Mastering Productivity: Using The Pomodoro Technique To Maximize Your Work Day! | Ravi Jaipaul | Skillshare

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Mastering Productivity: Using The Pomodoro Technique To Maximize Your Work Day!

teacher avatar Ravi Jaipaul, Founder of Yoke Wellness, Optimist

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

11 Lessons (28m)
    • 1. The Best Time Management Tool

      1:40
    • 2. Part 1: Introduction To The Pomodoro Technique

      3:07
    • 3. Part 2: Setting Up Your Pomodoro

      2:51
    • 4. Part 3: Working On A Pomodoro

      4:05
    • 5. Part 4: Tracking Your Progress

      2:46
    • 6. Part 5: Common Challenges

      3:16
    • 7. Part 6: Tips To Get The Most Out

      2:56
    • 8. Part 7: Working From Home

      1:42
    • 9. Case Studies

      2:57
    • 10. Class Project

      2:01
    • 11. You Now Have The Tool! Use it!

      1:04
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About This Class

What time hack do  J.K Rowling, Mark Zuckerburg and Tim Ferriss use to help them achieve success?

The Pomodoro Technique!

Are you tired of feeling scattered and unproductive at work? Do you find yourself getting easily distracted and unable to focus on the task at hand? If so, you're not alone. But fear not, because the Pomodoro Technique is here to save the day!

In this course, we'll be teaching you everything you need to know about the Pomodoro Technique, a simple yet powerful productivity method that can help you to increase focus, reduce multitasking, and stay motivated. By breaking your work into shorter, focused sessions and taking regular breaks, you'll be able to get more done in less time and feel less stressed and burnt out.

This class is for anyone looking for a better way to work or complete personal projects, for all levels.

The class project at the end will be identifying, completing and reflecting on a project that you will complete using the Pomodoro Technique.

Our course objectives are simple: we want to help you increase your productivity, reduce your stress, and have a little bit of fun along the way. So if you're ready to transform your workday from a chaotic mess into a well-oiled machine, let's get started!"

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Meet Your Teacher

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Ravi Jaipaul

Founder of Yoke Wellness, Optimist

Teacher

"Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. It is that we are powerful beyond measure."

This is my favourite quote because unlocking people's potential is something I believe in is a great way to give back. 

From:

Managing a hospital as a nurse in a refugee camp in South Sudan with Doctors without Borders To motivational public speaking and lecturing To being a sustainable business creator...

My career reflects who I am: a passionate lover of life who is guided by the ethos of 'Giving. Something. Back.' 

I am passionate about learning about our lives, and teaching what I know to help others. I've been an Airbnb Superhost, Founder of a Start-Up and currently live and breathe Yoke WellnessI

Life is worth living,&... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. The Best Time Management Tool : Are you tired of feeling scattered and unproductive but work to find yourself getting easily distracted and unable to focus on the task at hand. If so, you're not alone. Hi, hi Ravi, dipole, founder of V0 plus. A few years ago, I was in the same boat trying to do too many things, getting very far with any of them. Until a few years ago. I discovered the Pomodoro Technique. In this course, we'll be teaching you everything you need to know about the Pomodoro Technique. A simple yet powerful productivity method that can help you increase focus, reduce multitasking, and stay motivated by breaking your work into shorter, focused sessions. In taking regular breaks, you'll be able to get more done in less time and feel less stress and burnout. This class is for anyone looking for a better way to work or a complete personal projects. It's suited for all levels. The class project. At the end we'll be identifying, completing, and reflecting on a project that you will complete using the Pomodoro Technique. Our course objectives are simple. We want to help increase your productivity, reduce your stress, and have a little bit of fun along the way. So if you're ready to transform your work day from chaotic mess it to a well oiled machine. Let's get started. I'll see you in the course. 2. Part 1: Introduction To The Pomodoro Technique: I'm so glad you decided to take the course. Welcome aboard. Should we get started? Section one is, what is the Pomodoro Technique and how does it work? The Pomodoro Technique is a time management method that was developed by Francesco Cirillo in the late 1980s. It involves breaking work down into intervals, traditionally 25 min in length, separated by short breaks. These intervals are known as pomodoros. A pomodoro is Italian. You probably guessed it means tomato. Some people call it, call it the Tomato Technique. Same thing. The goal of the Pomodoro technique is to help you stay focused on a task and improve your productivity by working in short bursts and then taking regular breaks. It's based on the idea that taking breaks helps you to recharge your brain and prevent burnout, which can lead to more focused and effective work. To use the Pomodoro Technique, you'll need a timer, either a physical one like this cute little tomato here, or on online timer. And we'll go through a few of those later. You'll also need a list of tasks to work on. You'll start by choosing a task to work on and setting the timer for 25 min. During this time, you'll focus solely on the task at hand without distractions or interruptions. Once the timer goes off, you'll take a short break, traditionally five-minutes, before starting another pomodoro. You will repeat this process until you've completed four pomodoros, at which point you'll take a longer break, traditionally 15 to 30 min. The Pomodoro Technique is flexible and you can adjust the length of Commodores and breaks to suit your needs. What are the benefits of using the Pomodoro technique? This is a powerful tool for improving your productivity and focus. By working in short bursts and taking regular breaks, you can avoid burnout and maintain your energy levels throughout the day. When I first adopted the technique, it took me a few months to get used to this different style of working, but I realized I was getting so much more done. Now let us try did myself for being so ineffective before. I hope you find the same results. The Pomodoro Technique can also help you be mindful of your time and how you're using it. By setting a timer, committing to focusing on a task and a set period of time, you can reduce distractions and procrastination, which can help you get more done in less time. This technique is also a useful tool for tackling larger product projects or tasks that seem overwhelming. So by breaking these tasks down into smaller, 25-minute bite-sized chunks, in tackling them one at a time. You can make progress more easily and feel more in control of your workload. 3. Part 2: Setting Up Your Pomodoro : Welcome to Part Two, setting up your Pomodoro Technique practice. So the first thing you wanna do is choose a task to work on. Before you can start using the Pomodoro Technique, you'll need to choose a test to work on. This can be any task that you need to complete. So whether it's related to work, school or personal, when choosing a task to work on, what you're trying to achieve. And how long do you think it'll take to complete? If you have a long list of tasks to complete, you might want to consider choosing a smaller tasks to work on first and then move on to the longer ones. Once you've built up some momentum. It's also a good idea to choose a task you feel motivated to work on. If you're not interested in this task, it will be harder to stay focused during your pomodoros. Some people find it helpful to create a list of tasks to work on during their pomodoros. This can help you keep organized and ensure you're making progress on a variety of tasks. You might want to prioritize your tasks based on importance or deadlines, or simply choose tasks you're in the mood to work for. Next is setting a timer for 25 min. Once you've chosen the tasks to work on, the next step is to set your timer for 25 min. This will mark the start of your first Pomodoro. If you're using physical timer, you'll need to set it manually. If you're using a timer on your phone or computer. My favorite timer is Pomona focus dot io. You will need to open the timer app or start the online timer. It's important to set your timer for the full 25 min, even if you don't think you'll need that much time to complete the task. The Pomodoro technique is based on the idea that focusing on a task for a set period of time can help you improve your productivity and focus. So by setting that timer for 25 min, you're committing to focusing on the task at hand without distractions or interruptions. If you have a long list of tasks to complete, you might want to create a list of tasks to work on during your pomodoros. This can help you keep organized and ensure you're making progress on a variety of tasks. You might want to prioritize the tasks based on importance or deadlines, or simply choose tasks you're in the mood to work on. Some people find it helpful to use a to-do list app or software to track their tasks. And Pomodoro timer that I use, palm of focus dot io tracks things for you. This can make it easier to see what you've accomplished and what you still need to do in can also help you track progress over time. 4. Part 3: Working On A Pomodoro: There are three sections to part three, working on a pomodoro. The first section is staying focused. Once your timer is set, it's time to start working on your task. During a Pomodoro, you'll need to focus solely on the task at hand without distractions or interruptions. This can be challenging, especially if you're used to multitasking or frequently checking your phone or e-mail. One way to stay focused is to eliminate distractions as much as possible. Put this in a drawer away from you. Close unnecessary tabs and your computer, remove any other distracting apps. You might want to also consider using a tool like freedom or cold turkey to block distracting websites or apps during your pomodoros, especially when you're getting started. Another helpful tip is to set a specific goal for each Pomodoro. This can help to keep you focused and give you a sense of accomplishment when you reach your goal. E.g. you might set a goal of completing a certain number of pages, making a certain number of phone calls, or writing a certain number of words. If you find it hard to stay focused, you might want to try using a variation called Pomodoro with a question. With this variation, you'll set the timer for 25 min and then ask yourself a specific question related to your task. E.g. you might ask yourself, what are the three most important points I need to make in this presentation? Or what are the three biggest challenges I'm facing with this project? Answering this question will help you stay focused and make progress during your task. But what about dealing with interruptions? Even if you do your best to eliminate these distractions, it's likely you'll still be interrupted at some point in the form of phone calls, e-mails, or requests from co-workers or family members. When an interruption occurs, it's important to deal with it in a way that doesn't disrupt your focus. If the interruption is urgent, need to deal with it right away. But if it can wait, you might want to consider postponing it until your next break or until the end of your pomodoros for the day? I had a few requests come in over the last half hour and I said, Listen, I've got this many more projects to film. I'll probably be done by 05:00 P.M. can get to it at 05:30. And they said fine. In that way too. You're also learning how to set your own boundaries. And another helpful tip is a reminder to use the Pomodoro with a question to stay focused. Even when you're interrupted. Taking breaks. To me, taking breaks is the magic of the Pomodoro techniques. I used to work continuously as hard as I could for as long as I could. And since this technique introduced me to the world of breaks, I found that it's kept refresher, kept me able to work longer, and kept me more focused. So one of the key benefits is that this technique encourages you to take breaks regularly. For each Pomodoro, you'll need to take a short break, traditionally five-minutes before starting another Pomodoro. These breaks are so important because they give your brain a chance to rest and recharge, which can help you stay focused and productive. I'm at that stage now. When I hear the timer goes off, I jump up and then just walk away from the computer. During your breaks, you might want to step away from your desk and do something physically or mentally active? I usually don't pick up my phone and try to get outside for a quick walk or do some stretching, grab some water, a quick snack. Some other ideas that people use. Some stretching, some yoga. Some people like cleaning for five-minutes, whatever it is that takes your mind away from work, but doesn't include another screen I find it's always the most helpful. 5. Part 4: Tracking Your Progress: Part four is about tracking your progress. Whatever we measure in life, tends to improve. So by keeping a record of your pomodoros, it's helpful to see how much you've accomplished and identify areas for improvement. There are few different ways you can track your pomodoros. One option is to use Pomona focus dot io. That's what I use on my laptop and that's what I use on my phone. And it helps keep track of all of the projects that I'm using, how many pomodoros it tucked and even tracks it over weeks. Another option is the old pen and paper to track how many pomodoros is doing every day. You can even create a simple spreadsheet. You can use a planner. Regardless of how you choose to track your pomodoros, the important thing is you have a system that works for you. Identifying areas for improvement. As you track your palm doors, you might start to see patterns or areas for improvement. E.g. you might notice you're frequently interrupted or that you're having trouble stay focused on certain task. If you identify areas for improvement, it's important to take action to address them. E.g. if you're frequently interrupted, you might want to try to eliminate distractions or set aside specific times of day for handling interruptions. E.g. I. Used to check my email ten or 20 times a day. Probably closer to 20 to be fair. Now, since implementing the Pomodoro technique, I check it before I get to work at nine, and I check it when I'm leaving at five. It's also a good idea to be flexible and willing to adjust your practice as necessary. If something isn't working for you. Don't afraid to try, don't be afraid to try something different. It's also a good idea to be flexible and willing to adjust your Pomodoro Technique practices needed. If something isn't working for you, don't be afraid to try something different. E.g. you might find that you need to adjust the length of your Pomodoro. Is that breaks based on the tasks that you're working on or your energy levels. In the morning for me is my greatest time to get the most stuff done. So I like to adjust my poem indoors, maybe to 35 or 45 min. When I start the day, near the end of the day in the afternoon, my pomodoros are always 25-minute. I need more frequent breaks to help keep the fresher. There is no one-size-fits-all. So whatever works for you. 6. Part 5: Common Challenges: In this lesson, we're going to address some common challenges and solutions. Some people struggle to stay focused during pomodoros. This is a very common challenge when starting off the Pomodoro Technique. And it can be particularly challenging if you're not used to working in this manner where you focus on one project at a time. Our society is been created in a way with Instagram and with TikTok, that our attention span is dropped to about ten or 15 s. Trying to change the rewiring and your brain to focus on one task for 25 min, it's going to take work. So my tip for you is be kind to yourself. You're trying something new that should be applauded. You may not get it on the first time or the tenth time or the 100th time, but stick with it in soon. Your brain will be able to focus on one task or 25 min. Another challenge I hear a lot is interruptions, like we've mentioned before. This can come in the form of phone calls, emails, requests from co-workers or family members. I've removed the email app from my computer so I can no longer see it unless I'm specifically typing in the name of the service that I'm using to check my email. I take away my phone so I'm removing all of my distractions, physically removing them, as they say, out of sight, out of mind. Those have been the most helpful. When it comes down to people contacting me though, face-to-face, whether that be someone at home or someone at work. Those can be done in a different way. And that includes setting those boundaries. Such as, I'm working on this project right now. Can I get back to you in a little bit? If it needs to be done right now, pause your Pomodoro, go deal with the issue and come back. It can also be helpful to create an interruption list to track interruptions and deal with them at your brakes are at the end of pomodoros for the day. This can also help you keep focus and avoid getting sidetracked by interruptions. Another common challenge with the Pomodoro technique is finding that right balance between pomodoros and breaks. Some people find they need longer breaks to recharge, while others prefer shorter breaks, more frequent pulmonary press the keys experiment and find a balance that works for you. You might want to try adjusting the length of your pomodoros up or down from that 25-minute standard. Andrew breaks up or down that five-minute standard to see how it affects your productivity and focus. You might also want to pay attention to your energy levels and take breaks when you start to feel tired or burnt-out. If you haven't slept well, maybe it's best to start with 25 or 15 minute Pomodoro and then slowly work your way up. It's also important to be flexible and willing to adjust your Pomodoro Technique practices needed. If something isn't working for you, don't be afraid to try something different. 7. Part 6: Tips To Get The Most Out: Welcome to this lesson where we're talking about tips for getting the most out of the Pomodoro Technique. My first tip is to find a time that works for you. I've used most of them. Whether that be an online desktop, top timer, like palm of focus dot io timer on my phone or physical timer. With my purposes, I like using my desktop timer the most because I usually work on my laptop. So for me that's the time where that works best for you. It might be something different for you. Just find something that's easy to use and fits your needs. E.g. if you're frequently on the go without your laptop, using your phone timer is probably the best choice. Experiment with different timers to see which one works best for you. Second tip is to create a dedicated workspace. This might be a separate room in your home, a corner of your office, or quiet spot in a library or a coffee shop. A dedicated workspace can help you reduce distractions and improve focus. Good idea to keep your workspace organized and free of clutter or tomatoes. Make use of your brakes. Finally, it's important to make the most of your brakes. This is the magic. I think the Pomodoro Technique. Breaks are so important is that give your brain a chance to rest and recharge, which is something that was never doing before. Maybe you're not doing it either. So use these breaks, do something that helps you recharge. Whether that's being physically active, whether that's being mentally active, chatting with a colleague, doing something that fills you up. Doing something active during your breaks can help refresh your mind, keeps you energize, clear your head. In, come back to the next Pomodoro with a fresh perspective. I used to really struggle around 03:00 P.M. on a workday. And now I know that taking these regular breaks allows me to work longer throughout the day. Lastly, experiment with the different Pomodoro lengths and break frequencies. Some people find that longer pomodoros 30-40, five-minutes and longer breaks, 10-15 min work best for them, while others before 15 minute Pomodoro is a five-minute breaks experiment with different combinations to see what works best for you. Soon, you'll just be in the flow. You will be, you will know what you'd like to do. Pomodoros will be suited to the type of working style that you have. And that alone will help create flow, will help create structure, will help create progress in your work or personal project. 8. Part 7: Working From Home: One of the questions I get a lot is, can the Pomodoro Technique be useful for working at home? The answer is unequivocally yes, and allows for better focus and concentration. So it allows you to focus on a single task for a set period of time. It helps to reduce multitasking. When you're at home, it's easy to water the plants, to vacuum the floor, to get distracted by whoever is home. So by using this technique, it only sends a message to everything else in the house that says, you'll have to wait until their break? Three, it provides structure and routine. I don't know about the rest of you who work from home, but this can be an isolating activity. And the lack of structure and routine often presents a challenge compared to a traditional office setting. This technique provides a sense of structure and routine by breaking up the workday into focus work sections and breaks. This helps improve motivation and reduces that feeling of isolation. Lastly, it allows for regular breaks. I know that it's super easy to just keep working when you're working from home and not take breaks. Usually in an office environment, there are cues to take breaks and certain hours that are acceptable at home. It's a little different and it can be demanding. So it's important to take breaks to recharge and avoid burnout. This technique helps you do that. 9. Case Studies: In this lesson, we're going to use a few case study examples of people who have used the Pomodoro technique to achieve success. Case study, one college student uses the Pomodoro technique to study for exams. Susie is a college student who struggles with staying focused while studying. She often finds herself getting distracted by her phone or other tasks, which lead to her feeling overwhelmed in behind on her work. Sound familiar. To improve for focus and productivity, susie starts using the Pomodoro technique. She sets her Tyra for 25 min and works on a specific study task until the timer goes off. Then she takes a short break to check our phone or grab snack. After four pomodoros, Susie tastes a longer break to rest and recharge. She repeats this process until she is completed. Oliver steady tests day. By using this technique, she's able to stay focused and avoid burnout while studying. As a result, she's able to complete our work more efficiently and achieve better grades on her exam. The second case studies with a freelancer. Using this technique to manage your workload. As a freelance writer, Rachel often finds herself with fluctuating workload. Some days she has lots of reading tasks to complete, while other days she has very little work. To stay organized and productive. Rachel starts using the Pomodoro technique. She creates a task list for the day and set your timer for 25 min. She works on a specific task until the timer goes off, and then takes a short break before starting a new Pomodoro. By using this technique, Rachel is able to break down her work into manageable chunks of time. She's also able to take regular breaks, which helped her avoid burnout and maintain her productivity. Lastly, we have a project manager who uses this technique to stay on track with deadlines. As a project manager, john is responsible for managing multiple projects and meeting tight deadlines. He often finds himself feeling overwhelmed and stressed out by the amount of work Yes, to do to improve productivity and managers workload. John starts using the Pomodoro technique. He creates a task list for the day, sets a timer for 25 min. He works on a specific task until the timer goes off, and then takes a short break before starting a new Pomodoro. By using this Pomodoro Technique, John is able to stay focused and on task with his work. He's able to take regular breaks, which helps him avoid burnout and maintain his productivity. As a result, he's able to meet deadlines and successfully manage those projects. These are just a few examples of how this technique can be used to improve your focus, productivity, and motivation. Whether your student, freelance or project manager, the Pomodoro technique can be a valuable tool for managing your workload and achieving success. 10. Class Project: For our class project, you will choose a task that you would like to complete using the Pomodoro Technique. This could be a task for a class assignment, no personal project, or even a work-related tasks. Before you begin, take some time to plan out your tasks using the Pomodoro Technique. Consider how many pomodoros you will need to complete your task and how long it breaks you're going to take in between pomodoros. You might also want to consider what you will do during your breaks to help you stay refreshed and motivated. Now, once you have your plan in place, starting to get started, set a timer for 25 min and get to work. When the timer goes off, take a break according to your plan. Repeat this process until your task is complete. As you work, pay attention to your focus and productivity. Do you find that the Pomodoro technique helps you to stay focused and motivated. Are there aspects of the technique that you find particularly helpful or challenging? When you have finished your task. Take some time to reflect on your experience using the Pomodoro Technique. Write a short summary of your experience, including any insights you gain about your work habits and how this technique maybe helpful for you in the future. In your summary that you will submit as your class project, be sure to address the following questions. What task did you complete using the Pomodoro technique? How many pomodoros did you complete and how long were you breaks? What did you find helpful or challenging about using the Pomodoro technique? How did the Pomodoro Technique affect your focus and productivity? And how might you use this technique in the future to increase your work habits? Submit your class project, and I can't wait to review it. 11. You Now Have The Tool! Use it!: Well, that's it for our course on the Pomodoro technique. I hope you've learned everything you need to know to transform your workday from a chaotic mess into a well-oiled machine. By now, you should be an expert at using the Pomodoro technique to increase your focus, to reduce multitasking and stay motivated. You should also know how to deal with interruptions. Find the right balance of public doors and breaks, and make the most of your brakes. So go out there and conquer the world with their newfound productivity Bowers. Remember, did you ever feel like you're losing your focus for getting burnt-out? Just take a break and come back to your work with a fresh perspective. Thank you for joining me on this journey to greater productivity and less stress. I hope you had as much fun learning about the Pomodoro Technique as I had teach you two. Until next time. Happy pomodoros.