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7 Videos (43m)
    • Lecture #1: Writing (Smart) About Pop Culture (4:34)

      4:33
    • Lecture #2: Analyzing Good Examples of Pop Culture Writing (9:51)

      9:50
    • Mary and Lou and Rhoda and Ted (2:22)

      2:21
    • Mary Tyler Moore Show: Three Things You Didn't Know (2:53)

      2:52
    • Lecture #3: Dos and Don'ts of Pop Culture Writing (10:01)

      10:00
    • Lecture #4a: Taking Pop Culture Writing to Book Level (9:49)

      9:48
    • Lecture #4b: Taking Your Pop Culture Writing to Book Level (3:11)

      3:10

About This Class

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What did Beyonce's Super Bowl performance mean to feminism? Is Girls great art? How does binge-watching TV shows change the way we interpret them?

Pop culture drives national conversations like never before, thanks to social media and blogs. That means there are more opportunities than ever to write about the TV shows, movies, and music you're passionate about -- and you can go beyond the mere who-are-you-wearing/who-are-you-dating fluff that dominates so many entertainment-driven sites and publications.

I've spent a decade on staff at Entertainment Weekly, and write for several publications, including Women’s Health, Runner’s World, Writer’s Digest, Fast Company, and New York‘s Vulture. I've provided pop culture commentary for CNN, VH1, A&E, and ABC. In this class, I'll be sharing my pop culture writing secrets with you so you can begin writing brilliant pieces of your own.

If you want to make a living -- or even just an online splash -- by writing about your favorite stuff, this is the class for you.

In this class, we'll look at some of the best pop culture writing out there, from the likes of The New Yorker, Vulture.com, and The AV Club. We'll talk about ways to keep up with the latest in entertainment, the elements of a "smart" pop culture piece, and how to expand these ideas into book form.

In this class, you'll work to develop your own essay, blog post, or article and submit it for feedback from myself and your classmates. 


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Hope to see you in class!

40 of 44 students recommendSee All

I thought this was a great webinar on writing smart Pop Culture -- Lots of great points and tips.
Maria K.

Hi Everyone. Ready to learn.

Excellent class! The content provided in this class is informative and well organized. There are plenty of examples of the types of writing produced. Jennifer is smart, charismatic and inventive. I would love to see more classes like this.
Candice Lee

Lifelong Learner

Very informative! Learned so much about writing and pop culture. Great class!

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Students

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Jennifer Keishin Armstrong

Writer @ Entertainment Weekly, BBC Culture + more

Jennifer Keishin Armstrong grew up in the southwest suburbs of Chicago, where she spent most of her time putting on shows in her parents’ garage, studying TV Guide,devouring Sweet Valley High books, and memorizing every note of every George Michael song. This finally came in handy when she got a job at Entertainment Weekly, where she worked for a decade. She’s now the TV columnist for BBC Culture and also writes for several other publications, including The New York Times Book Review, Fast Company, New York‘s Vulture, The Verge, and Dame. She’s the author of the New York Times bestseller Seinfeldia: The Secret World of the Show About Nothing that Changed Everything and a history of The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Mary and Lou and Rhoda and Ted. She now lives in Manhattan.