10 Advanced Photoshop Patterns to Make and Sell - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class | Helen Bradley | Skillshare
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10 Advanced Photoshop Patterns to Make and Sell - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

teacher avatar Helen Bradley, Graphic Design for Lunch™

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

    • 1.

      10 Patterns in Photoshop Introduction

      0:54

    • 2.

      Pt 1 - Wavy Line Pattern

      11:51

    • 3.

      Pt 2 - Argyle Pattern

      8:02

    • 4.

      Pt 3 - Swirly Loops Pattern

      8:24

    • 5.

      Pt 4 - Woven Pattern

      6:06

    • 6.

      Pt 5 - Enhance the Woven Pattern

      6:31

    • 7.

      Pt 6 - Knitting Pattern

      13:37

    • 8.

      Pt 7 - Customize the Knitting Pattern

      5:58

    • 9.

      Pt 8 - 50s Loopy Pattern

      12:55

    • 10.

      Pt 9 - Uneven Stripes Pattern

      12:08

    • 11.

      Pt 10 - Multi Color Uneven Stripes

      5:34

    • 12.

      Pt 11 - Diamonds Pattern

      6:58

    • 13.

      Pt 12 - Photo to Pattern

      10:16

    • 14.

      Pt 13 - Photo to Shape to Pattern

      4:40

    • 15.

      Pt 14 - Photo to Brush to Pattern

      11:45

    • 16.

      Pt 15 - Hexagon Pattern

      14:05

    • 17.

      10 Patterns in Photoshop Project and Wrapup

      1:07

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About This Class

10 Advanced Photoshop Patterns to Make and Sell - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Graphic Design for Lunch™ is a series of short video courses you can study in bite size pieces such as at lunchtime. In this course you'll learn to create 10 advanced patterns in Adobe Photoshop. The instructions for all the patterns are very separate so you can study any or all of the 10 patterns in whatever order you like. Each pattern showcases a range of Photoshop tools and techniques to help you build your skills. By the time you have finished this course you will have the skills you need to make 10 new patterns ready for sale and use.

The patterns include: a wavy line pattern; a knitting pattern; a woven pattern; a loopy line pattern; a leaf pattern (created three ways); a diamond pattern, a 50s curve pattern, an argyle pattern; an uneven line pattern; and a hexagon pattern.

More in this series:

More in this series:

Make Patterns from Sketches & Digital Art in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

10 Pattern Tips and Techniques in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Make Ikat Patterns in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Marble Repeating Patterns in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Make & Sell Scrapbook Paper Designs in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Create a Range of Circle Patterns in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ class

10 Blend Tips in 10 minutes in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

10 Brush Tips in 10 Minutes in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Clean & Color Scanned Line Art in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

10 Top Photoshop Tips in 10 mins - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

3 Exotic Patterns in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Abstract Glowing Backgrounds in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Complex Pattern Swatches in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Complex Selections Made Easy in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Award Badge & Ribbon Design in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Backgrounds - Halftones, Sunburst, Patterns in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Create Hi-Tech HUD Rings in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Create Organic Patterns in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Create Text on a Path in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Curly Bracket Frames and Text Boxes in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

10 Selection tips in 10 mins in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Cutout & Frame Photos in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Vintage Image Cutout Effect in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Creative Layer Styles in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Make Patterns with the New Pattern Tool in Photoshop 2021 - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Paint a Photo in Adobe Photoshop using Art History - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

4 Critical File Formats - jpg, png, pdf, psd in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

B&W, Tints & Isolated Color Effects in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Bend Objects with Puppet Warp in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Glitter Text, Shapes and Scrapbook Papers in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Color a Scanned Sketch in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Create a Color Scheme Graphic in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Create a Custom Character Font in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Create a Mandala in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Reusable Wreath Design in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Create Complex Half Drop Repeating Patterns in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Create Mockups to Use and Sell in Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Create Plaid (Tartan) Repeat Patterns in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Color a Sketch with a Texture in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Droste Effect with Photoshop and a free online tool - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Critters with Character in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Whimsical Textures for Drawings in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Demystifying the Histogram in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Double Exposure Effect in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Draw a Fantasy Map in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Emboss and Deboss Text and Shapes in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Folded Photo Effect in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Everyday Photo-editing Made Easy in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Get Your File Size Right Every Time in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Grab Bag of Fun Text Effects in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Grid Collage for Social Media in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Hi-tech Mosaic with Brushes & Patterns in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Warhol inspired Colourful Animal Images in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Intro to Creating and Using Photoshop Actions - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Isometric Cube Patterns in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Layered Paper Collage Effect in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Layers and Layer Masks 101 for photographers in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Make & Sell a Shapes Collection in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Seamless Repeating Patterns in Adobe Photoshop - Just the Basics - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Make & Use Photo Brushes in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Photo Collage for Social Media in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Make and Sell Overlays for Social Media in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Make Custom Shapes in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Kaleidoscopes with Smart Objects in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Diagonals, Chevrons, Plaid & Polkadots in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Make & Sell Photoshop Brushes in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Overlapping and Random Circles Patterns in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Pattern Bombing Effect in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Turn a Photo into a Pattern in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Patterns as Photo Overlays for Social Media in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Photo Texture Collage - Blending & Textures in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Inking Techniques in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Prepare images for Social Media & Blogs in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Recolor Objects without Making Selections in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Techniques for Recoloring Patterns in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Remove Objects & Tourists from Photos in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Reusable Video Glitch Effect in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Seamlessly Blend Two Images in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Set up Colors, Tints and Shades in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Sketches & Brushes to Whimsical Patterns in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Snapshot to Art - 3 Handy Photo Effects in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Surreal Collage Effect in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Text Over Image Effects - Glyphs & Layers in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Using Textures in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Photoshop Type Basics in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Upside Down Image Effect in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Using Illustrator Objects in Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Using the Scripted Pattern Fill Tool in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Valentine's Day Inspired Hearts in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Whimsical Rotated Patterns in Adobe Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

Scrapbook Paper Designs with Displacement Maps in Photoshop - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

3 Awesome Photoshop Patterns - Step by Step - A Graphic Design for Lunch™ Class

 

Meet Your Teacher

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Helen Bradley

Graphic Design for Lunch™

Top Teacher

Helen teaches the popular Graphic Design for Lunch™ courses which focus on teaching Adobe® Photoshop®, Adobe® Illustrator®, Procreate®, and other graphic design and photo editing applications. Each course is short enough to take over a lunch break and is packed with useful and fun techniques. Class projects reinforce what is taught so they too can be easily completed over a lunch hour or two.

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Level: Intermediate

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Transcripts

1. 10 Patterns in Photoshop Introduction: Hello and welcome to this Photoshop class on making 10 advanced patterns in Adobe Photoshop. My name is Helen Bradley and I'm a Skillshare top pager. I have over 270 courses on Skillshare and over 168,000 student enrollments. In this class, we're going to make 10 more advanced patterns in Adobe Photoshop, including patterns of wavy lines and swirly loops, a woven pattern and a knitting one, a pattern of uneven lines and a hexagon pattern, and more. Every one of these patterns has been chosen because it uses different Photoshop skills and techniques. So you're going to grow your Photoshop skills as you create these designs. By the end of the class, you'll have 10 new types of patterns to add to your Photoshop pattern collection and you'll have learned lots of handy tips and techniques for working in Photoshop every day. So without further ado, let's get started making more advanced patterns in Adobe Photoshop. 2. Pt 1 - Wavy Line Pattern: This wavy line pattern can be made in a single color or in multiple colors. It is a little bit tricky to make, but it's worth learning how to make it, because it does illustrate a key principle for creating patterns out of unusual objects, if you like, in Photoshop. Now I'm going to start with a document that is 1,000 pixels by 1,000 pixels in size. I'm going to the rectangular tool down here, the rectangle shape tool, it's set to shape. I have a fill which is going to be one of the colors of my lines and it's got no stroke at all. I'm going to drag out a shape that is the width of the document and it's quite a hefty depth. Mine's going to be something like about 1,000 by 280. It's not exact, but I can make it exact in this dialogue. It doesn't have to be exact, so don't worry too much about that, but I'm going to position it right on the very edge of the document by setting my X value to zero. This is my starting shape here. In the layers panel, I'm going to right-click this layer here and choose convert to smart object. This is going to mean that the filter I'm about to apply can be edited. That's important if you don't get it right the first time. We'll choose filter and then distort and then wave. I'm going to apply a wave filter to this shape. Now I'm setting it to sign because we want that curvy wave shape. What I want in this dialogue is at least two of these bumps at the top. I want two bumps at the top and one and a bit bumps at the bottom. It's going to make it easier to get a really nice pattern later on. I've set my number of generators here to 26. It's not set in concrete, but you will find that changing that value is going to change the shape of your lumps and bumps, if you like, on this line. Again, making sure that we've got plenty of pattern, plenty of element to create our pattern from. 2025 might be an appropriate setting. For wavelength, you want your minimum and maximum to be pretty much the same. They can't be the same number but they can be one digit off. I'm dragging on the minimum because it's always going to be less than the maximum. You can say that that's flattening it out. Drag on the maximum to go back the other way because that takes a minimum with it. Again, I'm just making sure they've got plenty of bumps here that I can make my pattern out of it. Let me just adjust that a little bit. That's a pretty good amount of bumps to make the pattern from. You don't want lots and lots of waves here because we're not going to be using them. You're just wasting the document that you've got here. Amplitude, I've got my minimum set to one and my maximum to 70. You can see that the maximum is pulling this into a different shape. That's not the shape I want, I want mine to be this very generous, rounded wave shape. The amplitude again is going to change things to the minimum. I'm setting minimum, as I said, to one, maximum to something like 70, 71. The scale is 100 on vertical and horizontal. Once you've got that and once you're happy with the number of bumps you've got in here, just click Ok. Now if you look at that and it's not right, the reason why we created this as a smart object is that, that this wave filter is editable at this stage. You could just double-click on it, open the dialogue back up and make changes to it. I'm happy with this, so I don't need to use that feature. I'm just going to right-click and rasterize this, which turns it into pixels. We've lost our shape, we've lost our filter. They're not editable any longer. But that's what I wanted. I'm going to right-click and choose duplicate layer because I want a second copy of this. Now with my duplicate selected, I'm going to flip it. I'm going to choose edit and then transform. It's really important that you choose the right one here. What we're going to do is flip it horizontally. Click flip horizontal and you should end up with something that looks like this. Set the blend mode of this for now to different. Just click on Difference and then just click away from the shape and then re-select that. Because if you don't do that and you're on a PC, you're going to start changing the blend mode, not moving the subject. With this top layer selected this is going to be the red one right now. I'm moving it over so that it overlaps the one underneath. Because what I want to do is even out any inconsistencies in these shapes. That filter that we just use does not give you perfect, perfect waves. They're good enough for a lot of purposes, not for patterns. I'm just going to zoom in here. What this difference filter is giving us is a look at how these two shapes are out. They're not overlapping perfectly. The blue bit is I'm not overlapping, and so is the read bit. The black bit is we've got pixels on both layers. What you want here is the amount of pixels showing here to be roughly equivalent to the amount of pixels showing there. That's it. Just adjust it by nudging it with the arrow keys until you get approximately the same number of pixels showing. That's all you need. You just want to line these up as well as you can. Switch this back to the normal blend mode, right-click this layer and choose merge down. What that does is it merges those two layers together. Now we have perfectly symmetrical shapes because they've been joined together. Well, they're symmetrical in the area in which they were joined together. They're not symmetrical over here. Next thing is to make sure you've got rulers visible, choose view and rulers if you don't. Then you're going to drag from the ruler line here down and drag a ruler to the very top of these two bumps. Then go and drag one to the bottom, come to the side here, and drag one to the middle of this bump, and then another one to the middle of this bump. Essentially this area in here is going to be our pattern, so we need to make sure that it looks good. Let's zoom in. What I'm looking for here is for this grid line to be pretty much in the middle of my shape. I think it's off by about a pixel so I'm just going to move it. That looks like it's pretty even. I'm also going to drag this down, so it's just sitting on the top of the shape. Let's go across and make sure things are looking good on this second shape. Well, it's not quite in the middle. I think eyeballing it, that's a better position for it. Let's zoom out. I'm using control or command zero to zoom out. Let's go and just check the bottom here because we don't want to cut the bottom of our shape off. Well, it's perfectly positioned. You can see that the guide is just immediately below the last pixels in this shape. Everything is looking good at this point. I'm going to choose the rectangular marquee tool here. I'm going to make sure that I've got my snaps turned on. I've got snap turned on and it's snapping to everything. That's perfect. That's going to work just fine. I'm going to click and drag a rectangle that fills this area that's marked out by the guides because this should be our pattern. I'll go to edit and then define pattern, and I'm going to call this wave, and click Ok. Now we'll test that with a new document. Want to make sure that you test these straight away, because if there's a problem with them, you need to know that now. Layer, new Fill layer pattern. Click Ok, and select the very last pattern in the list. At this point, we can check and make sure our pattern looks like we don't need to zoom in very far. We know that the pattern involve these two top loop. If everything looks fine in this area and in this area then the pattern is perfect, and it is just that it is a perfect wavy pattern. But let's go back now and see how we can create our second pattern of multicolored waves. We want to leave everything intact here. We also want to make sure that our pattern is perfect before we go further. If your pattern wasn't perfect, then you would come in here and adjust your guide so that you've got a better selection going. Remake your pattern, go and check it. Don't make your second set of colored waves until you've got the first one perfect. Then when you've got it perfect, don't move anything because we're going to use this marquee that we have for our pattern as a cutting guide. I'm going to choose image and then crop. What that does is that it crops the image to the selection I had in place. I'm also going to turn off my guides, I don't need them any longer. View guides, clear guides. I'm going to deselect my selection with select and then de-select. I've got my pattern here, I need to double this document size. What I'm going to do is choose image and then canvas size. Now it's important to use canvas size, not image size. We don't want to change the size of this loop, we just want to space to add a second one. Right now the height of our document, the depth here is 477. We're just going to double that. Leave the width as it is and just change the height. Now you can do the mathematics in your head or you can get out a calculator, you just going to multiply whatever your height is by 2. I happen to know that that's going to be 954 because I just did it on a sheet of paper. Then for the anchor, you're going to click here in the top most box in the middle. What that does is it makes sure that this shape that we're seeing here in the document is going to stay where it is. When we make the canvas bigger, we have an option here to move it. We don't want to move it, we want to leave it exactly where it is. Click Ok. Now we have a canvas which has double the height that it was with our shape in the very top. Let's right-click this and choose duplicate layer, click Ok. I'm going to the Move tool. I'm going to hold the Shift key because I want it to be moving in a perfectly vertical direction. I'm just going to take this down so it bumps against the very bottom of the document again, using those guides to line everything up. We don't want blue pattern because we already got that. What we want to do is make this a different color. I'm going to target this rectangle layer here. I'm going to the fx icon and I'm going to choose color overlay because I just find this as a really nice and easy way to add color to a layer. In the color overlay area here I've set the blend mode to normal, the opacity to 100%. I've just chosen a color. Just go choose a color and click Ok. This is another pattern, is a pattern of turquoise and pink wavy lines. Because we're taking the whole document, this time we don't have to make a selection. We can just go straight to edit, define pattern. Let's go and test it. In our other document, we'll double-click on this pattern fill layer, click the drop-down list and go to the very last pattern. There is our pattern. Of course, using the pattern fill layer option, you do have the ability to scale this so that you can have a look at it at different scales. That's how you create a single or multi-color wave pattern in Photoshop. You've learned something of the principles of selecting a repeat swatch from a rather more complex document. 3. Pt 2 - Argyle Pattern: Argyle patterns like these are fun to make. They're really attractive and they're a really good foundation pattern to know how to create. I've got some single color and multicolor ones as well as the black and white one. Now, the black and white one has a trick where the lines over the top actually change color depending on what color they are over the top of so watch the end of the video because you're going to be interested in that trick. I'm going to start with a brand new file. It's going to be 1,000 pixels by 1,000 pixels. This is pretty important in terms of getting the pattern to look good so just use these dimensions. I'll click "Create". I'm going to show my guide, so I'm going to View and then Guides and New Guide Layout. For this, I want columns and rows enabled. Four columns, four rows, no width, no height, no data, no nothing. The color, you can just choose whatever color you want. Just click "Okay". Now, we're going to use the pen tool for this, but I promise you it's really just four clicks. Make sure it's set to shape, makes sure that you have the fill color you want to use, and make sure you don't have any stroke. You're just going to come up here and click at this anchor point assuming that your snaps are turned on so I've gone to View. I've Snap turned on and all my Snap Tos are enabled. The pen tool is going to snap to this anchor point if I get it close enough. I'm going to come down here to this one. What we just drawing here is a long thin diamond basically. You want to finish off so I'll go back to your starting point, hover over it and click so that you get a shape that finishes where it began. Now, if we go to the layers palette, I'm just pressing F7 so I can see my layers palette. I'm going to right-click here and choose Duplicate Layer so that I can get a second one of these. This one, I'm going to drag across, so I'm holding the Shift Key as I drag it across. I'm going to make sure of its position by using Edit and then Free Transform Path. Just making sure that the center of this shape is at 750 and 500 looks fine to me. Let's go to this shape and again, Edit, Free Transform Path. Make sure that it's at 250 and 500, the center here. If you're not seeing those nine little boxes then turn on this checkmark. Everything is looking like it's in the correct position. I'm going to make a duplicate of this layer and it's going to be my lines so I'm going to target this top-most layer. I'm going to one of the shape tools, it doesn't matter which one. I'm going to turn my fill off, that's really important and I'm going to set my stroke to a black stroke. Now, it's way too thick. I think I'm going to bring down the stroke with two four and see how that looks. We're going to click on this icon here to select dashed lines. Now, in more options you'll see that I've got the dashed lines turned on, the dash set to four, the gap set to two. You can adjust those settings if you need to, to get longer or bigger spaces between your dashes, but I'm happy with that. I'm going to the Move tool. I don't have auto select enabled, that's important because it's going to make it easier for me to move this and start moving it and hold the Shift Key to make sure that it's moving in a perfectly horizontal direction. I'm going to check that it's middle is right over the edge of the document, Edit, Free Transform Path. It's middle is at 1,500 x and y, that's perfect. I'll right-click and I'm going to duplicate this layer again. This time I'm going to drag it back to the middle of the document. At this point, the middle of this shape should be at 500, 500 Edit, Free Transform path check 500, 500 which it is. I'll click the check mark. I'm going to make one more duplicate of this and drag it across holding the Shift key so it's going in a perfectly horizontal direction. Double-check its position, it's not correct. I didn't think it was correct. I just had that feeling it wasn't snapping correctly. I've changed its x to zero, it's y should be 500. It's easy enough to change those if you get them in the wrong position. We're going to turn our guides off with few guides. I'm just going to clear my guides, I don't need them any longer. This is my pattern, so I'm going to choose Edit and then Define Pattern. This will be Argyle 1. We need a document to test this in. It's always wise to test your patterns immediately you create them, because if you've made a mistake, you want to know immediately that there is a problem with the pattern so that you can fix it up while it is still fresh in your mind. Here is our argyle pattern, if you want to make any changes to it, then go back to the original pattern piece make your changes and test it again. I'm pretty happy with this. Let's go and see how we'd make a two-color version. Well, for a two-color version, we're going to select one of these shapes. I'm just going to add a color overlay so click on the ''FX'' icon and choose Color Overlay. I've some colors I'm using for these patterns and this happens to be the color that I want to be using. Its blend mode is set to normal, opacity to 100 and you can just click in here and just choose your color, but my colors are already selected. This is my second pattern, easy as that Edit, Define Pattern, Argyle 2. Go on and check it looking the way that you want it to look, which it is. Now, that we've got a two-color argyle, let's go and have a look and see how we can make that into a black and white argyle. I'm coming back to this document, I'm going to select my two argyle diamond shapes. Go back to a Shape Tool and I'm going to set the fill to pure black. I'm going to use these grayscale options because I know this is pure black and we can double-check it, and that's going to be important because the next effect is going to work better on pure black. It's zero in the red, green and blue channels, that's black. Let's go and select the three layers that are this dashed line. For these again, select a shape tool. We don't want to change the fill, but we do want to change the stroke to white. Again, let's go to this grayscale selection because this is pure white. Now, we're halfway to where we want to be. I've got white appearing over the black, which is perfect. The problem is that I am not seeing the white over the white because they're the same color. What I want to do is to put the lines at this point to be black. Well, you can do that with a blend mode, so I'm selecting these layers here and I'm going to set the blend mode to one of two blend modes, exclusion or difference. It doesn't matter. They both have the same effect in this situation. Let's click on ''Exclusion'' and you can see that these white shapes here are now white where they encounter black, but they're black when they encounter white so invert process. Interestingly, it doesn't work if the lines are black. They have to be white so that's why we went through the trouble of making them white because then this effect works perfectly. You can see that the lines are seamless. If they cross over the edge of one of these rectangles, they immediately change color so we haven't had to do anything fancy to have the lines work really perfectly. Edit, Define Pattern Argyle 3 and let's go and test it. Here we have our black and white argyle pattern. As I said, argyle patterns are a wonderful addition to your Photoshop pattern tool kit. 4. Pt 3 - Swirly Loops Pattern: This swirly pattern here looks a lot more difficult to create than it actually is. We're going to start with a new file. I suggest you follow along with these measurements because it's pretty critical to getting this to work. I'm doing a width of 900 pixels and a height of 600 pixels. Ultimately, we're going to have a pattern swatch that is 600 by 600. We just need to make it bigger to start off with, I'm clicking "Create". I'm going to choose View and then Guides, and then New Guide Layout. This allows us to make multiple lines or multiple guides at a time. I've set the color to cyan. You can use whatever color you like, it's not relevant at this point. I've set columns and rows on. I have six columns, two rows. I have nothing in the width or height columns here and nothing in the gutter. That's really important. You don't want any gutters at all and just click, "Okay". I'm holding down the space bar as I move things up so I can see everything a little bit more clearly. I think I'll zoom in just a little bit. [NOISE] I want to say this corner of the document and this area here, I think I'm pretty good. I'm going to the pen tool. Select the Pen tool and select Shape. I have a fill of nothing at all. I have a black stroke that you need something so that you can see it at work. I have it set to four pixels that it's going to be pretty easy for you to see and over here with this little gear icon, I've got rubber band turned on that's going to make life a little bit easier for you because you can see the shape as you're drawing it. We're going to start down here in the very bottom corner of the document and you're going to click and drag, and drag to the right, hold the Shift key down. You're coming all the way to this grid line here. Once you've got there, you're going to let go the left mouse button first, and then let go the Shift key. You can see this rubber band is showing you where we're headed to. I'm going up here to this point here so it's two grid lines in. I'm going to click and drag to the left this time and I'm going to add the Shift key, and I'm coming all the way across to this first grid line here. Again, let go the left mouse button. Again, let go the Shift key. Now we're coming down here and this is where you want to watch out because this seems a little bit too far, but you're going to come across here from this midpoint here, we're going to come across two grid lines and you're going to click here and drag to the right and we're going all the way to the very right edge of the document. Again, hold down the Shift key so that you make sure that you get this perfect. When you get there, let go the left mouse button, let go the Shift key and then go and press "Escape" because that's going to stop the drawing. You'll see that the shape is in the bottom half of the document and it only goes out to two-thirds of the way across the document this bit we're going to discard in a minute, but we needed it to be able to draw. I'm going to the crop tool. I'm going to bring this in and I'm just looking for that little tooltip to tell me I've got to 600 and because we've got grid lines there, you're probably going to find it just snaps in perfectly. All we're doing is taking 300 pixels off the edge there, click the "Check mark". Now I have my options here set to the document size so you can actually change what you see here and I've got document dimensions because that allows me to make sure that I'm on track here. It does say 600 by 600 pixels. I'm going to the Path Selection Tool. I don't need my grid lines anymore, so I'm going to choose View Guides and then I'm just going to clear my guides. With the path selection tool, I'm going to select Over my Path and I want to move it to the middle of the document. Let's go up here to this option. Make sure that this says canvas, and let's center it in the middle of the canvas. Over in the last pallet, we're going to make this a smart object. Right-click and choose Convert to Smart Object, and then right-click and duplicate it. As with all of these patterns that follow this design approach, we're just going to use the offset filter, filter, other offset. Again, the documents 600 by 600, so we're throwing it 300 in the horizontal and 300 in the vertical. Make sure wrap-around is selected, make sure previous turned on so you can see that it looks pretty much like mine does, and click, "Okay". At this point, if you want to change the color or the thickness of the line, you can do so just double-click on the smart object. Use the path selection tool to select your shape, go and give it a different color. I'm going to make mine this pink color, and I'm going to take it up to six pixels. I'll close the document and click "Yes" to save my embedded smart object. Now I'm just going to save my Pattern, Edit, Define Pattern. I'm going to call this loops. New fill layer pattern and here's our loopy pattern. If you want to take this pattern one step further, you can do so. What I'm thinking here is to fill these areas with a color. The first thing I'm going to do is select this shape down here, and I'm going to the Magic Want Tool here. I haven't set to a fairly high tolerance, and I'm just going to click inside this shape to select it. Then I'm going to make it a little bit larger with select and then modify and expand, and I'm setting it to two pixels. My line weight was about four, so our two pixels is just going to tuck this shape ultimately behind this line. If your line weight is very small, then you will have to expand at a very small amount or perhaps not at all. I'm going to add a new layer to the document. I'm going to move it underneath this shape so that the color is going to go under and it's still going to have that nice line over the top. I'm going to choose orange as my color. I've targeted orange and I'm going to the Paint Bucket tool. I'm just going to fill that portion of this layer with orange. I'll choose, select and deselect to deselect my selection. So far so good, we've got our fill. Now, I want to put a different color fill in the corners here. I'm going to make a duplicate of this. Let's just duplicate this layer and so that it will be a bit easier if I want to change this color, this one I'm going to make into a smart object because I'm about to throw it into the four corners, which is going to break it into four pieces, making a smart object, it's going to make editing it later on just a little bit easier. It's now smart object, let's throw it into the corners with filter other and then offset. The offset values are the same as they were before they should be. I'll just click, "Okay" and now if we want a different color here, we can do that. I'll just double-click on my smart object, and this is the smart object. What I'm going to do is lock the transparent pixels on this layer. So you can see lock transparent pixels is selected. I'm going to select a different color. This one's going to be my pink and because it's the foreground color. I'm going to press "Alt" and then backspace to fill this layer with the pink color. You can also use the paint bucket tool, but you want to put in a fairly hefty tolerance because you need to get rid of that orange color. When you're happy with that, close it, save it. We're back in our document and we've got our pink color in the corners and our yellow color in the middle. Let's make a pattern from that and here's our multi-color version. Of course, if you had 1-2 you could have saved the all-orange version on the way through and that would have given you another pattern. 5. Pt 4 - Woven Pattern: Creating a woven pattern like this in Photoshop is pretty easy and it offers us some opportunities for some customization. Let's see how we're going to create it. In this case, using the dimensions that I'm using are going to be critical. I'm going to click on New file and I'm going to create a document that is 1,000 pixels by 1,000 pixels. I'm using RGB color, 300 pixels per inch with a white background. Now we're going to use some guides here. Again, these settings are critical. I'm going to choose View and then Guides and choose New Guide Layout. Now for this I want to have some margin. I'm going to set margins on. I don't want anything for the top margins. I'm going to type zero. For my left margin, I want a 50 pixel margin so I'll type 50. For the bottom, I want another 50 pixels so I'll type 50 and for the right zero. Then for my columns, I want to have four columns. I'm going to type four in here and the gutter is going to be that same 50. For the rows, the exact same thing, for columns and a 50 pixel gutter. What this is doing is marking out the area for us to be able to draw our shapes and we'll be able to draw them with extreme accuracy if we have these set already for us. I'm just going to click, Okay. I'm going to make sure that snap is set on, so I have view and I'm showing obviously my guides here so I've got show guide set on. I've got snap turned on and I have snap to guides turned on. That's important to make sure that the shapes we're about to draw actually snap to the guides. Now for this, we're going to use the rectangle shapes on targeting it. I'm setting it to a shape. Then I'll set no stroke on this at all and a fill of something that I like. Let's just go and get a light colored fill for this. I have a pink fill. You can choose whatever you like. Now we're going to draw some shapes, and we're going to start here and we're going to draw one across the three large boxes. Because snap is turned on, I should be able to just drag out my shape. I'm looking in the little tool tip at the bottom right corner of my mouse pointer here to make sure that the width and height are nice even values. I've got 700 and 200, that's exactly perfect. I'll let go. The next shape is going to be down here. I'll click in this corner here and just drag out a shape. Now, this is not the right size. It says to 54 by 200. It shouldn't be that size. Let's just size it correctly. I'm just dragging it out and in on the edge that I saw that it was incorrect. Now we're going to draw a shape here, and it's going to go all the way down to just above this bottom line. I'm going to click and drag out, check the size, 200 by 700. That's perfect. Now we need one in here, so again, I'm going to set my starting point. You might find it easier to actually start at an intersection here. It might be more accurate sort the problem I had earlier. This one is 200 by 450, that's perfect. We're going to draw one here too, and this is going to be 200 by 450. I've dismissed the edge there. There it is at 200 by 450. We have one final shape to draw and that's going to be here. It's going to go all the way to the very bottom edge of the document. Again, 200 by 250. In this instance, let's just make sure that it is the right size. These are the elements that allow us to create our woven pattern. We're going to have a wave here. It's going to duck under this, it's going to reappear over here. This one is going to be a horizontal wave and then a vertical, then there will be another horizontal here. We've got everything in place. All we need to do is to grab our pattern. I'll choose Edit and then Define Pattern and click Okay. We'll create a document to test this. I'm going to create quite a large document, in this case, 3,600 by 3,600 pixels. A number of copies of my patterns should go in here about 3.5 in the vertical, 3.5 in the horizontal. New Fill Layer Pattern, click Okay, and go and find the very last pattern in the patterns dialogue, which is our pattern, and I'll click Okay. As you can see, this is a nice woven pattern. If we wanted to see it as smaller size, once we're convinced that it's working just perfectly, let's set it to 50. Now this is one iteration of the pattern, and as soon as we've determined that everything is working, let's go and have a look at a way that we can add a little bit of variety to it. I'm going back to my rectangle tool this time. I'm going to select a black fill, and I'm going to fill in these little boxes here, these four of them. I'm just going to drag out a square that will go in this box, and these are going to be 200 by 200. Again, just trying to line up with the intersection as close as I can get. I'm going to be using that snap feature to snap in and create four 200 by 200 boxes. Everything's looking really good here. I'm going to choose Edit and Define Pattern and click Okay. Let's go back to our pattern. Let's go back to our layers here. Double-click on this and go and pick up the last pattern in the pattern's dialog. This is a different iteration of the pattern. In this case, we've got a cross wave with a border on it, and we're saying that we have a black space in-between each of these pattern elements. Of course, you can adjust the colors should you wish to do so. 6. Pt 5 - Enhance the Woven Pattern: Now that we've created our woven pattern, it's time to have a look at adding a little bit of dimension to it. We're going to add some shading. For this, I'm going to be using the Rectangle tool again, but I do want to switch my colors around. Black is my foreground color, and white is my background color. That will mean that the gradient I'm about to use will actually go in as a black to transparent gradient. I'm going to make sure I have the Rectangle tool selected, make sure it's set to shape for the fill. I'm going to the Gradient option and I'm going to choose the second one of these, and that is a foreground to transparent gradient. It's going to click away. Now I want my gradient to go in here, so I'm just going to drag over a shape and I want it to go about halfway across my shapes. I'm going to make it 200 by 100. It's going to snap at the top, which is exactly as it should, but not snap at the bottom because there is no guide near here. That's just perfect. Now the problem with this gradient is it's the wrong way around. I'm going to open up the gradient box and I want to set this to 270 because that will make it gray at the top and clear at the bottom. That's good for that first gradient. I need this same gradient over here. I'm going to click on this rectangle, hold down the Alt or Option key, and drag a duplicate away. I also need it down here, but I need it in reverse. I'm going to Alt or Option drag a duplicate away, place it in the exact position lined up to this guide here. Go to one of my Shape tools. I'm just heading back to the Rectangle tool because that gives me access to this fill, and I'm going to set this to 90 because I want this gradient to go the other way. Just click away. This shape I need over here. I'm going to Alt or Option, click on it and just drag it over here. There's a pattern to what we're doing. We're doing internal shading on each of these shapes. This one's internal going in this direction, this is internal going in this direction. We're going to do the same over here on the gradients are going to go in a different direction. Let's take this one, I'll Alt or Option drag it, over and I'm going to rotate it. I'm holding the Shift key so it rotates in a perfect 90-degree direction. Then I'm going to move it into position. Now, the gradient is in the right spot, but again, the gradient is just incorrect. With one of these Shape tools selected, I'm going to reopen my gradient and this time I need either zero or 180. Well, I tried zero and it wasn't right. Let's try 180 because that's going to be correct. I'll just click away from this shape because I want to re-select it and Alt or Option drag it because it's going up here as well. Then we need one here and one here that are going in the opposite direction. Let's Alt or Option drag this, place it in position, go back to one of our Shape tools. Click on the Fill, set this back to zero because we know that that's going to go in the right direction. Go back to our Move tool and Alt or Option drag and place this one in position here. We're now in a position to choose Edit and Define Pattern. To define this as a pattern click "Okay". Let's go back into this document, open up the layers palette, double-click on it, and go and add in our new pattern. Here you can see now that we've got some dimension in this pattern. Now we might have done a bit of overkill in terms of how dark the shading is but knowing that the pattern actually functions, we can go back and sort that out. I'm going to select on all the layers that have this gradient in them. There's going to be eight of them, so I've selected all of those. I'm just going to dial down the opacity a little bit. If I drag down the opacity of all the layers at one time to, for example, 50%, then I'm going to have less of a gradient effect. Again, Edit Define Pattern, save this as another pattern. Go back and test it. Go back into the layers palette. I just pressed F7 to save because it had disappeared. Double-click on it and choose the last pattern, and here is the same shading effect this time it's just a little bit more subtle. Of course, we can change the colors very easily by going back into our pattern element. Let me just roll down the actual layers palette. Select all the shapes that are pink. Go to a Shape tool and select a different color for them so we could turn them into green or some other bright or dark color. Let's go and get a pure color. Let's go and get a turquoise-blue effect. Because the gradients are separate and they're on top of everything, they're showing up, even though we've changed the color to something quite considerably darker. Edit Define Pattern, click, "Okay", go back to layer, double-click on the pattern layer. This is another pattern. There are lots of iterations of this pattern that we can use in Photoshop, just working from the basic pattern that we created. We spent the time creating the grid and the shapes. Now, we can go ahead and make changes to the basic design. I can see here that I'm missing a shading area, so I think I might have knocked one of these out. I have knocked one of these out. I just saw that in the pattern, so after that happens to you just find the matching gradient, the other one that is the exact same shade. I'm just going to move that into position. I will need to recreate those patterns so that they actually have that gradient in them. This is the one that actually has the gradients in it correctly. I'm going to right-click on the one that was incorrect and just delete it so that it's cleaned up and that I won't have patterns in my pattern swatches that aren't perfect patterns. 7. Pt 6 - Knitting Pattern: For this meeting style pattern, we're going to see how we can turn a drawing of a stitch into something that we can use for a knitting pattern. Now, I've already created the drawing for you, so you'll want to download the knit stitch file and go ahead and open it. This is the image is on a transparent background. Now we could use this image as it is, but it's a little bit rough and ready so I'm going to trace around it using the pen tool. I'm going to the pen tool, I'm going to turn off the fill and I'm going to set the stroke to a reasonable size because this document is actually pretty big. I'm going to choose a 12 pixels stroke. I'm going to zoom into the top end of this shape and with the pen tool, I'm going to start drawing around it. I'm going to start here by clicking and dragging, so it's left-click and drag. I'm going to come down here to this point where there's a dip and I'm going to click and drag a little bit there and here, click and drag. Now at this point I want to move the Canvas so I'm going to hold the space bar and that allows me to move the art-board around but not affect the line that I'm drawing. Again, I'm just clicking and dragging around this shape. Don't really want to click on the tip of this point down here so I'm going to create an anchor point just before it and then create an anchor point just after it. If I don't get this perfectly all right, I'm not worried about that at this stage let's just get these lines down. I'm missing this one entirely here but as I said, worried about that. Click and drag I'm going to hold down the space bar as I drag on the art board so that I'm just moving the canvas and not the line. Now if I go and make a mistake, I'm just going to press Control or Command Z to undo that and then just continue on. You could undo a few steps if you made a few mistakes. Let's go round here and let's go back to the beginning just before I click on the beginning if your not seeing this rubber band thing happening, go up here to the settings and you can turn on rubber band. But I've got a rubber band, so that's alright so I'm going to Alt or Option, click on the starting point and then just drag out and that just makes the handles work a little better. I still have my Alt key pressed down I'm going to let go the left mouse button and then let go the Alt key. Now I'm going to look at smoothing my shape. At this point I may want to turn the background layer with the content on it off. I might also want to add a layer with a white fill so I've got a white fill here let's just go and use the paint bucket tool to drop in a white color behind it that might let me see the shape a little bit better I'm going to zoom out a little bit. Now we can just finesse it. I'm going to any anchor point that looks a little bit untidy and I might want to clean up just ahead of it or clean up the anchor point itself. We've got a couple of that are looking a bit rough and ready here. You don't have to exactly trace the shape you just want to end up with something that's pretty much looking like it. That's looking pretty smooth to me. I'm pretty happy with that shape so I'm going to the Path Selection Tool I'm going to select over it because it is a shape when I went to use the pen tool I had shaped selected so this is a shape and because it's a shape, I can create it as a saved shape. I'm going to Edit and then Define Custom Shape. You'll see here that it's a filled shape. I'm going to call this knit stitch. Saved as a shape it means that I've got it stored on my computer and I don't need to worry about this any longer. I can just trash this file, so I'm just going to close it. I don't need to save it. Now let's go and make our pattern. I'll create a new file that is 1,000 pixels by 1,000 pixels. I'm using RGB color, white background I'll click Create. I'm going to the shape tool and I'm going to drop the shape drop-down list down and the very last shape is going to be your knit stitch. I'm going to grab that I'm going to fill it with black. Let me just go and get black and I don't want it to have any stroke at all so I'm setting this up for success if you like. Now to draw this shape in proportion. I'm going to hold the Shift key down as I drag because that's going to constrain it to the original proportions. What I want here is a shape that has a width and height that are nice values right now these are not nice values but as soon as I let go the left mouse button, I get the chance of altering the width and height. What I'm going to do is round off the width to 240 because that's nearly what it was now affecting the width and I don't have this option locked. If it was locked, it would be dark, but it's not so that means I can adjust the height as well so I'm going to take that to the nearest round value, which is 500 pixels. The shape is marginally altered in size, but not very much. That's just a nice, easy way to get a shape that is a fixed size and that's going to make life a little bit easier for us as we progress. Let's open the layers panel because we need to have access to that. I want to make the other half of this Knit Stitch because the other half of the stitch is opposite this. I'm going to drag this Knit Stitch onto the plus icon here to make a second copy and then I'm going to edit and then transform path. What's really important here is that you flip it horizontally. It's probably going to look pretty much the same if you flip it vertically, but it's not going to be identical and that can be a got you. I've flipped it horizontally. I'm holding the Shift key down as I drag it across and where I want it to be is close to itself but not on top of itself. If you add the Shift key as you move it around, you'll drag it in a perfectly horizontal direction. These two shapes are perfectly lined up and I'm going to put them together. I'm going to click on the first stitch, Shift-click on the second one, right-click and choose Merge Shapes and that gives me a layer which is my stitch, that's a whole knit stitch. Now, need stitches are pretty handy because you don't have to select a lot to get a stitch so I'm going to show you what to do. Let's grab this stitch and we're going to make a copy of it. Drop it onto the plus icon holding the Shift key I'm just going to move it up. Now I don't want it to touch the previous stitch because that's going to make it difficult to fill in later on. I want it close but not touching. Let's go and get a third version of it and let's move that up. Now I want to make sure that the gaps between these stitches are identical so I'm going to select over all three sets. I'm going up here to this icon here, and I want to align to selection and I'm going to click here on Distribute Spacing. You might see one of your shapes jump a little bit the one in the middle is the one that's going to jump. What that's doing is making sure that the spacing between all three shapes is identical so that's the good news. Now we're going to start pegging the bits that we want to use for our actual pattern. I'm going to click on this stitch. If you click on your stitch, your guides are going to snap into position. Let me just zoom in here a little bit. I've got my Knit Stitch Selected here, so it's targeted and I'm going to drag down a guide. When I do, you'll see that snapping into position because I've got Snap tone on, I've got View, Snap tone on and snap to is set to everything it can possibly be set to and so this guy just snap into position. Now I'm going to pull down, I want to say the top of this shape here, if I click on the shapes so it is targeted, as I said, these guides are going to snap into position because they know where they have to snap and you can see it just snapping nicely. Now we're going to bring one in from the side. Now this one, we don't want to be positioned right on top of the shape because we do want a little bit of space between our knit stitches. I'm just bringing it up to a slight distance away from the edge of this shape. Now if you want to get your guide a little bit closer, you can pick it up and you can hold down the Control key and that will allow you to move it without the snap taking effect. Because if you snap it, it's going to snap to underlying pixels. Actually a pixel grid here behind everything it's going to snap to that and it might get you too far away from the shapes so I think that's a better setting there. Now I'm going to put one exactly the same position on the other side again, grab this line here, hold down the Control key if I need to I don't this time I'm able to position it really well. Now if you can't see your rulers to be able to drag your guides, you'll choose View and click on rollers. Rollers are things that you can just drag a guide off. It's a really handy tool to use. I've got a guide down here just outside the edge of this shape. I've got a guide across the top of this shape underneath got a guide across the top of this shape and a guide a little off the edge of this shape here. This area in here is my pattern. It's very small it's disconcertingly small so let's just go and grab the pattern paste. This is the pattern pace. With it selected I'm going to edit and then Define Pattern. I'm going to call this knit stitch and click okay. Now we're going to test it by creating a brand new document. This is going to be much bigger so that we can see how the pattern behaves in the document layer, new fill layer, and then pattern click okay. Then from the drop-down, we're going to select the last element, the last pattern that is the one that we have just created and here is our knit stitch pattern. You can zoom in to make sure it's perfect. But if you follow those instructions really carefully, you will find that you should have a perfect pattern because the snap to guides has done all the work for you. Now we have a knitting pattern. Now this one has its background with it. Let's go back to the original and turn off the background. We've still got our selection in place so let's go and make another pattern from this. This is going to be knit stitch transparent. That's a benefit because if you use this particular pattern, you'll be able to put a colored background behind it so I'm just going to select it nothing's going to change because it's actually got a background behind it already. Let's add in here a fill layer. I'm going to Layer New Fill Layer, Solid Color, like using the solid color layer because it's very easy for me to now, experiment with different colors here that I can use for the background and we're just dragging into position a color to use for my background. Now, of course, in addition to adding a color fill behind it, we could go above this pattern and we could invert it so we would add an inversion layer new adjustment layer, and we'll go down to invert and click okay and that just inverts everything so what was black is now white what was white is now black because I turned off this blue layer. If I turn the blue layer on them, I'm going to get a weird color because the inverse of blue is red. Well, the inverted cyan, and this is more like cyan is actually red the true inversion of a true blue is yellow but here we've got something that's a bit more cyan and so it's inverting to red. But I just want black and white so that's what I've got here. At this point if you have a look at your pattern and think it's too close here and I'm thinking this is pretty close this stitch then I would go back again to my original design I'm going to get rid of my selection with select, de-select and I'm going to these guides and I'm just going to move them out a little bit. I think that may be a little bit close and then I'll go and re-select my Pattern. Edit, define pattern. I'm going to call this Knit Stitch Version 2 and let's go and test that in the document. We're still got iron version layer selected. It's still going to invert, but we're going to double-click on this and go and get the last pattern. This is a bit further spaced apart so you might prefer that particular design to the one that we had earlier, but you can finesse this pattern very easily provided you've still got that content accessible to you. 8. Pt 7 - Customize the Knitting Pattern: Once you've created your knitting pattern, you can look at options that you have for creating things within the knitting pattern. I've just got this in a slightly larger document here, but it is the last knitting pattern that I made. I'm going to add what's called a hue saturation adjustment layer here to change the color of the knit stitches. I'll choose Layer, New Adjustment Layer, and then Hue/Saturation and click "Okay". This is going to allow me to color this design. I'm going to increase the lightness and increase the saturation. I'm going to click on "Colorize". That's going to allow me to colorize this pattern. I'm just going to drag over on the hue slider here. I think I'm going to need to lighten this up a bit so that I can choose a color to use. I'm thinking Christmas here. That's why I'm going all the way into the red to get access to the reds for my knitting pattern. If I'm happy with that, I can just click to close it. Now, I want to limit this hue saturation adjustment to just this layer here, just the knit stitch layer, because I'd like to put a really dark color behind this and if I put a dark color behind it, it's going to get the color applied to it as well from this hue saturation adjustment. What I'm going to do is click on the "Hue/Saturation" adjustment layer and go to Layer, Create Clipping Mask. What that does is it adds this little bent arrow to this layer, this hue saturation adjustment layer. What that tells us is that the hue saturation adjustment layer is now only going to affect the layer immediately below, which is my knit stitches. That's going to mean that it doesn't impact the background at all. I'm going to add a new fill layer here, New Fill Layer, Solid Color, just above the background and in here, I'm going to put a really dark red. It's almost black and click "Okay". Now I have something that's more reminiscent of Christmas colors, but if we want to make it more Christmassy, we're going to need some white stitches. At the top of this document, I'm going to add a new empty layer, so just click on the "New Layer" icon. It's a transparent layer, it's at the very top of the document. Now we can use the paint bucket tool provided that you design the knit stitch pattern the way I showed you. There's actually space around every one of these stitches. There's black around or transparency around every one of these stitches. Using the paint bucket tool, we'll be able to make use of that space. I've got white selected here, that's the paint I'm going to be using. I'm coming up here to make some settings. I've got anti-alias set on. I need contiguous to be set on and I need all layers to be set on. What that means is that paint bucket tool is going to look at where my cursor is, which is over this stitch here. If I click to add paint to it, it's going to look for the bounds of this red area. Because we added black around it, the color is only going in to that one stitch. I can just click on stitches to add a design. I could come down here and perhaps add colored stitches every second stitch. You'll find that in terms of knitting patterns that this is a stitch. It's this and this comprises an entire stitch. It's not this and this, that's not a stitch in knitting term, so just be aware of that. Now you can design patterns for your knitting. Before you do that, you'll want to make sure that you've got your knit stitches looking the way you want them to because if you make this smaller, so I've got a scale of 20%. I think that this is too big a scale. I want to take it down to 10. Well, all of a sudden I've got underlying stitches that are half the size of the originals in terms of width and height and so these big stitches and are way too big. You will want to settle the stitch, look before you start dumping color into it. Otherwise, you'll have to go back to the beginning and you probably don't want to have to do that. Let me just finish this. You will want to go to the very edges. Just be aware that there might be half a stitch or something at the edge of a document. If you make a mistake, Control or Command Z. This is two rows of stitches. It's all on one layer here. If I drag and drop it onto the plus symbol, I'll end up a second copy of it. If I go to the Move tool, I'll be able to move that down. I can, for example, add it down here to be a second row of stitches in the design. You could create this Christmas look if you wanted to. Not happy with that, I could move it up because the stitches are all the same in exactly the same place, then the white stitches can easily be moved around. That's a way of customizing your knitting pattern. Make sure you get your stitches the right size before you do anything. Then color your stitches with the hue saturation adjustment, add a color behind them to fill in the gaps. Darker colors work particularly well and then start adding some empty layers and dropping some paint into it. Just making sure that for the paint bucket that you have the settings up here. If you don't have contiguous set on, this is what's going to happen. You'll know immediately because it's pretty obvious that things weren't working. Well, the problem is that you didn't have contiguous turned on. When contiguous is turned on, then the paint only goes into the selected stitch area. Also be careful that you don't dump it over the black by mistake, or you'll need to just undo it and start over again. 9. Pt 8 - 50s Loopy Pattern: A mid-century pattern like this is really wonderful to create. There's lots of things that you can do with it. Now, it can be a little bit tricky to create but I've got a way of making it really easy. But you will want to follow along with my measurements because they are fairly critical to getting this right. We're going to start with a document this time that is 1,200 by 1,200 pixels in size. I'm choosing this because I want it to be evenly divisible by 6. One thousand isn't 1,200, is. It's going to make life a little bit easier because we need guides to help us here. We're going to choose view and then guides and go to new guide layout. For our layout here we need six columns and six rows, no width, no height, no gutter, no nothing down here just six columns and six rows. You're looking at a design that looks like this. I'll click, "Okay." Now, we need some additional guides we're going to put those in by hand. I'm going to choose view and then guides and I'm going to new guide because this allows us to add additional guides by hand. I'm going to make the first ones red, so you can see that I've got blue guides right now. It doesn't matter what color your guides are but you'll want to choose a different color here so it's going to be easier to manage these and the position for this one is going to be 380 and just click, "Okay." Then the next two guide of the exact same color is going to be 820 vertical and click, "Okay." What we've done is we've made guides, 20 pixels to the right and 20 pixels to the left of this particular guides. We're going to make two more view guide, new guide. I'm going to make black this time so again, a different color because these are going to be slightly different. I want one at 420 vertical and I want the next one at 780 vertical. View guides, new guide 780 vertical. You should have a layout like this. If you've got a layout like this, then life is going to be so much easier. Let's go to the pen tool again, this is really easy stuff. We're going to set this to shape and what you're going to do is to hover over this point here in the middle of all of these guides, this one here on this line, you're going to click and you're going to drag perfectly vertically and you're going to align the circle, end up here with the intersection between those guides. As soon as you've got it there, just let go the left mouse button. Now, I've got my rubber banding turned on, you can turn it on up here and that will make things a bit easier because you'll be able to see where you're going. We are headed out now to this black guide and we're going to click there and drag downwards. It's a click and drag. My left mouse button is still pressed down. I'm making sure I'm going perfectly vertically and I'm aligning this circle at the end of the handle with the intersection between the black guide and the blue guide, so I'm going to let go. Don't worry about what's happening up here. it's going to be really clear in just a minute. We're going back to this middle guide. We're going to click here on this intersection between these two guides dragged down until a circle is lined up at the very bottom here, at the intersection of these guides down here and you'll see that the top circle of this handle is also over our guide intersection. We're just going to let go the left mouse button and then you'll press, "Escape." Basically now what we've got is this shape here and if you set it up as a shape, it's going to be a shape in the shapes panel. We're going to grab this shape and we're going to move it out. It's going to line up on its leftmost edge with this blue guide here, giving us a space in the middle, we're going to make a duplicate of that. Just right-click the layer and choose "Duplicate Layer" and click, "Okay." We're going to start moving it just so that we can see what we're doing. We're going to flip it with edit, transform path, flip horizontal, so it's going in the opposite direction. Then we're just going to line it up also. Its left side here is aligned along this blue guy, the middle of these three here. It's going to be aligned to the rest of the guides top and bottom, so that it's perfectly opposite this one here. Once we've got that in position, we need a piece to go in the middle here. If you've got it right, this is going to fit perfectly. We're going to do a paste whose width is 40 pixels and whose height is 800 and click, "Okay." Now we'll just move that up into the middle here and again, it should snap to the top guides, it should snap to the center guide. When I click away basically, I've got this beautiful shape. The problem is in the last palette, it's three layers, three shapes. I'm going to click on the topmost one shift-click on the bottom most one. I'll right-click and I'm going to choose merge shapes because that's going to put them all together. Then with a shape tool selected, either the path Selection Tool or the rectangle tool or whatever it is visible here in your shapes group. Go up here and click on this icon here and choose "Merge Shape Components". Yes. We're going to turn a live shape into a regular shape, that's just fine Now, we've got a shape. Now, this shape can be used over and over again, so if you want to at this point, you could save this as a shape. We just go to edit, define custom shape and we could call this 50s curve. We could come back and use that if we needed to in the future but right now we've also got a pattern. Let's go and get the rectangular marquee Tool. We're keeping all our guides in place because these red guides are now going to be helpful. We're going to select using the red guides, this area here. Now, we are going to check before we go and make sure that the guide is sitting right on the top of the shapes. We don't want any pixels visible underneath here. If there were, we would just bring our selection down a pixel or two so that the shape is well inside here. But if you've got everything lined up perfectly and created using your smart guides, then everything should be perfect. This is now a pattern we're taking from the red lines here, the red guides, the outermost guides all the way across. We're building a little bit of space either side of the shape. That's important because it's going to balance out this shape later on. We'll choose edit and define pattern. I'm calling it 50s curve, let's go and test this on a new much larger size document. I'm using 3,600 by 3,600. Yours can be any size you like. Just make it bigger than the pattern that you created, so it's really easy for you to see. Here is the 50s curve. Now, this is a really balanced curve. These shapes in here are the exact shapes that we have here. It's a lovely basic pattern. But I want to do a little bit more with this pattern. Let's come back into the original pattern I'm going to right-click and choose "Duplicate Layer" and click, "Okay." I'm going to grab this second layer and I'm going to move it up here but a bit hard to say what's going on, so let's go and change its color. I'm going to one of these shape tools. I'm going up to the fill here. Instead of a solid color, I'm going to use a gradient. I'm going to click here on the gradients. Now, for this gradient, I'm going to use a pink gradient. I could use solid color. I just want to play with some gradients, and I don't want it to go off at an angle. You need your gradients to be vertical and they need to go across a shape because otherwise they're not going to join up together later on. That's just tricky because we are creating a seamless repeating pattern. We want our gradients to be able to repeat as well, we don't get breaks in them because it's just not going to look good. You can say that my gradient is going from dark pink to light pink right across this shape. This is perfect. I can make a duplicate of this shape, right-click and choose duplicate layer. I'm going to drag this one down. If you add the "Shift" key as you drag you'll go in a perfectly vertical direction, we just need to double-check in the middle here to make sure that everything is joining up perfectly, which it is. Again, I'm going to grab both of these layers here that have this pink shape on them. I'm going to right-click and choose merge shapes. Then because this is not really merged, it's only halfway merged, let's go and grab this layer. I'm just going to remove the selection there, select deselect, so that's not in our way. Let's just grab this layer with one of the shape tools we're going here and we're going to choose merge shaped components, so that makes this a total shape. It's going off the edges of the document, that's just fine. Because we may want to re-color this later on and we're about to duplicate it over here, making it a smart object's a really good idea. I'm going to just convert this to a smart object. Now when I right-click, I'm going to choose duplicate layer, which is going to give me a second smart objects. Let's go to the move tool and we're going to drag this one across. I'm adding the shift key so it's going in a perfectly horizontal direction just saved me a little bit of work. Let's double-check around the middle that everything seems lined up, which it is. Let's go back and make that exact same selection for our pattern that we did previously from the red lines all the way down to the end here. Edit, define pattern 50s version 2. We're not quite finished, I think that this will look better if we have a gradient in the middle shape later on. But you may like this, you will probably want to do something about the green color but that's what it's looking like with a single gradient. Let's go back here we can locate this shape again, it's still a shape, so we have the ability to fill it too with a gradient. I'm going to pick a turquoise gradient. Again, I'm going to have to make sure that this gradient is across the shape. You can see that this later on would join up with this, and this is a darker blue, this is a turquoise blue. We're going to get a really obvious line if we don't turn the gradient around. This gradient has to run across the shape. It could be zero, it could be 180 but it has to run across. We still have our selection in place so life is nice and easy, define pattern and this is going to be 50s version 3. Let's come back in and just test this. There's another version of our 50s designed this time, it's got embedded in it a gradient fill on both of those shapes. If you save this original document, then you can come in and create this at anytime, if you need to edit the pink shapes, you just going to double-click on this layer to get access to the embedded smart object, where you can change its color, do all things. Let's just go and make it a solid color. I'm going to close the smart object and I'm going to say yes to saving it. Because both of these pink shapes were the same smart object, they've both been edited together. They have to be if they're going to be a pattern because half of this shape and half of this shape makes a whole shape later on. The middle piece does not have to be a smart object because there's only one shape there. If you want to save this selection, go ahead, just choose, select, and save selection and you could call this pattern, and click, "Okay." You can always get back to that selection, so you can come in here and work around your shapes. We can even get rid of our guides because you don't need them any longer. We can come in and work on our pattern, make all the changes we want when we want to save it, we'll just go to select, go to load selection and we're going to grab our selection. Here's the pattern selection click, "Okay." There's our pattern, we can just go ahead and save it. That's a nice way of working with particularly complex designs that takes you a little while to develop. you want to make editing them and creating other patterns from them a whole lot easier and that's the way to do it. 10. Pt 9 - Uneven Stripes Pattern: For this pattern, we're going to make it two ways. Firstly, as a single-color design, and then we're going to re-color it to make it multi-colors. We're going to start with a brand new file. It will help if your files are the same size as mine. We're starting with a document 1,000 pixels by 1,000 pixels. I'm going to select the rectangle tool here. It's set to shape and I have the fill color, the color that I want to use. I have no stroke at all. I'm going to drag out a reasonably thick line or rectangle into my document. I'm going to the last palette. I'm going to right-click this and just choose rasterize layer. The benefit of using a shape to start off with is this is always going to be separated from the background so you're not going to run into the background by mistake. However, we do just want pixels, which is why we've rasterized it. I'm going to the brush tool. I'm going to select a brush. I'm using a hard round brush here. You'll see that the size doesn't really matter at this point, but the hardness does you want 100% hard brush. You want to sample the color here in case you haven't got this color already selected, you would go to the Eyedropper tool and just target this color because this color is actually coming from this area here, and these two could be very different, but you want to be painting in the same color. Making sure my rectangle layer is selected. What I'm going to do is just try and draw along this line. I'm trying to draw a reasonably straight line, but I don't have a very steady hand and I am using a mouse. That's actually working really well for me because that's giving me an uneven line. If you're really good at drawing lines, you might want to get not so good at it right now. Just going to make that into a nice, somewhat wiggly line. Now I'm going to make this longer, so I'm just going to drag on it to make it longer. I want it to be around 1,500 or 1,600 pixels wide. That's a really good width for it. Click the "Check mark". I'm going to place that in this location. The middle of it is well inside the document. Make a duplicate of it by just dragging this onto the plus sign. This one I'm going to move by choosing edit and then free transform. Up here you'll want the checkmark selected. Of these nine little boxes, you want the middle one to be selected. Whatever the value is for the x, you're just going to add the number 1 in front of it because that's going to move it across 1,000 pixels. I'm just going to click the "Check mark". Now, this is the shape that we're working with right now. We're going to put these two together by selecting both these layers. Click on "One shift", click on the other, right-click, and merge the layers. At this point, if you want to do a little bit of touch-up, you can. I think I've got a dip there that I don't want to see. I have a really large shape here. I want to check its dimensions. I'm just going to drag upwards to see how tall it is. What I want to do is for those little tool tips to show me that the height is an even number, a number that can be divided by two without leaving anything behind. Mine is 138, that's a really good number. It's an even number. Now I'm going to do the same for the width. Again, I want that to just be an even number. It doesn't matter what number it is. It just has to be even. It is even. I'm just going to click the check mark. Now I'm going to place this at the very top middle of the document. Now, it can be tricky to get that into position. What you're going to do is with it selected, go back to edit free transform. You'll see that the shortcut key here is Control or Command T. Again, you have the middle option of these nine boxes selected. Don't change that. You're going to use it all the time. We're going to set the x value here to 500. If it's not reading 500 already, just type it in. The y value is going to be zero and just click the "Check mark". What that does is it puts this shape exactly over the top edge of the document. I'm going to make a duplicate of it, just drag it onto the plus sign. Then again, edit free transform. This time the x value is going to be exactly the same, the 500 and the y value is going to be 1,000. Now, if your x value reads 500.5, you didn't have an even number. That's a tale for that. If you don't have an even number for your height and your width, these values are going to be out by half a pixel. That's why we're working with even numbers. I'm setting this to 1,000. Click the "Check mark". Now over here in the Layers palette, I'm going to label these two. I'm going to call them half because they are half of what is going to be a final shape in our pattern. It's just helpful to just rename them. I'm going to take one of these doesn't matter which one I'm going to drag it onto the plus sign. I'm just going to put this name stripe. With this selected, I'm going to move it now. I've got my Move tool set to auto-select so that will check boxes on from this drop-down list, I have layer selected. It's going to make life really easy here. I'm going to move my stripe up and I'm going to move it horizontally. Doesn't matter where as long as it fits in a document, but I am going to move it horizontally. Then I'm going to make a duplicate of that stripe, drag it onto the plus symbol, and then move it but in a different direction. I'm going to do it again and again until I fill my document. Now, the fat or the stripes you work with, the less work you're going to have to do, particularly the first time you make this pattern. Later on, you may want to make something with a bit more detail, but right now while you're just learning a process, it probably will behave you to make thicker stripes and have less work to do. I'm just making sure that everything looks like it's nice and evenly spread across the document and that I don't have elements that are visible like this bump, really visible elsewhere. I think this one might be a bit too visible so let's just move it out of the way a bit, well let's come the other way because it's not going to work there. I don't want to say repeat elements really obviously here right now. Once I'm happy with that, I'm going to the Crop tool and I'm just going to crop everything else away in this document. All I'm left with is these stripes length that they are and the position that they're in. Now, in the last palette, I'm going to locate and select the very top element here. Doesn't matter what it is, but just select it. Now we're going to check to make sure that everything is going to work perfectly in our pattern. To do that, we need to apply to every single one of these stripes and offset filter. The easiest way to do that, it's going to be to write an action to do the work for us so that we don't have to select it every time. This is what we're going to do. I'm going to select the "Move tool" with the topmost layer selected. I'm going to Actions. If you go and see them choose "Window" and then "Actions". At the bottom of the actions panel here. I'm going to click this little folder icon to create a new action set. I'm going to call this offsets. This could potentially be used for a series of offset actions. We only need one today. Then I'm going to click this little plus sign to create a brand new action. Now before you do that, it's really important that you are set up. You've got the Move tool selected, you've got the topmost layer here selected because you don't want to build in a layer selection into your action. Because otherwise, it's going to do that every time we're going to work. You have to be in the right place before we start here. We're going to click the "Plus sign". Our action is going to be called Offset 500 horizontal. I'm going to click "Record" and from now on I am recording. What I want to do is run my offset filter, so I'll go to "Filter Other" and then "Offset". This filter is really easy to use. All we're going to do is type in the horizontal area 500, which is half the width of the document. In the vertical 0, we don't want to move our stripe vertically, but we just want to rearrange it horizontally, half its existing value. We're just going to click "Okay". Then there is a Photoshop shortcut, which allows you to use the keyboard to select this next layer. Don't click on it. If you do, you're going to build a selection of a layer called stripe copy 2 into your Action. What we don't want to do is to select a specific layer. What we want to do is to select the next layer down. The command for selecting the next layer down is on a PC Alt and the open square bracket. I'm just going to press that now. Now if you are on a Mac, it would be option open square bracket. You can see over here in the actions palette, it says select backward layer. In other words, select the layer next underneath, perfect. Before we do anything else, we're going to click the "Stop" button here, which is this one. Stop playing recording. Now we're no longer recording, but we have the next layer already selected that we want to do this exact same thing on. All we need to do is go to our Offset 500 Horizontal, click on it to select it, and then click the "Play" button and it gets flipped and the next layer gets selected. We can just sit here on this button and just do it as it goes all the way down the document. When it gets to the background, we're going to stop playing it. Now, we're just looking at this area down the middle. Any problems are going to appear right down the middle of this document. I can see one bit, I don't like this bit here. What I'm going to do is go to the Move tool and just click here because remember we selected, always set this to auto-select layer. When we click on it, we automatically select the layer that is the problem. I'm going back to my brush and all I'm going to do is just clean up this bit in here. I can double-check any of these underneath layers. Let's go and just target this one if you wanted to change it a little bit, you could go and just paint on it. But again, all we're doing is checking down the middle of the document because that's the only place that problems can exist. What I'm going to do just to finish off, is run through that exact same set of actions again, selecting the topmost layer and just clicking on this all the way until I get to the background layer. Then just double-check down the middle to make sure that everything looks perfect, then it should look perfect at this point. You shouldn't have any problems. Edit, define pattern, and this is our pattern. To test it, I'm going to choose "File" and "New", and I'm going to create a document that's much larger, in this case, 2,000 by 2,000 pixels. I'm going to open up my patterns palette, and at the very bottom should be the pattern that I've just created, this one here, I'll just drag and drop it into my document. I can double-click on it and reduce the scale, for example, to 50% so I can see what it's going to look like in use. It is a really nice pattern of uneven stripes. Now that we've got a single-stripe version, it's time to go back and turn this into a multi-stripe version. 11. Pt 10 - Multi Color Uneven Stripes: To create this pattern as a multi-stripe version, we're going back to the original document. At this point, you may want to save this so that you've got a single color version of your pattern. I'm going to do that and come back in just a minute. I've saved my document as single color stripes, and now we're going to make some multi-colored stripes from it. I'm going to this layer called half, and I'm going to click here on the fx icon and choose Color Overlay. Color Overlay is a tool that you can use to apply color to a layer and it's just going to make life a whole lot easier for us to use this right now. You're going to set the blend mode to normal. That's really important. There's a chance that it might read color. You want it to be normal because you want to replace the existing color with your new color. You're going to click on the color selector to choose a color. Now, if you want to use your swatches at this point, you can open your swatches panel. You can still get to it even though this color picker is open, and you could go and select a series of colors to use. Now, I'm going to use pastel colors. I'm just going to select the first pastel color, which is near enough to what I was using already. Just click Okay and then Okay again. Now, remember when we made this pattern, we made two of these pattern elements in the layers palette called half. The reason was that this is half of this. This color and this color have to be the same or else the pattern's just not going to look right. But we're going to borrow the thing that we've just created, this color overlay for all of our layers right now. I'm going to right-click and choose Copy Layer Style. I'm going to select the second of the half layers, and I'm going to Shift click on the topmost layer. I'm going to right-click and choose Paste Layer Style, and that puts that color overlay on every single other layer. Just a really quick way of doing the work. The two half layers we don't have to worry about because they have to be the same color and I'm going to make them that orange. But now I'm going to the first of these striped layers. I'm going to just double-click on effect and that opens the Layer Style panel we're going to color overlay. I'm going to click on this here now. Then I'm going to select a color to use from my color palette here. I think I'll go for a green color. Click, Okay, and then click Okay again. Then we'll go to the next layer. Double-click on it, select Color Overlay, click on the color to replace, and go and choose a different color to use, Okay and Okay. Go to the next layer, double-click on the effects, go back to your gradient overlay, click on the color to use. Select the color from your swatches panel or a color from your pickup. Doesn't really matter. Click Okay, and then we've got one more to do. Color Overlay, click the color, go and find a color from our collection of colors here and click Okay, and Okay, again. Now, this pattern was perfect when we created it as a single color pattern, so it's going to be perfect now. All we need to do is go to Edit, Define Pattern. Make sure that we see our colors here Click, Okay, and then we can test it in our testing documents on. It's going to open up my patterns panel. Go to the very last pattern, which is going to be the pattern that we just made and drag and drop it into the document. That's as easy as that is to recolor your pattern once you've actually created it. The work is done in creating the pattern in the first place. Then you can easily recolor it using the color overlay. Back in this document here, you could recolor it by choosing Layer and then New Adjustment Layer, Hue/Saturation, and click Okay. Here, you could re-color up by dragging the hue slider around and just increasing or decreasing the saturation to get some different results. The relationship between the colors is going to be the same, but you could fast-track some additional color for the pattern by just doing it this way. Of course, if you put this hue saturation adjustment into the original pattern file, you would have the same result. Just go to the topmost layer, choose Layer, New Adjustment Layer, Hue/Saturation. Here we can make changes to the pattern itself. I might make a more pastel version of the pattern here and then just choose Edit, Define Pattern, and that will give me a pastel version, a permanent swatch, that is this pastel version. We're going to find that, of course, in the pattern's panel. Here is the more muted version of the pattern. You can either edit it by adding a hue saturation adjustment to the document that you're actually using a pattern in or you can go back and create the pattern from scratch with a new set of colors just using a hue saturation adjustment layer on top of that original pattern and just save the pattern self into your patterns palettes so that it will be available. 12. Pt 11 - Diamonds Pattern: A repeating diamond-shaped pattern like this is relatively easy to create, so we're going to actually make it in two ways. We're going to make just a plain one and also one that has uneven edges. I'm going to start with a new file, I suggest that you use my exact same values because the mathematics here is fairly important. My document is 1,000 pixels by 1,000 pixels in size. I'm going to select the color that I want to use. I actually have a swatch that I was going to use, so I'm going to open up my swatches panel. I'm going to use the blue out of the pastels here. I'm going to select the rectangle tool. The fill-up here is that same blue, I've already selected it, and the stroke is no stroke at all. I'm working with the shapes, so just make sure you have Shape selected, that means that it's going to go on a new layer and it's not going to be applied to the background of the document. Now, in here we're going to create a rectangle that's actually a square that is 707.11 pixels by 707.11, and I'll just click "Okay". The reason for a square of this size is that when I rotate it as I'm about to holding the Shift key, so I rotate it a perfect 45 degrees, it's actually going to fit from edge to edge in this document, the document being 1,000 by 1,000 pixels in size, what I did was I just use Pythagoras's theorem to work out what the length of this side needed to be and it's near enough to 707.11. Now that we've got our diamond shape, what's left is to color the background. I don't want to use white, I prefer to use a color, so I'm just unlocking the background layer. I'm going to target a color, I'm actually going to use from the Pastel colors, this yellow color. I'm going to the paint bucket tool here. Let me just turn off this rectangle. I'm on this background layer, or the bottom-most layer, and I'm just clicking to fill it with my yellow color. Let's turn our diamond back on and this is our first pattern, Edit "Define Pattern". Now while we're here, we're going to make the second version of it at the same time. Firstly, I'm going to rasterize this layer, the layer that has the shape on it, just right-clicking and choose "Rasterize Layer" because I want to be able to paint on it. I'm going to my paint brushes, I'm going to select a hard round paintbrush. You can see the hardness is 100 percent, that's really important. The size does not matter at this stage. I'm going to make sure I'm working with the same blue as I have here. With my paintbrush what I'm going to do is just come in here and just paint along these edges. What I'm not going to do is go over the very edge here, so it's important that you try and leave the point at the end here, so you may need to adjust the size of your brush or you just may need to be a little bit careful as you get to the very tip. I could round that maybe a little bit, but I don't want to go over the edge because it's not going to be possible for me to get a good join with that. All I'm trying to do is make the edges here just a little bit uneven to give some visual interest to this pattern. You may want to finish off the corners with just a smaller size brush. At this point, if you want to test to make sure your pattern is going to look all right, select this rectangle layer and go to "Filter", "Other", and then "Offset". In this case, we're going to offset it half the width and half the height of the document, so that's 500 as vertical and 500 as horizontal. When I do that, you can say that we're just flipping the shape around so that the blue shape is being broken up into the corners and this is our yellow shape. Now if you need to make any changes to it, you could at this stage, just be aware that your blue shape looks like this. If you want to make changes to the yellow shape, it's actually going to involve removing bits from the blue shapes, so let me just go and see what I've got. I've got a hard eraser here, and I could come down here and just make some changes to the edge of the blue shape, which is going to impact how the yellow shape actually looks. That bits is a little bit confusing, so you may want to have your wits about you if you're going to be making changes to the pattern at this stage. But we're ready now to make it this a pattern, "Edit", "Define Pattern". Let's go and save this artwork. I'm going to make a much larger size document. Let's go for something that is scrapbook size right now, 3,600 by 3,600. I'll open up my patterns dialogue and at the end here are the two patterns that we just made. This is the very even one that has very crisp edges and this is the one that has those uneven edges. Of course, having dragged it into the document, we can just double-click on it and change the scale, so if you want to see it at a smaller scale, you can do so. Before we leave this pattern, let's have a look and see what else we could do with it, because we've done the work of actually creating it.There are some other things that we could do to it and one of them is to make it less of rotated squares, but something that is more diamond shape if you like. What I'll do is go back to this design, I've saved it, so I would have it available later on if I wanted to make changes to it, but let's go to "Image" and then let's go to "Image Size". Now, in the Image Size dialogue here, we can change the size of the image. I'm just going to drop this down so we can say what's going on. Normally you would do this with this particular icon turned on, so any change that you made to the width was also made to the height. It's a constraint aspect ratio setting. In this case, I'm going to disable it because what I want to do is to bring the width in and I'm thinking maybe about 600 might be nice. When I bring it into 600, you can see that now we've got a difference diamond shape. Now, this again is a perfect repeating pattern. It's just that the pattern swatches 600 by 1,000 instead of 1,000 by 1,000. Let's just click "Okay", we've now got a document that is much narrower than it was before, but let's make a pattern out of that, and then let's go and see what it looks like in our master working document. Out of one basic starting design, we have a smooth edge version, we've got an uneven edge version, and now we've got one where the diamonds aren't square any longer they're much taller, just giving us a different look to this design. 13. Pt 12 - Photo to Pattern: For this next set of patterns, we're going to use a leaf image that we're going to download from unsplash.com. We're going to use that leaf to make a series of really interesting patterns and just see what you can do with something that is as simple as a photograph of a palm leaf. I'm over here at unsplash.com and this was the image I want to use. It's by Jonathan Castellon. What you'll do is locate this. I just did a palm leaves search. I'll give you the link to actually download this image and you'll download it onto your computer and then open it in Photoshop. Let's just go and do that. Here is the image open in Photoshop. Now, one of the issues with this image, as it's a little tricky to make a cut out, because you can see, although we've got these green leaves, there's a fair bit of shadowing behind it, and none of the typical cutout tools are going to work particularly well. I'm going to show you a trick for making a cutout. We're going to the channels palette here. What we're going to do is click on the red channel first because that turns off the other channels and just shows us the red channel. What I'm looking for is a good leaf and not very much of the background. I want the cleanest selection I can make. This blue channel is really good. You can see that the leaf is really dark and the background is much lighter. That's a good start for actually making our cutout. What I'm going to do is drag the blue channel onto the plus symbol here, because that makes a duplicate of it. This one I can edit and then get rid of later on so that I can use this just to make a cutout. That's all I'm going to do with it at this stage. This blue copy channel. I'm going to apply a fixed directly to it. I'm going to image and then adjustments. I'm going to levels, levels is a simple adjustment. This is a really good one to use here what we want to do is make the darker areas darker and these lighter areas and particularly these light gray areas, we want them to be more white. Underneath this chart here, I'm going to drag on the white slider across because that starts to remove some of those gray areas. Here I'm going to drag in on the black slider, which is the one on the left hand side, to darken up the darker areas, and so you can see that we're getting more of a black and white leaf and trying to remove some of the grays. You can just adjust these settings until you get as black a leaf as you can with very few, if any, of these gray areas. Once you've got that, I'll just click. "Okay", and we can load this as a selection by just control clicking that would be command click on the Mac, on this thumbnail, and you can see here that I've got a selection all the way around this leaf, but at this stage, I've got the blue copy channel selected. I want to go back to seeing my original leaf. I'm going to click here on "RGB". You'll see that the RGB master channel red, green, and blue are all selected, but so too is my blue copy. I don't want that anymore. I'm just going to click to hide it. This is my image back again, everything's looking really good. I'm going to the last panel over here. Let me just move it out so you can see what I'm going to do. I'm going to click here on this, add a layer mask to add a layer mask to this layer. Now the mask is gone in the wrong way. It's gone in so that it's blocking out the leaf and just giving us the background. We wanted it the other way round. I'm just going to click on the mask to make sure that it is selected. I'm going to press control and I, that's command I on the Mac. At this point, we can check and see how good our selection has been. I'm going to click the plus sign here just to add a new layer, and I'm going to fill this layer with black. I've got black selected here. Let's just fill it with black and let's turn the leaf back on and have a look and see how it looks. I don't want to be seeing any of the white or gray here. I'm really happy with that. I think that's a really good selection and that's a really good leaf. At this point you would go ahead and save this so that you had this to come back to if you need it in future. I'm going to stop the video and do just that. Now what I want to do next is to get just the leaf so that I could put it on another background. I can make a pattern from it and I can use whatever background that I like. I'm just going to get rid of this black filled layer, put it on the trash can, and I'm going to add another layer underneath this leaf layer, because if I merge these two together, I'm going to get rid of the background here. I'm just going to have an isolated leaf. I'm going to select both layers, right click and choose Merge Layers, and so now I have a leaf on a transparent background. Now that I've got this leaf here, I can potentially do things with it. One of the things I'm thinking of is actually making a pattern from this leaf. I'm having a look at the size of my document and it's just enormous. I'm going to start by reducing the image size. I'll choose image and then image size. Now I don't want to distort this leaf and I want to be really careful about not distorting it. What I'll be sure to do is to make sure that this little icon here is turned on. I'm just going to reduce the height because I think the height is going to give me a better idea as to what's going on. I think that I want my final pattern swatch to be about 800 pixels tall. I think I'm going to make the height of this image, this bit here right now, about 600. I'm just going to make that 600 pixels and you can see that the leaf has shrunk enormously, but we've got a copy of it already saved away. We don't need to worry about the fact that we're shrinking this one right now or this document right now. I've just shrunk it. Let's zoom in so we can see it more clearly. Now this image right now is 600 pixels by 400 pixels, but if we're going to make a pattern out of it, as I said, I thought I would start with a document that's about 800 by 800. What I can do is go and make that documents. Let's just go to file new and let's make a document 800 by 800 that we can work with. I'll go back to the leaf image and I'm going to take it and drop it into this new document. It's coming in as a new layer. I'm going to move it about centrally into the document for now. I'm going to take a duplicate of it, so I'm just going to drag and drop it onto the plus symbol. This one, I'm going to break up into four pieces and throw to the four corners of this document. The document is 800 by 800, so with this layer selected, I'm going to choose filter other and offset. I want to offset it horizontally, half the width of the document, which is 400 and half, the height of the document which is also 400, and I'll click "Okay". I'm just looking to make sure that it looks like these pieces are going to stick together. Sometimes when you do this, you may find that there's a piece missing or something's really wrong with it. If that happens to you, what you're going to do is just undo what you just did and you're going to the crop tool. Just click on the crop tool, it defaults to what the image is right now, and you're just going to press "Enter" twice and that will crop anything that is there. Sometimes Photoshop imagines that there's something there, and that means that your pattern just doesn't get made properly, so just be aware of that. If it didn't look like it got thrown to the corners correctly, undo it and crop it, and then start again and you'll find that your offset values are sticky. The 400, and 400 that we had a minute ago is still there. I didn't need to do anything more than just say, Yep, that's fine. That's what I want. If I want to be able to put this pattern on any color background in future, I'm going to turn off my background. If I want it to be on white, then I'm going to leave my background as white, but I'm also going to be aware that all these leaves are going to be pointing in the same direction. And it might be more attractive if I went to this middle leaf, the one that's a whole leaf and did something with it. I'm just going to flip it a bit into a more interesting position because I think that's going to make the pattern more interesting. Let's make the pattern twice. Let's add it as a white background. I'm just saying in that little thumbnail that it didn't look particularly balanced. I think it needs to go up a bit this leaf. Sometimes when you're looking at a thumbnail, you'll see something that's obviously wrong. This looks better balanced now the leaf looks a bit more central. I'm going to click "Okay". I'm going to turn off the background and make another pattern. This is a pattern that could go on anything, any other color. To test this pattern, let's go and create a new file. I'm going to make one that is the size of my screen here. I'm going to go to the patterns dialogue, and let's go and find our patterns here. First of all, is the one that has a transparent background. Let's just make it a bit smaller and then we can change the color of the background. I have black as my foreground color here. I'm just going to press "Alt "Backspace". That would be option delete on the Mac to fill the background with a black color. You can see that it's patterns looking really good on black and we'd look good on a number of other colors, I'm sure as well. Let's have a look at the second version we made. This is the one that has its white background already in it. That's one of the things that we can do with that isolated leaf, but we've got lots of other things that we can do. We're going to do that in the next video. 14. Pt 13 - Photo to Shape to Pattern: Returning to our original isolated leaf, let's have a look and see how we could create a pattern of the leaf, but not actually use the leaf itself, just its shape. I'm going to Control and click on this layer thumbnail that would be Command. Click on the marquee. I'm going up here to the rectangular marquee tool. I'm going to click it once because that allows me to get access to a menu of options that only appears when this rectangular marquee tool is selected. I'm going to right-click on my leaf and you can see here that I get the option to make a work path. What that's doing is it's making a shape of or a path from this leaf. I'm just going to click that. Now the range or the tolerance you can do here, I think is between one and 10. Let's just try 11 because I don't think that we can use 11. No, you need to use a number between 0.5 and 10. The larger the number, the less detailed the leaf is going to be. Let's just say what 10 looks like. You can see that this is not very detailed at all. I'm just going to undo that right-click and let's choose Make Work Path again. Let's try a setting of say, four. This again is a very stylized leaf. Now if you like that, use that. I want something that's a little bit more accurate. This is way not right for me yet. I'm just going to undo it, right-click and try again. I'm thinking for me, I want a value of 0.5 or one, that would be fine. I want a very detailed leaf. This is a really intense selection of our leaf. Now, what I want to do with this selection is having made it, I want to make it into a custom shape. I'm just going to choose Edit and then Define Custom Shape. I'm going to call this leaf and click ''Okay''. Now as a custom shape, I can use the leaf shape, fill it with some color, and make a pattern from that. I'm going to start with a brand new document. Again, I want this to be square because I'm going to make a pattern out of it. Let's just go back to our 800 by 800 pixel document. I'm going to the custom shape tool here. When I click on it, I can go to my custom shapes. The last shape is going to be the one that I just created. I'm going to select it. Up here on the control bar, you can see that I have shape selected, that means I'm going to be drawing a shape into this document. I have a fill color selected, not what I want to use. I want to use something that is a little bit different. I'm going to fill it with an aqua color. It has no stroke at all. I'm going to hold down the Shift key as I drag out a leaf in my document. I want this to be about the size I wanted in my pattern. When I click away from it, you can see we now have a leaf in our image. I'm going to make a duplicate of that. Just drag it onto the plus symbol here. Then I'm going to send that duplicate to the four corners of the document exactly as we did before. Because I'm using the same 800 by 800 pixel document, that offset filter is going to work just perfectly, but I'm going to be prompted to convert this to a smart object or rasterize. I'm going to just rasterize it because it doesn't really matter that it's rasterized. You can say that the pieces are going to the corner exactly as they did before when we had an actual leaf image. This time we've just got like a drawing of a leaf, if you like. Now again, this one in the middle, I wanted to do something with, because I think I want to add some more visual variety to the pattern. Let's go and make a pattern from this edit define pattern. Again, I'm having a look at this little thumbnail again, I don't think it's quite balanced. That looks fine here, but in the thumbnail it's pretty obvious that it's out a bit. Before I go and save it, I'm just going to move that leaf up a bit further and let's go back and define the pattern. I think that looks better in the thumbnail, I'll click ''Okay''. Let's go back to a working document, the one that we're working on. Let's just go and drag and drop that into the document. This is our pattern of palm leaves, but this time the palm leaf is stylistic. It's not a photograph, it's an image that we created from the photograph as accustome shape. 15. Pt 14 - Photo to Brush to Pattern: We haven't yet exhausted the possibilities of this isolated leaf image. We're going to use it as a brush to make a pattern from. We're going to start by selecting the leaf. In this instance, it's actually easier to select everything that's not the leaf then the leaf itself. I'm going to the Magic Wand tool here. When I click on it, I'm going to the options up here and making sure that Contiguous is not selected. I'll click on the layer and then click on the background. That selects the background. The leaf is not selected. To invert this or reverse this selection, I'll choose "Select", "Inverse." Now, the leaf is selected and the background is not. I'm going to set this color picker here to the default colors by just clicking on this icon. I want to fill this leaf with black so I'm going to press Alt Backspace on the PC, that would be Option Delete on the Mac. If you have any problems with that, there's another way that you can do this by choosing Edit and then Fill. From the contents here you'll see that there's an option to fill with black, just click "OK" and that selection will be filled with black. I'm going to choose Select, Deselect to deselect my selection. Now, I want to make this into a brush, but I'm about to have an issue with that too. Let's go to Edit and you'll see that Define Brush Preset is not selectable. The reason for this is that there's a physical limit to brush sizes in Photoshop. You can't have a brush that is more than 2,500 pixels in either direction. This document here I'm reading off the photo of my screen is 6,700 pixels in size, so it's way too big. I'm going to choose "Image Size" because that will allow me to make my image smaller so it can become a brush. I'll make sure this option here, this little icon is selected because I want to adjust the width when I adjust the height to keep the leaf in proportion. Making the height 2,500, that's well within the limits because you see I'm not using the area around this leaf, so it's going to be well under 2,500 pixels in size. I'll click "OK". Now, we should be able to make a brush from it. Click on the layer and choose "Edit", and you'll see that Define Brush Preset is available. I'm calling it palm leaf. I'll click "OK". Immediately this selects the brush tool. You can see I have a brush. I'm going to make a document into which I'm going to build my pattern. I'm going to make something that is 2,000 pixels by 2,000 pixels in size. I'll add a new layer to it because I want a brush onto a separate layer. Let's go and get our brush option. If you don't see your brush already selected, it should be in the bottom of this brush's panel. Right now, this is how it's painting. For a start, it's too big, so I'm going to use the open square bracket key to adjust its size. It's also painting as a solid stream. We'll go up here to this icon, it looks like a folder with a brush on it, and this will allow us to make changes to the brush. You can adjust the size here, but I suggest that you just learn those keystrokes, the open and closed square bracket keys, they're much easier to use. Spacing will allow us to separate these brushes from each other. We'll go to Shape Dynamics, make sure it's turned on, make sure it's selected. I'm going to increase the size jitter so I get big and little leaves. You can also select a minimum diameter to adjust the smallest one, and select "Angle Jitter" to rotate the brush. Now, the leaves are going in all directions. You can also use Roundness Jitter, that's just going to change the shape of the leaves a little bit, again for more variety. Right now the brush is going to paint with a solid color, so I'm going to select a different color to use. I want a lighter pink. But again, every single one of these leaves is the same pink color. We can get some variety into this by using a second color. Right now I'm going to set it to blue because I just want to show you a few things before we get to work with it. You're going to turn on Color Dynamics and select "Color Dynamics." Now by default, your settings probably look like this, so we're not seeing any color change in the brush here at all. But if we adjust the Foreground Background Jitter, then we're going to get some color changes between the pink and the blue. But right now if I paint with a solid line, if you like, I've just got my left mouse button pressed down, you'll see that every single one of these layers, although they're a different color, they're all the same different color. If we click on "Apply Per Tip," then when I hold my mouse pointed down and brush over the document, the leaves are going in as a variety of colors as between the pink and the blue, so you will want to set Apply Per Tip. You can also adjust the hue a little bit, that will add a little bit of variety into the flip between these two colors. I like to add a little bit of a hue jitter. But I'm going to change this color because I want actually to go between a pink and red rather than use blue at this stage. This is what we're going to get. I'm pretty happy with that, so I'm ready to start painting. I think it's better to click rather than paint at this stage because you don't have a lot of space to fill up. If you want your leaves to all be separate then don't have any leaves going over each other. But what is very important, regardless of whether you want your leaves to be separate or not, is that nothing at all goes over the edge of this document. Nothing can go over the edge or it won't make a pattern. Now, at this stage, I want to get things a bit closer to the edge, but I can't. But I'm going to use what's called an offset filter to be able to do that. We'll choose "Filter", "Other", and then "Offset". Now, a lot of people freak out over this filter, but it's actually extremely simple to use. Remember the size of your original document, mine was 2,000 pixels by 2,000 pixels. You're going to take the number 2,000 and divide by 2, and that gives you 1,000. You're going to set that 1,000 value as both your horizontal and your vertical because we're working with a square document. It was 2,000 by 2,000, so our offset is going to be half of that. 1,000 by 1,000. Just type them in there, select Wrap Around, and click "OK". This opens up this middle area, and so now I can add some more leaves. Now, if I put down a leaf that I don't like, I'm just going to press Control Z to undo it and then go and put in a different one. You can do your filter again, but just make sure that the leaves that you add are all inside this area. There are some leaves over the edge, but they were from the previous iteration of this pattern. Just make sure that anything that you add is not over the edge or again, you're going to break that pattern. "Filter", "Other", "Offset", exactly the same offset. Again, I can add a couple of layers, just making sure they do not go over the edge. I'm going to use the open square bracket just to size my leaf down a little bit because I want to put one in there. Again, I'm going to run the filter. These settings are sticky so all you have to do is come in and click "OK" because they're going to be the exact same settings. I want to add something in here, but this leaf is not going in the right direction, so I'm just going to put it in and undo it. I don't want that one either. I don't want that one either. It might off me at this stage to actually flip this leaf myself, so what I'm going to do is adjust its positioning and see if I can get it in the exact position that I want using this angle here. This is the one I want, so I'm just going to add it here, making sure it doesn't go over the edge of the document. Let's run our filter again. I think this is looking pretty good. Let's make a pattern out of this; edit "Define Pattern". Let's test it with a new file. A new file has to be larger than our design. I'm making mine 6,000 by 6,000. I'm opening my patterns panel. You can get to that by choosing Window and then Patterns. I'm just going to drag and drop my pattern into my document. The pattern, as you can see here, actually is bringing with it its background. We could go back to this image here. Let's open the Layers panel, let's turn off the background, and let's make a pattern out of it without the background. Let's go back to our document here. I'm going to drag this new pattern in. It's going to look exactly like the last one. But if we go to the Layers palette, we'll be able to add a layer in here between the pattern and this white background that has color in it. The way I like to do this is choose Layer, New Fill Layer, and then solid color. The reason for this is that I can now adjust that color layer in situ. I can see my pattern and this color background that I'm building into this pattern as I'm working so I can decide what I like and don't like. It's much more efficient than trying to work out the colors that you want to use using the foreground and background colors here. I really like this color, I'm just going to click, "OK". So we've got a pattern with a transparency behind it, and behind that, we can put any set of colors that we like. Now, once you've got a design, if you like it and you think it's a good and nicely balanced pattern, we could go back into this pattern area and I could add a hue saturation layer. "Layer", "New Adjustment Layer", "Hue Saturation", click "OK". What I'm going to do is adjust the color of my pattern just by dragging around on the Hue slider. So I really like this pattern as well. I'm going to turn off the background because I don't want to bring in a background, I want to be able to add my own background, make a pattern out of that. Make sure that you've got a layer that has content on it rather than the adjustment layer selected when you go to make your pattern or you won't be able to do that. Now, you can also make it with a white background if you want to. Just turn your Background on and just make that as an additional pattern. Let's go back into this document, go back into our patterns. This is the one that is transparent. So we're seeing that background that we built into this document, this new background behind it, of course, we can edit that if we want to. Go to the layers palette, double-click on the thumbnail here, and you could choose a different color for this background. Then of course we have the version of the pattern that brings in its own background here that has that white background built into it. There's lots that you can do with this palm tree image. It's just the case of looking at the possibilities and determining what patterns you can make with it. 16. Pt 15 - Hexagon Pattern: This hexagon pattern is a little bit tricky to make, but it's lots of fun and I've got a system that's going to make it pretty near foolproof to get it right. But I do suggest you use my values because that's going to be important to the success of this given that we're going to be making guides and shapes that are of fixed size. Let me click "New File" and I'm working in pixels so I have a shape that is 2,000 by 2,000 pixels. If you're working in some other value, just choose "Pixels" from this option here. Now we're going to start with our guides so we're going to "View" and then "Guides" and then go down here to "New Guide." We need four guides, we need two vertical and two horizontal. I'm starting with the horizontal guides here and the first one is going in at 303 pixels. Now, if you're working in inches or some other value, you can just type px to make sure it goes in at the right number of pixels. The second guide "View," "Guides," "New Guide," and this one is going in at 1,515 pixels. Again, type px if you need to. The two vertical guides are now going in, we'll choose "View," "Guides," "New Guide." The first vertical guide is going in at 650 pixels. I'm not going to type pixels because I'm working in pixels already, you'll type it if you need to. The final guide is going in, it's again a vertical that's going in at 1,700. These guides are going to help us line everything up as we make our pattern. We'll go now to the tool we're going to use to make our hexagon, that's going to be the polygon tool. Choose a toolbar position with the rectangle tool. You'll need to come up here to the control bar and make sure that you have "Shape" selected here and no stroke at all. It should have a line through it. If it doesn't, just click it and just select this option to put a line through so that you don't have a stroke. Now, I'm going to be using some pastel colors here so I'm just going to make my pastel colors available, and let's go and get a pastel color to use. I'm going to click once in the document because I want to control the size of my hexagon, and that's going to be 700 pixels by 700 pixels width and height. It's symmetric, number of sides is six, corner radius zero, star ratio 100 percent, from center is not selected, and we'll click "Okay." Now, we asked for a hexagon that was 700 pixels by 700 pixels. It's not. That's fine. There's a reason for this. Open up your properties panel which you can get to by choosing "Window" and then "Properties." Here in the Transform area, you can see that your hexagon is going to have a width of 700 pixels, that's what we asked for. But the way hexagons are in shape is that they're always wider than they're tall if the sides are even in length and we need the sides to be even in length. But, this is a really nasty value, this 606.22. It is a fraction of a pixel and it's not going to work particularly well for a pattern. So what we're going to do with our shape selected is make sure that this icon here is not selected so it should be the same color as its background. Shouldn't look like this, should look like this. What we're going to do is just make this 606 pixels. Again, if you're working in inches or something, just type 606 px and you're going to be good to go. What we've done is we've marginally stretched this shape, only a smidgen. It's not going to show up in the shape, but it is going to make things easier to line up. Now, I want this to be lined up to the top center of the document which I can do with my guides, but you'll also want to double-check it so click these three dots here. Make sure align to reads "Canvas," and then click here on the center option and the top option. We want to make it aligned to the very top and to the center of the document. We're going to show our layers pallet because we need to have our eyes on this to make sure that everything works properly. Of course, you can get to your layers palette by choosing "Window" and then "Layers." We're going to make a duplicate of this polygon. I'm going to drag and drop the layer onto the plus symbol. This polygon, we want to change its color so we need to select one of the shape tools. So that's this tool here, the path selection tool, or back to the hexagon tool, it doesn't matter. We can change the color of this particular shape so I'm going to make it a green. In the layers palette, you'll see that we've got an orange shape and a green shape on top of each other. I'm going to the path selection tool, this is going to be a really important tool to use so just click on the "Path Selection Tool" and then drag this shape down and over here. It should snap into position because we've got our guides there. The next move is really important and it's a little bit tricky. You're going to make sure you have the path selection tool selected. You're going to hover over this shape, in fact, you can select this shape with it. You're going to hold down the Alt key on a PC, and that would be the Option key on a Mac. You'll see that to the bottom right of that little arrow is a plus symbol. That tells you you're about to make a copy but it's a very special copy because if you hold the Alt or Option key as we move this across and keep holding it until you let go, you've not only made a duplicate of this green shape, but here you can see that they're in the exact same layer in the document. Now that's important because ultimately this bit here is going to join up with this bit here. These are the same shape and they need to be the same shape, and the reason I'm putting them on the same layer is this. If I change the fill color of them, the rules of shapes on layers are that both of them are going to change their color so let's make this a blue. You can see that they're both going to change color and that's going to work to our advantage. We've got the two shapes on the same layer that need to be behaving as if they were the same shape. I'm going to grab this layer and drop it onto the plus symbol and I'm going to change the color of these to another color I'm working with. Let's choose this color. Then we're going to move them. The problem is as soon as I click back on them with the path selection tool, I end up with only one selected. So I'm going to hold the Shift key down, select the other one, and then start moving. It's a little bit tricky, but you'll get used to it. This is going to snap in down the bottom here. These two shapes on the same layer, they're ultimately going to be pieces of the same shape in our pattern. Now this polygon here at the moment we're only going to get half of that in the pattern because this little area in here is going to be our pattern swatch, so we need an orange shape down here. But before we actually go and drag this down here, we're going to make a duplicate because we're going to need something in the middle here. Let's just drag this polygon onto the plus symbol so we've got one that we can hold for now. Then let's go and get the one that's on the top here. Hold down the Alt option key and drag this down. We should have a lab that looks like this with two shapes on it. Now, I'm just going to show you something that you might do by accident. If you use the move tool, you can also make a copy of a shape by holding down the Alt key. But this time, you're going to get a different shape, black arrow and it's going to have a white arrow behind it. It does just as what we asked it to. It does move a duplicate of this shape. It makes a duplicate and it moves up. But look over here in the layers panel, you end up with these two shapes on different layers. Not what we were supposed to be doing, but this can be saved. What you can do is select both of these layers, the bits that have these two shapes on them, right-click and just choose Merge Shapes and that puts them back on the same layer. If you find at the end of this that you've moved things around and all of a sudden things aren't on layers together, that should be on layers together, well, you can solve that problem. Now, I'm just going to turn this layer off for a minute because we need to deal with this particular shape which needs to be in the middle. Obviously, it needs to be a different color so we're going to on the shape tools and let's go and get a color for it. Then we'll turn the orange ones back on again. This is not everything we need for a swatch for a seamless repeating pattern. We're going to the selection tool and I'm just going to drag over using these guides as a guide. Now, everything should snap into place because that's why we had the guides in the first place. We'll go to Edit and we'll go to Define Pattern. I'm going to call this hexagon 1 and I'll click "Okay". To test this, we need a new document so I'll choose File, New. I'm going to make a document much larger in size. In my case, 6,000 by 6,000 pixel. We'll come across here to the patterns collection. You'll get to those by choosing Window and then Patterns. You can just drag and drop your hexagon pattern into your document. I'll double-click here and we're just going to change the scale down so we can see how nicely our pattern works. Now, we're going to zoom in here and just double-check and make sure that there are no spaces. They shouldn't be spaces because we set this up to be successful, so it should be a perfect pattern. Now, there are a couple of things that we can do with this now that we've got our pattern. Provided you're happy that everything works, then this is what you're going to do. Firstly, save this document so that you've got the swatch saved. But I'm also going to save this selection because rather than having to make it each time we know what works so it would behoove me to save it so I can just grab it. I'm going to Select and then I'm going to Save Selection. I'm going to call this hexagon swatch. I'll click "Okay". Now, I can turn it off because I don't need it right now. I'm going to de-select. I don't need the guides any longer because they're fine. Everything is perfect. I've got my selection. I don't need my guide, so I'll go to View, Guides and I will clear my guides. Now, I'm going to put some white borders around this pattern. I'm going to select everything. I'm going to the path selection tool, I'm just going to drag over all the objects in this pattern. I'm going up here to the Stroke and I'm going to click on the Stroke and I'm going to make it white. I'm going to make the size of it fairly narrow. Right now, let's do a 10-pixel stroke. Then we're going to this little icon here and you're going to align and you're going to make sure that this is the middle of these three options. What that does is it puts the stroke over the edge of the shapes, so there's half in and half out. It's important to have half in and half out and it's important to have an even number so that you have half in, half out. It's not like five-and-a-half pixels in and five-and-a-half pixels out as it would if you had a stroke weight of 11. It has to be an even number. This is a new pattern. We need to get our selection back. We'll go to Select, Load Selection and just here is our hexagon swatch, we'll click "Okay". That just loads the selection back in. It's the selection that's marking out the area that is our pattern. If it was right before, it's going to be right now. Edit, Define Pattern, hexagon 2, click "Okay". Let's go back into our patterns panel and drag and drop our pattern in. We're going to zoom in and just make sure it is perfect which, of course, it is. Because it was perfect originally, it should be perfect this time. Now, this time, we're going to enlarge the width of the stroke. I'm going to de-select my selection. I'm going back to the past selection tool. I'm going to select everything here and I'm just going to increase my stroke weight. Again, make sure it's an even number. This time, it's going to be 30 pixels. This is a chunkier design. Again, Select, Load Selection, come back in and load our hexagon, make a pattern out of it. Hexagon 3, and go test it. This is a chunkier version of our design. Now, before we finish up here, there is a potential for creating a two-color version. I'm going to de-select my selection. You will want to save this file at this point because what we're about to do is going to change the colors of pretty much everything. I'm going to leave the purple one the color that it is, but I'm going to select every other one of these layers. I've got three layers selected with the blue, the green, and the orange. I'm coming up here to the Fill and I'm going to change the fill color. I'm going to make this a blue color, maybe a slightly different blue color. Now, I'm going back to get my selection load back in my selection and go and make a pattern out of this. This is still the same hexagon pattern. This time, you've got a purple hexagon that is surrounded by similar color blue ones. Again, a different variety of pattern. This design, this pattern, once you've made the basics for the design, can be re-used over and over again to re-color it and do all sorts of things. Enjoy that hexagon pattern. Once you've got, I would save it so that you can use it over and over again as required. 17. 10 Patterns in Photoshop Project and Wrapup: We've now completed the video training portion of this course, so it's over to you. Your project for this class is to create one or more of these patterns in Adobe Photoshop and post an image of your completed designs as your class project. I hope that you've enjoyed this course and that you've learned lots about making more advanced styles or patterns in Adobe Photoshop. Now if you did enjoy this course and when you see a prompt that asks if you would recommend this class to others, please do two things for me. Firstly, answer yes that you do recommend this class, and secondly, write even in just a few words why you enjoyed it. Your recommendations help other students to say that this is a course that they too might like to take. If you see the Follow link on the screen, click it and you'll be alerted when I release new classes. If you'd like to leave me a comment or a question, please do so. I read and respond to all of your questions and comments, and I look at and review all of your class projects. My name's Helen Bradley. Thank you so much for joining me for this episode of Graphic Design for Lunch. I look forward to seeing you in another class here on Skillshare soon.