Writing Great Scenes Megacourse

Barbara Vance, Author, Illustrator

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29 Lessons (3h)
    • 1. Introduction

      14:43
    • 2. Scene Intentions

      5:44
    • 3. Building Tension and Character Decisions

      11:06
    • 4. Scene Beginnings

      4:05
    • 5. Inciting Incidents

      5:10
    • 6. Action Based Beginnings

      4:49
    • 7. Exposition Starts

      5:05
    • 8. Setting Starts

      6:09
    • 9. Scene Middles

      3:19
    • 10. Dramatic Tensions Thwarting the Character

      6:45
    • 11. Dramatic Tension Danger!

      3:53
    • 12. Dramatic Tension Revelation!

      3:13
    • 13. Dramatic Tension Power, Atmosphere, and Time

      4:04
    • 14. Scene Endings Overview

      1:47
    • 15. Endings The Grand View

      2:31
    • 16. Endings Zooming In

      2:21
    • 17. Scene Transitions

      6:49
    • 18. Surface Action and Subtext

      8:22
    • 19. Point of View

      3:51
    • 20. Character Development

      7:13
    • 21. Setting, Emotion, and Mood

      12:28
    • 22. Pacing and Length

      3:45
    • 23. Scene Analysis How To

      4:04
    • 24. Scene Analysis Example Part 1

      11:17
    • 25. Scene Analysis Example Part 2

      13:17
    • 26. Scene Analysis Example Part 3

      13:37
    • 27. Scene Analysis Example Part 4

      4:23
    • 28. Practical Application

      2:40
    • 29. Final Thoughts and Class Project

      3:44

About This Class

This class is Part Two in my plot-building series.

In this course, we will look specifically at developing great scenes. The class is designed to teach you to analyze scenes you love so you can determine why they work, thereby taking those lessons and applying them to your own work. This empowers you as a writer. While guidelines about how to write are helpful, and we will cover many of them, every writer breaks them in his or her own ways--often to great effect. It is therefore better to learn scene components and how to assess them.

Among the things covered include:

  1. Defining a scene
  2. Breaking a scene into beats
  3. Creating Dramatic Conflict
  4. How to make interesting character decisions
  5. The various ways to start a scene
  6. Writing dramatic scene middles -- increasing tension
  7. How to end a scene
  8. Scene transitions
  9. Point of view
  10. Character development
  11. Emotion
  12. Setting and Mood
  13. Pacing
  14. How to analyze a scene
  15. How to put it all together and plan your own scenes

The course also includes a detailed chapter analysis in which we break apart scenes from "A Little Princess".

I recommend downloading the Chapter Analysis document and reading it prior to watching the literary analysis videos.

Hope you enjoy! Please do leave comments or questions.