Your Enlightened Guide To Lyrics & Songwriting (FULL COURSE) | Adam Sweeney | Skillshare

Your Enlightened Guide To Lyrics & Songwriting (FULL COURSE)

Adam Sweeney, Songwriter/Emotional Intelligence Spec.

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32 Lessons (1h 44m)
    • 1. Introduction

      2:51
    • 2. Anyone Can Write Meaningful and Clever Lyrics - NO LIMITS!

      5:36
    • 3. Three Golden Rules (Create, Relate, & Communicate)

      3:03
    • 4. To Start: Who Are You Writing For?

      3:02
    • 5. Golden Key #1: Set It In Stone

      3:10
    • 6. Golden Key #2: Goals Are Garbage

      2:28
    • 7. TT: Enjoying The Process

      4:17
    • 8. Exploring Various Point of View (POV) Tools

      2:26
    • 9. 1st Person POV Unlocked

      2:32
    • 10. 2nd Person POV Unlocked

      2:20
    • 11. 3rd Person POV Unlocked

      2:32
    • 12. Using Multiple POVs (Expressed Through Multiple Vocals)

      3:53
    • 13. Golden Key #3: Abundantly More

      2:18
    • 14. Golden Key #4: Lyrical Admiration

      2:24
    • 15. Easy Guide To Intros, Verses, & The Pre-Chorus

      3:56
    • 16. Chorus Or Refrain, What Is The Difference?

      3:21
    • 17. Bridges, Breaks, & Interludes All Wrapped Into One

      2:01
    • 18. Secrets For Exceptional Outro Finales (Very Important!)

      6:18
    • 19. Platinum Key #1: The Waterslide Method

      4:17
    • 20. Platinum Key #2 :Ideal Key Words and Phrases

      4:23
    • 21. You Don't Need To Use Everything (Quality Over Quantity Rule)

      4:02
    • 22. Lyric-Optional Or Lyric-Manditory?

      1:55
    • 23. Arranging Colorful Order

      2:49
    • 24. Golden Key #5: Give Me 10!

      2:31
    • 25. Golden Key #6: The Writing Muscle

      2:11
    • 26. Golden Key #7: Lyric Warmups

      3:01
    • 27. Golden Key #8: Bating Your Lyrics

      1:41
    • 28. Golden Key #9: Escape To Focus

      2:17
    • 29. Golden Key #10: E-Motion (Energy In Motion)

      2:12
    • 30. TT: What It Means To "Nail" Lyric Writing

      4:36
    • 31. A Personal Message From Me

      4:08
    • 32. All I Ever Wanted Video

      5:03
44 students are watching this class

About This Class

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Welcome to Your Enlightened Guide To Lyrics & Songwriting ! (Formerly How To Become A Lyric-Writing Machine)

As I have been evolving and experiencing changes like many of you these past few years, personally and especially in my songwriting, it is also my intention that this course reflects these exciting changes I am experiencing within myself and in my own songwriting practice.

This is a process which we can thoroughly enjoy ever aspect. Writing/creating is an experience that expands you beyond yourself in the moment and when it is finished it has served you in that process, and then that finished song or recording will go on to serve those that listen to it and they can be inspired. So it all starts with us, the music makers and we can appreciate this.

I had a lot of challenges since I started when I was younger, fear to express myself fully in my writing because of what others thought about me shortchanged my songs, then I learned the greatest lesson: that when you write for yourself without fear or hesitation, it comes across as authentic and this is what resonates with people, authenticity...however you need to be authentic in yourself first...I can help with that.

Enough about me, now I want to share more details of what you can expect in this course.

The Enlightened Guide For All~

  • Titanium Tips - Realizations I have discovered which have helped me overcome my blocks, limiting definitions, beliefs and ways of thinking that prevented me from creating my best work.

  • Golden Keys - My methods/exercises to take action on and can get you into the proper state to connect with your creativity and taking (writing) action from that state.

  • Platinum Keys - Techniques I use to enhance my process of songwriting.

Lyric Basics Guide For Beginners~

  • Points of View (POV) - Learn about the 3 different kinds of POV, main and sub POV, as well as using multiple POVs and lyric spurts and how this awareness can make you a more refined songwriter.

  • Anatomy of A song - Learn in detail the different parts of a song and get tips on how to use them effectively and keep listeners engaged.

  • Lyric Structure Variations - Learn different lyric structure variations, when lyrics are necessary, and how to create variety among your songs.

Additional lectures are created and uploaded periodically.

Whether writing songs is your hobby or your professional career you will find this course to be different from any other with unique and original ideas and upon completion I hope you feel a sense of excitement and enthusiasm as well as enlightenment.

I am on this journey with you so reach out to me and chat if you would like to speak with me. I am excited to meet you and honored if you join me on this amazing/challenging/exciting journey.

You can find my personal creations at SoundCloud under AdamSweeneyMusic.

Transcripts

1. Introduction: My name is Adam Sweeney. I've been writing songs since I was about 13 years old, back when I used to record them on my four track cassette task cam recorder. And then as I was growing up, I'd use them to express myself in a more confident way in areas of my life that I wasn't so confident in back then. And now, at this point in my life, I use song writing, lyric writing as a process to take me through who I am now and to express that in its many amazing ways possible. That I can think of it brings me through a process of creativity and connecting with myself . And as I do that I discover blocks within myself that I can transform whether they're writers, blocks and blocks about what other people think it effects. Really, every area of my life when I go through this process of song writing and what I like to give to you in this course is everything that I've learned on my journey because I know you're going through your own journey and what could be more fun than doing it together? Some of the greatest things that I've learned is that writing for yourself is the most important thing, because when you write for yourself and right for yourself unfiltered because in this course I don't filter myself at all because I know that's not what you what you need. And that's not what anyone wants to hear when they're listening to music. They want to hear it in the most purest form and purest expression possible. And so what I'd like to take you through is my process of song writing not just the actual exercises off writing, but also getting you into a space where you feel good about yourself or you feel confident . And then from the space you take the action off writing and you just see what comes out, and no matter what comes out, you validate everything. They're also lessons on how I the order of how I write music, as well as how to break down lyrics and different parts of the song and different orders you can have them in. So all the basics are covered as well, and I am always updating and adding videos because my journey is still continuing. I'm I'm still doing this because it provides me so much joy and getting to know who I am and expanding beyond myself. Be ready to have some fun making writing a daily practice that you could enjoy. Come join me and connect with me in the course. Thanks. And I'll see you there. 2. Anyone Can Write Meaningful and Clever Lyrics - NO LIMITS!: Hello. This is Adam Sweeney, and I first want to thank you for enrolling in my course. And second, I want to welcome you to the first section of my first lecture. Anyone can write meaningful lyrics. There are no limits. Did you ever wonder how some artists, right? Album after album, song after song? Maybe they even have a side band or side project. They write songs for two, and each album may contain 10 to 14 songs. And keep in mind those air on Lee, the ones that made the record. If they didn't make the record, they either didn't fit in with the theme of the album or the artists were label didn't think the song was good enough so it would be set aside and may be released later. Either way, these artists that write album after album their entire lives you can say they're lyric writing machines. However, they know something you don't and I'm gonna share it with you. There are two key secrets. The first is a belief you must have. And the second is an action you must take. And I'm gonna get into that more specifically later in the course. But you need them both to succeed. But first, let's take a look at three examples of living lyric writing machines. Billy Joe Armstrong from Green Day. It's written 11 albums with Green Day and over 150 songs. Even his last album, in 2012 was a triple album with over 30 songs on them. Tom's Along, You may know him from Blink 1 82 or Angels and Airwaves. He also had a side project called Boxcar Racer. But over his career he's written over 14 albums and over 100 and 20 songs. Even this year, he's releasing an album with demos and B sides and songs that didn't make his other albums . We'll see if they're any good and last but not least, the ultimate song writing machine. Paul McCartney. The Guy's been writing songs for 50 years, 36 albums over 450 songs between the Beatles wings and all his solo projects, which he's still continuing to this day. So let's get into the first lyric writing secret. Listen carefully. Your lyrics and music do not come from your brain, but something bigger, more vast and most importantly, limitless. The brain can't conceive Writing 100 songs, even 20 is overload. Successful songwriters know that they channel is creative information from an unlimited source, and the well can never run dry if you're tuned into it. This is how they write song after song. They don't have these limiting beliefs holding them back, that they can't do it or that this is, ah, high number of songs to write. They don't even think in terms of numbers. So what is this unlimited source I'm talking about? It is a space where all ideas come from not just for songs, but books, movies, TV shows, articles. What do you think Stephen King gets all the ideas for the 40 books he's written over his career? True, not all of them are good. The good ones come from this source or plain, where all ideas exist, and the author artist is the one channeling them into existence. So with connection to this source, inspiration, song writing becomes effortless. So what does your brain coming here? Your brain is on Lee, a facilitator. The brain is on Lee able to come up with a mediocre ideas, at best by itself. So where does your brain come into play? Exactly. You get the material from source inspiration and your brain structures and moulds it into a song. So if you want to be a lyric writing machine and a good one not just turning out crap, you need to connect and be in. Tune with your source and use your brain. If you only use your brain, you'll write songs. Don't get me wrong, but the majority won't be very good. It's gonna cost you a lot more time and effort to do it, and you just you won't be satisfied at the end. So the main point in this lecture and promised to you is that anyone can be a good lyricist with this knowledge that I'm sharing with you. In this course, you're going to be able to write lyrics, great lyrics and effortlessly, even if you have never done it before. It doesn't matter if your singer and it's your job, or if your basis or even a drummer can contribute to the band's lyrics. Even if you've been writing for years, I promise, this course is going to help you explode your output of lyrics effortlessly so to connect to this unlimited source have been talking to you about. You need to be in a state of creative flow. And in the next lecture, I give you 10 easy ways to get into this flow zone where you can truly amaze yourself and others. And these ways have always worked for me. And it doesn't matter if I'm writing lyrics. I use them whenever I need to be in a creative space. So I hope you enjoyed this lecture. I'll see you in the next. 3. Three Golden Rules (Create, Relate, & Communicate): it's time to learn the three Golden rules for writing lyrics create, relate and communicate. So what is writing lyrics and our to give my own personal definition for the art of writing lyrics it would have to be. Writing lyrics is creative storytelling based on beliefs and experiences in order to express oneself and communicated to others in a clever and stylish way, she might wonder. Where does music fit into the scheme? Well, music is the mood or tone, which is usually reflective of the tone of the lyrics. First golden rule creating What is it you're creating? You're creating a piece of art, you're creating an experience for others and you're bringing something into existence which never existed before, which is an amazing thing. Second golden rule relating to whom are you relating? You're relating that others your audience, whomever, they maybe, maybe just someone that's listening. And it's important to remember that your lyrics are a reflection of your experiences and beliefs, which in turn affect your audience. So why is relating? Important relating is important because it builds an invaluable connection. Listeners want to know if you experience the world the way they do. If you've been through what they've been through. This creates a bond between you and the listener, and the stronger the bond, the more they'll feel that you understand them and any material that you put out. They will give it a listen because they think, Hey, this artist's understands me who I am, what I've been through, what I believe and I can relate to that. So I'll enjoy listening to whatever they put out. Third Golden Rule Communicating How do you communicate? You are creating a story or retailing one of your own experiences. The one thing that gives lyric and edge is that you're communicating this story in a clever and stylish way that remains with your listeners long after the experience is over. And you can do this through either using certain phrases or rhymes with their catchy and stay in the listeners heads long after the songs over and I give you some examples. Example. One. We are the Champions by Queen Example to the Y M. C. A song example. Number three. We all live in a yellow submarine, so good luck. Now you have that stuck in your head for the rest of the day. So these artists were very good at communicating their lyrics do their listeners because they were very, very catchy. And we're going to later explore the key secrets that make lyrics Stick to your listeners like crazy goo. So don't worry. I got you covered. So this concludes this lecture, I'll see you in the next. 4. To Start: Who Are You Writing For?: Hi, everyone. This is Adam. And today I just like to share something with you, something I'll call my titanium tip. And that is how we write our music. And this is something I believe would be helpful for everyone Before you start your song. Writing and journey before you get deeper into this course is to really ask yourself, Who am I writing for, Who is my audience? And from my experience, the number one person in Number one audience I'm writing for is myself. And I'll tell you why. Because this is actually the most efficient way to write music. You have a world full of billions of people who have all different tastes and music, and we know music is about residence. You know, the kind of song you resonate with that will make you feel good. This is what you get out of your favorite artists and your favorite songs that you like to listen to over and over again. And when you find the songs somehow and you recognize yourself within these songs and you feel like, Hey, I know these artists and know where they're coming from, these artists are not really writing for you. They're writing for themselves because it's really it's too big of a job the top to try to write for a specific audience. So it's actually so much easier just right for yourself and to express yourself and to do it fearlessly. Because when you're not afraid to express yourself for the type of music, the type of sounds you want to make or certain lyrics you want to write, if you conduce this and its most purest form and biggest of self expression, this is the light that attracts people. This is what says says, Hey, I am out there and you can see me. I'm letting everything out on the table and this is actually what we like, because we can see it so much easier when we can identify ourselves with it. So much easier. However, if you keep yourself if you hold yourself back or to concern about what others might think or what they might like, then it sort of compresses your music and compresses the experience a little bit. So this is works wonders for myself on my song writing journey, and I hope it will help yours too. So thanks everyone for listening and for enrolling in my course. It is a privilege for me to serve you in this way to share my experiences on my song writing Journey with you and I wish you a lot of fun and a lot of joy expressing yourself in your music and sharing it with everyone by. 5. Golden Key #1: Set It In Stone: This is the first golden key. Set it in stone. Set aside time for yourself every day, too, right? Even if it's only 15 minutes, this is very straightforward. Set aside a time and stick to it. It doesn't matter if you sit at your desk doing nothing during this time. In fact, unless you're doing something that involves writing than do nothing, this time is reserved for writing on Lee. And you must honor that time by at least being present for it. The point is to make writing a habit. When you set aside a time, you're also setting an intention of writing, and when you intend on doing something, it makes it much easier to do it. Just use the time to start writing. Don't worry about if what you're writing is good or not. What is happening is your programming yourself to write, and the intention will help you. It doesn't matter what time you could set this time in the morning or in the evening. Whatever suits you best, this will solve ultimately the problem of having no time because it will always be scheduled. You may not do much the first couple of days but soon after you will. So let's say you set aside 30 minutes and just write a couple random words on the paper. This is okay, but at some point you will start writing more and you will start getting into a flow. And when that happens, don't be surprised if 60 or even 90 minutes flies by. Because when you are in the state, you don't notice time you become timeless, and this timeless space is where creativity lives. You'll know when you've accessed it, because you'll be full of curiosity, excitement and very proud of what you've written musically. Your lyrically. Like I said, this may not happen the first few days when you make it a habit along with your intentions , it will, and it will build upon itself and get easier and easier with every day. So at the end of the week or month, you have set aside depending on the amount of time. Let's say you set aside 45 minutes than at the end of the week or month. You might have anywhere between 5 10 to 40 hours just for song writing, because they do add up in the end and the more time that goes in the writing, the more output you produce and in there will lie some quality output. One great song with high energy passion and clever lyrics is worth its weight in gold and outweighs 10 mediocre songs by far. So starting today, set a time, honor it, and in this way you also honor yourself. 6. Golden Key #2: Goals Are Garbage: this is golden Key. Number two goals are garbage. Traditionally, we grew up learning that setting goals is effective Proactiv and a way to get focused. In my opinion, this is not always true. And from my experience, this is definitely untrue. When applying to writing lyrics, what you actually want to do is not have a goal, but create a process, a goal, for example, in our case, maybe to write a song, right, three songs or an album. And the problem with that is that goals are very future focused and not in the present, where all the work actually takes place. Goals are short term thinking, and once a goal is reached, we tend to rest on our laurels. End sort of take a break. But when you're writing, you have momentum and you want to keep going. Let's say you have a goal and you having trouble reaching it, or something comes up or it's taking longer than expected. From my experience, this can lead to discouragement, frustration and even a lapse and writing until you pick yourself back up again. With the process, you're only processes just to write and sick to a daily practice or schedule as mentioned in the first key processes are long term and don't end once a song has been carved out of your writing. Also, since there are no goals, you get a sense of accomplishment after every time you sit down to write, you can compare it to going for a run or a workout. You always feel good afterwards and are satisfied. You're not too concerned that you're not immediately in shape, which is probably your goal. You simply feel good that you made the effort and you have something to show for it when you don't have a goal, there's no reason to feel bad or have a sense of failure if you don't reach it with the process your productivity goes of anyway. Writing in a sense, is the process and the goal in itself. So when you think about it this way, you get the effect and feeling of accomplishing a goal through the process. Every time you sit down to write 7. TT: Enjoying The Process: Hi. This is Adam coming at you with another titanium tip. I'm calling, enjoying the process. So I'd like to share with you in this video is something I've learned. Not only that applies a song writing, but life in general and that is process is the point. The reason we write songs is to grow and expand beyond ourselves and who we were and to express our emotions and how we feel and think about things. Did you ever notice whether you were writing a song or playing it on stage or your recording that that expansion, that growth, that feeling good is in that moment? And when the moments over No, that's it. So I noticed. Noticed this when I was writing and recording songs that I would feel this expansion while I was doing it. And then once the song was done and recorded, I shared it and that was it. Time for the next thing. Another way that I thought about. This was this past summer. I finished recording about five songs and was going to release Anne Pay, and part of me was saying, I'd like to get this out as soon as possible, so people can listen to it and I can say I wrote another five songs and then and then share that people say all good job But then I thought, Hey, maybe the quality could be better. And then I thought to myself, Well, I'll have to pay someone to master it. What? Not so what? I did waas. I went on YouTube and I found music Help Tech Guy. I think he's called And he showed me that I had everything to make My song sounds great, like studio quality at everything at my fingertips. I just didn't know how to use it. So I took the time. I took 1 to 2 weeks and I went through his videos and I stopped and I pause and I went through my songs and I tell you, it was a great experience. I felt so much growth, and I felt so powerful within myself that I had this knowledge, and with a few clicks I made things sound a lot clear. And then I thought, Well, okay, then I'll just delay it because it's worth having my songs sound this clear this this great quality and once they're put out anyway the process is done, that the growth is done now. I encountered this before when I would write a record, and I think, uh, I just want to be done. I just want to be done forgetting that the process is the point. And if I stay in the present moment and enjoy his process, get myself into a state of flow and take action from that state, bringing that song through is actually the highest joy that I that we have. When we do that and once it's done, it's great. And at that point that process has served you in your growth and the finished product will serve someone else. And that's how this exchange works. So I thought that was something really interesting and it changed the way I thought. Well, when I was writing music and I would get frustrated with myself, I began to have more fun and just relax and was in the moment when I was writing and recording or performing. And, you know, it's like when you read a book you really like, and you don't want it to end, but you keep going through it faster and faster. That's what this was for May. So I like to remind you as well to remember that this is this is a process and the process is the point. It's where the growth and expansion is of yourself. And when we connect to that space and pull it through, pull our energy through, it can provide so much joy. So that is all I wanted to share with you in this titanium tip. Keep writing. Enjoy the process on. I'll talk to you soon by. 8. Exploring Various Point of View (POV) Tools: welcome to Section two Versatility of lyrics for effective storytelling. And in this section we're gonna be exploring various point of view tools. So we're going to be going through all three points of view, along with examples and how they affect your lyrics when you're writing songs. All right, so what concepts can your lyrics revolve around? Well, normally, lyrics revolve around a story. So you're telling a story, and it could be about yourself. It could be about someone else. It could be a true story or a story you made up could have happened in the past. Now or in the future. Your lyrics could simply be about stating your beliefs about the world, how you view the world or your observations about the world. And there are so many more concepts that you can base your lyrics on. But just in case you're a beginner, I want you to be familiar with these first. Every song has a main point of view in some points of view, that does not have to be only one point of view going on here. Rarely is an entire song on Lee based on one point of view, but there usually is a main one, and from my experience it's usually your point of view. But it doesn't always have to be that way. So let's explore. There are three points of view, and you may remember this from your English or grammar class. So there's first person, second person, their person. And since this is a song, there could be multiple points of view going on at the same time. So I don't want you to be afraid to mix it up with several points of view. This was just an introduction to points of view, and in the next lectures in this section, I'm going to go into detail in each point of view, and I'm going to show you. Examples are now each one is used and how you can be insanely creative, using multiple points of view in your lyrics, and you don't always have to make a decision right up front. When you're writing a song, I'm going to make this song based on the first person point of view. It usually just happens naturally when you start writing. But a pro lyricist is always at least aware of what's going on, and that's what I want for you. I just want you to be aware when you're writing your lyrics 9. 1st Person POV Unlocked: welcome to first person point of view unlocked in this lecture, we're going to talk about the first person point of view. So what is it? And I want to give you the textbook definition. The first person point of view is when an I or we serves its a narrator of a piece of fiction up home, a song, a story and the narrator could be a minor character, could be observing the action or the main protagonist of a story. And writing in the first person is probably the easiest thing to dio. And in my opinion, you have an advantage because it allows listener to feel close to your point of view. And that's what they want. They want to identify with you, and this is the easiest way of doing that. So you're representing yourself. I or you're representing we a group of people or an opinion based on you and a group of people. So let's get into the example. So I've chosen a clip from the band The Dangerous Summer the song is called Settled Down, and it wasn't easy to find a song that is purely in the first person because, like I said before. Songs have main points of view, sub points of view, but this one specifically is all about I the first person. Let's have a listen. That's a no. So I found what I'm looking. So what did you think? It's very obvious. It's in the first person. He talks about what he does, what he did, how he feels. And I just want to reiterate one more time that writing in the first person is the best way to connect with your listener. 10. 2nd Person POV Unlocked: this is second person point of view unlocked. So what is the second person point of view? So I'm gonna give you the textbook definition again. In the second person point of view, the narrator is telling the story to another character using the word you and the story is being told through the addresses point of view. I'll give you an example. Often, love songs are written in the second person because they're saying, You are my love, You are my baby and so on and so forth. And in my opinion, the second person point of view has its advantages because you can use it to address a specific person or a group of people are even just in general, your listeners. Let's take a look at this example. This is a clip from Mr Big Shot by Ann Arbor, and I made sure that this is a text that is purely in the second person point of view. Let's give it a listen. Oh, you missed anything that you got to tell me. You and there you have it, and you can definitely see there a lot of use in the lines. But let me ask you a question. Who is he addressing? Well, he's addressing this guy he calls Mr Big Shot, and it's very pinpointed because he's asking the specific person questions. For example, do you mean to tell me I'm not worthy? Ever think you're going to get caught? Oh, you think you're hot as hell? You think you're Mr Big Shot. So please make sure to keep all this in mind if you're deciding to write a song in the second person point of view. 11. 3rd Person POV Unlocked: third person point of view unlocked. This is the third and final point of view we're going to be discussing in this section now . The third person point of view is the most storytelling like point of view you can use because you're writing a story about someone or something else. You're relating all action in third person, and you're using third person pronouns such as he, she and they. Now there are advantages to writing in the third person, and that gives the writer more freedom and how he or she tells the story. And since the story is about someone or something else and it can be one person or multiple people, there are basically no restrictions in how it is told when you're using the third person. Let's take a look at this example. Caesar clips from the song White Lights by the Ban Days Veil. So let's have a listen. She's dropping show shoes, a place where she deals with sometimes stars in a style. So who is lyricist writing about in this song? Who is the third person here? Well, the third person is the woman, and he's describing her actions and her situation using the pronoun she and it's very clear that she is the only one in this picture, and this is the main message and what I would like you to think about when you're writing in the third person. 12. Using Multiple POVs (Expressed Through Multiple Vocals): in this lecture. Everything we've learned in this section regarding points of view is coming together. We're going to be using multiple points of view and expressing them with multiple vocals. The first thing you need to know is that you can do this by yourself on Lee if you recording separate tracks. But if you're live on stage, you need multiple vocalists to express multiple points of view. The second thing you need to know is that the multiple vocalists can be directed at one another, coming from different points of view. Or they can all be coming from the same point of view. Using Lear experts, which are basically one liners in the vocalist go back and forth, kind of like a tag team, one after the other, even one on top of the other. The difference is in the first case, the vocalists are singing to each other, like in the musical and the second case, the vocalists are the same point of view, but the lyrics are directed to the audience. Let's take a look at some examples of each case. In this example. We have two vocalists. We have a man and a woman and they're each singing to one another from their own points of view. Let's have a listen way. Is this clear to everyone? By the way, if something's ever not clear, feel free to write me in the discussions, and I'll be happy to answer any questions you have. But this is a very good case where we have to vocalists singing to one another from different points of view within the same song. So if you're planning to write lyrics for more than one person, you need to decide. Are they talking to one another? Or you both coming from the same point of view? An example to We have to vocalists coming from the same point of view, however, in the song there are three vocals. The 1st 1 is the chorus, which is in red. The second and third, labeled in Green and Blue, represent the other two vocal tracks in the recording and basically vocals two and three are going throughout, vocal one on top of it. So this is the perfect example of a Lear expert there. One liners. Let's have a listen. So what, you think pretty cool, huh? Well, they can't really do this on stage, but in the studio, Sure, why not? You can have as many vocal tracks as you want. This concludes this lecture and this section on points of view. I hope you learned a lot. Let's go on to the next section. 13. Golden Key #3: Abundantly More: this is Golden Key number three Abundantly more. This key falls in line with the previous two keys, those of which, if you follow, you should automatically be following this one as well as a result, which is right more than you need. We've already covered this at the beginning of this course, and it should be common knowledge. Do you buy now? Which is that just about every artists rights more songs than you actually hear on the album? They just cut it down to their best and most appropriate ones for that album. The same is true for other types of art as well, such as a director making a movie. He always films more scenes that is necessary, maybe even three or four hours worth, and it gets cut down to a two hour film in the end, and all the deleted scenes are put in the special feature section of the DVD for musicians . They'll take those songs that they're not using and put him aside, and maybe they'll use them to generate some more income later, and often they're called B sides. The truth is, you can never have too much material. However, there is another very important reason why I am making this a key to becoming a lyric writing machine. Your best writing is always there, but sometimes it's behind bad or mediocre writing. It is important to get it all out because it is a part of the string of creativity which always leads to inspired work. And sometimes you just have to follow and trust it. This is not the time to be a perfectionist, or you may be waiting a lot longer. Perfectionism makes you dismiss most of your ideas that barely touched the paper, but those ideas inspire better ones. They're all related and connected, so don't cut them off at the root. Another way to think of it is one idea is a stepping stone to another. So don't invalidate any stones is bad or unimportant because they ultimately get you to where you want to be. 14. Golden Key #4: Lyrical Admiration: Golden Key Number four Lyrical admiration to be a song writing machine requires you to know what you like lyrically and to be able to identify it in other songs, but also to explain why lyricists who can create inspired lyrics can only do so if they can truly recognize the remarkable craftsmanship of others. Simply put, you cannot create something of value if you cannot recognize value itself. Maybe you've done this kind of exercise before, but I'm asking you to do it again during your writing time, especially if you feel stuck. And even if you don't, it will still give you an enormous boost. I want you to take action now and listen to three songs you truly admire lyrically. But do this exercise one song at a time, Sit down with headphones, close your eyes and listen. Or if you wish to read the lyrics along with the song, then keep your eyes open. Really appreciate what you're listening to afterwards, ask yourself these questions. How do I feel when I'm listening to the flow of the words and the rhyme structure? What makes me feel this way? What are my favorite lines? Why are they my favorite. Why are they so great and perfect in every way? To me? Break the words down piece by piece. If it helps you explain, you don't have to write the answers out. In fact, when I do this, I talk out loud. This exercise of focused appreciation will put you in connection with your own creativity and inspiration. Energetically speaking, creativity is in the same space as beauty and admiration. They all feel similar. So if you begin to feel more excitement flowing in your body and your hands, even after doing this with just one song, you can keep going. But I recommend start writing and see and be surprised with what happens next. 15. Easy Guide To Intros, Verses, & The Pre-Chorus: welcome the Section three of this e course, the anatomy of a song. In this lecture, we're going to discuss the intro, the verse and the pre course. The intro starts at the beginning of the song, and I know that's self explanatory. But the intro is very important because it sets the tone and tempo of the song and grabs the listener's attention in order to lead them to listening to the rest of the song. If you're not sure how to make the intro of your song, one easy way is to make it an instrumental version of a verse or course. This is often the case, but it doesn't have to be that way. My personal advice regarding intros is be very straightforward. The listener is going to decide in the 1st 10 seconds of listening, whether they're gonna listen to the entire song, were skip to the next song on the radio or on the iPod as long as it takes to find the vibe that they're looking for. For example, if you have a minute of slow music and the tempo changes bam, it speeds up dramatically. For the rest of the song. Those listeners that were very in a relaxed mood are going to switch stations or switch to another song because they're just not feeling it. And it works the same way. If you're driving your car, you want a real fast song. And the 1st 30 seconds of the song are really slow. You really gonna fast forward if you know the song to the part that you want or you're just gonna skip it altogether? Remember, nowadays people lack patients, so you have a very small window to get their attention. Next is the verse and the versus deeply involved with the storytelling of the song, it actually moves the story forward. Throughout the song, however, there is a rule with the verse, and that's that. The melody of the verse is the same each time. However, the lyrics are different with each verse, and if you're listening to a recording of a song, you'll notice that generally the versus are quieter than the course. Just to give the course is a bigger effect. My advice with Versace is to diversify. It doesn't matter if you're playing in a band or your recording several instruments, because constant change in the song keeps the listeners on their toes, and this is very important, especially because what we talked about before about shorter attention spans You want to constantly change parts of the songs, even if it's in a small way. For example, the second verse can be different than the first by excluding the guitar and just having vocals, bass and drums so in the chorus comes in with a guitar effect is more powerful. Another idea is to add an additional guitar riff that has not been introduced in the previous verse, and something you can do for vocals is toe added different harmonies to each verse. Now we come to the pre course. The pre course occurs between the verse and the course. It's sometimes used to add an additional level of dynamics to the song. It's also sometimes known as the climb because you're building up to the course, and it heightens the anticipation of the listeners for the coming climax, which is the course. My personal advice regarding the Pre course is that not all songs need a pre course. You don't have to have one. They're usually added on kind of an as needed basis. If the song is lacking something or you need to make the course stand out more in a song 16. Chorus Or Refrain, What Is The Difference?: in this lecture, we're going to be discussing the difference between the chorus and the refrain. Now I'm sure you've heard of these two terms before. I always think of a chorus when I'm writing songs myself or I'm thinking of my favorite bands that are on the radio and the chorus is coming up. And when I think of a refrain, I kind of think back to when I was a kid and I had to sing in church and the refrain would come up. But there is a difference between the course and the refrain, and that is the length. The refrain is composed of Onley one or two lines, which were repeated either once twice, three times four times. It's the same one or two lines repeated, while a course can be made up of several different lines. Just so we're clear. I have three examples of refrains. The 1st 1 is Yellow Submarine by the Beatles. The refrain is we all live in a yellow submarine, a yellow submarine yellow submarine. We all live in a yellow submarine, yellow submarine yellow submarine. It's the same line just repeated twice the same goes, For example, number two which is also a song from the Beatles across the universe And the refrain goes, Nothing's Gonna change my world Nothing is gonna change my world Nothing is gonna change my world Nothing's gonna change my world Same line repeated four times The third and final example I have for you of a refrain comes from the song Smoke on the water And I believe most of you know the refrain to this song which goes smoke on the water, Fire in the sky, Smoke on the water And that's the refrain. Next comes the verse and then another refrain. If this were a course, it would be a lot longer. Now what you need to know about the course or refrain is it's the most important part of the song. I can't stress this enough. It's where you convey your main lyrical message about the song. You want this to stick to the mind of your listener, also melodically, rhythmically and lyrically. It is supposed to be different from the verse, and my personal advice regarding courses or refrains is to use them as, ah hook. It should be catchy and memorable, and if you could make it so it gets stuck in your own head like an earworm. You can be sure it's gonna do the same to others. Another tip I have for you that I often do myself is to make a two part course. So you have the same music but different lyrics sets, and you introduce the second version of the course the second time around or at the end of the song. You don't have to do this, but it's just something I like to do because I love the course of the song. Normally, listeners do love the chorus of the song. So at the end of the song, if I hear the chorus and then the music keeps going and I hear new lyrics, what can I say? I love it. 17. Bridges, Breaks, & Interludes All Wrapped Into One: in this lecture, we're going to be discussing bridges, breaks and interludes all wrapped into one. Now the reason that I wrapped up bridges, breaks and Inter lose all together in the same lecture is because they all basically served the same purpose and they all basically occur. And about the same time in the song, which is after the second course. And the purpose of having a bridge or a break or interlude is that it offers a bit of contrast to the song, and it offers a reason why the final course should be repeated at the end of the song. Now, although they're quite similar, there are subtle differences in my opinion, and that is that the bridge offers a new lyrical and musical message. It's a break from the entire song, and it can be different. And if you haven't expressed enough lyrics, this is the opportunity to if you have any loose ends in the story, use it on the bridge. Brakes are more for solos. It can be for guitar solos, drum solos. It can be if you want to add live and go jazzy or simply jam. The break is the opportunity to do it. The interlude to May is usually instrumental and kind of offers a new pattern to the song and brings it home to the course or the outro. Now my person advice regarding these tools, particularly the bridge, is use it as an opportunity to break up the repetitive verse and chorus structures and create a new lyrical message to tie things together or offer something that's unexpected. 18. Secrets For Exceptional Outro Finales (Very Important!): in this lecture I'm going to share with you. My secrets for exceptional out show finale is, and not only is this my favorite part of the song to talk about, but it's one of the most important, and I'm going to tell you why. But first you need to know that the Outro not only brings the song to a close, but it's the finale to which everything hasn't building up to the entire song. It could be the last chorus, or the outside could be something new. Or it could be a combination of melodies and rips that have gone throughout the entire song , all bunched up at the end. This is more important than you think. This is your chance to leave your listener on a single or lingering note, which will also dictate how they will feel when the song is over. My advice is to remember, use different kinds of Paltrow's for your songs. Play around with it, get creative. Slight changes and additions will keep the listener's attention up until the very end. I have two examples for you of creative Paltrow's that have constant, slight changes right up until the very end This is the 1st 1 You put the chorus as the outre of this song, and you add harmonies to the vocals. Then you repeat the chorus a second time. But with Lear experts going on top of the original text and these later experts can be new or previous lines that have already been in the song, you can also add additional instruments like guitars and keyboards. You want to keep building up until the very end, at which point you will either end on a single note. Or, if you're recording, you'll have the option to gradually fade out, leaving the listener with a lingering feeling. So the song that represents this constant change altro you're already familiar with because I've used it in a previous section. I'm going to play for you, the outro of this song, and I want you to pay attention because the choruses played five times but changes gradually and continuously the first time the chorus has played its normal. Then the course has played a second time, with harmonies on top of the vocals. Then the chorus has repeated 1/3 time with the first lyric expert afterwards, the course has repeated 1/4 time, adding Blair Expert number two and the fifth and final chorus repeat has all the instruments removed. So on Lee, the vocals remain is personally one of my favorite out Rose. So let's have a listen and follow along with the lyrics on the screen. Dreamin of You. - The second outro example I have for you is to play the chorus once as the Outro at the normal tempo, then play it again a second time. But in half time as the original tempo, or if you already playing halftime the second time, go full speed to the end and to demonstrate this altro. I am using the song like a 1,000,000 Lights by the band This love, and I call this a tempo change outro, So I want you to pay attention. The first course is played at a high tempo, and then it's played a second time, but in half time and Lear experts are added, which are taking from the course but sung slightly delayed. So follow along with the lyrics on the screen and let's have a listen. You fight. Are you take a moment to think about these two Altro is I could honestly go on forever talking about Paltrow's and different kinds and versions. But take a moment and think about your favorite songs and listen to them and pay close attention how the out tro Zar created and how the song comes together at the end. This is the end of this lecture. Please make sure to do the fun exercise in the next lecture before moving on to the next section. 19. Platinum Key #1: The Waterslide Method: in this lecture, we're gonna talk about what I call the water slide method of song writing. And this is an actual technique of writing a song, not just the lyrics but including the courts on melody as well. What I'm doing is I'm expanding on one of the golden Keys baiting your lyrics because I feel it deserves more explanation or in depth explanation. And I literally use it for writing every song that I write because it works and it's true and it makes sense. And if you follow it, you're gonna have a lot of success, and lyrics are just gonna flow and come out a whole lot easier. So what is the water slide method? Basically, I'm going to compare chords, melody and lyrics to that of a water slide so the actual physical water slide, Or let's say the cords, the water is the melody, and you who are riding down it are the lyrics. So what you do first is you come up with a couple of cords you like for song doesn't have to be the whole song. It can be verse or a chorus and whether your instrument is the guitar, piano or something else. Just just play those chords, play around with them and just start trying to hum a melody. Just something something that you like to start humming the melody so people don't realize , is that between the cords and the lyrics is the melody. There's this gap, and it's like a steps own. And if you just write the cords and then jump in with lyrics slash milady at the same time , it's sort of like going down a water slide without any water. You can do it, but it's a lot easier and more fun if there's the water. So in what I dio is when I'm playing my chords and I'm thinking of my melody, I'm just going in my head or sing out loud Lotta Uh uh, or I'll take something from around the room. I have a cat there on just talk about him, how he's sitting down and then he looking himself and walking around and just come up with the melody. That way you can use whatever stupid Lear want to. It doesn't matter because you're not going to keep them. But once you have a melody that you like and you're playing in the cords and you're you're humming the melody. Then the lyrics are basically going to jump on so fast. Just like when you jump on a water slide and the water just flows and you flow on top of the water and it's carried by the slide or the courts. So you will see as you start playing your cords and humming your melody and you tell yourself, Okay, I'm going to try to think of lyrics. So you're playing, You're humming. And then, instead of talking about Brandon, things were singing La, la, la, la, la You're going to just whatever comes out. Whatever lyrics come out one piece at a time, write it down piece by piece, and that's that's how I do it. Your lyrics are going to flow so much easier with the melody because it's literally in between. I know you can't see it, but metaphysically it's there. And if you keep that in mind, you're going to write songs whole lot faster and it's just gonna flow and you'll feel the flow, just the melody just coming through you and the lyrics created by you know your brain, whatever you spit out just gonna fall onto them. So it's really something that you have to try for yourself. So this is one exercise to try, and I'm really love to hear your feedback. How this works for you works wonderfully for May and out, really excited about sharing it and explaining it in this new way. So good luck and have fun. 20. Platinum Key #2 :Ideal Key Words and Phrases: in this lecture, we're going to discuss using keywords to enrich your lyrics. So as I was writing my own lyrics the other day, sometimes I get stuck or I get caught up in using the same old lyrics. And for me, that sort of nature words like stars and sky are trees. And I don't want those in every song. I want to sort of differentiate everything. So I decided to do was when I was writing lyrics. Perhaps I would come up with a line and it was okay, maybe didn't rhyme with the next one. But there was. There was a key word in a key word or phrase. The one I wanted to use was with Summer Solstice and anything and everything that I wrote around that. Well, that came out as I was writing. Um, it didn't make much sensor. It just came out. And I like the summer solstice part and it want to keep anything else. So I did was I wrote that word down, and I sort of came back to it later. And as I'm writing my lyrics, not just when I had my writing time, but maybe I'll be out during the day and I'll hear a keyword or phrase something that just sounds good like another one was was white nights on. I like the sound of that. I just write it in my phone or somewhere on my desktop or a piece of paper just all throughout my day. And then when I sit down to write the lyrics just to write lyrics in general, I'll have that list somewhere near me. I'll write it down on a piece of paper and put it on my desk. Just look over it and then sort of, you know, ignore it and that I was will be, you know, playing my chords, having my melody and thinking of my lyrics as they come out, I'll notice that I'll put the keywords in there. And since those keywords are in my consciousness already, whatever else is coming through well, naturally for around those keywords, and I'll find myself writing a great line with the keywords. So this is something that I use pretty much every day because I want my lyrics to be no, not only good, but I want to be creative, descriptive, expressive. Paint a picture in in someone's mind when there when they're listening, and I don't want it all to be the same cause, sometimes not find myself getting trapped into the same patterns or ideas. I don't want every song to be about the same thing. So to sum up during the day, whether I'm reading or listening to the radio or other songs or just, uh, thinking off key words or phrases that I like all write them down and I'll keep them close by when I'm actually, you know, like a tar. I'm working and writing the lyrics like anything close by, and I'll just look at it and then begin my lyric writing process. And the new lyrics that came in usually form around it pretty well. And now I have my lyrics, which had the key words I want, and I'm very proud of it at the end. So I'm proud of all my lyrics, and I want you to be proud of your lyrics because you know, when you were, you're satisfied you're unsatisfied. You think, Hey, that's really good. I like I like those keywords. It's very descriptive and it sticks out and it separates me from the other songwriters So I hope you found this lecture interesting. And you can apply this practically throughout your day and during your song writing process , as always. Let me know how it works out for you until the next lecture. Happy writing. 21. You Don't Need To Use Everything (Quality Over Quantity Rule): welcome the Section four of this e course in this section will be talking about lyric structure variations. What parts in a song we need and which of those parts require lyrics. In this lecture, we're going to be focusing on the parts of a song which are necessary to have now, although there's a lot of flexibility, and you can really do whatever you want. I'll say you should have at least one verse and one chorus in Joe's and Paltrow's are not mandatory. But I would like to mention that although the intro is the beginning of a song and the altro is the end, they do not have to be different from other parts. So if you're playing the course, for example, at the end of a song that is your outro, you do not have to create something different, and you make this decision on a song by song basis. Once you're finished writing the music and lyrics and you listen to it, you'll know if it lacks something and this is why I'm making you aware of all your options , quality of a quantity, and what I want you to understand from this is that you do not have to use every song part in the box on the right. Each song should have its own unique structure, and I can give you some good tips to think about which I've come across myself when writing such Aziz. Pre courses are not always necessary, and I believe that bridges always give a well rounded structure. But if you have more than two verses or you have a two part chorus, it becomes even more optional. And you may want to think about creating an instrumental bridge interlude or logical break or solo. When in doubt. If you think you would like more lyrics, you can always add another verse or add lyrics to the bridge. One cool thing about intros is that although there technically at the beginning of a song, they can be used several times to introduce verses, and they don't have to all be exactly the same. Or you don't have to use the intro more than once. You could use it at the beginning to introduce the verse, and then, after the chorus go right into the next verse, I would advise doing that if you think your song is for example too long and you want to shorten it. Brakes, like we said before, can be used for solos, jamming if you want to get jazzy, depending on your genre. In my opinion, I think that interludes are great for musically emotional songs. In fact, just in case you are still unsure of what an interlude is or how it sounds, here's an example that was the interlude for Adam Song by Blink 1 82 Like I said before, the Altro can be another part of the song. So why not the same as the intro? On some occasions you came into the song that way, so why not leave it that way? I would just recommend if you do this, to add more to it, since it is the finale or the end of the song. 22. Lyric-Optional Or Lyric-Manditory?: in this lecture, we're going to cover whether each part of the song is either Lear CA mandatory or lyric optional. Since we already talked about all the different parts of song can have, it is also important for you to know which parts require lyrics and which parts are lyric optional, as I call it, because story lies within the verses and the main message within the course, it's necessary to write lyrics for all versus whether it's 32 or even just one verse. I also mentioned previously that you can have two parts to a course, although it's not necessary, but it is necessary to have lyrics for at least one course. In fact, the least you could get away with is to write a refrain because they're only 1 to 2 lines long and you just repeat it. Your remaining parts of the song, highlighted in blue in the box on the right, are lyric optional. So how do you decide if you're going to use those parts and write lyrics for them? Well, depending on how your song goes, ask yourself if you have more to say regarding this story topic or theme or do you want your listeners to focus more on the music in this song? Some other questions you might ask yourself would be. Do I need lyrics for a pre chorus to connect the story from the verse to the chorus more smoothly? And that's only if you have a pre chorus, or do you want to make a few points in the intro or outro of the song? Maybe you want to add some oohs and aahs during the interlude or the break, Or maybe wanna write lyrics the bridge using a new melody to shake things up a bit. These are the questions that I ask myself when I'm writing, and if they work for you, too, I highly recommend using them. 23. Arranging Colorful Order: in this lecture, we're going to go over using the parts of a song in different orders because you don't want all your songs to be the same. Now I want to say You can arrange your songs, whoever you want and you can. But there are a few logical exceptions, like the pre chorus must precede the course. Otherwise, it wouldn't be called the Pre Course, and the intro comes at the beginning and the ultra at the end of the song. But this is just because every song was to have a beginning and an end. So what can you dio go crazy? I want to start the song off with the chorus to get your main message out first. Go ahead, explain later. So you wanna have two verses in a row instead of verse chorus, verse, chorus. Why not? All I want to say is, get creative and make things interesting. Another tool, so to speak you should keep in mind is repeats repeats, and you don't have to just repeat the chorus or refrain. You can repeat intros or repeat your intro as your outro or repeat your pre chorus, with the course coming after of course, but why do we use repeats? Maybe your song is too short. The course is pretty much always repeated, and it's repeated because the lyricist is making a point. So if you're making a point, why not repeat yourself to make it clear? And the more times you repeat something, the better the chance you have of getting it stuck in your listeners head. Maybe you have a really cool guitar. If somewhere in the song and it's so awesome, you want to repeat it. In fact, that riff is in your verse. You could repeat it somewhere in your last chorus or altro, assuming it fits. And unless you change the key or have radically changed tempo. Otherwise, there's no reason why you shouldn't Here I have some examples of song structures I pulled together from picking random songs from my iTunes, listening to them and paying attention. I want you to think of your favorite songs and break them down because there's a reason why you like them. And there's not just one reason, but overall many reasons, which go into the making of a song which most people aren't aware of. They just know they like it, like hearing it and like how it makes them feel. And this is what I want you to know, whether you're a beginner or you just need to hear this information again. The bottom line is be creative and choosing which parts of the song you'll use, which parts you'll write lyrics for and the order you put them in to make the active listening to your song wonderful experience. 24. Golden Key #5: Give Me 10!: Welcome to Golden Key. Number five. Give me 10 opening cognitive doors. The next few keys will help you get started each time you sit down to write, especially if you're blocked. Don't know where to start or not feeling the flow. Yet we already discussed in the course the different topics you can write about in the different points of view you can write them from now it's time to get more specific. You're going to take action and jot down 10 topics you can write about. It could be anything. Keep in mind that this is only an exercise, and you don't have to use any of these topics. These ideas already exist inside your brain, and when you write, some will come out anyway. Whether you list them or not. The point of the exercise is simply to make you aware of what is on your mind. Whether it's on the surface or a little deeper. You may shed some light on things that are hidden to you. I think it's easy, maybe up to five, but you have to come up with 10 after listing seven, your brain may start to sweat a little, but what is really happening is that you're opening cognitive doors and you'll feel and see the proof of it. Once you're finished. After you list 10 topics, one or two things can happen. You'll pick one, and you'll know which one at that point and start writing, or you will simply start writing. And no matter where you start, the odds are you will be subconsciously guided back to one of those topics. At least now you have a bigger view and awareness of what's going on inside your mind and what is important to you at the moment. Sometimes we keep certain things just below the surface, and when we uncover them, we feel a stronger sense of awareness that we can see everything right in front of us. And I believe this makes our writing more personal in the end. And what is personal to us is important to us, and therefore we write about it honestly from our truth. Listeners recognize truth in songs, and it makes it more real for them. Amazing what one little exercise that may take you 5 to 10 minutes conduce Oh, and the effects it can have on the outcome 25. Golden Key #6: The Writing Muscle: Golden Key Number six. The writing muscle. Write a journal entry or do scripting. You may have heard that writing journal entries can be therapeutic, and this is true, But how can this help you become a lyric writing machine? Well, I'm glad you asked whether your writing lyrics or journal entry it's still writing, and you were using those same skills for exercising your writing muscle you're writing. Muscle needs to be flexed just like any other muscle, and this is a great exercise to do before you begin writing, especially if you don't know where to begin. So take out your writing pad and pen, or open up a word document and just start writing. You can write about how you're feeling about everything in your life, or, if you would prefer not to do that than you could write fictional situations for yourself or other people, which make you feel good. The latter of the two is called scripting. Now, as you exercise your writing muscle, you begin to get a flow going, and although sometimes you may become blocked when writing lyrics, it has nothing to do with the lyrics but being inflow with writing When you write a journal entry or do scripting, it is nearly impossible to be blocked because you're basically writing your thoughts, and you always have thoughts unless you are sleeping or brain dead. So this will create a steady flow. And if you decide to do this exercise, then make sure it is at least for 10 to 15 minutes. Because your flow becomes more steady and rapid and then you feel like you have more creative control, you will feel it. And once you do take out that guitar and start writing down those lyrics, you may have even had some ideas or inspiration during the writing muscle exercise, so get going. 26. Golden Key #7: Lyric Warmups: Golden Key Number seven warmups. This warm up exercise will help you get into a state of channeling and creative flow well, at the same time working with the creative part of your brain. So let's begin pick and object in the room or person, you know. Then list all the words to come to your mind quickly and without thinking they don't all have to be about the main object. And, for example, the 1st 1 usually is about the main object, and then that word will make you think of another word. Now take those words and write random sentences with, um, try to have them enforce so either 48 or 12 sentences. Let's say you have eight. Arrange sentences into two groups of fours by deciding which ones make the most sense to go together at the end. See what you've done and perhaps put a couple quarts to them and voila! You have a couple of verses. It doesn't matter if they make much sense. You should be in a creative writing space at this point, and you should be feeling a sense of accomplishment, as we all do. Once we've created something because before it didn't exist. Take a look at my example. I started with radio, and I also made my sentences rhyme, which gets the rhyming muscle going. But you don't have to. So I started with the word radio, and then the word block popped in my mind and then knob and then dial and then show and then can. Then I thought of the word worm and then fish and then boat. And that's where I stopped. So I took each word and made a sentence for it. Block we block ourselves knob turning the knobs of fate Dial to dial Murder in the Sun Show showing what awaits Can can we survive this world? Worm or worms be what's left fish fishing for answers. Boat in a boat on a quest. Now what is great about this exercise is that the words you use can have more than one meeting and can be used as different parts of speech. For example, I use Ken, and I don't know how I jumped from show to can, but it just popped in my head. So I was thinking, originally a can as a noun, like a can of beans or a can of worms, but I used it as a verb. Can we survive this world? You this exercise a try and feel free to let me know how it worked for you in the discussions. Remember, this is to get you in a state of creative flow. So once you do this exercise and whether you use what comes out or not, whatever you right from that point forward should come through a lot easier. 27. Golden Key #8: Bating Your Lyrics: Golden Key Number eight. Baiting Your Lyrics Bait your lyrics with Melody. I can honestly say that ever since I discovered this technique, I've been using it to write every song since. However, for this tip, you have to already have some courts picked out for your song. You don't have to have the music for the whole entire song ready, but at least a Siris of cords for the verse or course. All right, so you have your cords, and the next step is to create a melody. As you're playing the chords, you can start to freestyle random words that don't make sense, or you can make them up completely as you're thinking of them or you sounds like locked. Ah, bah I personally just like random warrants. So next play the chords over and over again, experimenting with different melodies until you find when you're happy with, then sing the melody and start writing and singing the new lyrics as you come up with them . The lyrics should then come at full speed, and this technique works because you have the cord, the melody and the last thing is lyrics. What makes it work so well is that melodies actually bait or provoke the lyrics, meaning they bring them in more effortlessly and just coming up with them at a blue with a pen and paper even know the lyrics don't exist yet they lie metaphorically behind the melody so that when you bring in a melody the words air just behind the curtain, so to speak, give it a try. 28. Golden Key #9: Escape To Focus: Golden Key number nine escaped to focus. This technique might sound a bit out of the box, but it's experimental, and when writing lyrics, you should not be afraid to experiment. It will definitely come in handy if you're writing, but you feel nothing. Specialists coming out. Just try this out for a few minutes, pick some chords or the cords you intend to use for your song. Play them over and over again until you've memorized them and they become pure muscle memory so you could even play them with your eyes closed. Now you're going to play them with your eyes closed a few times until you get into a nice rhythm. When you are ready, just start singing and see what comes out for me. I was able to produce a lot of lyrics this way, much more than if I sat down with a pen and paper. Although you may want to record the session because you will not remember everything. Ah, lot of creativity and inspiration is channeled through you during your times of writing. And you know this because it's only there for 10 seconds and then you can forget it very easily. Similar to forgetting your dreams when you wake up. So what increases the output of lyrics with his exercise? The first thing is that you're eliminating all distractions in the room. Any and everything can affect your thoughts, and I don't think you always want to write about your television or computer. Those everyday items distract you from inspiration because they trigger thoughts and those thoughts trigger other thoughts. And then you are no longer present, which is what creativity and inspiration require from you. Sunlight can come through if there are a lot of clouds. The second reason for increasing output is because you become more aware of how you feel internally. So now, with the external thoughts and distractions out of the way mawr emotions and subconscious material can surface. What you write about comes from the internal perspective of you anyway. So, in effect, you're just streamlining the whole process for yourself. 29. Golden Key #10: E-Motion (Energy In Motion): This is the 10th and last golden key to becoming a lyric writing machine. Emotion, energy and motion. Harnessing your current emotions. Writing songs convey emotional. However, this does not have to mean heavy emotions. But all kinds. The easiest way to produce the best lyrics is to use your current emotions. You can invoke other emotions, but then you should be a very skilled actor. I can't do that because I still feel like I'm lying to myself if I try to write a happy song when I'm actually kind of sad. In fact, sometimes when I'm upset, I grabbed my guitar and just start strumming and singing and believe it or not, great things come out of that that even rhyme. My only mistake is that I forget it right away. So let's start this exercise. Take a moment and focus on how you're feeling. Come into the present because you're always feeling some way. For some reason, no matter what you're feeling, it always wants a way to express itself externally and be a part of everything that is so to speak. Your emotions air riel, but always fleeting. So when you use them to write music it's easy to capture them. Emotions are energy in motion, and songs and music are also energy in motion. Do you see how it all connects? You can take a moment and fathom this theory, or you can dig in. Once you have a good sense how you're feeling. You can acknowledge it and turn it into music and lyrics. The music is taken from your mood and the lyrics that come out of you articulate how and why you're feeling this way, your emotions and how you're feeling. Don't lie. They are the truth. When you write from your truth, it's pure and sometimes even pure gold. What comes out can really surprise you, so please do yourself a favor and record your session or have that pen and paper at hand. 30. TT: What It Means To "Nail" Lyric Writing: - everyone . This is Adam coming at you with another titanium tipped and we're gonna call that had a nail song writing. And this was an inspired idea that I had, because I get messages from people about my course improvements or what they liked about it . And I usually respond on the wall. But I thought, Why not make a video about it? Because it's an important topic. So I'm just going to read you what they wrote to me. And Mark says, I was less interested in the technical aspects of song writing as it seemed fairly self explanatory, at least in terms of pop music. I did find it interesting that I do most of these things instinctively, but I'm more interested in those songwriters that I feel really nail lyric writing whose lyrics are simple but achingly familiar and can infer complexities. I also think the author should branch out of the pop punk space a bit more as most of the lyrics, using the lesson kind of banal and lacking something. I guess I was looking for some answers on how the more artistic of Lewis's pull it off, and if there are tricks, they use a bit of a knock at my favorite genre, but that's OK. So the point that I would like to share with Mark and everybody is that there? I want to say there is no such thing as nailing lyric writing. There are no tricks. What I've given you in these videos and these courses directs you to hear. Because if you want a nail song writing or lyric writing, you nail it in here because it's subjective. Just because a song is loved by millions of people doesn't mean they nailed it. It just means that resonated with a lot of people. So what your job is to do is to make sure that wouldn't you write. You write from your heart, you express yourself and you put yourself in a space where you have this flow and you see what comes out of that are clever. Lyrics are expressions that maybe you never thought of before, and when you nail it for yourself, then it'll resonate with other people on that same level because all the songs that I write and I record to me I nailed it. I nailed those lyrics. I think they're clever. I think They're insightful, inspiring, passionate and the other people that resonate with that resonate on the same level as me. And they sense that I nailed it. But really, because I'm writing for myself and I know when I personally nailed it and I'm happy and it really excited by the lyrics and I want to share it with everybody. That's how I know. And that's how you can know, too. Now he said that he did most of these things instinctively. The Golden Keys and the message that I have shared connecting to yourself were making writing and everyday practice. But that's the thing it directs there, no external, where you can have external tools and there are some exercises. But really, it's all about connecting here, connecting here, getting yourself to a space of that connection, tapping into that greatness you have inside you and then in that state, expressing the song, expressing yourself from that state and because nailing it is a state. It's a it's a feeling, and it can express itself, express itself in many different ways. So that's what I'd like to share on this topic. So I really appreciate the message Mark sent me and I hope it helps. All of you are inspired you. And I appreciate it because it makes me look at these topics and think, Well, how can I think about this in a different way that I never thought about it before? So this is fun. Thank you. And I'll talk to you soon by. 31. A Personal Message From Me: right. I don't want to say hi . This is Adam. I want to thank you again for taking my course wherever you found it. And as a treat or surprise, I'd like to share something with you. I'm about to share with you a song and music video that I created recently because I think it would be good for you guys to know who I am and what my life is about and how I express myself. So you know that I live by the principles that I'm teaching. And I'm so grateful that you have been watching my videos and taking my courses, that this is another way I can get back. So and I also want to say something else because writing this song was challenging for me in a way that it had me tap into sections of myself, tapping the emotions of love and appreciation that I never tapped and do before. So I wrote it thinking about how I appreciate my life and my friends and my family and how much I love them. And before it was challenging for me to express that so openly. So besides this, I also wanted to demonstrate to you that I wrote this recorded this and produce this myself , spending very little money because if you're a songwriter, I assume that you also want toe make videos and recordings. And I got so much out of it, not just from writing this song and in the, um, the therapeutic sense of writing it, but also recording it myself and logic and I mixed and mastered it, and all I did was I went to YouTube and I found a music help tech. I think that's what it is. And he showed me that I had everything I needed in logic to make my songs sound great. And before I was making excuses, I just put him out as is, or I need to pay someone to do it. But it was fairly easy to learn how to use compression and eq you and some other things. And after that, I went out with a friend with a five year old HD video camera that I had lying around and we went out and we shot it for two hours, got a bit of sunburn, but we had so much fun doing it, and then even afterwards, I took that and a bunch of videos from my phone and I did the post production and editing process in Can't Asia myself, and it was just amazing. I got so much from that experience that kept taking it from the level of writing it to recording it, to making a video and editing it and then sharing it as far and wide as I could. And I want you to have that, too. So this is an expression of that. This is an insight into my life and when you know that I appreciate you so much and sit back and enjoy all I ever wanted. 32. All I Ever Wanted Video: I mean them every way with no conditions Mine frieze my life way I mean, every condition my way. Thank you Way No being in my life to this right expects Speak. I mean, with everything. Wait a no frieze thing I've ever one way I am right.