Writing Skills: Senses - Write Description In A Way That Will Touch Everybody | Elizabeth Bezant | Skillshare

Playback Speed


  • 0.5x
  • 1x (Normal)
  • 1.25x
  • 1.5x
  • 2x

Writing Skills: Senses - Write Description In A Way That Will Touch Everybody

teacher avatar Elizabeth Bezant, Writer and House-sitter

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

4 Lessons (11m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:10
    • 2. Write for the Senses

      7:04
    • 3. Quiz

      1:38
    • 4. Project

      1:35
  • --
  • Beginner level
  • Intermediate level
  • Advanced level
  • All levels
  • Beg/Int level
  • Int/Adv level

Community Generated

The level is determined by a majority opinion of students who have reviewed this class. The teacher's recommendation is shown until at least 5 student responses are collected.

454

Students

10

Projects

About This Class

Description is a vital part of writing, fictional or otherwise. It adds a subtle depth to the work that allows each reader to transport themselves from everyday life into the wonder of a fictional world. But how do you do that when everybody seems to be inspired by something different?

The answer is to reach out to them through their senses and allow them to be transported.

This inclusive course, quiz and project covers the importance of good description and how to write it using your senses so that each reader will feel included in your work.

PLUS, I’ve also created these Pack of Prompts especially to back up all you learn in this course.

36b27189

Looking for books to help you with your writing?  Check out my Amazon page.

e63d9c42

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Elizabeth Bezant

Writer and House-sitter

Teacher


 

Hi, my name’s Elizabeth Bezant and I’m an internationally-published, freelance writer and writing coach, currently house-sitting full-time across Australia.

For the past two decades, or so, I’ve had a wonderful time inspiring and informing writers (in person, in print and online).

Over the years I’ve had a diverse range of articles, stories, columns and educational features published in countless magazines, anthologies and newspapers across the world. The ones I’m proudest of were included in: Britain’s Sunday Telegraph newspaper, Living Abroad, and Grace magazines; America’s Chicken Soup for the Soul, Chocolate for the Woman’s Soul, and&n... See full profile

Class Ratings

Expectations Met?
  • Exceeded!
    0%
  • Yes
    0%
  • Somewhat
    0%
  • Not really
    0%
Reviews Archive

In October 2018, we updated our review system to improve the way we collect feedback. Below are the reviews written before that update.

Why Join Skillshare?

Take award-winning Skillshare Original Classes

Each class has short lessons, hands-on projects

Your membership supports Skillshare teachers

Learn From Anywhere

Take classes on the go with the Skillshare app. Stream or download to watch on the plane, the subway, or wherever you learn best.

Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hello and welcome to the right for the Senses course Overview description is a vital part of writing, fictional or otherwise. It adds a subtle depth to the work that allows each reader to transport themselves from every day life into the wonder of a fictional world. But how do you do it when everybody seems to be inspired by something different? The answer is to reach out to them through their senses and allow them to be transported. This inclusive course quiz and project covers the importance off a good description and how to write it, using your senses so that each reader will feel included in the work, So why not join us and see what there is to learn? 2. Write for the Senses: description is an important part of most kinds of writing, as is the ability to describe anything smoothly. We all know that description is important to stories, and it's not so much that it adds strength to a story. But that adds depth. It makes her two D picture three dimensional. It paints the bits around the edges and helps everything become more riel with a great resemblance to life. Basically, it gives the reader a more fulfilling experience. But as the writer, how much description you include is entirely up to you. Because thes days there are so many variations, not just between genres what writing styles, authors, publishers and publishing styles but also in what the reader once at one time, a page of description about a room or an event or even a meal was acceptable. But these days people seem happier with just a couple of words thrown in the painter general picture or the indicate what's happening and allow the reader to fill in the gaps. You can still include large swathes of description, but I would advise against better to include an array of well placed descriptive words and short phrases. The advantage of this is you avoid awkward, clumsy and obvious descriptions that's more like an information dump than a subtle inclusion. Try weaving it around your store. Ethiad word or phrase here and there should be sufficient. It's unlikely you have to include all the details, especially since in real life, as adults, we tend to make our own assumptions about pimple from tiny hints will glean from everyday actions, traits and words, not information dumps. In many ways, this comes back to many older adults, preferring young adult novels. And in this case, when I say old adults, I'm referring to those over 20. They prefer the stories that are easy to read and absorb those that don't bog the reader down with too much in depth description on replace information rich passages with world chosen descriptive words strategically placed in the story that enable that. So then we come to using your senses. Just because most of us no longer have time for full pages of description, it doesn't mean that we don't still enjoy a full breadth of description on the opportunity to smell the smells, feel the textures and taste the foods. For this reason, it's important when choosing your descriptive words to remember that everybody has a primary sense. Primary sense, you might say. What on earth does that have to do with anything here? Well, surprisingly, it has a huge amount to do this. When you describe anything to anyone, you will no doubt do it relating to what to soar, felt, heard, tasted and smelt. This is something we all do. However, what makes one person's description different to another's is which, since they use most when given the description. For example, if your primary senses visual as it is with well over half of us, it means that most of the descriptions in your story will probably be visual to, which is fine if your reader is visual. But what if they're old factory or auditory? It means the story won't grip thumb as much because you're asking them to experience the world in a way that's different to them. Have you ever bean out to an event with a group of friends and your reminiscing at some later date, and you try to explain where you were thinking off on the bits that you've disk? You're describing off the event. Nobody can klatch onto. Nobody is recognizing your description of the amazing corns and chocolate mousse. But as soon as somebody says, Ah, that's where they had that fantastic band Or do you remember the smells from the flowers as we drove down the main entrance? Everybody knows exactly what somewhere you're referring to. All senses are important. Just because you remember the tastes doesn't mean somebody else doesn't remember the smells , all the sounds. This is what I mean by primary sense. Different things trigger different memories, thoughts and associations in different people. It's the same with writing. We need to focus on all senses to involve all people. If you only describe things using your primary sense, you're severely limiting your readership, something none of us ever want to do. So when you're choosing your descriptive words and phrases, be conscious of using all five senses given experience that readers can absorb on all levels. Write your story, focusing on all senses so that nobody is missing out, experiencing the depth off what you're describing. So have you heard of purple prose? Purple prose is another shortcut and want to definitely be avoided. This is when you have a list of descriptive words instead of one or two well chosen ones. Sometimes it can look Aziz, though the writer couldn't quite decide which were to use. So they used them all, hoping it would show exactly what they meant. Been a natural fact. All it usually shows is the writer couldn't find the right word and couldn't be bothered to go look a bit harder. So if you're tempted to write like this, please don't. It might take a bit more time, but I promise your writing will be better for it. The punch in your words will be stronger, and the depth of your writing will be greater. My suggestions on how to avoid purple prose would be one search a little longer for the perfect word to weave descriptive words around your surrounding text. Three. Describe things in a different way. Use your senses. Use an analogy. Use something that's just a bit different from what you were thinking. Next, try using dialogue or action to describe what you want to show. And finally, if you really can't think, find a suitable way to put your description into your sentence thing. Don't like the sentence without it. The perfect opportunity to include it is bound to appear later. There is really no reason for taking short cuts with any kind of writing, either with purple prose or simply finding the right words. 3. Quiz: Hi. How about a short quiz to go over some of the information in this course? Well, how would you go? Can't see sharing your results. 4. Project: and welcome back. Here's a project designed specifically to help you describe using your senses. So how did you go? I hope you had fun with the project. Don't forget to share your descriptions.