3 Awesome Photoshop Patterns - Step by Step - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class | Helen Bradley | Skillshare
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3 Awesome Photoshop Patterns - Step by Step - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

teacher avatar Helen Bradley, Graphic Design for Lunch™

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      Introduction to 3 Awesome Patterns in Photoshop CC

      0:57

    • 2.

      Make the Japanese Inspired Pattern

      12:21

    • 3.

      Japanese Inspired Pattern - Save the Swatch

      5:00

    • 4.

      Make the Pixelated Pattern

      9:04

    • 5.

      Make the Turing Pattern

      13:40

    • 6.

      Project and Wrap Up

      1:05

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About This Class

Welcome to this masterclass - Create 3 Awesome Patterns in Photoshop CC. In this course you will learn to make 3 very different patterns which all use different Photoshop skills and features. Each pattern is created step by step so you can follow along and make the pattern yourself.

These patterns are ones that you can easily include in your pattern collections - they are sophisticated, interesting, and unusual. You can use colours of your choice to make them bright and colourful or more subtle. As with all the Graphic Design for Lunch™ classes you will learn lots of tips and tricks for working in Photoshop as you make these patterns. I hope you enjoy this class!

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Meet Your Teacher

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Helen Bradley

Graphic Design for Lunch™

Top Teacher

Helen teaches the popular Graphic Design for Lunch™ courses which focus on teaching Adobe® Photoshop®, Adobe® Illustrator®, Procreate®, and other graphic design and photo editing applications. Each course is short enough to take over a lunch break and is packed with useful and fun techniques. Class projects reinforce what is taught so they too can be easily completed over a lunch hour or two.

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Level: Intermediate

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Transcripts

1. Introduction to 3 Awesome Patterns in Photoshop CC: Hello and welcome to this Class 3, Awesome Photoshop Patterns; a graphic design for lunch class. My name's Helen Bradley and I'm a Skillshare top teacher. I have over 270 courses here on Skillshare and over 170,000 student enrollments. In this class, we'll deep-dive into making three awesome patterns in Photoshop. I've chosen those three patterns because as well as looking wonderful, they'll all add interest to any pattern collection and they showcase a range of handy Photoshop tools and techniques. The patterns include a Japanese-inspired pattern, color pixelated pattern, and a Turing pattern based on the work of the English mathematician, Alan Turing. I'll show you step by step how to make these patterns, and along the way, you'll extend your Photoshop knowledge with lots of handy tips and tricks. Without further ado, let's get started making these patterns in Adobe Photoshop. 2. Make the Japanese Inspired Pattern: This Japanese inspired pattern looks absolutely gorgeous and I know that you're going to have a lot of fun making it, but it is a little bit tricky. So word of warning, for this pattern do it exactly to the measurements that I'm using, because otherwise you're setting yourself up for failure. If you want to later on you can double everything, but let's just go with my sizes to start off with. I'm creating a document 600 pixels by 600 pixels, I'll click "Create". I'm going to create an ellipse, so I'll go to the ellipse tool. It's going to have no fill at all. That's pretty important because otherwise it's not going to work. It's going to have a stroke of whatever color you want to use for your pattern and the stroke width I'm using is six pixels. I'll click in the document and I'll create a ellipse which is 200 pixels by 200 pixels. With the properties panel open, I'm going to move it up to fit it in the top corner of the document. The x and y value should read here zero and zero. We'll choose layer, new layer via copy. We're making a duplicate of this shape and the duplicate is selected. We'll come over here to the y value and we're going to move it down 150 pixels. Then we're going to do that again, layer, new layer via copy. For this one, the y value will be 300. We'll do it once more, layer, new layer via copy. The final value here will be 450. You should have this arrangement of overlapping circles. We'll select the every one of these, and we'll choose layer, new layer via copy, we'll shape layers via copy. That's made a copy of all four of these shapes, and the copy is selected. We'll come over here to the x and y values. We're going to move it across 120 horizontally and 80 vertically. We should end up with this overlapping look. We'll select over everything and we'll do again layer, new layer via copy. We'll shape layers via copy. Over here for the x value, we're going to move them across 240 pixels. At this point we'll select everything and move everything up so that the middle part of our arrangement is in the middle of the document because the actual location at this point now doesn't matter. The location of the shapes relative to each other did, but the location in the art board or the document area doesn't matter. Now we'll go and create a rectangle. Now the rectangle can have whatever fill you like. I just suggest you choose a pale color. It's going to not have any stroke at all. You're going to click in the document and go to create a rectangle that is 240 by 150 pixels in size, and click "Okay". For this in the last palette, I'm just going to reduce the opacity down so I can see everything through it. I'm going to position it over the middle of my pattern area. What I'm concerned about is that these circles here that are underneath this shape are complete circles. They've got full overlap. I'm really happy with its positioning there. I'm just going to lock it down. If you want to, you can also just drag it down to the very bottom of the document. In this case, I'm putting it just above the background. Now the reason for this shape is that it is the size of our pattern. This is the only area in the document we have to get right. All the bits that are outside this area don't even have to be correct. Next we're going to select over all of the shapes. I'm clicking on the bottom most one and shift clicking on the top. We don't need these to be shapes any longer, so I'm going to right-click and choose rasterize layers. I'm going through the very top of the document, and I'm going to click here to add a new layer. I'm going to the paint bucket tool. I'm going to set my foreground color to black, and up here in the toolbar, I'm going to make sure it's set to 100 percent opacity, the tolerance is 200. It needs a really high tolerance level. I have anti-alias, contiguous, and all layers checked on. Again, that's really important. Now I'm going to identify these little rounded triangle shapes. I'm going to click in each of them. It's the all layers setting here that is allowing me to identify the shapes as being the combined result of all these layers. It's very easy for me to just click to fill them. The ones that I'm most concerned about filling are obviously the ones that are where this pink shape is because that is our pattern. Now everything is done there. I'm going to add a new layer to the document. I'm going to the paint brush tool. This time I'm using a round paint brush and I'm going to set the color to something that is brightish and easy to see. I'm going to zoom in. This is where you need your wits about you. We're going to look at this circle here. I'm going to position myself in this area just at the top of the circle. Let me go and get my paint brush. I'm going to drag down with my paint brush. That's marking this line as one to be removed. When I come down, I'm going to swing to the left. This is going to be removed. Going back to where I came from, and let's come down and swing to the right. That one's done. Let's have a look at this circle. I'm going to the same starting position. I'm just going to drag down. That line is going to be removed. I'm going to come down and swing to the left. Go back to where I came from, come down and swing to the right. This circle here, I'm going to come down and drag to the left and to the right. Now, none of these lines are actually impacting the pattern, so we don't have to do anything with them. Let's go to this circle here. Same starting position. This line goes, come down and swing to the left, come down and swing to the right. This one is impacting the pattern, and potentially this one is too, so I'm going to make sure I remove them. Coming here to where we would be in this similar position, we would get rid of this line and this line, none of these are impacting the pattern. Here, we'd be getting rid of this line and this line again, nothing is impacting the pattern. Here there are things that we need to be concerned about, so let's go to the starting point, drag down, and then swing to the left, go back to where we came from and swing to the right. We're just going to do this last one here. Imagine that this is the starting point, we come down here and swing to the left and there's nothing on the right. We've got a lot of things marked out here, not all of them we're actually going to do anything with; the ones that we're concerned about is anything that has a blue line through it that is over the top of this pink shape. Let's go and find out where we are. I'm just turning these shapes on and off, clicking on the layer and then turn it on and off and noticing if there's something on this layer that has actually got a line through it and this one does. Let's go to the eraser tool. Have the eraser set to a round brush. I have a smallish size mine is 21 pixel, something like that's perfect. What you do need to do is have hardness set to 100 percent. It's actually critical that you have a hard brush here. Again, let's focus on what we're doing. This is this circle here. We're just going to come around and erase anything that has a blue line on it. Now the way that we're doing this by working with separate shapes means that you don't have to be really really accurate with your eraser. You just can't go into the shape the other side of the line. But provided you are on the line, you'll be able to erase really neatly. Design this so that it would be easy to do this erasing. Let's have a look here to see if there's anything that we need to be aware of or possibly this line, not a 100 percent sure it's impacting the pattern, but I'm going to make sure it's removed anyway. Nothing up here is impacting the pattern. Select the next shape. Nothing here is impacting the pattern. Got a few things here that are impacting it. I'm going to travel around this circle, just erase the bits that we need to erase come around here. This would be going, but it's not actually part of the pattern, so we don't have to do anything. Let's go round. This is probably not impacting the pattern. I'm going to remove it anyway. Let's go to the next shape. Nothing here has lines through it, so I'm just going to ignore that one. They show here. Nothing has lines through it. Something here is important. I'm going to go here and remove this. If you're trying to remove something from a circle and it's not erasing, it's because you've got the wrong circle selected, so just be aware of that. There's potentially things here that need to be erased. Let's just go around this circle, check it. This one's really important. I'm going to continue on and just speed up the video as I do this, I'm going to come back once I've finished all the erasing. Now that we've done last, let's just turn off the blue layer and just see how things are looking. Well, I can say that there's a problem here immediately, this line has not been removed, so I need to locate this circle before I go any further. Here it is. At this point, we should see in this area, the general pattern here is a complete y-shape, here's a complete y-shape, here's one of those y-shapes again. It's complete as far as it appears over the top of this pink rectangle. I think we're pretty good here. I'm pretty happy with this. At this point I'll hold down the Control key and click on the rectangle here. That's marking out the pattern area. I'm going to turn the visibility of that layer off because I don't want it to be a pink and black pattern. If I didn't turn the visibility off, I would end up with pink and black. I'll choose Edit and then Define Pattern, then we're going to make this a Japanese inspired pattern. We'll test it. Layer, new fill layer, pattern. Here's our completed Japanese style pattern. As I said, it is a little bit tricky to make, but provided you follow the instructions and use the same values as I have used for the sizes, everything should work out just fine. If you want to double the size, then just make everything twice as big and make your moves twice as big. If we moved, say a 150 pixels, then make it twice the move it read 300 pixels. Let's see what happens when we use the pink background because that's another possible pattern. If you wanted to have a colored background, then you could include that rectangle in your pattern pace. 3. Japanese Inspired Pattern - Save the Swatch: Before we completely finish up with this Japanese inspired pattern, let's clean up our pattern file because this would be useful later on if we wanted to create other versions of this pattern. But right now it's a little bit hard to maneuver, and in six months' time, it's going to be near impossible to remember exactly what we did. First of all, I'm going to get rid of this blue layer because that was just marking out the lines to remove. We don't need that any longer. I'm going to target the pink rectangle, because this is my pattern piece I'm going to control on a PC control click on this thumbnail on a Mac, I would command click and that just selects this pink area. This is where our pattern pieces, I'm going to choose Image and then crop. That just crops everything to the size of my pattern piece. The next thing I'm going to do is to put together all these black layers, all the layers that comprise the black part of the pattern. I'm going to click on the top most layer, scroll down here and Shift click on the bottom one of these layers. All of these comprise this black area. There are some empty layers that's just fine. They're going to be removed in this process, I'm going to right click and choose "Merge Layers". What this does is it merges the selected layers, so the pink is not being merged into the design. Just the black areas are now in a layer by themselves. There's transparency here so we're seeing through to the pink layer underneath. I'm going to deselect my selection with select and deselect. Or you could press Control or Command D, depending on whether you're on a Mac or a PC. Now, I've got this rectangle here. I would like to invert this so that black becomes white and pink becomes black. Let's go and do the black becomes white bit first. I'm going to target this black layer and choose layer, new adjustment layer and I'll choose invert and click "Okay". Now this has made black into white, but it's done something a bit funny with the pink because pink when it's inverted becomes green. What's happening is that this inversion layer effect is affecting everything in the document. We want to limit it just to the layer immediately underneath it. I'm going to target this layer and choose layer and then create a clipping mask. That just clips it so that the inversion effect only affects the layer immediately underneath so it's just flipping black into white. We've got our pink layer still here. If we want it to be black, we're going to have to undo some things that we did earlier. Firstly, I'm going to unlock this layer. Secondly, I'm noting that this layer has reduced opacity. I'm actually going to do what. There's a good chance that you're going to do so that you can see the problem and identify it and fix it in a minute. I'm just going to double click on this layer thumbnail to bring my color picker back up. I want to fill this with black. Black is 0, 0, 0 in red, green, and blue channels. This is black, but of course it's showing up in the image as gray. At this point you're probably going, I have no idea what's going on here. Well, the problem is that this layer still has that opacity of 57 percent. I brought the opacity down so that we could see through it. Now we need to take it back up again. When I take the opacity back up to 100 percent, I end up with true white and black. Of course, this is another pattern. This is an inverted color pattern. This is going to give us the ability to use this pattern piece over and over again. We can re-color it. I could turn off this black layer. I could turn off the inversion layer, and I could add, for example, over here, a color layer. Let's go to layer, new adjustment layer, and let's choose hue saturation. I'll click, "Okay". I'm going to colorize this. I'm going to click on colorize, going to increase my saturation. I'm going to increase my lightness. Then I'm going to walk around my hue to make a different color version of this pattern so I can choose whatever color I want to use. Of course we could do the same if we'd left the inversion on and simply changed the background so we would have white on some other color. White on red, white on blue, white on green, whatever we wanted. Once we've cleaned up this pattern file, life's going to be a whole lot easier in terms of using it to make different patterns. Obviously, it's a lot more easy to understand and to work with now that we've reduced it to just the elements that are needed. Of course, at this point, this is where I would say that. That's another attractive version of the pattern, made very simply by just adjusting the original pattern swatch. 4. Make the Pixelated Pattern: For this exotic pattern, we're going to create it as a series of smart object so it will be easy for us to alter it by simply altering a gradient. I suggest that you stick with the values that I'm using for my files because it's going to be more easy to reproduce. I'm using a document that's 1000 by 1000 pixels in size. It is RGB color mode and it is a white background. I'll click "Create". If you want to increase the size of this, I would suggest that you just double everything. So what I'm going to do here is select the base colors the black and white by just clicking on this icon here. Then I'm going to flip them. So I want white as my foreground and black as my background. I'm going to double-click on the white and choose a color to use. So I'm looking for something that is in the region of about 240, 239, 240. I just think that this is a pretty good color. So I'm just going to choose something. It is relatively light. It's probably lighter than you imagined that it should be by the looks of the pattern. So right now, my color values here are in the region of about 239, 69 and 76, but just something in that blue will be just fine. Now the reason why I've made this a foreground color and black the background color is that when I grab the gradient tool here and click the drop-down list, the very first gradient is a foreground to background gradient. So we've actually got our selected foreground color here and our selected background color here. So we don't have to set up a gradient because it is actually a built-in gradient. So let me just click in the top corner of this document, shift-click to drag down, so it's light at this end and dark at this end. We open up the last pallet. You'll see that I've got just a single layer that's filled with the color. I'm going to click here to unlock it. I'm going to add another layer to it. Just click on the plus sign here, just drag it underneath. Because that's going to make the rest of this work a little bit better. We're going to make this into a smart object because we're about to apply a filter to it. So I'll right-click and choose Convert to Smart Object. Then we'll apply our filter. Now it's important to convert these two smart objects so that we can alter it again later on. Filter, Pixelate and go down to a mosaic. This was one of the reasons why it was important to have a fixed size document. Mine's 1,000 by 1,000 because I want to make the cell size equal sizes. So I need to select the cell size that divides evenly into 1000 with nothing left over so that I've got nice even size cells. Now I can use anything up to 200 if you want lots of cells and you could use 100, that would work too. But I think 200 for this is going to be just perfect. So I'm just going to click "Okay", I'm going to tuck this away so I don't see the smart filter. There's no point in seeing it, I just need it to be there. Now I'm going to add another smart object. So I'm going to right-click and choose to Convert to Smart Object a second time. If you don't do this, this next step is not going to work. I'm going to choose Edit and then Free Transform. If for some reason that option is not available, you may want to press control and command T to get into free transform. Sometimes that just short circuits that, but with edit free transform, that will take us to these options up here. Click on the check mark here and make sure the middle of these nine squares is selected. I've got the icon here between w and h, width and height clicked so you can see that mine is selected as black, so you want that to be the case. We're going to select the width and we're just going to type 707 px. Then we're going to set a rotation. Now, I want this to put the light over this side. So I'm actually going to go in a negative 135 degree direction. You can use whatever rotation you like provided some multiple of 45 degrees so that you end up with this diamond shape and whatever color you want at the top being there. So I'm just going to click the check mark, that's looking good to me. Now I'm going to make a duplicate of this, just right-click and choose Duplicate Layer. It's really important that you do it this way because we want to actually duplicate that smart object. Otherwise, the next steps won't work when we come to actually edit this pattern. I'm going to apply a offset filter to this. So with this top most layer selected, I'll choose Filter, Other, and then Offset. Going to have to do this twice because of the way that this document is designed. So we're going to set the horizontal and vertical to half the width and half the height of the document. So in this case, the document is 1000 by 1000 so we're setting it to 500 and 500. You have to do this twice. The first one will be negative and negative. So just set it to minus 500, minus 500. Wrap around and click "Okay". Going to tuck that away, let's make a second copy of this duplicate layer, click "Okay", filter, other, offset. This time they're going to make it a positive 500 and positive 500. Click "Okay". Now, because of the measurements, this may be slightly off. You may be seeing a slight pixel like line around the edge of your shape. If you're using really light gradient, you probably won't see that. This is what you're going to draw. You're going to click on this bottom layer that we made, and we're just going to fill it using the paint bucket tool. Just grab the paint bucket tool and fill it. I think with the black is probably going to give us the best results. I'm just going to fill it with black paint bucket tool layer selected, click on it and filling up with black just darkens those edges and it just makes it look perfect. Now, this document is pretty big, so we're only talking about one pixel as a maximum there. So the fact that it's black there is just not going to show up on the final result. We're ready to save this; edit, Define pattern. I'm just calling this blue spectrum. Let's go and test it with File New. We're going to create a document 3600 by 3600 Layer, New Fill Layer Pattern. Click "Okay", drop-down list down, and pick up our pattern. At this stage, we can reduce its size. We made it at quite a large size so that it can be easily reduced. There's our finished design. If we want to alter the pattern, we can go back to the original document. Let's display our layers palette here. I'm going to one of these smart objects. It doesn't matter which one. I'm just going to double-click on the thumbnail, that opens up the first embedded smart object. We need to double-click on it again to get the second. Let's go and lighten this pattern a little bit. Let's go and get a slightly lighter color. I'm going back to my Gradient Tool which is hiding here. Let me just go and grab my gradient. This one is going to be a little bit lighter. Let's close this, click "Yes" to save it and close this, click "Yes" to save it. This entire pattern is now updated. We'll go to Edit and then Define Pattern. This is our second one. I won't bother naming it right now, but let's go and add another fill layer with our new pattern so that we can compare the lightness of these two. Let's just drop this down to 50 percent as well. Click "Okay" and here are the two patterns. So just by lightning that color, we're able to lighten up the pattern. Of course, we could change the colors entirely. It is just the case of double-clicking on this layer, thumbnail and double-clicking on it again, and then choosing a gradient. So this time let's go and choose a very different gradient. Let's choose a gradient out of the gradient collection here. This one's interesting. Let's just drag that through here. We're going to close it and save it, and close this one and save it. And here is our pattern. We're going to save our pattern, and we're going back to our document. For comparison purposes, let's just add another fill layer. Let's drop this down to 50 percent. There is another version of the pattern. So setting it up as smart objects makes really good sense because it means that it's editable very easily. You just have to drop another gradient into the design and you've essentially got your pattern sitting ready there for you. 5. Make the Turing Pattern: This pattern that we're going to create is called a Turing pattern. It's based on some work by the English mathematician Alan Turing. It relates to how liquids can diffuse together but we'll just create this as a two-dimensional pattern, but it's cool to know where it comes from. Now for this pattern, it's really important that you stick to the sizes we're going to use because of the way that clouds filter that we're going to use is actually, a repeat if we created it the right size. I'm creating my document at 1,024 by 1,024. I've got a white background here, which is going to work just fine. I'm also using the default colors, black and white. That's really important. We're going to apply a clouds filter so we're going to filter and then render, and we're going to choose clouds. Now, this clouds filter at this size of 1,024 by 1,024 is a repeat. You see over here, this element would repeat over this element here and that's going to really help us in this process. At this stage, I'm going to display my layers palette with window and then layers. I want to make three copies of this. I'm just going to right-click and choose duplicate layer or you can choose new layer via copy. I'm just selecting both of these and duplicating them basically. I want four copies of this document. The next thing I'm going to do is make my document much bigger image and then Canvas size. It's important that you use Canvas size because that's going to allow you to change the size of the Canvas but without affecting the actual size of the elements that we've got on the Canvas. I'm just typing 2,048 and 2,048. That's double the width and double the height of the original document again so that we can fit four of these in. They're going to repeat seamlessly. Just going to click this anchor point over here so that all of these shapes are going to appear in that top corner. Now I'm going to each of them in turn, and I'm just going to move them across so that they line up. Now I've got my smart guides turned on. If you go to view and snap, make sure snap's turned on and then snap to guides. With those smart guides enabled, everything is going to snap into position. I'm just going to select these other two and just move them down. Well, I just got one, not two, but that's fine. That's the last of them. What we want to do before we go any further at all is to just make sure that there are no seams but they should seamlessly repeat because we started them at 1,024 and 1,024. If you wanted to make it bigger, you could do it at 2,048 and 2,048 to start off with, and then just make a document that is twice as large when you go to join them together because these are the dimensions that when you fill them with different clouds or with clouds, they're going to seamlessly repeat. Back to our layers palette, what we're going to do now is to create a combined version of this. I'm just going to select over all four layers, right-click and choose merge layers, so they're merged into what is now a seamless repeating pattern. We're going to do the things that allow us to develop this Turing effect and there are three steps in this process. The very first one of these steps is to apply what's called a high pass filter. We're going to filter and then other and high-pass. We're just going to set this to something like five or six. It doesn't really matter what you use here, but five or six is going to be perfect. Then we're going to apply a threshold adjustment. Which is going to convert this to either black or white. Let's go to image adjustments threshold. It's very important that you use image adjustments threshold and don't add it as an adjustment layer because we need to bake this into the image. The default value here is 128. Just select that and click "Okay" because what that's done is now is extracted the pixels in this document as either black or white. Now we're just going to blur it up again. Filter, blur, and then Gaussian blur. For our Gaussian blur, we're going to set a value of somewhere 4, 3, 6 something that's going to blur our image nicely, and then just click "Okay". To develop this Turing effect, we're going to repeat those steps over and over again. In case you don't want to have to do that by hand, let's make a very quick action. Go to window and then actions. I've got a group here already, but you could click to create a group to store your actions in. Once you've created your group, you can just click to create the action. I'm going to call this Turing and I'll click record. I'm now going to record those exact steps over again. Luckily the filters will keep those values so we don't have to enter them again. Filter other and high-pass and just click "Okay" and then Image Adjustments, Threshold, sine value as before click "Okay". Then I Gaussian blur, filter blur, Gaussian blur, and just click "Okay". There are three steps that we need to repeat over and over again. Down the bottom here, click on the square, because that stops the recording from happening. Now we can go to the Turing, just click on the word and click the play button. But because we need to do this over and over again we can also create another action which does it over and over again. Let me just click the plus sign and I'm going to call this action Play Turing and record it. The recording is to click on this Turing action and play it once, and twice, and three times, and four times, and five times for example. Now we're going to stop it. This Play Turing action is going to play this action over five times in a row. It's just a little bit quicker than doing it by hand so I'm going to play this a few times. As you can see things are developing in the image. We're getting more of what we saw in the beginning of this Turing effect. You can do that until you've developed something that you like. Let's just have a look in here. But you'll say that it's a little bit fuzzy. Well, we can unfold that by adding a sharpening to it. I'm going to filter and then sharpen. I'm going to choose something called unsharp mask, which sounds counter-intuitive, but it is actually a sharpening process. For this, we're going to just adjust the amount and the radius. You're going to set the threshold to zero and use quite high values for the amount and the radius. You can see in here what it's doing to the effect. Just sharpening it up so I'll click "Okay". Now, once we've got our sharpened effect we need to extract our seamless repeating pattern from this. The bad news is that this over here is not going to join up with this over here. But because we put four of them together in the first place, if we take a 1,024 by 1,024 slice out of the middle of this document, that will be a repeat. Let's go and select on the rectangle tool. Let's make it set to shape. I'm going to set a fill for it and no stroke at all. I'm going to click in the document once and I'm going to type 1,024 and 1,024 and click "Okay". While I'm here I'm just going to drop the opacity down on that and we can do a really quick check here. I'm having a look up here and you can see this bent V-shaped with a little dash on it. Well down the bottom, just inside this 1,024 by 1,024 square is that exact same shape. Over here we should see a little line across the edge of the shape and over here we see the corresponding line. We can see that it looks like we've got pretty much a seamless repeating pattern. Let's control or command-click on this rectangle so that you see the little marching ants. We're just going to turn off that. We've still got the marching ants in place and we're just going to choose edit define pattern. This is our pattern. It is the selection here that we have. I'm just going to click "Okay". Now let's test it with file and then new. I'm going to create a document 3600 by 3600 pixels. A pattern is going to fit in here at least three times. Fill layer pattern, click "Okay" and now we're going to find our pattern. I'll click the drop-down list and the pattern should be the last one in the patterns dialogue. I'll click "Okay" and of course now we need to check and make sure that everything looks alright. The original pattern pace at 100 percent is 1,024 pixels and this document is 3,600. Any mistakes should be in about this area. They're going to show up in about this area and about here. Let's just zoom in. If we've got a problem in the repeat, we're going to see it. I'm not saying any problems in this repeat at all. It all looks perfectly good. If we wanted to create this effect as a different color, let's have a look and say how we would make the black a different color. We're going to use a different process for this. What I'm going to do is just target the background here. I'm just going to choose layer, new fill layer, and solid color. I'm going to choose a color to use at this point. I'm going to go for a nice turquoise blue. One of the ways that we can recolor when we've got something that is solid black and white because that's what we designed this as. We've got black and white. Well, we can poke through the black areas to bring the color in from the layer underneath. I'm going to target our pattern fill layer. This is the pattern layer here. I'm going to target it and I'm going down to this fx icon, and I'm going to choose what are called Blending Options. Here we've got a thing that says blend if gray. What we're going to say to Photoshop is if there is black on this layer, you can see it says this layer here. If there is black on this layer, start poking a hole through it. I'm just going to bring that across and you'll see that what is happening is that we've got a whole being poked in our pattern in the shape of the black objects and not the white ones. Now, if we have a look very closely, you'll see that there's a slight haze around the edges of this. We can get rid of that by holding down the Alt key on a PC and option on a Mac and you can split this little indicator here. When you split it, you can drag one side of it all the way across pretty close to the white end and the other one for this particular illustration quite a bit closer but that gives us a bleed if you'd like so around the very edges of the shape are some not perfectly black pixels. They're a little bit gray. Everything that is pure black is going to be picked up here. Anything is between black and almost white is going to have that color applied to it on a graduated effect. That's going to give us this smooth-looking edge. The edges are much smoother now. At this point, if we're not happy with the color of the patent then I can just double-click on the color fill layer and choose a different color for the pattern itself. Of course, the pattern can be resized really easily because it is still a pattern. Let's just double-click on it. For this, let's make it 250% and click "Okay" so we can see it a bit more clearly. This Turing pattern is really exciting to create. It's wonderful to see it develop. Once you've actually created your actions, they're going to be in your actions palette. It's very simple to just create a starting Clouds document and then start applying the shearing actions to it. Every time you apply the clouds filter to a document, you get a different set of clouds. You're going to get a slightly different iteration of this pattern every time you create it. Of course, over here we still have our marching ants in place and they are over a selection of this pattern. If we wanted to save this as a pattern pace that we could use, again, I would just choose Image and then crop. We are cropping it to that pattern size. I'm going to delete my color layer because I don't need it any longer. if I go ahead and save this, this is the seamless repeating pattern. Of course, it's in our patterns collection but we may want to come back and do some other things to it. We can do so because we have the pattern watch selected and save as an actual document. 6. Project and Wrap Up: We've now completed the video training portion of this course, so it's over to you. Your project for this class is to create one or more of these patterns in Photoshop and to post an image of the completed design as your class project. I hope that you've enjoyed this course and that you've learned lots about working in Adobe Photoshop. Now, if you did enjoy this course and when you say a prompt that asks if you would recommend this class to others, please would you do two things for me. Firstly, answer yes, that you do recommend the class. Secondly, write even in just a few words, why you enjoyed the class. Your recommendations will help other students to say that this is a course that they might like to take. If you see the Follow link on the screen, click it and you'll be alerted when your classes are released. If you'd like to leave me a comment or a question, please do so. I read and respond to all of your questions and comments, and I look at and review all your class projects. My name's Helen Bradley. Thank you so much for joining me to this episode of graphic design for lunch. I'll look forward to seeing you in another class here on Skillshare soon.