Paper Flower Basics: Creating a Dimensional Composition Free class

Ellen and David, Designers, educators, collaborators.

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10 Videos (1h 17m)
    • Trailer

      1:24
    • Overview

      3:15
    • Supplies

      4:17
    • Simple Daisies

      13:35
    • Daisy Variations

      7:03
    • Bell Flowers

      9:39
    • Leaves, Stems and Greenery

      10:10
    • Craft the Letterform

      10:48
    • Assemble the Composition

      15:01
    • Thanks!

      2:16

About This Class

Designers and educators, Ellen Schofield and David Rogers have recently teamed up to explore their shared passion of cut paper forms and playful typography. Now they want to share that passion with you. In this course, you will create a vivid and multi-layered composition made from paper flowers and your initial.

This class will guide you through the process of working more sculpturally with paper by demonstrating how to create two different flower forms and a dimensional letter. These components will come together in a final composition that when framed will add a burst of spring to any room.

Designers, illustrators and floral enthusiasts of all skill levels are welcome to jump into this class to begin developing their own paper flower and letterform composition. So break out a fresh x-acto blade, grab some paper, and let the cutting begin.

7 of 8 students recommendSee All

Great instruction, easy to follow. No expensive equipment. Nice variations.

358

Students

1

Project

Ellen and David

Designers, educators, collaborators.

Ellen Schofield and David Rogers are friends and colleagues within the Department of Art at Minnesota State University, Mankato. They have been collaborating to explore their mutual love of color, form, and physical materials. One of their current projects is Paper State Flowers that has them developing dimensional compositions for all fifty states. Each composition incorporates an experimentation with letterform through the state's abbreviation and with the geometric interpretation of each state's flower.