • 21.

      Stitch Primer Left Hand

      11:55

    • 22.

      Foundation Left Hand

      3:20

    • 23.

      Round 1 Left Hand

      6:36

    • 24.

      Round 2 Left Hand

      8:41

    • 25.

      Round 3 Left Hand

      7:28

    • 26.

      Round 4 Left Hand

      5:36

    • 27.

      Round 5 Left Hand

      7:10

    • 28.

      Colour Combos - Left Hand

      2:45

    • 29.

      Darning Ends - Left Hand

      10:35

    • 30.

      Sewing Squares - Left Hand

      8:10

    • 31.

      Edging Rnd 1.1 Left Hand

      4:18

    • 32.

      Edging Rnd 1.2 Left Hand

      4:06

    • 33.

      Edging Rnd 1.3 Left Hand

      3:29

    • 34.

      Edging Rnd 2.1 Left Hand

      2:33

    • 35.

      Edging Rnd 2.2 Left Hand

      2:21

    • 36.

      Edging Rnd 2.3 Left Hand

      2:39

    • 37.

      Fringe - Left Hand

      10:10

    • 38.

      Blocking - Both Hands

      3:03

    • 39.

      Project and Inspiration

      2:19

  • --
  • Beginner level
  • Intermediate level
  • Advanced level
  • All levels

Community Generated

The level is determined by a majority opinion of students who have reviewed this class. The teacher's recommendation is shown until at least 5 student responses are collected.

278

Students

2

Projects

About This Class

Want a new way to relax while creating something fun and handcrafted?   

This class will teach you all the basics you need to get going on the fun and relaxing hobby of crochet.

I love crochet because, not only is it a fun and playful way to get creative, it is also a way to connect with others.  Through the craft itself, or through giving your beautiful, handmade items as gifts to loved ones.  Another rewarding part of making handcrafted items is giving to those in need, as donations to charitable organizations.  

Modular Crochet is a method of creating a project from multiple smaller pieces.  Often called Granny Squares.

I love this method because :

  • you only need to learn one square
  • completing each square feels so rewarding
  • your project is portable, so easy to take with you on the go.
  • the same square directions can be used for any number of different projects 
  • great for using up scrap yarn

What you will learn in this class:

  • The Supplies - what you need to get started crocheting 
  • The language of crochet - Learn how to read a pattern
  • The Stitches - hands on, step by step demos
  • Complete walk through of your first square
  • Colour options - give your square a different look
  • Darning and Sewing - simple techniques to tidy up your squares and put them together
  • Adding an Edging - Give your scarf that finished look
  • Fringe - a fun, finishing touch
  • More inspiration - more colour ways and project ideas

NOTE: This class provides both Right Hand AND Left Hand Instructions for all instructional lessons.

What you will need for this class:

  • 5 colours of yarn - one ball of each is more than enough
  • 2 sizes of crochet hooks, 5.00mm and 5.50 mm 
  • small scissors, darning needle and ruler

Included as a download with this class is the full written pattern as PDF.

In have created this class with the beginner in mind, as I want to inspire others to try playing with colour and texture through crochet.  If you have always wanted to learn how to crochet, then this is the class for you.

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Jane Snedden Peever

Living the Creative Life

Top Teacher

 

- Create Some Space For Yourself, And Enjoy Simply Creating Something From Your Heart-

 

Hi I'm Jane and my favourite ways to relax are crocheting and doodling.

I love exploring creativity through texture, colour and shapes

and sharing this with you through

Simple and Fun Classes.

One of the best things we can do for ourselves is to carve out some space everyday for a little creativity. 

It doesn't have to be elaborate or complicated, just simple and fun and speaks to... See full profile

Level: Beginner

Class Ratings

Expectations Met?
    Exceeded!
  • 0%
  • Yes
  • 0%
  • Somewhat
  • 0%
  • Not really
  • 0%

Why Join Skillshare?

Take award-winning Skillshare Original Classes

Each class has short lessons, hands-on projects

Your membership supports Skillshare teachers

Learn From Anywhere

Take classes on the go with the Skillshare app. Stream or download to watch on the plane, the subway, or wherever you learn best.

Transcripts

1. Modular Crochet - Create a Colourful Scarf: For me, crochet is like finger-painting with yarn. It's all about the senses, the feeling of the textures and the colors. Hi. I'm Jane Snedden Peever and I'm a creative force behind JSPCREATE. I learned to crochet when I was young. My mom bought me a crochet hook and a ball of yawn to keep me busy on a family summer vacation and well, the rest is history. I followed my passion as an adult when I opened up my own yarn shop, fresh out of school, and through my shop, I met many wonderful people, honed my design skills and even had the opportunity to publish a few books. Me and my little helper continue to enjoy exploring and sharing color and textures in crochet, creating designs online through my website and blog, tutorials on YouTube, and of course, creating these classes for you on Skillshare. In this class I focus on modular crochet. What I mean by that is making small pieces that you can put together and make into any project that you want. Today, we're going to focus on making this scarf. I'm going to walk you through the steps on how to create this beautiful, fashionable, colorful scarf, one square at a time. I've created this class with a beginner in mind as I want to inspire others to try playing with color and texture through crochet. I've also formatted this class for both right-handed crotcheteers and left-handed crotcheteers. If you've always wanted to learn how to crochet, this is the class for you. I'll start the class by taking you through the basics of the online layout, as well as the materials we use and the crochet language to help you read the pattern and follow along with the lessons. I provide the written pattern and will be showing you how to read it as we progress through the project. What we're going to do is I'm going to walk you through all the basics of learning how to crochet while making your first granny square. Before we jump into the project, I'll provide you with a stitch primary lesson where I'll demonstrate all the basic stitches we will be using in this class slowly and with detailed explanation. Once we have our square complete, we'll discuss color combinations, taking care of your ends, and sewing our pieces together. We'll then move on to creating our edging and finally, finish off with a beautiful fringe. I'll finish up the class by explaining how to alter the size of your project, as well as discuss different color combinations and other projects you can make using the same square. When you complete this class, you'll have all the crochet skills you need to create many more beautiful crochet items. Join me as we make this simple scarf to keep you or your loved ones cozy and fashionable. It's a one of a kind handcrafted item that you won't find anywhere else. Let's get crocheting. [MUSIC] 2. Supplies and Class Layout - Both Hands: First let's deal with what you're going to need for this class. You will need the pattern. In the pattern, you will have all the supplies listed as well. The pattern is available for download under the projects section. If you're on the browser, it is off to the right and if you're in the app under the project section, you will see a link that will take you back to the browser where you can download the PDF pattern. Throughout this class, we will be referring to the pattern and I want to show you how to read a pattern as we go. Whether you want to print it out or just have the digital version in front of you as we go, we will be referencing the pattern throughout the class. For this class, we'll be using five colors of yarn. In the pattern I've listed the exact yarn brand and color numbers that I've used for this project. But you can use any colors and brands that is accessible to you and that you enjoy working with. On the yarn label, you will be looking for the weight of the air and in this case we want a number 4. You'll find that right here. This indicates it's approximately a worsted weight or an air and weight yarn. There's many different numbers, but we want number 4. I love this weight because it's not too heavy, but it's still cozy. The yarn label also has a lot of other info on it. It has the weight of the ball, which is different than the yarn weight itself. This is the weight of the ball itself. Here we have 127.5 grams. This is just this particular brand. It also has the link, so it has it in meters and in yards. This scarf uses approximately 300 grams of yarn total. One ball of each color is more than enough. It's actually a great project to use up scraps. You'll also find here the suggested hook size, the gauge using that hook size and you'll also find washing instructions here. Then if you keep looking around the label, you'll find the color number and a lot number, which specifies that this particular lot, it's really good to get the same lot if you're getting a lot of one-color. Here's our color name, which is putty and then if you continue around, you'll find in very small letters on this one that it's a 100% acrylic. You'll always find on here somewhere what the yarn is made of and that helps you with the washing instructions. I mix and match my brands because I like to pick certain colors and it doesn't matter to me as long as they all fall within this number 4 and they work well together. It's an experimental thing. Again, this is a different label, but you still have a number 4, suggested hook, suggested gauge, and washing instructions. Here they have a 100% acrylic right beside all that information. They have the weight of the ball itself and how many yards. The next thing the pattern looks at is your hook size. What I use in this pattern is a 5.0 millimeter for the main square. Then I go up to a 5.5 millimeter for the edging. Hook sizes are measured in three units depending on the country that you live in. A 5.0 millimeter, which is the one we use for the main square, is metric and it can also be called a size H or a size 8 US. These days, all three sizes are usually listed on the hooks themselves. It's easier for me to just go with the metric, that's what I'm used to. The next thing on our list is other supplies. This includes a darning needle and here I have a metal one and I always wanted to have a large eye. You can get the yarn through and a dull point is my preference. It doesn't have to have a dull point, but it's easier on the fingers if you do. You also want a ruler to measure your gauge or your square in this case and we'll get into that more in the class. You'll also want a pair of scissors small enough to get into tight spaces and sharp enough to cut the yarn. Now let's talk about the layout of this class. I'm a right-handed crocheter. The recording of the class is done from a right-handed perspective. However, when I taught in person, the best way to teach a left-handed person, I found was to either sit across from them or teach them while looking in a mirror. I've included left-hand versions of all the instructions by mirroring the video. As you look through the lessons, you'll see each lesson is titled with either right hand or left hand. Only follow the lessons that apply to whichever hand you are dominant with. This is why the class looks so long, but really it's just two classes in one. One for right hand and one for left hand. I've given you a stitch primer where I go over the basic stitches moving very slowly. You can return to this primer whenever you have trouble with any of the stitches. As I move on through the class, you may find them getting faster with a crochet. This is so the class is not any longer than it needs to be and I'll focus only on things that are new to us at that point in the pattern. As we move through the pattern, I'll be showing you where on the written pattern we are, as well as the current line of instructions will be at the top of the screen. If you're find I'm moving too quickly on a section, you can slow the video down or you can pause it. To the left of the Skill Share screen, there is a number 1x. This is the speed. If you click on it, you'll either get a selection of speeds or the number itself, we'll just change to the next speed. You can speed it up. But more importantly, you can slow it down by at least half. This may help you if you find a certain spot giving you some difficulty and would like to see it slower. There will be parts of the instructions specifically with the edging where I will tell you to go ahead and I'll meet you at the end of the repeat. In this case, you can go ahead and pause the video and then resume when you reach that point. If you'd like captions on your screen, this is available on the bottom right. You can choose your language and you can turn them on or off here as well. Now let's move on and learn a little bit of the crocheting language before we get going on our project. [MUSIC] 3. The Language of Crochet - Both Hands: Now let's learn a little bit about the language of crochet. Once you have downloaded your pattern and you have it in front of you as a printed version or a digital version, we can take a look at some of the terminology. Patterns will give you a gauge in some form. We are working small squares. Here we will find the finished square measurement, which is five inches by five inches. Sometimes they give you a stitch gauge where you have to work out a pattern stitch. But in our case, we're making squares, so we will give you the finished square measurement. After you finish your first square, use your ruler to measure it and see if this works out for. Now, since we are making a scarf, fit is not so important, but if you were making a sweater or wanted a specific finish size for a cushion or even a blanket, this is important. If your square is smaller, then you are a tight crochetier, and you can change your hook size one size bigger. If your square is too big, which means you crochet loosely, just choose a hook that is one size smaller and try again. It is important to get used to checking your gauge so your finished project turns out as close to what the pattern designer intended. After all the work you're putting into this, you want to be pleased with it. Next, we have the finished measurement for the scarf. I'll show you at the end of this class other projects I've done with this square. In this case, you can change the finished links simply by adding or subtracting the number of squares you'll be using. Next, we have the abbreviations. These are used across the industry and are here to ensure your instructions are not 50 pages long. This is the language of crochet and you'll learn it quickly just by following the pattern. Keep the sheet handy if you want to refer back to see what stitch the abbreviation is referring to. The other item you'll be learning about is repeats. Each designer will have their own preferences on how to mark these in a pattern. But in general, it will either be a star or a multiple of stars, a pair of round brackets or a pair of square brackets. Round brackets and square brackets are sometimes used interchangeably, but generally, it goes as follows. A pair of round brackets contain the instructions that need to be done all into the next stitch as a group, or it can also mean the instructions will be repeated a certain number of times. Square brackets are usually used for a larger set of instructions that will need to be repeated a set number of times and are often used when the round brackets are already used within them. So it would be too confusing to use the round brackets again. A single star or multiple stars are used to repeat a section from the first star until a set point on the pattern. They're used if you're using different sizes and don't know the exact number of times it needs to be repeated because sizes will differ. We'll be using all of these in this pattern, and I will guide you through what to look for and how to use them. You'll be a pro by the end of this class. Find a look for any special notes that might give you helpful suggestions in the pattern and any diagrams. At the end of this pattern, I give you a diagram as to how I lay out my squares to sew them up. Let's get going on our project and learn as we go. Pick up your yarn and hooks and let's practice making some stitches using the stitch primer. [MUSIC] 4. Stitch Primer Right Hand: Before we get going on our instructions for the square, I want to just set you up with a little bit of a stitch primer. This will just be something you can come back to if you have any trouble going along with each of the stitches. If you want to see them slower and a little more detailed, come back to this stitch primer. We're going to start with the slip knot and I'm going to go over this very slowly for you. This is how I start all my projects, whether they're in the round or back and forth. You're going to take the cut end of the yarn and you are going to lay it over your non-dominant hand. If you are a right-handed crocheter you're going to lie it over your left hand and if you're a left-handed crocheter or you're going to lay it over your right-hand. Line the yarn over your palm, you want the cut end towards you and the end that comes from the ball, which is called the working end, your want that at the top of your hand. You're going to hold that in place with your thumb and then you're going to flip your hand over and wrap the yarn around your first two fingers. Just your first two fingers. you're going to bring it back across the bottom and you're going to cross over towards your arm. You're going to lay it over your next three fingers and then hold it in place with your baby finger. The first wrap is towards the ends of your finger, and the second wrap comes across and it's further down your hand. You're going to take your hook in your crochet hand and you're going to put it underneath the first strand and over top of the second strand. You're going to pull through a strand of yarn underneath. You're going to twist the hook away from you so you can get this strand onto the hook and then roll it back towards you. You've just twisted this knot onto the hook. Then you're going to slip you fingers out, holding on to the two ends of the yarn, keeping the loop on the hook and then you're going to pull it gently until it creates this knot. Then you're going to take the two strands and pull them away from each other. That's the slip knot part of this knot. You want it to go right up to the hook but not tight. Just nice and gentle so there's still some space in there for you to work with. That is your slip knot. The next thing we're going to learn is the chain stitch. You want you cut end of the yarn down towards the bottom, away where you're not going to use it. You don't want to use that end of the yarn. It's very easy to pick that one up and start working and then realize that you have no yarn left to work with and you have to rip out what you just did. Make sure that yarn is a way. Sometimes I'll tuck it under my thumb to start with along the hook. You want the working end of the yarn that comes out of the ball. To get some tension, I usually wrap it once around my baby finger and then back over the top of my three fingers. That's how I hold my yarn. Some people just literally lie it across their hand. Some people have it wrapped around a few fingers. It just creates a little bit of tension on the yarn as you work. You want your index finger and your thumb to hold the knot of the slip knot so that you can work through this loop. We're going to go ahead and do the chain stitch. You take your hook and you reach over and go underneath the yarn and you grab the yarn. You're going to pull it through the loop on the hook. Make sure that it is hooked around that yarn and it's coming with you, using your finger and thumb to hold this knot open so that your can get it through the loop and pull it through the loop. There's your chain stitch. You're going to do that again. Often when you start a piece of work, it asks you to do a certain number of chains to create your foundation. Let's do another one. We're going to move our thumb and our index finger up to the base of the hook. That's where I keep them so that they are always working with the loop on the hook. You only ever have one loop on the hook when you've completed a stitch, unless you get into some complicated stitches, but we won't be doing that. One loop on the hook. That's part of the reason I love crochet. I tend to rotate my hands as I work towards each other, away from each other. Towards each other to wrap the yarn around the hook from underneath and then you're pulling them away from each other. This thumb and forefinger are helping you pull this loop. you pull the loop through. That gives you two chains. Let's do one more. I move my finger and my thumb up to the base of the hook, rotate my hands towards each other, wrapping the yarn over the hook. The hook goes under the yarn, twisting it so that it gets caught up with the hook and then I pull the hands away from each other to pull the chain through. I'm going to do a few more of those so that we can move on to our single crochet. Next stitch is gonna be our single crochet, and I'm working them into a foundation chain. In this case I'm just working them across. We're not doing them in the round. We'll do that when we get to the instructions. To work our first single crochet, we always work into the second loop on the hook, the second chain. We're going to insert our hook into the chain loop. That strand of yarn is over your hook and it goes into the center of the chain. Then you're going to put you hook under the yarn and wrap the yarn over top, just like we did for the chain stitch, pulling the yarn through. See how our thumb and our index are at the base of this stitch. Pull it through and now you have two loops on the hook. We're in the middle of creating a stitch. We now have two loops on the hook. We want to do again. Wrap the yarn over the hook. Make sure that you have that yarn so you're rotating the hook so that the hook part has the yarn. You're going to pull it through both loops on the hook. Through we go using this thumb and finger. They are very key in letting you pull this through. You pulled it through two loops at the same time and that's your single crochet. Once again, we will go into the stitch, into the center of the chain. You're going to wrap the yarn over the hook. The hook goes underneath, turns it, so that you can pull it through. See where my thumb and index finger are, at the base of the next stitch, and we're creating some space. You're pulling your hands away from each other to create this space. you're going to pull that through and end up with two loops on the hook. Then you're going to wrap again. You're going to pull it through both at the same time so focus on one and then the second one. Your attention for your stitches might seem a little wonky as you're learning this, but it will get better with time. It's all about practice. That's our first stitch; our single crochet stitch. Now we'll do the half double crochet. The half double crochet is wrapping the yarn over the hook first. We're going to wrap the yarn over the hook. Then we're going to insert into the next stitch. We're going to pull up a loop just like we did with a single crochet. Then we have three loops on the hook. We're going to pull through all three at the same time. Yarn over and then you're going to go through one, two, three. You just did three loops. That's a half double crochet. Again, we're going to do yarn over the hook first. Then you're going to insert the hook into the stitch. Then you're going to pull the yarn, wrapping the yarn over the hook again, you're going to pull through one loop. You have three loops on the hook. You're going to wrap the yarn over and you're going to pull through all three of those loops. Here, your thumb and your index finger are key on pulling the yarn down so that you have lots of space in there and you pull through all three loops. That's a half double crochet. We're gonna move to the double crochet. Again, you're going to wrap the yarn over the hook and then you're going to insert the hook into the next stitch. You're going to wrap the yarn over the hook again and pull through one stitch. Three loops are left on the hook. Again, we're doing a double crochet. We're going to wrap the yarn around and we're only going to pull through two. Use that thumb and index finger to make space. We're going to pull it through the first two loops and that is all. We have two loops left on the hook. You're going to wrap the yarn over and you're going to do the same thing. Moving my thumb and index finger up a little more, we're going to make space and pull through the last two loops on the hook. That's a full double crochet. Again, we'll do one more. Yarn over, insert your hook into the stitch. Yarn over the hook and pull up a loop, moving my thumb and index so that I can see this better and get a good grip on it. Yarn over. Pull through the first two loops. We have two loops left on the hook. Moving my thumb and index finger up again, yarn over. Pull through the last two loops. you notice when I'm pulling through the hook is facing down. It just works best for me, but when I'm wrapping I have the hook up. There we go. We have our two double crochets. Let's see if you can see this on this swatch, see how they keep getting bigger. you can see here the single crochets are the first two, the half double crochets are the next two and the full double crochets is at the last two. The stitches get higher. Single crochets are the lowest, half double crochets in the middle, and a full double crochet is higher. That's the height of your stitches. The last stitch I want to show you is a slip stitch and that's usually how we join things like the ring for the foundation or the end of a row. A slip stitch is pretty simple. you just take the hook into the stitch that it asks your to go into. In this case, I'm slipping into the first chain of the round. I'm going to wrap my yarn over. You're going to use your thumb and your index finger to hold those stitches in place. Once you have that yarn wrapped, I'm going to bring it through both stitches at the same time. you're not actually creating a stitch, you're just joining things. That is a slip stitch. [MUSIC] 5. Foundation Right Hand: Let's get started on our first square. We're going to start with this color combination. Using our colors in order from A which is the putty, B which is the blue, C which is the red, D which is the beige, and E which is the green. This will be our first square that we follow along with. Then later on you can change up the colors and make these different squares that will go into completing our scarf. We're going to get started now on following our directions and our pattern to make our first square. We're going to use color A, which is this off-white or putty as it's called here, and we're going to go ahead and read the pattern. Under directions, we see foundation. With color A, make a slip knot on the hook. Again, I'm using my 5.0 millimeter hook. We'll go over that again. It's in the primer if you need to see it much slower, but we're going to create a slip knot by lying the yarn across our fingers, wrapping around our first two fingers, bringing it up, and wrapping it around the third. Again, follow the primer. It goes much slower if you're having trouble with this. We go under our first strand, over our second strand, pull it through, twist the hook towards us, and slip your fingers out. There's your slip knot and slip it up to the hook. With color A, we have our slip knot on our hook. Chain four and then join with a slip stitch in first chain to form a loop. This is going to be our beginning ring, our foundation ring, so we chain four. Holding our hook in our dominant hand and our yarn in the opposite hand, we will wrap the yarn over the hook and using our hands to pull apart, slip that hook through the loop on the hook. That's your first chain. We need three more of those. Wrap your yarn, pull it through, and see how I'm working my hands together. They rotate towards each other and then away from each other. That's how we get this yarn around the hook. Pull it through. There's our four chain. Let's count them, 1, 2, 3, and 4. Now, we want to join with a slip stitch in the first chain to form a loop. We go back to this first chain, we slip our hook underneath. Now, we wrap the yarn around the hook again bringing the hook up underneath and hooking the yarn. Pull it through that loop and the loop on the hook. Use your thumb of your non-dominant hand to maneuver that hook through those two loops. There we have our foundation ring that we will be working around one into. 6. Round 1 Right Hand: Moving on to round 1. It says in the pattern, continue with color A. We're going to continue with this off-white color so we don't need to cut any ends and worry about that. We're going to start by chaining three, so again, from where we were, we go ahead and wrap the yarn around our hook, pull it through, that's 1, 2, and 3, so that's chain 3. That counts as our first double crochet. Moving on, we're now going to do the double crochet right into the taller stitch. We work 11 more double crochets into the center of the chain 4 loop. Working into this center of the loop, see if you can see that there, you want to work 11 double crochet into that. By working in double crochet again, we do yarn around the hook to begin with. Then we insert the hook into the ring. Then we bring it up and wrap the yarn around again on the other side, pull it through the ring so you have three loops on the hook. Wrap the yarn around again, pull through two loops, wrap the yarn around one more time and pull through the last two loops on the hook. That's your double crochet stitch. We want to work 11 of those into this ring, so that's the first one. Again, we wrap our yarn around. Give yourself a little bit of leeway here with your yarn so it doesn't create extra tension on your hand. You want to keep this yarn nice and loose coming onto your hands so the tension stays nice and even. We have our yarn wrapped around our hook. We insert it into the middle of the ring, and I'm working over this end. You want the end to be lying over top of your hook as well. If you find that too confusing, you can leave it to the back and darn it in later, but I like to work in my ends at every possible opportunity. You're going to wrap the yarn around the hook now that's on the other side of the ring. Pull through, you have three loops on the hook. Wrap the yarn around, and pull through two, wrap it around and pull through the last two. We'll do this a little smoother and faster this time. Yarn over, insert into the ring. Yarn over, pull through three loops on the hook. Yarn over, pull through two, yarn over, pull through two, and that's how we do this. We want 11 of these. Again, I'm always keeping this cut end of the yarn over top of the hook. It's working into our work at the back. We want 11 of these. Moving a little faster now. You just keep working your way through and you're always pulling away from each other with your hands when you're pulling the hook through. This hand will pull in one direction and the hook hand will pull in the other direction. That is how you keep your tension nice and even and it also makes it easier to pull these pieces of earring through the loops on the hook. We've done a couple here. Let's go back and count. Counting stitches, very important. You never want to be off on your count because then your next round isn't going to work out and somewhere along the line you'll figure it out and then you'll just have to rip back. That's not fun. We're going to count the chain 3 as our first double crochet and then there's going to be 11 more after that. This is our first one, so then 11 more. So 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8. You can either count the posts or you can go up here and count the actual chain loop stitches. I need nine and 10. Maybe a little bit more yarn here and one more for 11. Now it'll feel like you're really packing them in there and that's okay. That creates a nice solid center for us. Now that we have the 11 plus the chain 3, it gives us a total of 12. We want to slip stitch in third chain of starting chain 3. So 1, 2, and 3. You want to slip stitch into this third chain of your starting chain 3. Just poke your hook through, wrap your yarn around, pull it through, and pull it through the one on the hook as well. That is how you slip stitch to join and then because we're working with a different color each round, I will be cutting my colors after each round. I cut about anywhere from 2-4 depending on how comfortable you are. I work my ends in. Usually by working them in as I go, I only need about two inches. But to be safe, you could go 3-4 because you can always trim them off later. Then you're going to go ahead and pull that yarn through the last loop there. There you have it fastened off. This center, you can see there's a hole in it and that's okay, that can be part of your design. Often there's a hole when we'd start with a chain ring. I've turned over to the wrong side. This is the right side. Turning over the wrong side, you can see this yarn. If you put your thumb over the hole and your index finger over the other side and just give this yarn a little tug while holding that in place, it stitches up the center. You can continue to darn this around and stitch it up even more. If you don't want that hole in the center, that's a good way to close it up. Now we're ready for round 2. [MUSIC] 7. Round 2 Right Hand: Moving on to round Number 2, we want color B, which in my case is this blue. Round 2 says join color B with a slip stitch in any double crochet of previous round. It doesn't matter where you join, and that's another reason why I like fastening off my colors at the end of each round because I like to start my rounds in a new place so that I'm not getting all these ends going up in one line. If we take one of these squares, if I were to join in the same place every time, I would have a bulky line of ends all in one of the corners. Every time I join a new color, I like to pick a different space on the square so that when I'm done, my ends are dispersed around the square. Seeing as I fastened off here, I'm just going to rotate it maybe 45 degrees, and just start into one of these. You want your hook to go underneath the two loops of any one of these double crochet. We're going to join by pulling up a loop, so wrap the blue around your hook and pull up a loop. That's how you join a new color. Following Round 2 instructions, we join col blue with a slip stitch in any double crochet of previous round, chain 1, so yarn over the hook and pull it through, that's your chain 1. Now you want to do two single crochet in same stitch as join. Not only learning the single crochet, we're learning how to do increasing, because as you work in the round, you have to increase your stitches so that your work lies flat and doesn't pucker. We're going to start by two single crochet in same stitch as join. You want to take that hook, keep the loop that's on it, nice and firm by holding your attention with your opposite hand, and you want to insert the hook under the same two strands and wrap the yarn around and bring it through. Now you have two loops on the hook. Wrap the yarn around and pull through both loops. That's your single crochet. Then you want to do a second single crochet in that same space. Again, we go back into that space, draw up a loop, two loops on the hook, wrap the yarn over your hook, pull through both loops on hook. Now you have two single crochet into the same stitch and that's considered an increase. We go back to the instructions and we see we did the two single crochet and same stitches join increase made. Now we have the square bracket, and when you get the square brackets again, it's about whatever's in those square brackets, you're going to be doing a set multiple number of times. We have two single crochet in next stitch, and we're going to do that 11 times. Our first one's already done. This one doesn't count as the 11. This one was done before the bracket. Then you want to do two single crochet next stitch, a total of 11 times. We're going to go ahead and start working these two single crochet into your next stitch. Then move on two single crochet into the next stitch. Move onto your next stitch, and you're going to do this 11 times. Sometimes it's good to have a little piece of paper beside you to tick off how many times you've done it. A lot of people have different kinds of row counters and stitch counters. You can use them even on your devices like your iPhone or your iPad. Some people are just really good at keeping it in their head. For me, I really just have to keep counting my stitches. I've come up to the point where I joined from the previous one. I'm going to show you a different joint on this round that isn't as bulky as this one, although this one is a simple join. But you have to make sure you're going to go into the right stitch. That's what I don't like about this join, is that it can get confusing. We just worked into this stitch, and we have to see where this one joined and it joined over here. That's the place you want to work your next stitch. Don't get confused by this right here. This is really just a chain. It almost has to go to the back. You want to go way over here and create another single crochet, and then another. Even though that's a very common joint and a very simple one to do, pulling it tight from the back there, it does leave a little bit of a bulky gap. I'm going to show you a different way to join that doesn't leave that gap. It's not so bad on your first ring, it's really not going to show. We did our two single crochet there and nowhere make sure you work into the next one. Going under two, what we did back there is worked into that third chain. It's a little confusing there. Then again, now I'm on my last one because here is my last stitch. If you're not sure if you've reached your last stitch, then you do have to go back and count your stitches and make sure that you don't end up with too many. But before we join this one and finish off this round, I want to count the stitches to make sure. You go back and you count all these little loops that are on top. That's the easiest way with single crochet. Round 2 says at the end after we've fastened up, we should have 24 single crochet. Let's count them. One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, and 24. We have the right number. Now we're going to join. In my instructions, I always say slip stitch and first single crochet or slip stitch fastened off. It is the most common and it is the simplest. If you were working on one color, you wouldn't even really notice. But when you're working with multiple colors, I prefer the one I'm going to show you now. Before I do any fastening off here, I'm just going to go ahead and cut my yarn. Now, we're going to cut the yarn about three to four inches. You'll be fine, and go ahead and pull it through with your hook. We're going to take our darning needle now. We're going to get that yarn onto your darning needle. However, that works for you. This is how I fasten a color so that you don't see the join. This is our first stitch here. We're going to go into the second stitch and imitate this loop right here. We're going to go under the two strands of the second single crochet. We're going to pull the darning needle through and just lightly snug it, don't yank too hard, you're trying to match the tension that you've already got there. Then you're going to go back into the stitch that yarn comes out of, as in the last stitch you created. We're going to push our needle through and just a nice tug and you're trying to match it, so see how this is the stitch we just made and it matches all the other ones. You can just let your yarn go at the back, and there you go. There is one of the best invisible joins that you can get when you're doing this crochet. You can see back here with the white, this slip stitch join, which again I say it's very common join, does leave a little bit of a bump. That is fine where that one is. But going forward I'll mostly be using this kind of a join, but you're welcome to use the slip stitch joint as well. There are times when the slip stitch join is better and we will be using that going forward as well because when you end your round with chain stitches, it's much easier to use the slip stitch. You'll see when we get there. But for now, we have finished Round 2 and we're ready to move on to Round 3. 8. Round 3 Right Hand: Onto round 3 we go and we are now going to be using color C which in my case is the red. Picking up our work, we're going to join color C with a slip stitch in any single crochet of our previous rounds. Again you can join it anywhere you want, and I once again will rotate a little bit further past where I fastened off just so my ends aren't all hanging in the same spot. Here we go. We're going to wrap the yarn around, joining by pulling the yarn up into a loop. With a slip stitch it says join your color C in any single crochet of previous round, then we will chain three which will count as our first double crochet. Again, yarn over, pull through. That's one chain, two chains, and three chains. Now we hit our square bracket which we know that when we find a square bracket, it means there's a bunch of stuff in there that's going to be done a multiple number of times. We're going to go ahead and it says double crochet. If it doesn't say in same stitch, it's usually in the next stitch because it would be very wordy to have to say double crochet next stitch, half double crochet next stitch, you get tired of the words in next stitch. So they're left out. The only time you will see it specified as if it has to be in the same stitch, it will say that. Again, we're going to double crochet. Again, I'm going to show you how to work over this yarn. I try to do this as much as possible but I've been ignoring that because you have a lot of other information going in right now, but you'll get the hang of it after a while and you may not have to to darn in any ends. Double crochet into next stitch. Wrap the yarn around three loops on hook, pull through two, and pull through two, then we want to do 1/2 double crochet which we have not done yet. Half double crochet, yarn over, insert into next stitch keeping that cut end over top of the hook. You're going to pull up a loop; three loops on hook, and remember 1/2 double crochet is yarn over and pull through all three loops. Push up with your hook hand against the hook, so it can pull through all three and use the opposite hand to help maneuver that hook through. There is your 1/2 double crochet. Then we're going to do a single crochet, so simply putting it into the next stitch, yarn over, pull up, yarn over, pull through two loops. Moving on, 1/2 double crochet. Yarn over, insert into next stitch, yarn over, pull up three loops on hook, yarn over, pull through all three. Then a double crochet, yarn over the hook first, insert in, yarn over three loops on hook, and now double crochet is pulled through two and pull through two. Now we're going to do a round bracket which usually means everything in that is going to be done within a certain place, so it says double crochet chain three, double crochet into next stitch. We're going to go ahead. Double crochet into that next stitch, chain three, and then double crochet again into that same stitch. Now this is going to create your corner. What we're doing is squaring off this piece, so you can get this flat. You can see it. We've been working in the round but now we're going to get the square part; so see here, same thing. We've worked across this first slide and created this corner over here, and now we're going to continue to work around and square off that circle. We're going to go back and read the end of our square bracket which means that's the grouping that we'll be repeating and it says three times. We did it once. It's going to be three times total including the one we just did. We're going to go back and double crochet in the next stitch. Remember if it doesn't say anything it's the next stitch. Half double crochet, single crochet. You're getting a good variety of stitches on this round. Half double crochet, double crochet. Make sure you give yourself enough extra yarn there so you're not creating too much tension. If you're pulling really tightly from the ball, if you're really having to yark on it, it's going to affect the tension of the square. Now we do the double crochet chain 3, double crochet chain 3, double crochet, and we've done it twice now, so you want to do one more time. Back to the beginning of the square bracket: double crochet, 1/2 double crochet, single crochet, 1/2 double crochet, double crochet, and then double crochet chain three; here we go, and double crochet. We've done it three times: 1, 2, and 3. Then we can move on, so then it says two double crochet, 1/2 double crochet, so we're doing the same thing. Single crochet, 1/2 double crochet, double crochet, and double crochet into same stitch is joined. See the stitch right here is where we joined, we need to do a double crochet back into that same stitch. Chain 3, and then it says slip stitch to third chain of starting chain: 1, 2, and 3. This is the case in which I do use a slip stitch to join, it just works better when you're ending with chain stitches instead of an actual stitch. Again, we're going to go into the third chain of our beginning changes; push that through, wrap the yarn around, pull it through, and pull it through the loop on the hook. We're going to snip this about 2-3 inches [NOISE]; probably more like four inches there, and pull it through. We have finished [MUSIC] round 3 and we have squared off our circle. [MUSIC] 9. Round 4 Right Hand: Now we're ready for round four. With round four, we're going to use this nice beige color. This is color D, almost a brownie beige. We're going to just do simple single crochets around our square. We need to join color D with a slip stitch in any chain three corner space of previous rounds. I'm not going to join it in the same one that I fastened and opened because I like to move around. Move one more corner over, insert your hook into that chain three space. Draw up your yarn with a slip stitch. Chain one, yarn over, pull yarn through chain one, single crochet in same chain three space as joined. Let's do a single crochet in there as well and I'm just hooking my cut end over top of my hook to lock it in. Then we go square bracket, single crochet in each of the next seven stitches. We're going to do a single crochet in each of the next seven stitches. One, two, three. I'm working over top of that into the stitch but keep the cut end over top and it works the cut end right into your work. Losing track here, that's where we started and then one, two, three, four, five, six, as you get closer to it flies up at seven. There is the seven stitches. Then in round brackets we have single crochet chain three, single crochet into next chain three space. Again, our corner is single crochet, chain three, and single crochet. Don't worry as we if you've been working in the ends and they pop to the front, you can just pop them back to the back when we're all done this. We have finished the first square bracket and we need to do it three times. That's our first time. Now we're going to go across seven single crochet for our second time. That's four, five, myself, a little leeway here, six and seven. Then I want to single crochet chain, three. My yarn's creeping back in there. I have all my balls in a yarn up there and they're wrapping around each other so if you get one of those yarn holders that you can just work with one ball at a time that's always nice. One, two, three chains in a single crochet into the corner space. We've done it twice now. You're going to go one more time single crochet seven across. I also don't like pulling out too much yarn at once because it can actually tangle in itself. There's different ways to keep your yarn loose and not tangled. But it's different for everyone, have to work it out the way you like. If you're like me and you have a cat and the horse chances are if you pull it too much yarn, the cat will steal the ball and run away with it which really makes it hard to crochet. Our corners, single crochet chain three , and single crochet. We now have done one, two, and three. What's next on our instructions? End of square bracket, then single crochet in each of the next seven. Where we joined here, you're going to be working into that third chain just like you joined it. Work it just like you joined it where you go in the center of that third chain and that's your first single crochet. Then continue on. The nice thing with crochet is you can fudge a little. It's not like knitting where you can see every stitch and if it doesn't line up perfect, then you're in trouble within reason. But you can fudge a little bit with it because you only ever have one stitch at a time. As long as you're pretty consistently going into the fabric, you're not really going to notice if you've missed a strand or went into the wrong place on a stitch for the most part. Then we have our seventh one here and then we do single crochet chain three in the same chain three space, so really it's the single crochet in the same chain three space then chain three. Then you're going to slip stitch because I'm ending with chains I am going to slip stitch again into that first single crochet. Wrap the yarn around pull it through the single crochet and pull it to the loop on the hook and now you have joined. We're going to cut the yarn again with four inches or so, pulling it through to fasten off. There you have round four and we're ready to complete our last round. 10. Round 5 Right Hand: We've made it to round number 5. Round number 5 we join color E. Color E for me is this nice green. We're going to be working double crochets this time around. Join color E with a slip stitch in any chain 3 corner space of previous rounds. Again, I don't want to do it in the same one that I just did. I'm going to move up to this one. We join by wrapping the yarn around the hook and pulling up a loop. That's how slip stitch. We start with a chain 3, which counts as our double crochet, so chain 3. Now square bracket, double crochet in each of next nine stitches. We'll go ahead and do that. Wrapping the yarn around, away we go into the next line. If we can keep that end over top of our hook just to lock it in place and maybe work it over. It's so much easier to work your yarn in, especially when you've got consistent stitches like single crochets or double crochet a whole row of them, then you're not having to hide it anywhere. It's a little harder if you've got chain stitches and open work that end doesn't necessarily hide very well. But in this case, it's perfect for it. When this happens and your hook slide out of everything, you can try to just put it back in like this. Worst case, you just pull the stitch out until you end up with one stitch and then you go back from there. Always count your stitches so that it's so easy to think that you did the right number when you come up short or you actually got an extra one in there somehow, and that really affects when you're trying to make the square work with others squares and they're not the same size. This should be nine. Now counting our chain 3, we have 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6,7,8,9, so nine stitches. Then we have our little round bracket here, which is two double crochet, chain 3, two double crochet into next chain 3 space, which is right here. You won't realize how many little kitty hairs you have until you try to do this on a white background. [LAUGHTER] We go two double crochet, chain 3, two double crochet. That is our corner. You can see here that's the first square bracket. We want to do this three times. I'm going to give myself a little extra yarn here. Because these balls are rolling all over my desk. Crocheting at a desk isn't my norm. Crocheting on my lap just about anywhere is more normal for me than crocheting at a desk. Since crochet is supposed to be my relax, I don't do it at a desk, and if I do it at a desk, I'm usually doing it in my lap as well. That is why I love crochet because it can be done anywhere. We're coming up on the ninth one here. I like to double-check. Yes. It should work out to the end but double-check just in case, 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9. Now two double crochet, chain 3, two double crochet. Now we're ready to do nine more double crochet, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9. Then we need to do another corner which is two double crochet, chain three, two double crochet. We've hit the end of our square bracket. Then we want to double crochet in each next nine. So really the same thing as we were doing, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9. Now we want to finish it off with two double crochet chain 3 and a single double crochet. Two double crochet, chain 1,2,3, and a single crochet. My yarn is really coming at me here. In the same chain 3 space as our join. You came up to it, you knew that was where you're probably going to work. Again, I say here, slip stitch into third chain as starting chain 3 you could. But because I'm going now from a regular stitch, not chain stitches, I'm going to do the other type of join here. We're going to cut the yarn about three to four inches, pull it through, and see how we have this gap here because we didn't do the slip stitch. And now I'm going to show you how to do that invisible join again, put the yarn onto your darning needle. See here we have the three chain, you don't want to go into that you want to go into the next one.. Go underneath the two strands of the next stitch, pull the yarn through just gently, then go back to where you came out of. Insert it in, and just tag it lightly and see how it imitates the stitches. You can't really tell where the end is. That completes round number 5. You can see on the back here, the reason I started in different places is because now I have ends to darn in, in different sections of the square. So they're not all in one line and create a bulk in one section of my square. They are dispersed around. It'll balance out nice and even. There is your completed square. [MUSIC] 11. Colour Combos - Right Hand: Now we're ready to create more squares in different color combinations. Now that you've completed your first square, you are ready to make the rest of the squares for the scarf. This one is square 1, and we're going to use the exact same square pattern but we're going to mix up the colors. I have five square color combinations that make up this scarf and each square is approximately, if I pull up my ruler there, it's approximate five inches by five inches. I'll show you later when we're putting the squares together how to figure out how long you want your scarf to be and how many squares to use. But for the scarf that I made, I did four of each square for a total of 20 squares. Square 1, we've already discussed the color combination and each one keeps the colors in the same order, it just changes up what round they're being used in. Square 1, we've already done. Square number 2 is going to have blue for round 1, red for round 2, beige for round 3, green for round 4, and the putty color will be in round 5. That's square number 2. Square number 3 will have red for round 1, beige for round 2, green for round 3, putty for round 4, and blue for round 5. That's square number three. Square number 4 is going to have the beige for round 1, green for round 2, putty for round 3, blue for round 4, and the red for around 5. That's square number 4. Our fifth square will have green for round 1, putty for round 2, blue for round 3, red for round 4, and the beige for round 5. That gives you five different squares using the exact same square pattern but because you're mixing up the colors, it gives your scarf a nice multi-variety look. You're going to go ahead, you're going to make four of each of these squares. I'll see you in the next lesson where we'll talk about darning in ends. [MUSIC] 12. Darning The Ends - Right Hand: Now we're ready to darn in our ends. Once you've completed your square, you can darn in your ends right away, or you can wait till you completed all of your squares and then just sit down and do one big darning in the ends best. Because I like to work my ends in, I don't have as many and I can even go as far as getting them all worked in and not have to darn them in. But often I forget as I'm crocheting through and I'll leave the ends hanging, so that's fine, it gives me something to do after the completion of the square. You can see here in this particular square, I didn't work in any of the ends, so there's two of each color hanging, and again, I like to start in different places, so they're dispersed around the square. If I started in the same place each time, they would all be lined up and darning them in would create a little bit of bulk on the back of the square in that particular spot. I like to move around, that's why I do that, so my ends are all dispersed. We need our darning needle, and again, it's the one with the big eye and I don't really like a pointy end myself, but you can use one with a pointy end. I tend to hit my fingers and it can hurt. You can start anywhere, you can pick any of them. The only one that I do a little bit different is this one in the very center, so I'll actually start with that one. We get our yarn onto our needle in whatever fashion that works best for you. This one in the center, which is usually the only one, I can't darn it even though I've worked over it, to do that foundation ring. What I want to do here is continue around and then I can really cinch up that square. You just go in underneath these stitches, so you're going into the middle of the stitches so that you can't see it on the front side. You're going right into the center of the stitches. I do a few stitches at a time and just give it a little tug, not a tight tug, you don't want any puckering, and then just keep on going, and you can darn this in until you feel confident with it. But I usually go like a boat and into two, two is a lot, but at least an inch in one direction. I've probably gone all the way around because I'm back to where the yarn started and stopped. Amazingly, it's much more secure than you think it is because I have done simple darn ends, cut them, and then decided to change something and really had a hard time pulling the stuff apart. But if you want to be more secure, you can turn around and work in the opposite direction for another inch or an inch is plenty really. But you don't want to tug too tight because again, you don't want a little clump there. So just didn't leave, the trick with darning in ends is not to pull too tight but to be secure. I think that is plenty, that end will not come out and then you trim it as close to the fabric as you can get, but be very careful not to cut any of your stitches. You just want to trim it, and it doesn't have to be flat against it because if you leave just a little bit of a knob up there, [NOISE] and then you give it a nice little tug, over time it will work itself in. If you cut it flat against the fabric, it might actually work its way to the front and it does that sometimes that's okay, you just tuck them in. The joy of handmade items is you're going to see those ends flop out every now and again, but as long as you've darn them in securely, it's not going to be a problem. Again, we're going to take the next one and in this case it's the beige, and what I do is I try to work in where it's not going to show. Even though I'm going under the green here, that's also the top of the beige section, so it's going to blend in. You want your ends to blend in, and if I were to go up here and start working at over here, you'd see it from both back and front, and you really don't want it to happen. Again, just a few more stitches around, just gently tugging it in. I use my thumb to make sure I'm not puckering, and then if it makes you feel better, you can turn it around. Don't go right in where you came out, it'll just undo what you've done, go over one strand and then work your way back a few stitches. Now you've reversed it, and reversing it, even just that small amount secures it in place, and when I cut it, I don't cut it right flat against the surface. You'll see that little end, but it works its way in. There we have the beige all darned in and then we can work on the next. Now some people like to knot their ends and I do get people asking that question. I don't like knotting my ends in general because if I were to knot these two ends, it would create a knot on the back of my work and often those knots will work their way to the front of the work. If you knot it and then cut it off short, if for any reason that knot will come undarn, which it can, then you have nothing to secure your darned in ends and your work will start to fall apart. The only time I do knot my ends is if I really don't have anywhere to darn them in or in a section that's actually going to be folded over like edgings and the knot will be hidden. But again, there are times when you want to knot it, but even if I knotted it, I would use probably about an inch or more of the yarn to darn it in as well because I wouldn't want that knot to come undone. Again, let's go up to an area that has a space. Here you can see there's a nice big gap. We are on the wrong side. This is the right side, it is where you don't really want things to show. Being a scarf, you really are going to see both sides, so we just try to be as neat as possible because once you get the work finished and you're wrapping it around your neck, you might not even notice what's right side and wrong side. But if you have a section here that has a space, and let's say we're going to go back in this direction, again, you don't go in where you came out or you'll undo the stitch, you go over this strand so you're locking in place. We'll go up to the corner, we'll just give a little pull but not too tight. Then I'm going to go around the corner and back down the other side, so go under a few stitches at a time. Then just allow that to lie next to the same color and it really isn't going to show or do anything that's going to fall apart, and I'll go a few more stitches. Now when I'm working over my ends, I only work them in one direction, that's why when I work over them, I work as far as I can with it and then you could just cut it. I'm going to go a little bit further. I'm not going to reverse this one, because if you work the end in long enough, so we started here, I worked it all the way round corner here, so that's about three inches I've worked in at least maybe four and then just trim it. Now you don't want to trim it, see how he stopped a little bit before the space. I wouldn't want to come into the space and then trim it because it definitely will show, so you want to do your best to leave the ends in an area that's well packed in with stitches, and it'll just hide itself in there. Again, you can continue around and always try to darn your ends in to the same color that they are so that you're camouflaging them. Remember, we never go back in where the yarn comes out, you want to go over at least one piece of yarn and then you just go around. Again, like I said, two inches is good and then you can reverse for few stitches or you can go another three inches, whatever makes you feel comfortable. But I have found in the past, I do overkill, and then when I actually think that I'm going to rip that square and do something different, I can't find the ends. That's how secure that they actually get in there. [NOISE] You can continue like that. I want to show you one here that I did actually work some of the ends in. See here. For the most part, this one I worked all the ends in. You see how you have little ends like this hanging, this is where the end again I began to work in. They're all worked in, again here, and what I would do here is I would just neaten that up on the back, just trimming off that little frayed part because they do tend to fray because they've been stuck out for a little while, while I've been playing around with the square and cut a little bit there. Then I darn the rest of these in, and you'll see that one seems like it doesn't really fit. I'm going to leave it there because it will work its way into the fabric. Again, at this point, nothing has worked to the front, but I do have garments that will work their way to the front, and you just take your little darning needle and poke it back or your crochet hook and you just pull it back, and if it really bothers you, you can tuck it in somewhere else back there. [NOISE] But they're going to show that's just the nature of a hand-crafted item. There you go. You have darned in, you've got your squares to darn in, and the next one we're going to do is learn how to join all our squares, sewing them together. [MUSIC] 13. Sewing Together - Right Hand: Now we're ready to sew our squares together. On the pattern, I do show you how I laid out the squares, but the best way to do it is to lay them out yourself and see what you like next to each other and then follow that however you like it. Sewing the squares together, I always use one of the colors of either of the squares. In this case, I sewed it up using a white and then here I sewed up these two using the green, so that you're sewing blends right in, you can't even see it. But in this case, I'm going to use a contrast color so that you can see exactly what I'm doing. If I use the same color, it would blend in, you couldn't probably be able to see where the stitches are lying. Take two of your squares that you want to join together and we're going to align them side-by-side. Because we counted our stitches, every side is going to have the equal number of stitches. Therefore, they will line up. So these two chain three spaces and these two chain three spaces will line up and there'll be the same number of stitches in-between each one. You can pin your squares together if you want. When it's this obvious, I usually just stitch them up by sight. If it was a more complicated edging, I would probably pin them to make sure that I wouldn't be off by the time I get up to here, it'd be so frustrating and then you'd have to rip it all back out again. But we're just going to go slowly here and I'm going to show you how I do this. I darn the yarn onto my darning needle and I'm going to come up from the bottom through one of the squares corners in whichever direction you prefer to sew, there is no right or wrong here as to which direction you go. Right to left or left to right, whatever feels best for you and pull it up. We'll leave a four inch tail. Then you're going to go back and down into the opposite corner and then you're going to come back up again where you just came up. We're going to pull that through and we're not going to pull it too tight because we will end up pulling our tail, so hold on to that tail and we're going to pull this. The way I'm going to lock it in place is I'm going to go underneath the strand that comes between the two and that's going to lock my yarn in place so that the tail doesn't keep disappearing on me. Holding everything down including the tail, give it a gentle tug, so it's almost like you're tying a little knot there. But it's really not going to show. But it keeps your tail, because, as you saw, your tail just will keep coming out with you and really frustrate you. That's how we secure our first stitch and we did it in the chain three spaces. Next up we go to the next stitch on the opposite side that we came up from. We go into this next stitch here and see how it's a loopy stitch. Go under both strands and then come across and go under both strands of the other square and then pull it through and I have a nice long piece here. You're probably looking at, the way I gauge is you go three times minimum the length that you want to sew, so I just cut myself in a strand, I had one here. You're going to pull gently and it's good to hold down the two pieces and just pull gently. You want it to match the tension of the stitches that are on the squares. Now you're going to up under the next two loops and come across under the next two loops of each of the sides, and again, pull it through. This is a whip stitch. Again, just gently tug it so it matches the tension. You want it to be enough that's going to hold them together, but not so tight that you're going to pucker them and it's going to be rigid. You have to remember that this is a garment and you want it to remain soft and supple when you're wearing it. If you end up pulling your seams really tight, you're going to feel that in the scarf. You're going to have this nice soft square and then you're going to feel this ridge and that's going to be where your seam is and you don't want that. Again, we're going to keep moving up under two strands and under the next two strands, pull your yarn through. Just then gently tuck it up. So see how you can see the stitches because I have a contrasting yarn. You wouldn't see those if it was in one of these colors. It's a beautiful stitch that blends right in with the work that you have. Just keep on moving up to more loops, into more loops and you're going to work your way up to the top and see we're right on track because our top is matching. If for any reason they don't, then you've gone off with your stitches and you've missed one or gone into one twice. That is very easy to do. Just keep working your way up. I always recommend doing the seeming in a color that matches your work. Some people think this is a beautiful contrast seem to work on. But what I would do is do the seam in the same color as the square and then embroider something like this after because it's not always this even and it really enunciates how uneven sometimes it can be. You would prefer to embroidered the way you want it. I always work in the same color yarn as one of my squares. We're almost to the top. Keep on working your way up. There we go, almost there. These are great to work on your lap. I don't usually do this on a desk. Nice small pieces you can sew together. Keep going until you hit that space. It looks to me like that's probably the last stitch. The next one will be into the corner space and then across to the other corner space then you always want to end at the back, so go back down corner space. Then if you want to lock this one into holding that yarn, so this doesn't loop up too much, come back, just bring your needle back to the front over the top. Go under that last stitch and give it a poll and now you've got a little bit of a knot there that holds it in place. There's your whip stitch seam that joins the two squares. Again, you're going to use a yarn that matches and you will do that all along and you end up with something that looks a little more like this. This is my completed scarf and see how they're all whip stitched together. You can't really see the scenes. When I'm sewing my squares together what I usually do is I figure out the order that I'm going to solve them together in, and then I literally pile them backwards in order. Say, I wanted these three to be done together, I would place this on the bottom then this one, then this one and as I pull them off, I stitched them to the one that's in the pile. Then these two would be stitched together and I would stitch into this one, and that way I don't have to keep looking as to what square is next. I already have them piled in reverse. That's the easiest way to do it. Good luck with sewing your squares together and I'll meet you back here to start working on our ending. [MUSIC] 14. Edging Rnd 1.1 Right Hand: Moving on to the edging, we now have all of our squares sewing together. Again, I have 20 squares. That's what I've written the pattern for. But the nice thing about these edging instructions is they will work with however many squares you're using. If you find 20 squares to be too long of a scarf for you, you can cut that back a little and the edging will still work. What we want to do is with all of this scarf that's all joined together, we want to pull out one of the ends, it doesn't matter which end, and lie it in front of you. Now the edging I go up half a size or I guess it's a full-size of hook really. For the main square I use a five millimeter hook but for the edging because I like my edgings to be soft and cuddly and airy, I go up a size in my hook. Now this stitch that I'm using actually does require me to go up a size as well because otherwise it would be very peccary and pulley on my scarf. Just so that you know, whatever size of hook you ended up using for your scarf if you felt that your squares weren't coming out right and you change the hook size just go a size of hook. Again, I use the five millimeter to make the squares and I'm using a 5.5 Millimeter which is also a US 9. I'm going up from a US 8 to a US 9 to do my edging. Again, my edging, you can get creative and use any of the colors you want in the edging. But my first row I'm going to start with my color A. That is my off-white color. The instructions say place scarf right side facing, so this is your right side and this is your wrong side. You want the right side facing you, short edge at top and long edges of the side. We're going to join color A with a slip stitch in the top chain three corner of the end square. For your right-handed version you want the top right corner and for the left-hand version you want the top left handed corner. We're going to be working across your short edge first. You want the corner that you're going to be working across the shortage. We're going to take a color A and we're going to pull up a slip stitch in that corner. Working across short end of scarf, chain one, single crochet in same chain three space as your joints so single crochet then we hit a star. We haven't done any of these star repeats yet. Stars are usually a repetition that's going to be quite a bit of stuff repeating to an endpoint. Ignore the star for the moment and we're going in round brackets, we're going to chain one, skip next stitch. Working into these edge stitches here, skip this stitch, single crochet in next stitch and we want to do what's in the round bracket six times total. That was our first one. Skipping the next stitch, single crochet, that's our second one. Chain ones skip next stitch, single crochet and next that's three. Going across until we've done it six times total. That's five and this will be six. Then we want to chain one, skip next stitch and then in round brackets single crochet chain three single crochet into next chain three space which is right here. Single crochet, chain, three, single crochet. Now you want to turn your scarves so you'll be working down the long edge. 15. Edging Rnd 1.2 Right Hand: Now you want to turn your scarf, so you'll be working down the long edge. This is a really long edge. I'll get you started on it, and then I'll meet you in the far corner. Let's get started on this long edge. In round brackets chain 1, skip next stitch, single crochet next and we want to do that a total of six times. We do that across the top and here we are again. We're doing it a total of six times. Hold your scarf, however, it's most comfortable for you because you've got a lot of weight probably sitting in your lap as you're working along this little part of the long edge. You want six, this is my sixth one here and let's just count them. We'll pass the corner here, chain 1, skip a stitch, single crochet. So that's 1, 2,3, 4, 5, and 6. I'm just counting the single crochets because that's part of what's in those round brackets. We ended with a single crochet. So that's six times, chain 1, skip next stitch. Now here's a double star, but just ignore it for now. It's going to be used later on as a reference point to come back down like in coda if you do music, like repeat from coda, it's going to be that kind of concept. Single crochet in next chain-3 space, which is right here. Chain 1, single crochet in next chain 3-space. Then we're going to continue on chain 1 and we're in round brackets again, so chain 1, skip next stitch, single crochet next. Anyone will do that, six times. Keep on moving across, sometimes it's good to have little marker following on your patterns so that you know exactly where you are. When you get into these hefty instructions it's easy to forget where you are, so that should be six but let's go back and count. Is with a chain-3 space. Then we did 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. I get talking, I lose track. Now we want to chain 1, skip next stitch, single crochet. Nope, see I've lost track. I did the six and then I chain 1 and skip next stitch. Then repeat from double star. We're going to go back to the double star and it says single crochet in next chain-3 space. Chain 1, single crochet in next, chain-3 space and then you've got your round brackets. Chain 1, skip next stitch, single crochet, is chain 1, skip next stitch, single crochet. I'm going to show you what happens when we finish this part so that you'll understand these star or repeats. We want to do six of these working our way down this long side of our scarf. That's the sixth one right there. Then we chain 1, skip next stitch, repeat from double star. You're going to continue to repeat from the double star down the long edge of your scarf to the last chain-3 space corner, which is at the far end of your scarf. This is what we've done so far and you're going to continue to do that repeat all the way down. Each of the squares really has the same repeat and I'll meet you at the far corner of this long edge. 16. Edging Rnd 1.3 Right Hand: Now we've worked all the way down our long edge and we are at the opposite chain three-space corner. Here's a work down long edge of scarf to the last chain three-space corner, which this one right here. Now there's a triple star there, again, ignore that for the moment. We don't need it. We will come back to that. You want a single crochet, chain three, single crochet, in the corner chain three-space. Single crochet, chain three and single crochet. Turn the piece of work to work across the short end of the scarf, which is what we're doing now. Repeat from single star to triple star. You're going to go all the way back and look for that first single star and then you're going to work all the way through it again until you hit the triple star. Then you'll come back to this place in the pattern. Let's go back and start that up. Single star takes us back to round brackets, chain one, skip next stitch, single crochet, and next and we do that six times. This is just like working across the short edge at the very beginning. That's really exactly the same thing that we're doing here. We will do six of these. This is our sixth one. Then we chain one, skip next stitch and single crochet, chain three, single crochet into that chain three-space. We do our single crochet. Then you're going to turn the scarf so you're working down the long edge again. We turn it and we see what we're doing here and we're going to do the round bracket, chain one, skip next stitch, single crochet next six times. You're going to do that just as we did the first time around. Follow through the pattern just like we did before until you end up at the three stars and I'll meet you there. Here we are. We've worked down the last second long edge, and we've ended up again at the final chain three-space at the end of the scarf. Instructions had said to work from the single star to the triple star, which would bring us down to this last corner again. Then this is how we finish it off, following the pattern. Then single crochet in same stitch as beginning join, so single crochet, chain three, 2, and 3, and slip stitch in the first single crochet of the round. Slip stitch comes through both the loop and the one on the hook and fasten off. We're just going to cut it three or four inches, pull it through and it has fastened off and we have finished Round 1. 17. Edging Rnd 2.1 Right Hand: Now, we're moving on to Round 2. Once you have Round 2 in place, that will be the same as Round 3, 4, and 5 just switching the colors. This Round 2. Round 1, set our edging in place. Round 2 will be easier and I'm going to use my color B, which is my blue, and continuing on with the 5.5-millimeter hook. You can see your edging, has a little bit of area space to it and that'll be nice as you keep adding the rows, you're going to get a nice lighter feel to the edging, and a nice more solid coziness to the center of the scarf where the squares are. In Round 2, it says to join color B, with a slip stitch in any of the chain 3-space corners of the previous round. It doesn't matter which one you join it in. I'm not going to join it in the one that I finished off on because that's the way I do things. I'm just going to go with this one, and I'm going to join it in this one, so it doesn't matter which one you join in. We've put our hook into the chain 3-space, we draw up a loop, so joining with a slip stitch. Again, we're using color B. Then you want to chain 1 and single crochet in same space. Now we have the square brackets, and in the square brackets we have also a star. Just take note of those, but we don't need them yet. Chain 1, single crochet in next chain 1 space, which is right here, single crochet into that chain 1 space. Repeat from star to next chain 3-space, corner. Again, simple. You just chain 1, single crochet in next chain 1 space, and you repeat that chain 1 single crochet and next chain, 1 space, chain 1 single crochet and next chain 1 space and so on, all the way down your long edge until you get to your next chain 3-space corner. I'm just going to continue on there, and have you continue along there, and I will meet you at the next chain 3 space corner, which is at the opposite end of your scarf. 18. Edging Rnd 2.2 Right Hand: Here we've reached the corner, the far end of our scarf, so we repeat from star to next Chain 3 space corner, which we have done. Then we are going to proceed to Chain 1 in round brackets, single crochet, Chain 3, and single crochet all into that Chain 3 space. Now we've hit the end of our square bracket after all that and it says to do whatever is in the square bracket three times total. Basically, you're working up the three sides. We've done it the first time. I'll walk you through the second time because it's a short one. We go back to the square bracket and we Chain 1 single crochet in next Chain 1 space. We repeat that to the next Chain 3 corner so we Chain 1 single crochet in next space. Chain 1 single crochet next space and just keep repeating that across this top short edge, which counts as one of our square bracket times. There is our Chain 3 space. Make sure we're doing this right. Chain 1 single crochet, next Chain 1 space repeat from star to next Chain 3 corner. Chain 1, single crochet, Chain 3 single crochet into that corner. Single crochet again into that corner. That's the second time through the square brackets and we have one more time through the square brackets, which is going to take us all the way down the next long side. Continue on on your last time through your square brackets and I'll meet you at the Chain 3 space corner at the far end of the scarf. 19. Edging Rnd 2.3 Right Hand: Here we are finishing up our square bracket. We repeated from the star to next chain 3 space corner, chain 1 single crochet, chain 3 single crochet into next chain 3 space, and that's the end of our square bracket repeat. Now we're going move on, so double star chain 1 single crochet and next chain 1 space which is over here. Then we're going to repeat from the double star to the next chain 3 space just over here. You can start this in any one of the corners. You might be working on your long side now, but the way that I started it, I'm actually finishing up on my short side. Chain 1 single crochet and we just keep repeating that until we get to the next chain 3 corner, which won't take us long. Then we can finish off this round. We're almost there chain 1 single crochet, and we are at the next corner. Finish off that single crochet. Now we chain one single crochet in same chain 3 spaces joining. We're back to where we started, single crochet chain 3. Then we slip stitch in the first single crochet of the round slipping through both. We cut our yarn, and we pull it through to fasten off. Now we have finished round 2. Round 1 was in color A, round 2 is in color B. Now we continue on to round 3, which is just repeating round 2, but using color C, which is my red. Round 4, we'll again be repeating round 2 using color D, which is the beige. Then round 5 we'll be repeating round 2 using color A again, which is the off-white. That'll be the end of the edging. Go ahead and work on that, and I'll meet you back here at the end of round 5. We will finish off our scarf by adding some nice fringe to the ends. 20. Fringe - Right Hand: We're ready now to add on some fringe. Here we have our scarf done with all of our rounds. Our round 1 of the edging was in the off-white putty, then round 2 we did in blue, and then I left you to do round 3, 4, and 5 on your own and this is what you end up with. Again, you can mix up those colors to whatever you prefer, but this is the result of the one that I worked on. When you reach the end of your edging, you can decide whether you want to put on extra fringe or not. I like to add on fringe to my scarves. It gives it that extra little touch. I'll show you here on this end I've already added the fringe on, and you can mix up the colors the way you want. You can do them all in one color. Here I've made sure that I have every color in here, and then I've added in the off-white in multiple places as an accent. Because of the width of this scarf, what I've decided on is a six-strand fringe which doubles over into 12 strands, and I've decided to do it and spacing them out, so I end up with seven fringe knots altogether. Now, I'll discuss this at the end about blocking, but you'll see some of my fringes a little bit kinky. It does that if I pull it from the center of the ball. When I'm further along it's a little straighter, but I can block that out. We'll talk about that at the end of this. What I want to do is make three knots of off-white and then one of each color. To make my fringe, [NOISE] I use piece of cardboard. You can buy things from a craft store that specifically are made for making fringe. I just use a piece of cardboard or notebook. Sometimes I'll use a notebook about this size as well. Whatever I have in the house is what I use. You can just use a cereal box. I've just used a plain piece of cardboard. What I've done is I've cut it six inches in depth, and then I've actually cut it eight inches across in case I wanted to use it this way for longer fringe. But for my scarves I like to do six inch, and then what I'll do is I'll wrap them around and I'll end up with a finished six inch fringe that I can trim off evenly. So I usually guarantee myself a five-inch fringe. We're going to take some yarn here. I'll use the blue this time around, easier to see on the cardboard. I cut my cardboard again six inches, and then I put a little slit up here so that it has somewhere to hold the yarn. I just tuck my yarn in there, [NOISE] like that. Now I'm going to wrap it six times so it count six. A full wrap up to here is one. I take my yarn and I wrap it once, twice, three times, four times, five times, and six times. [NOISE] Once I have it wrapped the six times, I'll take my scissors, tuck it under your strands, and cut it. [NOISE] It leaves this little piece in here which is fine. You don't need that anymore. [NOISE] I take this ball away and I should have six strands of yarn, approximately 12 inches long. I'm going to pull my little ruler out and we're going to say that that is approximately 12 inches long. Depending on how tight I pull it when I wrap it, so try to wrap it very loosely, you'll end up with the 12 inches. [NOISE]. You might want to go ahead and make everything that you need and join them at the end. But I'm just going to do another one here in off-white so I can show you two of them. Again, I tuck the white in and I wrap it loosely six times around, so 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6. Again, I'm going to take my scissors and go underneath and cut it. [NOISE] I can let the ball fall away, pull away my cardboard, and I should have six strands which are usually lined up well. If they aren't, you just pull that one out and realign it up. Pull them all straight, and again I have 12 inches, and I'm ready to go with my off-white ones. I start in the corner with my off-white, so that's the one I want to start with. You fold it in half over your finger, so it's basically lined up at the bottom here. Take your hook. You want your piece right side facing towards you, and you're going to go underneath it to this corner chain space. Poke your crochet hook through, and then loop your yarn over top of the crochet hook at the halfway point. Now, you're going to want to keep a little bit of tension on it so your strands all stay together. Then you're going to pull it through to the back, and leave your strands lying to the front. Now, pull up enough of a loop that you can pull this through. You can either use your hook, or you can take your hook off and put your fingers through. I like to use my fingers, and grab the yarn and loosely pull it through because you don't want to upset the knots at all. Now that it's through, grab all the strands together and gently target tight. Not super tight but just firm. There you go. There is your first fringe. Now, the next one I want to put on is the blue. We're going to again go in and I'm going to skip this chain space. Again, fringe is what you want. You can put one in every chain space, I wouldn't do six strands every chain space because it'll get very bunch up. I like to space mine out but make them bigger. We're going to skip over this chain space and go into this one. Make sure I've got the right space there. Looping the yarn over my finger at the halfway point, trade it off to the hook, and then hold it firm on the hook and pull it through that chain space. Make sure you get all the strands and pull it up a little bit, keeping it firm there so it stays together. Slip your hook off and slip your fingers in, grab the tail. Gently pull that through, and then make sure you grab every one of the strands because if you don't, someone's not going to get pulled tight, and then gently tug it until you have it right up to the scarf itself. There you have two of your fringes. Once you have all of your fringes attached as I've gone ahead and done here, you're going to want to trim them up so they trim even. See how they're all different lengths down here. If I were to go through here, flatten them out and look for the shortest piece because that's what you do. It looks like it's about there. If I lie this ruler across, this helps me trim them. So we're going to make sure this is straight and this is straight, then I can just trim them across. I'm just going to show you that they're going to end up being about four inches in length, and that is why sometimes I'll use the long edge of my tassel maker and make them eight inches. Depending on how long you want your tassels to be or your fringe, you should accommodate for about two inches off of that because part of it is in the knot, and part of it you're going to trim off from them knot being even. If you want your finished fringe to be eight inches long, which is a good length, you would need to cut your strands 10 inches times 2, so you'd need 20 inch strands because you're folding them in half. You always want to take the finished, add two inches to it, and then double it. That's the length of each strand that you want. You fold them in half, then once they're in the knot, that takes a good solid inch off, and then when you trim them so that they all are even, you're probably taking another inch off. I'm going to end up with four-inch strand , and that's okay. That's fine with me. I don't like them to be super long. I find sometimes the best way to trim them is just to somewhat eyeball it, but I like to use a ruler, so I'm straight here. Then you just go along and trim them across [NOISE] slowly because you don't want to mess anything up. We'll get through this first one here. A little bit of an awkward angle formula on this desk. You want them all to be the same. Let's just go there. I've started there, see how much more even they are. Sometimes a really nice quick way to do this if you're also a quilter, I like to take a quilting grid background and a roller cutter, and I push down on my ruler and I just cut them right across. But this method works just as well, and you're eyeballing them and going across slowly so that you make sure you don't miss any. Just keep doing that across. There you go. You've got your fringe. It's nice and even, and try to make it the same on both ends so when the scarf hangs down, your fringe matches. [MUSIC] 21. Stitch Primer Left Hand: Before we get going on our instructions for the square, I want to just set you up with a little bit of a Stitch Primer and this will just be something you can come back to if you have any trouble going along with each of the stitches, if you want to see them slower and a little more detailed, come back to this Stitch Primer. We're going to start with the slip knot and I'm going to go over this very slowly for you. This is how I start all my projects, whether they're in the round or back and forth. You're going to take the cut end of the yarn and you are going to lay it over your non-dominant hand. If you are right-handed crocheter, you're going to lay it over your left hand. If you're a left-handed crocheter you're going to lay it over your right hand. Line the yarn over your palm. You want the cut end towards you, and the end that comes from the ball which is called the working end, you want that at the top of your hand. You're going to hold that in place with your thumb, and then you're going to flip your hand over and wrap the yarn around your first two fingers, just your first two fingers. You're going to bring it back across the bottom, and you're going to cross over towards your arm, and you're going to lay it over your next three fingers, and then hold it in place with your baby finger. The first rap is towards the ends of your finger. The second wrap comes across and is further down your hand. Now you're going to take your hook in your crochet hand, and you're going to put it underneath the first strand, and over top of the second strand, and you're going to pull through a strand of yarn underneath. You're going to twist the hook away from you so you can get this strand onto the hook and then roll it back towards you, so you've just twisted this knot onto the hook. Then you're going to slip your fingers out, holding on to the two ends of the yarn, keeping the loop on the hook, and then you're going to pull it gently until it creates this knot. Then you're going to take the two strands and pull them away from each other. That's the slip knot part of this knot. You want it to go right up to the hook but not tight. Just nice and gentle so there's still some space in there for you to work with. That is your slip knot. The next thing we're going to learn is the chain stitch. You want your cut end of the yarn down towards the bottom, away where you're not going to use it. You don't want to use that end of the yarn. It's very easy to pick that one up and start working and then realize that you have no yarn left to work with, and you have to rip out what you just did. Make sure that your yarn is away. Sometimes I'll tuck it under my thumb to start with, along the hook. You want the working end of the yarn that comes out of the ball. To get some tension, I usually wrap it once around my baby finger, and then back over the top of my three fingers. That's how I hold my yarn. Some people just literally lay it across their hand. Some people have it wrapped around a few fingers. It just creates a little bit of tension on the yarn as you work. You want your index finger and your thumb to hold the knot of the slip knot so that you can work through this loop. We're going to go ahead and do the chain stitch. You take your hook and you reach over and go underneath the yarn. You grab the yarn and you're going to pull it through the loop on the hook. Make sure that it is hooked around that yarn and it's coming with you. Using your finger and thumb to hold this knot open so that you can get it through the loop and pull it through the loop. There's your chain stitch. Now you're going to do that again. Often, when you start a piece of work, it asks you to do a certain number of chains to create your foundation. Let's do another one. We're going to move our thumb and our index finger up to the base of the hook. That's where I keep them so that they are always working with a loop on the hook. You only ever have one loop on the hook when you've completed a stitch, unless you get into some complicated stitches, but we won't be doing that. One loop on the hook, that's part of the reason I love crochet. Again, you're going to go and I tend to rotate my hands as I work towards each other, away from each other. Towards each other to wrap the yarn around the hook from underneath, and then you're pulling them away from each other, and this thumb and forefinger are helping you pull this loop and you pull the loop through. That gives you two chains. Let's do one more. I move my finger and my thumb up to the base of the hook, rotate my hands towards each other, wrapping the yarn over the hook. The hook goes under the yarn, twisting it so that it gets caught up with the hook. Then I pull the hands away from each other to pull the chain through. I'm going to do a few more of those so that we can move on to our single crochet. Next stitch is going to be our single crochet and I'm working them into a foundation chain. In this case, I'm just working them across, we're not doing them in the round. We'll do that when we get to the instructions. To work a single crochet, to work our first single crochet, we always work into the second loop on the hook, the second chain. We're going to insert our hook into the chain loop. That strand of yarn is over your hook and it goes into the center of the chain. Then you're going to put your hook under the yarn and wrap the yarn over top just like we did for the chain stitch, pulling the yarn through, see how our thumb and our index are at the base of this stitch. Pull it through and now you have two loops on the hook. We're in the middle of creating a stitch. We now have two loops on the hook. We want to do again, wrap the yarn over the hook. Make sure that you have that yarn so you'll be rotating the hook so that the hook part has the yarn, and you're going to pull it through both loops on the hook. Through we go using this thumb and finger, they are very key in letting you pull this through. You pull it through two loops at the same time, and that's your single crochet. Once again, we will go into the stitch into the center of the chain. You're going to wrap the yarn over the hook. The hook goes underneath, turns it so that you can pull it through. See where my thumb and index finger are at the base of the next stitch. We're creating some space so you're pulling your hands away from each other to create this space. You're going to pull that through and end up with two loops on the hook, and then you're going to wrap again and you're going to pull it through both at the same time so focus on one, and then the second one. Your attention for your stitches might seem a little wonky as you're learning this, but it will get better with time. It's all about practice. That's our first stitch, our single crochet stitch. Now we'll do the half double crochet. The half double crochet is wrapping the yarn over the hook first. We're going to wrap the yarn over the hook, and then we're going to insert into the next stitch. We're going to pull up our loop just like we did with the single crochet. Then we have three loops on the hook. We're going to pull through all three at the same time, so yarn over, and now you're going to go through, one, two, three. You just did three loops. That's a half double crochet. Again, we're going to do yarn over the hook first, then you're going to insert the hook into the stitch, then wrapping the yarn over the hook again, you're going to pull through one loop. Now you have three loops on the hook. You're going to wrap the yarn over and you're going to pull through all three of those loops. Here, your thumb and your index finger are key on pulling the yarn down so that you have lots of space in there. Then you pull through all three loops. That's a half double crochet. Now we're going to move to the double crochet. Again, you're going to wrap the yarn over the hook, and then you're going to insert the hook into the next stitch. Now you're going to wrap the yarn over the hook again and pull through one stitch. Three loops are left on the hook. Now again, we're doing a double crochet, so we're going to wrap the yarn around and we're only going to pull through two. Use that thumb and index finger to make space. We're going to pull through the first two loops , and that is all. Now we have two loops left on the hook. Now you're going to wrap the yarn over, and you're going to do the same thing, moving my thumb and index finger up a little more. We're going to make space and pull through the last two loops on the hook. That's a full double crochet. Again, we'll do one more, yarn over, insert your hook into the stitch, yarn over the hook and pull up a loop. Moving my thumb and index so that I can see this better and get a good grip on it. Yarn over. Pull through the first two loops. We have two loops left on the hook. Moving my thumb and index finger up again, yarn over. Pull through the last two loops. You'll notice when I'm pulling through, the hook is facing down. It just works best for me. But when I'm wrapping, I have the hook up. There we go. We have our two double crochets. Let's see if you can see this on this swaps, see how they keep getting bigger. You can see here, the single crochets are the first two, the half double crochets are the next two, and the full double crochets are the last two, and the stitches get higher. Single crochets are the lowest, half double crochets in the middle, and the full double crochet is higher. That's the height of your stitches. The last stitch I want to show you is a slip stitch, and that's usually how we join things like the ring for the foundation or the end of a rope. A slip stitch is pretty simple. You just take the hook into the stitch that it asks you to go into, so in this case I'm slipping into the first chain of the round. I'm going to wrap my yarn over. You're going to use your thumb and your index finger to hold those stitches in place. Once you have that yarn wrapped, I'm going to bring it through both stitches at the same time. You're not actually creating a stitch, you're just joining things, [MUSIC] and that is a slip stitch [MUSIC]. 22. Foundation Left Hand: Let's get started on our first square. We're going to start with this color combination, using our colors in order. From A which is the putty, B which is the blue, C which is the red, D which is the beige, and E which is the green. This will be our first square that we follow along with. Then later on you can change up the colors and make these different squares that will go into completing our scarf. We're going to get started now on following our directions in our pattern to make our first square. We're going to use color A, which is this off-white or putty as it's called here. We're going to go ahead and read the pattern. Under directions, we see foundation with color a, make a slipknot on the hook. I'm using my 5.0 millimeter hook. We'll go over that again. It's in the primer if you need to see it much slower. But we're going to create a slip knot by lying the yarn across our fingers, wrapping around our first two fingers, bringing it up and wrapping it around the third. Follow the primer. It goes much slower if you're having trouble with this. We go under our first strand, over our second strand, pull it through, twist the hook towards us, and slip your fingers out. There's your slip knot and slip it up to the hook. With color A, we have our slip knot on our hook. Chain four and then join with a slip stitch in first chain to form a loop. This is going to be our beginning ring , our foundation ring. We chain four. Holding our hook in our dominant hand and our yarn in the opposite hand, we will wrap the yarn over the hook. Using our hands to pull apart, slip that hook through the loop on the hook. That's your first chain. We need three more of those. Wrap your yarn, pull it through. See how I'm working my hands together. They rotate towards each other and then away from each other. That's how we get this yarn around the hook, pull it through. There's our four chain. Let's count them, 1,2,3,4. Now, we want to join with a slip stitch in the first chain to form a loop. We go back to this first chain, we slip our hook underneath, and then we wrap the yarn around the hook again, bringing the hook up underneath and hooking the yarn, pull it through that loop in the loop on the hook. Use your thumb of your non-dominant hand to maneuver that hook through those two loops. There we have our foundation ring that we will be working our round one into. 23. Round 1 Left Hand: Moving on to round 1. It says in the pattern, continue with color A, so we're going to continue with this off-white color so we don't need to cut any ends and worry about that. We're going to start by chaining three, so again, right from where we were, we go ahead and wrap the yarn around our hook, pull it through, that's 1, 2, and 3, so that's chain 3, and that counts as our first double crochet. Moving on, we're now going to do the double crochet right into the taller stitch. We work 11 more double crochets into the center of the chain 4-loop. Working into this center of the loop, see if you can see that there, you want to work 11 double crochet into that. By working in double crochet again, we do yarn around the hook to begin with, then we insert the hook into the ring, and then we bring it up and wrap the yarn around again on the other side, pull it through the ring so you have three loops on the hook, wrap the yarn around again, pull through two loops, wrap the yarn around one more time and pull through the last two loops on the hook. That's your double crochet stitch. We want to work 11 of those into this ring, so that's the first one. Again, we wrap our yarn around, give yourself a little bit of leeway here with your yarn so it doesn't create extra tension on your hand. You want to keep this here and nice and loose coming onto your hands so the tension stays nice and even. We have our yarn wrapped around our hook, we insert it into the middle of the ring, and I am working over this end. You want the end to be lying over top of your hook as well. If you find that too confusing, you can leave it to the back and darn it in later, but I like to work in my ends at every possible opportunity. You're going to wrap the end around the hook, now that's on the other side of the ring, pull through, you have three loops on the hook, wrap the yarn around and pull through two, wrap it around and pull through the last two, and we'll do this a little smoother and faster this time. Yarn over, insert into the ring, yarn over pull through three loops on the hook, yarn over pull through two, yarn over pull through two, and that's how we do this. We want 11 of these. Again, I'm always keeping this cut end of the yarn over top of the hook, so it's working into our work at the back. We want 11 of these. Moving a little faster now, you just keep working your way through and you're always pulling away from each other with your hands when you're pulling the hook through. This hand will pull in one direction and the hook hand will pull in the other direction. That is how you keep your tension nice and even, and it also makes it easier to pull these pieces of yarn through the loops on the hook. We've done a couple here, let's go back and count, so counting stitches, very important, you never want to be off on your count because then your next round isn't going to work out, and somewhere along the line you'll figure it out, and then you'll just have to rip back. That's not fun. We're going to count the chain 3 as our first double crochet, and then there's going to be 11 more after that. This is our first one, then 11 more, so 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8. You can either count the posts or you can go up here and count the actual chain loops stitches. Eight, I need 9 and 10, and I need a little bit more yarn here, and one more for 11th. Now it'll feel like you're really packing them in there and that's okay. That creates a nice solid center for us. Now that we have the 11 plus the chain 3, it gives us a total of 12, and we want to slip stitch in third chain of starting chain 3. 1, 2, and 3, you want to slip stitch into this third chain of your starting chain 3, so just poke your hook through, wrap your yarn around, pull it through, and pull it through the one on the hook as well. That is how you slip stitch to join, and then because we're working with a different color each round, I will be cutting my colors after each round. I cut about anywhere from 2-4 depending on how comfortable you are. I work my ends in, so usually by working them in as I go, I only need about two inches. But to be safe, you could go 3-4 because you can always trim them off later. Then you're going to go ahead and pull that yarn through the last loop there, and there you have it fastened off. This center, you can see there's a hole in it and that's okay, that can be part of your design. Often there's a whole when we'd start with a chain-ring, but the trick that I do is because I've worked over this, so I've turned over to the wrong side. This is the right side. Turning over the wrong side, you can see this yarn, and if you put your thumb over the hole and your index finger over the other side and just give this yarn a little tug while holding that in place it cinches up the center, and you can continue to turn this around and cinch it up even more. If you don't want that hole in the center, that's a good way to close it up. Now we're ready for round 2. [MUSIC] 24. Round 2 Left Hand: Moving on to round number 2, we want color B, which in my case is this blue. Round 2 says, join color B with a slip stitch in any double crochet of previous round. It doesn't matter where you join, and that's another reason why I like fastening off my colors at the end of each round because I like to start my rounds in a new place so that I'm not getting all these ends going up one line. If we take one of these squares, if I were to join in the same place every time, I would have a bulky line of ends all in one of the corners. Every time I join a new color, I like to pick a different space on the square so that when I'm done, my ends are dispersed around the square. Seeing as I fastened off here, I'm just going to rotate it maybe 45 degrees and just start into one of these. You want your hook to go underneath the two loops of any one of these double crochet and we're going to join by pulling up a loop. Wrap the blue around your hook and pull up a loop. That's how you join a new color. Following round 2 instructions, we joined with a slip stitch in any double crochet of previous round. Chain 1, you're in over the hook and pull it through, that's your Chain 1. Now you want to do two single crochet in same stitch as join. Not only learning the single crochet, we're learning how do increasing, because as you work in the round, you have to increase your stitches so that your work lies flat and doesn't pucker. We're going to start by two single crochet in same stitch as joined. You want to take that hook, keep that the loop that's on it nice and firm by holding your tension with your opposite hand and you want to insert the hook under the same to our strands and wrap the yarn around and bring it through. Now you have two loops on the hook. Wrap the yarn around and pull through both loops, that's your single crochet. Then you want to do a second single crochet in that same space. Again, we go back into that space, draw up a loop, two loops on the hook, wrap the yarn over your hook, pull through both loops on hook. Now you have two single crochet into the same stitch and that's considered an increase. We go back to the instructions and we see we did the two single crochet and same stitches join increase made, and now we have the square bracket. When you get the square brackets again, it's about whatever's in those square brackets you're going to be doing a set multiple number of times. We have two single crochet in next stitch and we're going to do that 11 times. Our first one's already done. This one doesn't count as the 11. This one was done before the bracket. Then you want to do two single crochet next stitch a total of 11 times. We're going to go ahead in and start working these two single crochet and your next stitch and then move on to single crochet into the next stitch. Move onto your next stitch, and you're going to do this 11 times. Sometimes it's good to have a little piece of paper beside you to tick off how many times you've done it. A lot of people have different kinds of row counters and stitch counters, you can use them even on your devices like your iPhone or your iPad, and some people are just really good at keeping it in their head. For me, I really just have to keep counting my stitches. I've come up to the point where I joined from the previous one. I'm going to show you a different joint on this round that isn't as bulky as this one, although this one is a simple join. But you have to make sure you're going to go into the right stitch. That's what I don't like about this join, is that it can get confusing. We just worked into this stitch and we have to see where this one joined and it joined over here. That's the place you want to work your next stitch. Don't get confused by this right here. This is really just a chain. It almost has to go to the back. You want to go way over here and create another single crochet and then another. Even though that's a very common joint and a very simple one to do, pulling it tight from the back there, it does leave a little bit of a bulky gap. I'm going to show you a different way to join that doesn't leave that gap. It's not so bad on your first ring, it's really not going to show. We did our two single crochet there and now here make sure you work into the next one going under two. What we did back there is worked into that third chain. It's a little confusing there. Then again, and now I'm on my last one because here is my last stitch. If you're not sure if you've reached your last stitch, then you do have to go back and count your stitches and make sure that you don't end up with too many. But before we join this one and finish off this round, I want to count the stitches to make sure. You go back and you count all these little loops that are on top, that's the easiest way with single crochet. Round 2 says at the end, after we fasten off, we should have 24 single crochet, so let's count them. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21 22, 23, and 24. We have the right number and now we're going to join. In my instructions I always say, slip stitch and fasten single crochet or slip stitch fasten off. It is the most common and it is the simplest. If you were working one color, you wouldn't even really notice. But when you're working with multiple colors, I prefer the one I'm going to show you now. Before I do any fastening off here, I'm just going to go ahead and cut my yarn. Now, we're going to cut the yarn about three to four inches, you'll be fine, and go ahead and pull it through with your hook. We're going to take our darning needle now and we're going to get that yarn onto your darning needle. However that works for you, and this is how I fasten a color so that you don't see the join. This is our first stitch here, we're going to go into the second stitch and imitate this loop right here. We're going to go under the two strands of the second single crochet. We're going to pull the darning needle through and just lightly snug it, don't yank too hard. You're trying to match the tension that you've already got there. Then you're going to go back into the stitch that that yarn comes out of, as in the last stitch you created. We're going to push our needle through and just a nice tug and you're trying to match it. See how this is the stitch we just made and it matches all the other ones. You can just let your yarn go with the back and there you go. There is one of the best invisible joins that you can get when you're doing this crochet. You can see back here with the white, this slip stitch join, which again I say it's very common join, does leave a little bit of a bump. That is fine where that one is but going forward, I'll mostly be using this kind of a join, but you're welcome to use the slip stitch join as well. There are times when the slip stitch join is better and we will be using that going forward as well because when you end your round with chain stitches, it's much easier to use the slip stitch. You'll see when we get there but for now, we have finished round 2 and we're ready to move on to round 3. [MUSIC] 25. Round 3 Left Hand: Onto Round 3, we go and we are now going to be using colors C which in my case is the red. Picking up our work, we're going to join color C with a slip stitch in any single crochet of our previous round. Again, you can join it anywhere you want. Once again, we'll rotate a little bit further past where I fastened off, just so my ends aren't all hanging in the same spot. Here we go. We're going to wrap the yarn around, joining by pulling the yarn up into a loop. With a slip stitch, it says, join your color C in any single crochet of previous round. Then we will chain three, which will count as our first double crochet. Again, yarn over, pull through, that's one chain, two chains, and three chains. Now we hit our square bracket, which we know that when we find a square bracket, it means there's a bunch of stuff in there that's going to be done a multiple number of times. We're going to go ahead and it says double crochet. If it doesn't say in same stitch, it's usually in the next stitch because it would be very wordy to have to say double crochet next stitch, half double crochet next stitch, you get tired of the words in next stitch. They're left out. The only time you will see it specified as if it has to be in the same stitch, it will say that. Again, we're going to double crochet. Again, I'm going to show you how to work over this yarn. I tried to do this as much as possible, but I've been ignoring that because you have a lot of other information going in right now. But you'll get the hang of it after a while. You may not have to darn in any ends. Double crochet into next stitch. Wrap the yarn around three loops on hook, pull through two, and pull through two. Then we want to do a half double crochet, which we have not done yet. A half double crochet yarn over, insert into next stitch, keeping that cut end over top of the hook. You're going to pull up a loop, three loops on hook. Remember half double crochet is yarn over and pull through all three loops. Push up with your hook hand against the hook, so it can pull through all three and use the opposite hand to help maneuver that hook through. There is your half-double crochet. Then we're going to do a single crochet. Simply putting it into the next stitch. Yarn over, pull up, yarn over, pull through two loops, moving on half double crochet, so yarn over, insert into the next stitch. Yarn over, pull up three loops on hook, yarn over, pull through all three. Then a double crochet yarn over the hook first, insert in, yarn over three loops on hook. Now double crochets pull through two and pull through two. Now we're going to do a round bracket, which usually means everything in that is going to be done within a certain place. It says double crochet chain three, double crochet into next stitch. We're going to go ahead, double crochet into that next stitch, chain three. Then double crochet again into that same stitch. Now this is going to create your corner. What we're doing is squaring off this piece. Let's see if I can get this flat so you can see it. We've been working in the round, but now we're going to get this square part, so C here. Same thing. We've worked across this first slide and created this corner over here. Now we're going to continue to work around and square off that circle. We're going to go back and read at the end of our square bracket, which means that's the grouping that will be repeating and it says three times. We did it once. It's going to be three times total, including the one we just did. We're going to go back and double crochet in the next stitch. Remember if it doesn't say anything, it's the next stitch. Half double crochet. Single crochet. You're getting a good variety of stitches on this round. Half double crochet. Double crochet. Make sure you give yourself enough extra yarn there so you're not creating too much tension. If you're pulling really tightly from the ball, if you're really having to yank on it, it's going to affect the tension of the square. Now we do the double crochet chain three, double crochet. We've done it twice now. You want to do one more time. Back to the beginning of the square bracket, double crochet, half double crochet, single crochet, half double crochet, double crochet, and then double crochet chain three. Oops. There we go, and double crochet. We've done it three times 1, 2 and 3. Then we can move on. Then it says two double crochet, half double crochet. We're doing the same thing. Single crochet, half double crochet, double crochet, and double crochet into same stitches joined. See the stitch right here is where we joined. We need to do a double crochet back into that same stitch. Chain three. Then it says slip stitch to third chain of starting chain 1, 2, and 3. This is the case in which I do use a slip stitch to join. It just works better when you're ending with chain stitches instead of an actual stitch. Again, we're going to go into the third chain of our beginning chains. I'm just going to push that through, wrap the yarn around, pull it through and pull it through the loop on the hook. We're going to snip this about, again, two to three inches, probably more like four inches there, and pull it through. We have finished round three and we have squared off our circle. 26. Round 4 Left Hand: Now we're ready for round four. With round four, we're going to use this nice beige color. This is color D, almost a brownie beige. We're going to just do simple single crochets around our square. We need to join color D with a slip stitch in any chain three, corner space of previous rounds. I'm not going to join it in the same one that I fast and dolphin because I like to move around, so move one more corner over, insert your hook into that chain three space. Draw up your yarn with a slip stitch. Now, chain one, so yarn over, pull through chain one. Single crochet in same chain three space as joined. Let's do a single crochet in there as well and I'm just hooking my cut end over top of my hook to lock it in. Then we go square bracket, single crochet in each of the next seven stitches. We're going to single crochet in each of the next seven stitches, so 1, 2, 3, see how I'm working over top of that into the stitch but keep the cut end over top and it works the cut end right into your work. Losing track here, that's where we started and then 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, as you get closer to it flies up at you, seven. There is the seven stitches. Then in round brackets we have single crochet chain three, single crochet into next chain three space. Again, our corner is single crochet. Chain three, and single crochet. Now don't worry if you've been working in the ends and they pop to the front, you can just pop them back to the back. When we're all done this. We have finished the first square bracket and we need to do it three times, so that's our first time. Now we're going to go across seven single crochet for our second time. That's 4, 5, let me leave myself a little leeway here, 6, and 7. Then I want to single crochet chain three, my hand is creeping back in there. I have all my balls up there and they're wrapping around each other, if you get one of those yarn holders that you can just work with one ball at a time, that's always nice, so 1, 2, 3 chains in a single crochet into the corner space. We've done it twice now. Now you're going to go one more time. Single crochet seven across. I also don't like pulling out too much yarn at once because it can actually tangle in itself. There's different ways to keep your yarn loose and not tangled. But it's different for everyone, kind of have to work it out the way you like. If you're like me and you have a cat in the house chances are if you pull it too much yarn, the cat will steal the ball and run away with it, which really makes it hard to crochet. Our corners single crochet chain three, and single crochet. We now have done 1, 2, and 3. What's next on our instructions? End of square bracket, then single crochet in each of the next seven, so where we joined here, you're going to be working into that third chain just like you joined it. Work it just like you joined it where you go in the center of that third chain. That's your first single crochet. Then continue on. The nice thing with crochet is you can fudge a little. It's not like knitting where you can see every stitch and if it doesn't line up perfect, then you're in trouble within reason. But you can fudge a little bit with it because you only ever have one stitch at a time. As long as you're pretty consistently going into the fabric, you're not really going to notice if you've missed a strand or went into the wrong place on a stitch, for the most part. Then we have our seventh one here and then we do a single crochet chain three in the same chain three space. Really it's the single crochet in the same chain three space then chain three. Then you're going to slip stitch because I'm ending with chains, I'm going to slip stitch again into that first single crochet, so rap the yarn around, pull it through the single crochet and pull it through the loop on the hook. Now you have joined. We're going to cut the yarn again, four inches or so, pulling it through to fasten off. There you have round four. We're ready to complete our last round 27. Round 5 Left Hand: We've made it to round number 5. Round number 5, we join color E. Color E for me is this nice green, and we're going to be working double crochets this time around. Join Color E with a slip stitch in any chain three corner space of previous rounds. Again, I don't want to do it in the same one that I just did. I'm going to move up to this one, and we join by wrapping the iron around the hook and pulling up a loop. That's how you slip stitch. We start with a chain 3, which counts as our double crochet, so chaining three. Now square bracket, double crochet in each of next nine stitches. We'll go ahead and do that. Wrapping the iron around, away we go into the next nine. If we can keep that end over top of our hook just to lock it in place and maybe work it over. It's so much easier to work yarn in especially when you've got consistent stitches like single crochets or double crochets, a whole row of them than you're not having to hide it anywhere. It's a little harder if you've got chain stitches, an open work, and doesn't necessarily hide very well. But in this case, it's perfect for it. When this happens and your hook slides at everything, you can try to just put it back in like this. Worst case, you just pull the stitch out until you end up with one stitch and then you go back from there. Always count your stitches so that it's so easy to think that you did the right number and you come up short or you actually got an extra one in there somehow, and that really affects when you're trying to make the square work with others squares and they're not the same size. This should be nine. Not counting our chain 3, we have 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, so nine stitches. Then we have our little round bracket here, which is two double crochet, chain 3, two double crochet into next chain 3 space, which is right here. You don't realize how many little kitty hairs you have until you try to do this on a white background. We go two double crochet, chain 3, two double crochet, and that is our corner. You can see here that's the first square bracket. We want to do this three times. I'm going to give myself a little extra yarn here because these balls are rolling all over my desk. Crocheting at a desk isn't my norm. Crocheting on my lap, just about anywhere, is more normal for me than crocheting at a desk. Since crochet is supposed to be my relax, I don't do it at a desk. If I do it at a desk, I'm usually doing it in my lap as well. That is why I love crochet because it can be done anywhere. We're coming up on the ninth one here. I like to double-check. Yes, it should work out to the end, but double-check just in case. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. Now, two double crochet, chain 3, two double crochet. Now we're ready to do nine more double crochet, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9. Then we need to do another corner which is two double crochet, chain 3, two double crochet. We've hit the end of our square bracket. Then we want to double crochet in each of next nine. Really the same thing as we were doing, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9. Now, we want to finish it off with two double crochet, chain 3, and a single double crochet. Two double crochet, chain 1, 2, 3 and a single crochet. My yarn is really coming at me here. In the same chain 3 space as our join. When you came up to it, you knew that was where you're probably going to work. Again, I say here slip stitch into third chain of starting chain 3 you could. But because I'm going now from a regular stitch, not chain stitches, I'm going to do the other type of join here. We're going to cut the yarn about 3-4 inches, pull it through, and see how we have this gap here because we didn't do the slip stitch. Now I'm going show you how to do that invisible join again. Put the yarn onto your darning needle. See here we have the three chain. You don't want to go into that. You want to go into the next one. Go underneath the two strands of the next stitch, pull the yarn through just gently, then go back to where you came out of, insert it in, and just tug it lightly and see how it imitates the stitches. You can't really tell where the end is. That completes round number 5. You can see on the back here, the reason I started in different places is because now I have ends too darn in in different sections of the square. They're not all in one line and create a bulk in one section of my square. They are dispersed around, so it'll balance out nice and even. There is your completed square. [MUSIC] 28. Colour Combos - Left Hand: Now we're ready to create more squares in different color combinations. Now that you've completed your first square you are ready to make the rest of the squares for the scarf. This one is square one. We're going to use the exact same square pattern but we're going to mix up the colors. I have five square color combinations that make up this scarf. Each square is approximately five inches by five inches. I'll show you later when we're putting the squares together how to figure out how long you want your scarf to be and how many squares to use. But for the scarf that I made I did four of each square for a total of 20 squares. Square one, we've already discussed the color combination and each one keeps the colors in the same order. It just changes up what round they're being used in. Square one we've already done. Square number two is going to have blue for round one, red for round two, beige for round three, green for round four, and the putty color will be in round five. That's square number two. Square number three will have red for round one, beige for round two, green for round three, putty for around four, and blue for round five. That's square number three. Square number four is going to have the beige for round one, green for round two, putty for round three, blue for round four, and the red for around five. That's square number four. Our fifth square will have green for round one, putty for round two, blue for round three, red for around four, and the beige for round five. That gives you five different squares using the exact same square pattern. But because you're mixing up the colors, it gives your scarf a nice multi-variety of look. You're going to go ahead, you're going to make four of each of these squares. I'll see you in the next lesson where we'll talk about darning in ends. 29. Darning Ends - Left Hand: Now we're ready to darn in our ends. Once you've completed your square, you can darn in your ends right away, or you can wait till you completed all of your squares. Then just sit down and do one big darning in the ends first. Because I like to work my ends in I don't have as many and I can even go as far as getting them all worked in and not have to darn them in. But often I forget as I'm crocheting through and I'll leave the ends hanging. That's fine. It gives me something to do after the completion of the square. You can see here in this particular square, I didn't work in any of the ends, so there's two of each color hanging. Again, I like to start in different places, so they're dispersed around the square. If I started in the same place each time, they would all be lined up and darning them in would create a little bit of bulk on the back of the square in that particular spot. I like to move around that's why I do that. My ends are all dispersed. We need our darning needle. Again, it's the one with the big eye and I don't really like a pointy end myself, but you can use one with a pointy end. I tend to hit my fingers and it can hurt. You can start anywhere. You can pick any of them. The only one that I do a little bit different is this one in the very center. I'll actually start with that one. We get our yarn onto our needle in whatever fashion that works best for you. This one in the center, which is usually the only one, I can't darn it even though I've worked over it, to do that foundation ring. What I want to do here is continue around and then I can really cinch up that square. You just go in underneath these stitches. You're going into the middle of the stitches so that you can't see it on the front side. You're going right into the center of the stitches. I do a few stitches at a time and just give it a little tug. Not a tight tug you don't want any puckering, and then just keep on going and you can darn this in until you feel confident with it. But I usually go like about an inch or two, two's a lot, but at least an inch and one direction. There I've probably gone all the way around because I'm back to where the yarn started and stopped. Amazingly, it's much more secure than you think it is because I have done simple darn ends, cut them, and then decided to change something and really had a hard time pulling the stuff apart. But if you want to be more secure, you can turn around and work in the opposite direction for another inch or an inch is plenty really. But you don't want to tug too tight because again, you don't want a little clump there. Just didn't leave the trick with darning in ends is not to pull too tight but to be secure. I think that is plenty. That end will not come out. Then you trim it as close to the fabric as you can get. But be very careful not to cut any of your stitches. You just want to trim it and it doesn't have to be flat against it. Because if you leave just a little bit of a nub there, then you give it a nice little tug. Over time. It will work itself in. If you cut it flat against the fabric, it might actually work its way to the front. It does that sometimes that's okay. You just tuck them in. The joy of handmade items is you're going to see those ends flop out every now and again. But as long as you've darn them insecurely, it's not going to be a problem. Again, we're going to take the next one. In this case it's the beige. What I do is I try to work in where it's not going to show. Even though I'm going under the green here, that's also where the beige has it's the top of the beige section. It's going to blend in. You want your ends to blend in. If I were to go up here and start working it over here you'd see it. You'd see it from both back and front and you really don't want to have that Again, just a few more stitches around, just gently tugging it in. I use my thumb to make sure I'm not puckering. Then if it makes you feel better, you can turn it around. Don't go right in where you came out or it'll just undo what you've done. Go over one strand and then work your way back a few stitches. Now you've reversed it and reversing it even just that small amount secures it in place. When I cut it, I don't cut it right flat against the surface. You'll see that little in, but it works its way in. There we have the beige all darned in. Then we can work on the next. Now some people like to knot their ends and I do get people asking that question. I don't like knotting my ends in general because if I were to not these two ends, it would create a knot on the back of my work. Often those knots will work their way to the front of the work. If you knot it and then cut it off short. If for any reason that knot will come undone, which it can, then you have nothing to secure your darned and ends in your work will start to fall apart. The only time I do knot my ends is if I really don't have anywhere to darn them in or it's in a section that's actually going to be folded over like edgings. The knot will be hidden. But again, there are times when you want to knot it. But even if I knotted it, I would use probably about an inch or more of the yarn to darn it in as well because I wouldn't want that knot to come undone. Again, let's go up to an area that has a space. Here you can see there's a nice big gap. We are on the wrong side, this is the right side. It is where you don't really want things to show. Being a scarf, you really are going to see both sides. We just tried to be as neat as possible. Because once you get the work finished and you're wrapping it around your neck, you might not even notice what's the right side and wrong side. But if you have a section here that has a space and let's say we're going back in this direction. Again, you don't go in where you came out or you'll undo the stitch. You go over this strand so you're locking in place. We'll go up to the corner. We'll just give a little pull but not too tight. Then I'm going around the corner and back down the other side. Go under a few stitches at a time. Then just allow that to lie next to the same color. It really isn't going to show or do anything that's going to fall apart and I'll go a few more stitches. Now when I'm working over my ends, I only work them in one direction. That's why when I work over them, I work as far as I can with it and then you can just cut it. I'm going to a little bit further. I'm not going to reverse this one because if you work the end in long enough, so we started here. I worked it all the way round corner here. That's about three inches I've worked in at least maybe four. Then just trim it. Now you don't want to trim it? See how I stopped a little bit before the space. I wouldn't want to come into the space and then trim it because it definitely will show, so you want to do your best to leave the ends in an area that's well packed in with stitches and it'll just hide itself in there. Again. You can continue around and always try to darn your ends in to the same color that they are so that you're camouflaging them. Remember we never go back in where the yarn comes out. You want to go over at least one piece of yarn. Then you just go around. Again, like I said, two inches is good. Then you can reverse for few stitches where you can go another three inches, whatever makes you feel comfortable. But I have found in the past, I do overkill. Then when I actually think that all I'm going to rip that square and do something different I can't find the ends. That's how secure that they actually get in there. You can continue like that. I want to show you one here that I did actually work some of the ends in. See here for the most part, this one I worked all the ends in. You see how you have little ends like this hanging. This is where the end I learn how to work in. They're all worked in again here. What I would do here is I would just neaten that up on the back. Just trimming off that little frayed part. Because they do tend to fray because they've been stuck out for a little while, while I've been playing around with the square. Cut a little bit there then I darn the rest of these in, and you'll see that one seems like it doesn't really fit. I'm going to leave it there because it will work its way into the fabric. Again at this point, nothing has worked to the front, but I do have garments that they'll work their way to the front and you just take your little darning needle and poke it back or your crochet hook. You just pull it back. If it really bothers you, you can tuck it in somewhere else back there. But they're going to show that's just the nature of a hand-crafted item. There you go you have darned in, you've got your squares the darn in. The next one we're going to do is learn how to join all the squares, sewing them together [MUSIC]. 30. Sewing Squares - Left Hand: Now we're ready to sew our squares together. On the pattern, I do show you how I laid out the squares, but the best way to do it is to lay them out yourself and see what you like next to each other and then follow that however you like it. Sewing the squares together, I always use one of the colors of either of the squares. In this case, I sewed it up using a white and then here I sewed up these two using the green so that you're seeing blends right in, you can't even see it. But in this case, I'm going to use a contrast colors so that you can see exactly what I'm doing. If I use the same color, it would blend in. You couldn't probably be able to see where the stitches are lying. Take two of your squares that you want to join together and we're going to lie them side-by-side. Because we counted our stitches, every side is going to have the equal number of stitches. Therefore, they will line up. These two chain 3 spaces and these two chain 3 spaces where line up, and there'll be the same number of stitches in-between each one. You can pin your squares together if you want. When it's this obvious, I usually just stitch them up by sight. If it was a more complicated edging, I would probably pin them to make sure that I wouldn't be off. By the time I get up to here, it'd be so frustrating and then you'd have to rip it all back out again. But we're just going to go slowly here and I'm going to show you how I do this. I darned the yarn onto my darning needle and I'm going to come up from the bottom through one of the square's corners in whichever direction you prefer to sew. There is no right or wrong here as to which direction you go. Right to left or left to right, whatever feels best for you and pull it up so there's about, I don't know, what we've got here? Three to four inches? Four inch. We'll leave a four-inch tail. Then you're going to go back down into the opposite corner, and then you're going to come back up again where you just came up. We're going to pull that through and we're not going to pull it too tight because we will end up pulling our tail. Hold onto that tail and we're going to pull this. The way I'm going to lock it in place is I'm going to go underneath the strand that comes between the two. That's going to lock my yarn in place so that the tail doesn't keep disappearing on me. Holding everything down, including the tail, give it a gentle tug. It's almost like you're tying a little knot there, but it's really not going to show. But it keeps your tail. Because as you sew, your tail just will keep coming out and really frustrate you. That's how we secure our first stitch, and we did it in the chain 3 spaces. Next up, we go to the next stitch on the opposite side that we came up from. We go into this next stitch here and see how it's a loopy stitch, go under both strands, and then come across and go under both strands of the other square, and then pull it through and I have a nice long piece here. You're probably looking at the way I gauges you go three times minimum the length that you want to sew. So I just cut myself a nice strand I had one here. You're going to pull gently and it's good to hold down the two pieces and just pull gently. You want it to match the tension of the stitches that are on the squares. Now you're going to go up under the next two loops and come across under the next two loops of each of the sides. Again, pull it through. This is a whip stitch. Again, just gently tug it so it matches the tension. You want it to be enough it's going to hold them together, but not so tight that you're going to pucker them and it's going to be rigid. You have to remember that this is a garment, and you want it to remain soft and supple when you're wearing it. If you end up pulling your seams really tight, you're going to feel that in the scarf. You're going to have this nice soft square and then you're going to feel this ridge, and that's going to be where your seam is and you don't want that. Again, we're going to keep moving up under two strands and under the next two strands. Pull your yarn through and just gently tug it up. See how you can see the stitches because I have a contrasting yarn? You wouldn't see those if it was in one of these colors. It's a beautiful stitch that blends right in with the work that you have. Just keep on moving up two more loops and two more loops, and you're going to work your way up to the top and see we're right on track because our top is matching. If for any reason they don't, then you've gone off with your stitches and you've missed one or gone into one twice. That is very easy to do. Just keep working your way up. I always recommend doing the seaming in a color that matches your work. Some people think this is a beautiful contrast seam to work on. But what I would do is do the seam in the same color as the square and then embroider something like this after because it's not always this even and it really enunciates how uneven sometimes it can be. You would prefer to embroider it the way you want it. I always work in the same color yarn as one of my squares. We're almost to the top. Keep on working your way up. Here we go, we're almost there. These are great to work on your lap. I don't usually do this on a desk. Nice small pieces you can sew together. Keep going until you hit that space. It looks to me like that's probably the last stitch. The next one will be into the corner space and then across to the other corner space. Then you always want to end at the back. Go back down corner space. Then if you want to lock this one into holding that yarn so this doesn't loop up too much, come back, just bring your needle back to the front over the top, go under that last stitch, and give it a pull. Now you've got a little bit of a knot there that holds it in place. There's your whip stitch seam that joins the two squares. Again, you're going to use a yarn that matches and you will do that all along, and you end up with something that looks a little more like this. This is my completed scarf and see how they're all whip-stitched together. You can't really see the seams. When I'm sewing my squares together, what I usually do is I figure out the order that I'm going to sew them together in, then I literally pile them backwards in order. Say, I wanted these three to be done together, I would place this on the bottom, then this one, then this one, and as I pull them off, I stitch them to the one that's in the pile. Then these two would be stitched together, and I would stitch into this one. That way I don't have to keep looking as to what squares next. I already have them piled in reverse. That's the easiest way to do it. Good luck with sewing your squares together and I'll meet you back here to start working on our ending. [MUSIC] 31. Edging Rnd 1.1 Left Hand: Moving on to the edging, we now have all of our squares sewing together. Again, I have 20 squares that's where I've written the pattern for. But the nice thing about these edging instructions is they will work with however many squares you're using. If you find 20 squares to be too long of a scarf for you, you can cut that back a little and the edging will still work. What we want to do is with all of this scarf that's all joined together, we want to pull out one of the ends. It doesn't matter which end and lie it in front of you. Now the edging, I go up half a size or I guess it's a full-size of hook, really. For the main square, I use a five millimeter hook, but for the edging because I like my edgings to be soft and cuddly and airy, I go up a size in my hook. Now this stitch that I'm using actually does require me to go up a size as well because otherwise it would be very peccary and pulley on my scarf. Just so that you know whatever size of hook you ended up using for your scarf, if you felt that your squares weren't coming out right and you change the hook size. Just go up a size of hook. Again, I use the five millimeter to make the squares and I'm using a 5.5 Millimeter, which is also US nine. I'm going up from my US eight to US nine to do my edging. Again, you can get creative and use any of the colors you want in the edging. But my first row, I'm going to start with my color A, that is my off-white color. The instructions say, please scarf right side facing, so this is your right side and this is your wrong side, you want the right side facing you. Short edge at top and long edges at sides. We're going to join color A with a slip stitch in the top chain three corner of the end square. For your right-handed version, you want the top right corner, and for the left-hand version you want the top left handed corner. We're going to be working across your short edge first, you want the corner that you're going to be working across the shortage. We're going to take color A, and we're going to pull up a slip stitch in that corner. Working across short end of scurf, chain 1, single crochet in same chain 3 space as your joints, so single crochet. Then we hit a star. We haven't done any of these star repeats yet. Stars are usually a repetition. That's going to be quite a bit of stuff repeating to an endpoint. Ignore the star for the moment, and we're going in round brackets. We're going to chain 1, skip next stitch so working into these edge stitches here, skip this stitch, single crochet in next stitch. We want to do what's in the round bracket, six times total. That was our first one, skipping the next stitch, single crochet, that's our second one. Chain 1 skip next stitch, single crochet, and next, that's three. Going across until we've done it six times, total, that's five and this will be six. Then we want to chain 1. Skip next stitch and then in round brackets, single crochet chain 3, single crochet into next chain 3 space, which is right here. So single crochet chain 3, single crochet. Now you want to turn your scurf so you'll be working down the long edge. 32. Edging Rnd 1.2 Left Hand: Now you want to turn your scarf, so you'll be working down the long edge. This is a really long edge, I'll get you started on it, and then I'll meet you in the far corner. Let's get started on this long edge, in round brackets chain 1, skip next stitch, single crochet next. We want to do that a total of six times. We did that across the top, and here we are again. We're doing it a total of six times, so hold yours scarf however it's most comfortable for you, because you've got a lot of weight probably sitting in your lap as you're working along this little part of the long edge. You want six, this is my sixth one here, let's just count them. Go pass the corner here, chain 1, skip a stitch single crochet, so that's 1,2,3,4,5,6. I'm just counting the single crochets because that's part of what's in those round brackets. We ended with a single crochet, so that's six times chain 1, skip next stitch. Now here's a double star, but just ignore it for now. It's going to be used later on as a reference point to come back down like in coda if you do music. Repeat from coda, it's going to be that concept. Single crochet in next chain 3 space, which is right here. Chain 1, single crochet in next chain 3 space. Now we're going to continue on chain 1, we're in round brackets again so chain 1, skip next stitch, single crochet next, and you want to do that six times. Keep on moving across, sometimes it's good to have little marker following on your patterns so that you know exactly where you are when you get into these hefty instructions. It's easy to forget where you are, so that should be six, but let's go back and count with the chain 3 space, then we did 1,2,3,4,5,6. I get talking, I lose track. Now we want to chain 1, skip next stitch, single crochet, nope, see I've lost track. I did the six and then I chain one and skip next stitch, and then repeat from double star. We're going to go back to the double star, and it says single crochet in next chain 3 space. Chain 1 single crochet in next chain 3 space, and then you've got your round brackets chain 1 skip next stitch, single crochet. I'm going to show you what happens when we finish this part so that you'll understand these star or repeats. We want to do six of these working our way down this long side of our scaff. That's the sixth one right there, and then we chain 1, skip next stitch, repeat from double star. You're going to continue to repeat from the double star down the long edge of your scarf to the last chain 3 space corner, which is at the far end of your scarf. This is what we've done so far and you're going to continue to do that repeat all the way down, so each of the squares really has the same repeat, and I'll meet you at the far corner of this long edge [MUSIC] 33. Edging Rnd 1.3 Left Hand: Now we've worked all the way down our long edge and we are at the opposite chain three space corner. Here's a work it down, long edge of scarf to the last chain three space corner, this one right here. Now there's a triple star there. Again, ignore that for the moment. We don't need it. We will come back to that. You want a single crochet, chain three, single crochet in the corner, chain three space. So single crochet, chain three, and single crochet. Turn the piece of work to work across the short end of the scarf, which is what we're doing now. Repeat from single star to triple star. You're going to go all the way back and look for that first single star. Then you're going to work all the way through it again until you hit the triple star. Then you'll come back to this place in the pattern. Let's go back and start that up. Single star takes us back to round brackets, chain one, skip next stitch, single crochet and next. We do that six times. This is just like working across the short edge at the very beginning, because that's really exactly the same thing that we're doing here. We will do six of these. This is our sixth one. Then we chain one, skip next stitch, and single crochet, chain three, single crochet into that chain three space. We do our single crochet. Then you're going to turn the scarf, so you're working down the long edge again. We turn it, and we see what we're doing here and we're going to do the round bracket chain one, skip next stitch single crochet, and next six times. You're going to do that just as we did the first time around. Follow through the pattern just like we did before, until you end up at the three stars. I'll meet you there. Here we are, we've worked down the second long edge, and we've ended up again at the final chain three space at the end of the scarf. Instructions had said to work from the single star to the triple star, which would bring us down to this last corner again. Then this is how we finish it off, following the pattern, then single crochet in same stitch as beginning join. Single crochet, chain three, two and three, and slip stitch in the first single crochet of the round. Slip stitch comes through both the loop and the one on the hook, and fasten off. We're just going to cut it 3-4 inches, pull it through, and it has fastened off, and we have finished round 1. 34. Edging Rnd 2.1 Left Hand: Now, we're moving on to Round 2, and once you have Round 2 in place, that will be the same as Round 3, 4, and 5, just switching the colors. This Round 1, set are edging in place, Round 2 will be easier, and I'm going to use my color B, which is my blue, and continuing on with the 5.5 millimeter hook. You can see your edging, has a little bit of area space to it, and that'll be nice as you keep adding the rows, you're going to get a nice lighter feel to the edging, and a nice more solid coziness to the center of the scarf where the squares are. Round 2 it says to join color B with a slip stitch in any of the Chain 3 space corners of the previous round. It doesn't matter which one you join it in. I'm not going to join it in the one that I finished off on because that's the way I do things. I'm just going to go with this one, and I'm going to join it in this one, so it doesn't matter which one you join in. We put our hook into the Chain 3 space, and we draw up a loop, so joining with a slip stitch, and again we're using color B, and then you want a Chain 1 and single crochet in same space. Now we have the square brackets, and in the square brackets we have also a star. Just take note of those, but we don't need them yet. Chain 1, single crochet in next Chain 1 space, which is right here, so single crochet into that Chain 1 space, repeat from star to next Chain 3 space corner. Again, simple. You just Chain 1, single crochet in next Chain 1 space, and you repeat that Chain 1 single crochet and next Chain 1 space, Chain 1 single crochet in next Chain 1 space and so on, all the way down your long edge until you get to your next Chain 3 space corner. I'm just going to continue on there, and have you continue along there, and I will meet you at the next Chain 3 space corner, which is at the opposite end of your scarf. 35. Edging Rnd 2.2 Left Hand: Here we reached the corner, the far end of our scarf. We are repeat from star to next Chain 3 space corner, which we have done. Then we're going to proceed to Chain 1 in round brackets, single crochet, Chain 3, and single crochet, all into that Chain 3 space. Now we've hit the end of our square bracket after all that. It says to do whatever is in the square bracket, three times total. Basically, you're working up the three sides. We've done it the first time. I'll walk you through the second time because it's a short one. So we go back to the square bracket and we Chain 1, single crochet in next, Chain 1 space, and we repeat that to the next Chain 3 corner. Chain 1, single crochet next space and just keep repeating that across this top short edge, which counts as one of our square bracket times. There is our Chain 3 space. Make sure we're doing this right. right 1 single crochet and next Chain 1 space repeat from star to next Chain 3 corner. Chain 1 single crochet, Chain 3 single crochet into that corner, and single crochet again into that corner. That's the second time through the square brackets. We have one more time through the square brackets, which is going to take us all the way down the next long side. Continue on on your last time through your square brackets and I'll meet you at the Chain 3 space corner at the far end of this scarf. 36. Edging Rnd 2.3 Left Hand: Here we are finishing up our square bracket by we repeated from the start to next Chain 3 space corner: Chain 1, single crochet, Chain 3, single crochet into the next Chain 3 space, and that's the end of our square bracket repeat. Now we're going to move on. Double star, Chain 1, single crochet in next Chain 1 space which is over here. Then we're going to repeat from the double star to the next Chain 3 space, which is over here. You can start this in any one of the corners, so you might be working on your long side now. But the way that I started it, I'm actually finishing up on my short side. Chain 1, single crochet and we just keep repeating that until we get to the next Chain 3 corner, which won't take us long. Then we can finish off this round. We're almost there. Chain one single crochet, and we are at the next corner, finish off that single crochet. Now we Chain 1, single crochet in same Chain 3 spaces joining. We're back to where we started, single crochet, Chain 3. Then we slip stitch in the first single crochet of the round, slipping through both. We cut our yarn, and we pull it through to fasten off. Now we have finished Round 2. Round 1 was in color A, Round 2 was in color B, and now we continue on to Round 3, which is just repeating Round 2 but using Color C, which is my red. Round 4, we'll again be repeating Round 2 using Color D, which is the beige. Then Round 5, we'll be repeating Round 2 using Color A again, which is the off-white. That'll be the end of the edging. Go ahead and work on that, and I'll meet you back here at the end of Round 5, and we will finish off our scarf by adding some nice fringe to the ends. 37. Fringe - Left Hand: We're ready now to add on some fringe. Here we have our scarf done with all of our rounds. You recall our round one of the edging was in the off-white putty, then round two we did in blue. Then I left you to do round three, four and five on your own and this is what you end up with. Again, you can mix up those colors to whatever you prefer. But this is the result of the one that I worked on. When you reach the end of your edging, you can decide whether you want to put on extra fringe or not. I like to add on fringe to my scarves. It gives it that extra little touch. I was showing you here on this end, I've already added the fringe on and you can mix up the colors the way you want. You can do them all in one color. Here I've made sure that I have every color in here and then I've added in the off-white in multiple places as an accent. Because of the width of this scarf, what I've decided on is a six strand fringe, which doubles over into 12 strands. I've decided to do it on spacing them out, so I end up with seven fringe knots altogether. I'll discussed this at the end about blocking, but you'll see some of my fringes a little bit kinky. It does that if I pull it from the center of the ball, when I'm further along, it's a little straighter, but I can block that out. I'll talk about that at the end of this. What I want to do is make three knots of off-white and then one of each color, so to make my fringe I use piece of cardboard. You can buy things from the craft store that specifically are made for making fringe. I just use a piece of cardboard or notebook. Sometimes I'll use a notebook about this size as well. Whatever I have in the House is what I use. You can just use a cereal box. I'll just used a plain piece of cardboard. What I've done is I've cut it six inches in depth. Then I've actually cut it eight inches across in case I wanted to use it this way for longer fringe. But for my scarves I like to do a six inch. Then what I'll do is I'll wrap them around and I'll end up with the finished six inch fringe that I can trim off evenly, so I usually guarantee myself a five-inch fringe. We're going to take some yarn here. I'll use the blue this time around, easier to see on the cardboard. I cut my cardboard again six inches. Then I put a little slit up here so that it has somewhere to hold the yarn. I just tuck my yarn in there, like that. Now I'm going to wrap it six times so it count six a full wrap up to here is one. I take my yarn and I wrap it once, twice, three times, four times, five times, and six times. What I do here, once I have it wrapped the six times, I'll take my scissors, tuck it under your strands and cut it. It leaves this little piece in here which is fine. You don't need that anymore. I take this ball away and I should have six strands of yarn, approximately 12 inches long. I'm going to pull my little ruler out and we're gonna say that that is approximately 12 inches long. Depending on how tight I pull it when I wrap it, so try to wrap it very loosely, you'll end up with the 12 inches. You might want to go ahead and make everything that you need and join them at the end. But I'm just going to do another one here off-white so I can show you two of them. Again, I tuck the white in and I wrap it loosely six times around, so once, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6. Again, I'm going to take my scissors and go underneath and cut it. I can let the ball fall away, [NOISE] pull away my cardboard and I should have six strands which are usually lined up well. If they aren't, you just pull that one out and realign it up. Pull them all straight. Again, I have 12 inches and I'm ready to go with my off-white ones. I started in the corner with my off-white, so that's the one I want to start with. You fold it in half over your finger. It's basically lined up at the bottom here. Take your hook, you want your piece right side facing towards you. You're going to go underneath it to this corner chain space, poke your crochet hook through and then loop your yarn over top of the crochet hook at the halfway point. Now you weren't going to want to keep a little bit of tension on it so your strands all stay together. Then you're going to pull it through to the back and leave your strands lying to the front. Now pull up enough of a loop that you can pull this through. You can either use your hook or you can take your hook off and put your fingers through. I like to use my fingers and grab the yarn, and loosely pull it through because you don't want to upset the knots at all. Now that it's through, grab all the strands together and gently tug it tight. Not super tight, but just firm. There you go. There is your first fringe. Now the next one I want to put on is the blue. We're going to again go in and I'm going to skip this chain space. Again, fringe is what you want. You can put one in every chain space, but I wouldn't do six strands every chain space because it'll get very bunch up, so I like to space my knot but make them bigger. We're going to skip over this chain space and go into this one. Make sure I've got the right space there. Looping the yarn over my finger at the halfway point, trade it off to the hook. Then hold it firm on the hook and pull it through that chain space. Make sure you get all the strands and pull it up a little bit, keeping it kind of firm there so it stays together. Slip your hook off and slip your fingers in, grab the tail, gently pull that through and then make sure you grab every one of the strands because if you don't, someone's not going to get pulled tight. Then gently tug it until you have it right up to the scarf itself and there you have two of your fringes. Once you have all of your fringes attached as I've gone ahead and done here, you're going to want to trim them up so they trim even. See how they're all different lengths down here? If I were to go through here, flatten them out and look for the shortest piece because that's what you do. Looks like it's about there. If I lie this ruler across, this helps me trim them. We're going to make sure this is straight and this is straight. Then I can just trim them across. I'm just going to show you that they're going to end up being about four inches in length. That is why sometimes I'll use the long edge of my tassel maker and make them eight inches depending on how long you want your tassels to be or your fringe, you should accommodate for about two inches off of that because part of it is in the knot and part of it you're going to trim off from not being even. If you want your finished fringe to be eight inches long, which is a good length, you would need to cut your strands 10 inches times 2. You'd need 20 inch strands because you're holding them in half. You always want to take the finished add 2 inches to it and then double it. That's the length of each strand that you want. You fold them in half. Then once they're in the knot, that takes a good solid inch off. Then when you trim them so that they all are even you're probably taking another inch off. I'm going to end up with four inch strands. That's fine with me I don't like them to be super long. I find sometimes the best way to trim them is just to somewhat eyeball it but I like to use a ruler so I'm somewhat straight here. [NOISE] Then you just go along and trim them across, slowly because you don't want to mess anything up. I'll go through this first one here. A little bit of an awkward angle for me on this desk, and you want them all to be the same. Let's just go there. I started there, see how much more even there. Sometimes a really nice quick way to do this if you're also a quilter, I like to take a quilting grid background and a roller cutter and I push down on my ruler and I just cut them right across. But this method works just as well. [NOISE] You're eyeballing them and going across slowly so that you make sure you don't miss any. Just keep doing that across. There you go. You've got your fringe. It's nice and even. Try to make it the same on both ends so when the scarf hangs down, your fringe matches. [MUSIC] 38. Blocking - Both Hands: The other thing I wanted to talk to you about was blocking. With the fringe, you just need to wet it and then lay it flat to dry. With the rest of the scarf, sometimes I'll wet the scarf before I put the fringe on. I like to use yarn that is washable because with garments it's really nice if you can take care of them by throwing them in the delicate cycle. But you have to make sure that you either throw it in a hand-wash or delicate cycle because you've got a lot of ends that might come out, they might fray. If you do it after you put the fringe on, your fringe will fray. You can trim it up again, but the more you do that, the shorter your fringe is going to get. I wouldn't throw it in the washer if you're going to do to fringe, I would do it all by hand. You have two methods of doing it, you either can put it into the delicate cycle or the hand-wash cycle on your washer, and then you lay it flat and you just lay it on a towel and press it all down. You shouldn't need to pin it, but you just press it all down where you want it to lie and let it lay there for about a day and it'll dry. The other way is just to spritz it with water. Don't put it in the washer, especially if it's not a washable yarn, like if you're using wool, definitely do not. You're just going to spritz it with a bottle of water. Sometimes people soak a towel and wrap it up in the towel and then unwrap it and just lay it inside the towel and let the whole thing dry together. But I like to just spritz it so that I can mold it with my hands, and if there's any places that pull in, I just pull them out and let them dry like that and that works fine for me. Again, if you want something that you can throw in the washer, make sure you choose the right yarn for that to begin with and always delicate. Never think that the amount of time you've put into a hand-crafted item, you don't want to put it into a washer and have it come out all pulled apart. You don't want that. Always air on the side of caution. You can experiment with one square and see how it comes out of the washer because that will tell you how it will fare. Never wash it with anything else. You're always wanting to go on the side of delicate. That is how I block my pieces and I usually just a spritz unless I really have something that needs to be pulled out and is lying not the way I want it. But a nice good spritz of water, lie it out on a towel, mold it with your hands and let it dry and it will just give it that nice finishing touch. There we have our finished scarf. You've put a lot of work into it, now you can enjoy it. In the next lesson, I will show you the different ways that I wear it and a few more color combinations to inspire you. 39. Project and Inspiration : Congratulations you did it. Be sure to post your finished scarfs in the project section. I am so excited to see your beautiful creations. So now that you have all the basics down and you've experienced putting it all together, we can discuss how to change things up. I mentioned you could change the length of your scarf if you were finding my scarf too long or too short, so if you're making your scarf as a gift, keep this in mind. My mother-in-law is a tiny lady and the scarves I make for myself well they touched the ground on her. Each square measures five inches, so simply decrease the number of squares, just shorten your scarf in five-inch increments or the reverse, you can increase the length in five-inch increments by adding on squares. This, of course, is something you decide before you add the edging. I've written the edging instructions to accommodate any length or width. I use the same pattern to make this shawl, that is three strips of squares instead of just one. Then I use the same edging instructions to work around the entire piece and added on the fringe. This pattern will work for any number of colors. To get the best effect I wouldn't use any less than three. In this case, I've done it in three soft neutrals. In this one I've done in three rich bold colors, and you can do as many colors as you want. This pattern is great for using up scraps. I often get asked how I like to wear these scarves. So I'm including a few quick clips here on a few ways that I like to wear them. I like my scars long, the ends hanging down my friend, Even when I have them wrapped around me a few times. That's just my preference. They work well as a Cowell style or just loosely wrapped around once or twice. Really depends on what you will be wearing the scarf with. Either a heavy coat or a light sweater as an accent or as something to keep you cozy and warm on a cold winter day. Basically, any way that is comfy, cozy, and fashionable to you is the perfect way to wear yours, no matter how you wear it, be prepared for lots of compliments on you're one of a kind hand-crafted piece. Thank you so much for joining me in this class. I hope you had fun and are inspired to create many more hand-crafted crochet items.