Create Awesome Video Transitions in Adobe After Effects | Chris Brooker | Skillshare
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Create Awesome Video Transitions in Adobe After Effects

teacher avatar Chris Brooker, Filmmaker & YouTuber

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Introduction

      1:00

    • 2.

      Whip Pan

      5:18

    • 3.

      Zoom

      3:56

    • 4.

      Rotation

      5:51

    • 5.

      Shape layer

      8:40

    • 6.

      Luma Key

      2:32

    • 7.

      Glitch

      9:04

    • 8.

      Outro

      0:58

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About This Class

Do you want to spice up your video and add some digital transitions? Here's how. In this course, I walk you through how to create video transition in Adobe After Effects.

No previous Adobe After Effects or filmmaking experience is required. In this course, I explain what processes I'm following and why I'm using the features.

Transitions covered:

  • The Whip Pan
  • Zoom In/Out
  • Rotation
  • Shape Layer Transition
  • Luma Transition
  • Glitch Transition
  • MORE TRANSITIONS COMING SOON

Meet Your Teacher

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Chris Brooker

Filmmaker & YouTuber

Teacher

I’m a filmmaker and photographer from England. I graduated from London South Bank University with a first-class honors degree in 2015 and have since created hundreds of music videos, corporate films, and commercials with many established companies, record labels, and artists. 

In 2018, I turned the camera on myself and launched the Brooker Films YouTube channel. With 900 uploads and 95,000+ subscribers, I focus on sharing educational content to help others create compelling video content. I wanted to take that a step further though, so here we are.

 

See full profile

Level: Beginner

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hi, welcome to the Adobe After Effects video transitions course. In this course, I'm jumping into Adobe After Effects, and I'm going to show you how you can create some really awesome digital transitions. So throughout this course, I'm going to show you the likes of the rotation, the Whip Pan, the zoom, the Luma, that glitch transition and soap many other video transitions that you can complete inside of Adobe After Effects, This video transitions do not require any special plugins, so you don't have to get anything installed. You can just start editing these transitions today. Before we get into the course though, let me please first just introduce myself. My name is Chris broker. I'm a full-time at video creator. I run a music video and video production business. So I'm using these transitions in my work to make my videos look more interesting. I'm going to show you my favorite video transitions and a few other really awesome video transitions that you can add into your work to add the extra spice of something into your video. With all of that said and done, Let's begin creating some video transitions inside of Adobe After Effects. 2. Whip Pan: So let's start with the first video transition. The first video transition on this list is going to be the whip pan. And the Whip Pan is essentially just a quick whip from left to right, right to left, up to down or down to left. So in order to do the Whip Pan transition inside of Adobe After Effects, we first just wanted to make sure that we have two videos on our timeline. As you can see, I've got this handheld shots of this building on video layer one. And underneath, I've got the shots of the London Eye. So first of all, I'm just going to begin by dragging them both over to the left a little bit because these are handheld shots. There's a little bit of movement at the start. Now, I am just going to nudge these over from one another. So I want this video on video layer one to be at the start up until four seconds. Then I want the second video to be dragged over to the end of the first clip, it should automatically cut from one to another. Now, we need to go ahead and create a new null object. It will go to layer new null object. And a null object is essentially just a way of controlling both of these videos at the same time. We're just going to highlight both of those layers. And we want to see parents and link. If you can't see that than just right-click in this general area, that's columns and go to parents and link. Now you just want to select both of those videos. We use this pick whip tool and drag that onto the null objects. These books you should change to null one. Now from here, you just want to go to the end of the first video demo, go back on our clip, maybe 678 key-frames. We'll go into the drop-down arrow, go into transform and select position and creates a new key frame on position by selecting the stopwatch icon. Now we'll go over to the rights and we just want to go a few frames into the second clip, and we'll just note the position over to the right until that falls off screen. Like so. Certain that women play this back. You can see we've got this sliding effect. However, the problem is with that we are losing the second video. We're just going to go through to the point where that motion finishes. We'll select this second video, go into the drop-down arrow, go into transform into position, and we'll just drag the position until it is now back on screen. Just going to drag this all the way over to the left and that looks about right. Let's see how this looks. So as you can see, we've got this overlap where one finishes and one-star. So that's not great. Let's get rid of that. We're just going to drag the bottom layer over to the left and the top layer over to the right. Now you can see we've got the two clips on screen at the same time. Well, the other problem is at the moment this doesn't feel quick enough, so I'm just going to close the gap between these keyframes. Closing the Gap, decrease in the gap basically means it's going to be quicker. It's going to take less time to get from the starting point to the endpoint. Now, if we watch this back, you can see we're getting there. It's starting to look like a whip pan, but there's no character and we can see this black strip. So let's deal with the lack of character first. Highlight both of those keyframes. Right-click over one of those. Go to keyframe assistant and select Easy Ease. We've just converted this from linear keyframes to easy ease keyframes. Basically meaning it's going to accelerate in and out of each of those keyframes. There's a little bit more character there now. But now we need to go ahead and fix this black ball issue. To fix that, you just want to go onto the top video, got into Effects and Presets. And we're going to search for motion tile. They got Motion Tile should be under Stylize, will drop that onto the top layer. We want to go to output width and we'll go 300. Output height 300 then won't mirror edges. And let's see how this looks. As you can say, that has not done what we wanted it to do. And the reason why that has happened is because we've put it on the top layer and not the bottom layer. Let's just copy emotion tile. So Command C if you're on Mac or Control C if you're on Windows, or you can just right-click on hand. So that's called pay. And then we'll delete, then got onto the bottom layer and we'll paste that in. So Command V, control V, one of those options, and as you can see that has filled in the gap on the bottom layer. Of course. So at the moment everything is just a little bit too sharp and then he's because we have no motion blur. So in order to activate the motion blur, we want to select all of the layers. And you want to see this icon. If you can't see this icon, then you need to select toggle switches, slash modes, and select that makes sure the motion blur icon up here is blue. And now when we scrub through it, you'll notice we have motion blur that instantly looks so much better. There it is. That is how you do the first video transition. That is the Whip Pan. 3. Zoom: Transition number two is a zoom in or zoom out. So it's a scale in or scale out. The technique for this is actually kind of similar to the first transition that we completed. So the Whip Pan, however, I'm going to run you through the entire process in case you didn't care to watch the Whip Pan video. We'll just jump straight into the technique in this video. So first of all, you just want to go ahead and zoom out of this first layer and then zoom out of this second layer. You want to make sure that your two videos are running one into another. So as you can see, we've got 4.5 seconds of this first clip and then it runs into this second clip. Now, we're just going to go to the very end of that first clip. Go back in time 506 key frames, go into this drop-down arrow, into transform and select scale. Now we're just going to go towards the end of that clip minus one frame. And we're just going to pull these scale all the way down like this. Then we got into the next video. We'll go a few frames over to the right and create new keyframe on scale. So again, we'll go into transform new keyframe on scale by selecting the stopwatch icon. Then we'll go back to the beginning and we'll just increase the scale. Sorry, Let's see how that looks. That's the basic effect now complete. But first of all, we wanted to speed this up, so we're just going to close the gap there. And we'll close the gap there. As you can see at the moment, it just goes straight into that final resting position. But I want to add a little bit of a bounce. So I'm just going to go a few frames over to the right. It creates a brand new keyframe on the scale. And then I'm gonna go to the second keyframe. And I'm going to decrease the scale down, as you can see at the moment with filling in the edges because of the motion tile effect. But I'm going to delete that for now and we'll come back to that one. So this is what we have. Sorry, it looks pretty good. But at the moment we can obviously see the black edges. And then of course as well, there's no character in this animation. I'm just going to highlight all of those scale keyframes. Right-click on one, That's keyframe assistant and select Easy, Ease. Now we've got a little bit more character because we've converted those keyframes from linear to easy ease. Now we need to just tackle this problem with the black box. So we'll select this first layer will go into Effects and Presets and such for motion tile, which he's already that in my example, will drop that onto the first video. Will change the output width to 300. Which energy output height to 300. And as you can see, that's filled in the gaps. But at the moment it's all just a tile effects. We need to select mirror edges to basically reflect that across the different layers. And now you see when we watch this back in real time, you barely notice that tile effect. Now we need to just copy that motion tile effect. I will paste this onto this London I layer, the second layer. Moment. Play this back. You can say that looks much better. But the problem is, we can see this tile effect here because there's no motion blur. You want to make sure that motion blur is enabled on both of these video layers. Make sure the motion blur icon here is blue. If you can't see motion blur, then just select the toggle switches, slash modes. And you should see that. As you can see, that's looking really good. But the problem is there's a little bit of a delay. So I'm just going to nudge the second video clip to the left by two frames and that should solve the problem. There we go. So much better. You've got this really cool pop zoom-out scale transition. Now complete data inside of Adobe After Effects. Let me just render this out. We'll play this back one more time and let's see how this looks. There you go. That is transition number two. 4. Rotation: Transition number three is going to be the rotation transition. So in order to do the rotation transition, we need to set the video clips up exactly the same as the whip pan and zoom in slash zoom out transition. So you just want to make sure that you have two video clips on your timeline. You've got one that finishes at the same time, the next one starts like this. Then we're just going to go through to the end of the first video clip. We're going to go back a few frames, go into transform and creates a brand new keyframe on rotation. Demo go through to the end of the video. And we'll just change this to 100 and A2. If we play this back, you'll notice the video rotates around. Now, we just need to go through to the second video. We've got a few frames over to the right, creates a brand new keyframe on rotation. And now we'll go back to the beginning. And now we're going to select negative 180 degrees. Sorry, let me play that back and see how this looks. That is the transition technically working. But the problem is it just looks a little clunky at the moment. There's quite a bit that we need to do to fix this up. First of all, I'm just going to clean up this animation. So I'm going to highlight all of those keyframes. Right-click one of those. Select Keyframe Assistant and go up to easy ease. Now when we play this back, you'll notice there's a little bit more character there, although it's not quite perfect. So I'm just going to nudge this second video over to the left by two frames. And I'm just going to pull this back. Let's see how that looks. That looks a lot better. Although it could do with shifting the first video clip over by one key friend just to make that feel snappier. And then we got that feels a lot nicer. Now. Now we need to deal with the fact that we can see all of the black around the video. If you've watched the other two videos, the previous two videos, you'll note this is motion tile, so drop motion tile on the first video, output width is 300, outputs height is 300. And then we're going to select mirror edges. And then of course we do the same thing on the second layer. So we'll go motion tile, drag that's on output width 300, output height 300, and select mirror edges. Let's see how that looks. That is good. But at the moment you could argue that this is a little bit too quick. So let's pull that first key frame over to the left. That's a bit better. But then the permanent is the second keyframe just stops, completely stops the movement. And I felt like they'd be a little bit of a bounce. Let's fix that by going a few frames over to the right, creating a brand new keyframe on rotation by selecting this icon here. We'll get back to that second key frame and we'll continue the movement. So we'll just pull this around to positive 2025, somewhere around there. Now when we play this back, you'll notice there's this really cool bounce back as it falls back into place. However, at the moment everything is looking to clean and to shop. So we're just going to enable motion blur on both of these layers. Again, if you can't see that, that makes sure you select toggle switches, slash modes, and then make sure that this icon is blue. Then let's see how that looks. You can say that looks really good. And of course, if you wanted to, you could combine the rotation transition with the scale transition. At the same time as rotating. You could be doing the Zoom. We're just going to go through to the start of that rotation on the first video was brand new keyframe on scale got towards the end of the action. And we're just going to zoom out like this. So as you can see, 53 and will match that up to the other key frames and convert those to easy ease keyframes. You can see we've zoomed out like this. I would do the same thing on this one. So we'll just load up all of those keyframes so you can see he got rotation and scale will go through to the second keyframe, CREB, primary key frame on scale, then would just zoom in and pull this back to the beginning to match these other keyframes. Then we'll convert those to easy ease. So Keyframe Assistant, Easy Ease. Now let's see how these look. That looks pretty good. Although you could actually make this even more aggressive if you wanted to. I'm gonna pull this first video down to even smaller number. So an even smaller number, so 31. That's a very dramatic zoom out. Although the problem is you can see the motion tile effect falling apart here, and that is because we are too zoomed out now. I'm just going to pull that back up to around 40. See how that looks. Still falling apart. So let's go back up to around 50, will make them more dramatic change on the second layer. So go to that first keyframe, will increase this guy all the way up to around 200. Adults play this back. They got much better. So as you can see, you've got these really dramatic rotation zooming transition. Of course you don't have to add the Zoom, but if you wanted to add that extra element, to add the extra spice of life into your transition. That is how, of course, if you wanted to slow down that bounce, then you just extend the gap between the second and the third key frames on the rotation animation layer. And that will slow that down exactly like that. That is the third transition and that is the rotation transition and technically also the rotation zoom transition. 5. Shape layer: In transition number four, we're breaking away from the zooming, the whipping they rotation type transitions and we're gonna go into some shape layer transitions. So I'm gonna give you three different examples in this video. But of course these three are just flavors they see is just to get you inspired and show you what is possible. Of course, you don't have to follow these exact transitions, but use these three as examples to see what is possible in the shape of that transitions. In order to set up the transition, we first just have to have two video clips were running into another. We don't have to do anything special in terms of rotation, position, or scale. We just have them running into each other like this. And the transition will happen on the Shape Layer. Speaking of which, let's go ahead and create a new shape layer. Will go layer, new solid. And we can just press Okay on this if we wanted to or we could change the color hair. In my example, I'm just going to select a nice soft blue. First of all, I'm going to show you how to do a diagonal wiping transition with this solid layer. First of all, I'm just going to increase the scale. I'm going to increase the scale up there. Then I'm going to change the anchor point to the bottom left corner. So I'm just going to move the shape up here. Then I'm just going to move this anchor points so that it sits in the corner of the solid. So you want to try and get this as close to the corner as you can get it. So they've got that axis is done. Let's just pull this down. There we go. Now you'll see the reason why we wanted to put this in the corner. Because now when we adjust the rotation rather than the rotation affecting the center of the image, it's going to affect the corner of the image like this. Instantly. That's going to make a much more dramatic effect just by changing the position of the anchor points. So this is basically the principle of our transition. We're going to start like this and it's going to rotate it around to reveal the new layer. We're just going to rotate around, around. Negative 100 will move the anchor point down into the corner. So we'll move that solid down there. Then we'll go through to the end of the first video, creates a new keyframe on the rotation on the blue solid layout. Then we'll go to the right and we'll just pull this all the way around until it disappears again. Let's see how this looks. Good. That works pretty much exactly how we need that to work. But the problem is, you can say it's not tall enough on either axis. I'm just going to go into scale, unlink the horizontal and the vertical axis so we can adjust these independently from one another. And then I'll just go into the second layer and increase the number to fill in the screen. Let's see how this looks about what papilla. If for some reason you did this. You could see the video change, often old before or during the transition. Then all you need to do is just wiggle this over until the screen is covered at the transition point, you can say they split ends in this clip starts and the screen is completely below. You see when we play this back, you've got this really awesome diagonal wiping transition using a solid or a shape layer. Of course as well. If you wanted to improve on this effects or add something to this effect, you could copy that layer. So we'll go Command C, Command V. Or if you're on Windows, you can go Control C. Control V will nudge these keyframes over to the right by two frames. Then we'll go into Effects and Presets and we'll search for change. You can put change to color on the top layer. I drop this onto the top layer. Then we can just go into, from, and we can use the Eyedropper tool to select this blue. We can change the change to hue, lightness and saturation. And then we can change the color by selecting the white box and selecting a different color of choice. I'm going to select a muted green press. Okay? When we play this back, you'll notice we've got two different layers of colors. It's just the same layer. It's just, we've offset it by two key frames and we could even take it even some more. So we'll take it four frames apart from each other. That's creating this really nice double-layered transition. That is the diagonal rotation transition using shape layers. If you didn't want to do this transition, you can maybe just do a whip pan. We're just going to delete this solid and the solid will create a new solid layer, new solid press. Okay? And this one's gonna be nice and simple in comparison, we'll go a few frames towards the end of the first clip. Press P on the keyboard for position. Crap Brendan key frame on the position and will nudge the position all the way to the left until that disappears off screen. There we go. And now we'll go a few frames over to the right towards the start of the first video. And we'll just push this all the way over until the video appears off screen on the right side. Now when we play this back, you'll notice you've got this really cool color whipping transition. Of course, it is a lesser faster at the moment. So we'll just go into increase the gap between those keyframes. And that looks good. But the video changed. As you can see that while it was still color on screen. So I just need to adjust these keyframes. And that's his fixed the problem. That is the second shape transition inside of Adobe After Effects. So let's delete that and let's go into the third option, which is going to be a circle. It will go layer, new solid. I'll press okay on this layer. Then I'm just going to go into this rectangle tool, drag down to the ellipse tool. And then we'll just hold down the Shift button and we'll just draw a circle like this. Then we'll load the proportional grid. So select this icon, select proportional grid. We'll just move the mask of this ellipse into the very senza like this. There we go. Then we can go into the mosque and you can select Inverted. Then we go into the mask expansion. And as you can see, if we pull this up or down, it's going to either fill the screen old disappear. So we're just going to increase the mask expansion until that disappears. Creates a brand new keyframe there. We've got towards the end of the first video and pull them off expansion all the way back down until the screen is now filled. That is around here and that is minus 200. Then we're just nip over go maybe two or three frames to the right, it creates a brand new key frame of the same value. And then we'll go a few key frames to the rights, and we'll pull this all the way back until the screen is now revealed again. When we play this back. You've got this really cool Sacco transition. Although if you wanted to, you could make the hold list a bit longer. So we can just pull the first and the second to the left and the third and the fourth to the right. Just to open up that gap. Again, you can do that even more if you wanted. That. We've already got this nice hold in-between that transition. Then of course we'd just go into convert these keyframes to easy ease keyframes just to create that really nice stylized animation. And that was great. Of course, this first one is now a bit too quick, so I'm just going to increase the gap between those keyframes. And there we go, we've got ourselves a really cool transition. And of course the beauty is with the shape transitions is because of masking. You can literally create any shape that you like to create a transition. So you could have a box bouncing into frame and then opening up. You could have balls animating down one-by-one. There are so many different possibilities when it comes to the shape layer transitions. It's just up to you, your creativity and what you can do with Adobe After Effects. They've transitioned. Number four is the shape layer transition. 6. Luma Key: Full transition number five, we're going to jump in and start looking at some different effects. So in this one we're going to talk about the Luma Key transition or the luma matte. In order to set this transition up, you want to make sure that your first video is above the second video. And you want to make sure there is an overlap at the end of the first video, the start of the second video. Then you want to go into Effects and Presets and such for a Luma Key will drop that onto the first video. Will go through to the point where the second video begins, creates a brand new keyframe on threshold. Then we'll go towards the end, minus one key frame. And the reason why we're doing minus one is so that we can see what we're doing. Because if I go to the very end, we go to the next video. So go back on yourself one keyframe or one frame. And then we just pull the threshold all the way up until we see that next video. Let me just play that back. See how that looks really good. Although at the moment you can see that was very, very quick. So we've got to have to add some more time. Hail got into effects Luma Key. And then we just extend the duration of these keyframes. So extend that gap between them. And you can see we've got this really cool transition now happening. Of course as well. If you wanted to, you could combine this with some key frame animation on the position scale and the rotation to enhance everything. So as you can see when I play back this video, you can see it's just the towel that he's left behind. The sky comes down. And then once that sky has gone, we're left with the building for a second before it dissolves away. Just off to the sky disappears. I'm gonna go to transform and creates brand new key frame on position. And then I'm just going to move down. And I'm just going to move the position of this entire layer down just a little bit, just to enhance that movement. They go, you can see that really helps to add a little bit of something. It almost looks like it is now melting or dissolving away. And of course, again, we can convert our key frames from linear to easy, ease. You can see that just helps to accentuate the characteristics of that transition. Of course, though, if anything fails to quick than just increase the gap between those keyframes. But that age transition number five, that he's the luma matte luma Key transition. 7. Glitch: Transition number six is the glitching transition. At the end of the first video clip, we want the video to glitch out and glitch into the second video. First of all, we wanted to make sure that the first video is above the second video. Then from there we're just going to go into Effects and Presets and we go into search for channel. And that should load up Channel Mixer. And we just drop that onto our first video. You can see we've got red, red, red green, red blue red const red, green, red green green, green, blue green constant blue red, blue green and blue, blue, blue constants. The only thing we won't hear it set to a 100 is red. Red will say everything else to 0. You can see the video has tone red. Now we need to make two copies of this video. Will go Command C if you're on Mac or Control C if you're on Windows. And then the same again, Control or Command V, I will have two copies of that. So we've got three total. So we've got to the second video and we'll change red, red to 0. But we'll change green, green up to 100. Then we'll get to the bottom. And again we'll set red, red to 0, but we'll go to blue, blue and set that to 100. Then we'll just go to the top layer. We're going to change, I'll toggle switches slash modes, view. And we'll go into mode and change this to screen. Then we'll go to the second video. We'll change this to screen as well. Now we're back to where we were. However, if I press P on the keyboard and I changed the position, you can see we've got this glitching effects now happening, and this is the basis of the effect. So now we need to go to our second video and do the exact same process. I'm going to drop channel mixer onto that layer, will change the green, green to 0, the blue, blue to 0. We'll make two copies of that. So Command C, Command V, V. Then we'll go to the second layer, 0 on red, red, 100 on green, green. And then we got to the bottom layer, 100 on blue, blue. Then the other layers are all zeros. Then of course, don't forget to change the blending mode on the top two layers of that. Normal to screen and then normal to screen again. There we go. That is the basics of the transition. Now complete. Now from here, you've got the freedom to do whatever you like to the different layers. So one thing that I love to do to really create these elements of glitching effect is go into Distort. And you can see there's loads of different distort effects here. Got liquefy, magnify mesh, war, mirror, reshaped ripple. Pretty much any one of these is going to work here. However, I'm going to drop wave warp on to the second layer of the first video. As you can see, we've got this waving effect happening. However, I'm just going to go into wave type and change this to square. And that's going to create this glitching effect. As you can see, I can change the wave heights or I can change the wave width. And I can change the direction of the distortion. Then I can change the wave speed. I can change the pinning to all edges or sensor. As you can say, if I change the painting to all edges, then it fixes the corners. And it just means the sense of the video is going to glitch. And then of course we've got phase as well. In order to activate the transition, you just want to go to wave heights and wave width. Pull them both down to small numbers. Wave height 0, wave width can only go down to one, but if you create a new keyframe on both of those, and then you go towards the end and you pull these all the way back up. Degas, you can see you have incident got this glitching effects now happening. Of course is if you wanted to add movement to that, then you can change the direction. So if you crack brand new key frame on direction before it comes in, we go towards the end, so somewhere around here. And then we just rotate that around a bit. You'll notice there is a bit more movement in that glitch. Of course it's about if you wanted to, you could extend that layer over so that it overlaps here. Just for a frame, Let's just create that extra layer of distortion. And then you can do the exact same thing on the layer below. So we'll go to Wave Warp, drop that onto the top layer, will change the wave type two square will go to pinning, will change this to all edges. Then we just increase the wave width and the wave heights. In increasing the wave height. Hey, read, it does help goods at the very beginning. Credit brown and keyframe on wave heights and go over three or four keyframes and pull that back. It down to 0. You can see you've got this really cool glitch transition happening between these two layers. Of course, it's completely up to you now what you do, but you can just add Wave Warp onto each different layer if you wanted to. And every time you do that, it's going to add a different color, wave warp or distortion or glitch Because you're putting it on a different color channel. Even though we've made the glitch at the transition points, you can now go ahead and add extra glitches throughout. So in order to do that, you just create a new keyframe on 0, move over, pull it up, and then move back over to pull it back down to 0. But of course, if you wanted to take that to the next level, then you can just highlight all of those layers. Make sure you're hovering over the transition points. Right-click and select pre-compose press. Okay, then we'll drop Wave Warp onto this precomposed layer. And your precomposition is essentially just a big group of all those layers so that you can affect them all at the same time. Which means a wave type two square will change the pinning to all edges, will go through just before the transition begins. And we'll change the wave heights and the wave width down to 0. Dan will go through to the point where they transition. So it will increase the all the way up. Then we can come back down again on the other side and back down to 0. Let's see how that looks. You can see that's actually added a little bit of extra something come to that. But you could argue that it was just a little bit slow to get going. So we'll just close down those key frames, closed down the gaps. Let's play this back. You can see that feels a lot more like a traditional glitch. But if you wanted to, you could change the direction of this so that it now goes over to the side. That looks really cool as well. Alternatively, if you wanted to, you could actually add, maybe a flash of light may be potentially. So we can go into effect some presets, such four levels. Individual controls go through to the point where the transition is happening. Around here. When we get the green frame into RGBA will increase the input whites or decrease that all the way down to 0.76. We got back on ourselves three or four frames and pull that back to one. Then we'll go after the transition and pull that back to one again. Let's play this back and see what this looks like. I've got the glitch, we've got the Flash, we've got the glitch on the individual layers as well. And that to be honest, it looks pretty good. Of course, this is just one way of doing the glitch transition. There were so many different other effects in presets and distortion plugins that you can drop onto each one of these layers to create a different type of glitch. If I go into the distort tab and I just put any one of these on, so we'll go CC Bender. You can say that's how this is going to be affected. You could do a glitch like this. So you can have very subtle glitch or you can move that around quite a lot. You could go for magnify and drop this on. You can add the magnification into the sensor and you can add some feathering onto there so that you're only affecting a specific point and you can change the size of this. It's completely up to you. You could go into mirror offsets, fair ice, Mia wolf, there's so many different distortion plug-ins here that are going to give you a slightly different glitching effects. So that's up to you and your creativity. But transition number six is the glitching transition. 8. Outro: And there you go. That is all of the transitions now completes. So you should be able to create some really awesome video transitions inside of Adobe After Effects using all or just a few of these videos. So my challenge to you now is to go ahead and create a short sequence, a small video showing me three of your favorite video transitions. They could be a wet pad, a rotation, a glitch, or Luma. It doesn't matter what it is. Just picked three of your favorite transitions from this course and upload your work to the student's project section. And I promise I will share my feedback and honest opinions on your work. So thank you ever so much for watching this course. I really do appreciate your support. And if you want to learn more about filmmaking, video production over to your editing than I do have a whole load of other video courses available for you on my page. So feel free to check those out. But if not, if you're moving on, then thank you ever so much for your support. I really do appreciate it and hopefully I will see you on the next course. See you there.