Write Learning Objectives that Take your Courses, Presentations, and Writing to the Next Level! | Minkybubs Montessori Sarah Wilson | Skillshare

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Write Learning Objectives that Take your Courses, Presentations, and Writing to the Next Level!

teacher avatar Minkybubs Montessori Sarah Wilson, Passionate about Learning!

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

6 Lessons (16m)
    • 1. Welcome to All About Learning Objectives

      2:11
    • 2. Learning Objective Project

      0:58
    • 3. Lesson 1: All About Learning Objectives

      2:42
    • 4. Lesson 2: Bloom's Taxonomy

      6:51
    • 5. Lesson 3: Identifying, Improving, and Creating your own Learning Objectives

      2:20
    • 6. Conclusion

      0:30
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About This Class

In this class, you will learn how to identify, improve, and create learning objectives that will take your courses and instructional materials to a whole new level!  This class is for people from all levels of experience: novice to expert. You do not need any prior knowledge or experience to benefit from this class, and people with lots of knowledge and experience will still find useful tips and tricks here. While teachers and course developers will make excellent use of this class material, anyone who needs to convey information to an audience will find this class helpful and transformative.  

Meet Your Teacher

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Minkybubs Montessori Sarah Wilson

Passionate about Learning!

Teacher

Curriculum Designer, Montessori Guide (AMS), and Mom of Four!

I have over 20 years of experience teaching children, mentoring student teachers, and designing face-to-face and online curriculum. I have worked with thousands of students in many disciplines and of all ages. I specialize in Music and English Language Arts and progressed through my training under a master Montessorian to become the best Montessori teacher I can. I also work as a curriculum developer and consultant for governments and private industry.

I LOVE helping others learn about how to deliver Montessori lessons effectively. I also love creating resources for online and classroom use.

I have four small children of my own and I test my presenta... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Welcome to All About Learning Objectives: It's normal to feel intimidated at the thought of creating meaningful and effective lessons, speeches, or courses. What makes one class seems so much easier to understand than another? How do I organize my writing so it's logical and flows easily? How can I be a better course developer? What makes that teacher seem so special and magical? Hi, my name is Sarah, and I've been designing curriculum for over 25 years, and have over 20 years of teaching experience with adults and children. I have a Master of Education in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Victoria in beautiful, British Columbia, Canada. In this class, I'm going to show you how to create effective learning objectives. By learning about the different levels of learning and activities, and following a few simple steps, you can create learning objectives to improve your teaching and communication skills, while improving the learning experience for your audience. This class is useful for anyone at any level, and you don't need any special software or supplies. Teachers, online course creators, motivational speakers, writers, journalists, or anyone who's interested in developing their skills related to instructional design, oral presentation, or communication will find this course useful. You can apply these skills in a number of ways. For example, clarify and organize your thinking, identify easily your purpose and meaning when speaking and teaching, and create measurable outcomes to ease evaluation and make your students more successful. Crafting learning objectives is a useful skill for anyone who teaches, leads groups of people, designs online learning experiences, speaks publicly, writes materials for an audience, or any other activity that relies on relaying information to an audience. By the end of this class, you will be able to identify and improve poorly written objectives, create effective learning objectives, and develop better courses overall. Let's take your courses to the next level! 2. Learning Objective Project: You'll have the opportunity to complete a project throughout this course. You can make it as complicated or as simple as you like. First, you can choose a skill or an idea that you want to share. Then you will create a series of learning objectives for your chosen subject. And your finished projects will be a set of learning objectives that describe what the audience will be able to do after they experience your message. Whether it's a class, a speech, a newspaper article, anything goes! There will be exercises throughout the course to help you practice and develop your skills before you create your project. Project formats include plain text, photographs, audio, MP3 recordings, video recordings, PowerPoint presentations, even a Skillshare course outline. Your imagination is the limit. You can share your work in progress or complete for feedback from fellow students and from me. Let's get started! 3. Lesson 1: All About Learning Objectives: All About Learning Objectives By the time you finish this lesson, you will be able to Describe a learning objective, Explain why learning objectives are essential for teaching and presenting well, and Explain how learning objectives are effectively used. Number One: Describe a learning objective. A learning objective is a special kind of statement. It describes a desired change in learner behavior. Let's try that again in plain language, a learning objective is a statement that describes what a learner will be able to do by the end of the presentation or learning event. It also needs to be something we can measure or test, otherwise, how can we tell if the learner can do it properly or not? Learning objectives also have to be realistic. Can the learner actually do them within the time-frame given with the information provided? Number Two: Explain why learning objectives are essential for teaching and presenting well. Learning objectives are awesome! They're used by everyone involved in the learning process, share a common understanding of what is expected of the learner, what they will be able to do as a result of the learning experience. Number Three: Explain how learning objectives are effectively used. Learning objectives are used by everyone at various phases of the learning event (the introduction, lesson activity, conclusion) in the following ways: One: the course developer, instructional designer, or writer, uses them while planning and designing a learning event to help organize their presentation, identify activities, and enforce the learning, and evaluate or check that the learner actually learned the intended skill. Two: The teacher, instructor, or facilitator uses them throughout their learning presentation. And three: The learner, listener, or student uses them to check that they are learning what they are supposed to be learning, study for tests and assessments, and as a roadmap throughout the presentation or learning event. Let's complete an activity called 'All About Learning Objectives.' I have created a resource for you that you can complete to check that you have met the learning objectives of this lesson. 4. Lesson 2: Bloom's Taxonomy: Bloom's Taxonomy. By the time you finish this lesson, you will be able to define Bloom's Taxonomy, name the six levels of Bloom's Taxonomy, order the levels from lowest to highest, and list some objective verbs for each level of the taxonomy. Define Bloom's Taxonomy. Simply put, Bloom's Taxonomy is a hierarchical framework for learning objectives that can help teachers teach and students learn. It is a well-respected and well-known system used by educators and curriculum designers all over the world. Name the six levels of Bloom's taxonomy. Remember that the levels are hierarchical. That means the lower level skills are at the bottom and they get more complicated as we move up the taxonomy. Bloom's Taxonomy is often presented as a pyramid or a series of steps, from the bottom up. The original taxonomy said knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation. In 2001, the taxonomy, it was revised to be more learner-centered. It also transposed the nouns from the first version and made them into verbs. Lastly, 'Synthesis' (level 5) and 'Evaluation' (level 6) switched places becoming 'Evaluate' at level 5 and 'Create' at level six. Order the levels from lowest to highest. We will be using the learner-centered or revised version for this course. There are six levels to the taxonomy that move from simple to complex. From the bottom of the pyramid or simplest, to the top of a pyramid or most complex, the order is, remember, understand, apply, analyze, evaluate, and create. List some objective verbs for each level of the taxonomy. 'Remember' is level 1. Let's take a level one learning objective. Know the six levels of Bloom's Taxonomy. What is wrong with this learning objective? Ask yourself a big question, "Can I see someone knowing the six levels of Bloom's taxonomy?" In other words, how will you know that the learner actually knows something after your lesson? They could show us that they know by writing them down or reciting them, or selecting them from a list. So, we should change the learning objective to say one of these: Write the six levels of Bloom's Taxonomy. Recite the six levels of Bloom's Taxonomy, or Select the six levels of Bloom's Taxonomy from a list. Now we have made an objective and measurable activity that the learner can demonstrate, and we've even shared how the learner can demonstrate it. 'Understand' is level 2. Let's take a level 2 learning objective. Understand the six levels of Bloom's Taxonomy. What's wrong with this learning objective? Ask yourself the big question again, "Can I see someone understanding the six levels of Bloom's Taxonomy?" No, you can't. The learner could show us they understand by describing them in detail, or explaining what they are, even recognizing them from a list. So, we should change that learning objective to say something like one of these: Describe the six levels of Bloom's Taxonomy. Explain the six levels of Bloom's Taxonomy, or Recognize the six levels of Bloom's taxonomy from a list. 'Apply' is level 3. Let's take a level 3 learning objective. Apply a third level of Bloom's Taxonomy. This is getting closer to being observable, but we still need to know more, like how will they apply that skill? We could change the learning objective to something like this: Apply a third level of Bloom's Taxonomy to an activity in your lesson plan, Practice selecting the third level of Bloom's Taxonomy in your course outline, or Use some of the six levels of Bloom's Taxonomy in your lesson plan. 'Analyze' is level 4. Let's take a level 4 learning objective. Analyze the six levels of Bloom's Taxonomy. How will analysis in this example be demonstrated? We could change the word analyze to one of these: Compare a third and fourth level learning objective from the list using Bloom's Taxonomy, or Relate two third-level learning objectives to the Bloom's Taxonomy model, or Diagram, with examples, the six levels of Bloom's Taxonomy. 'Evaluate' is level 5. Let's take a level 5 learning objective. Evaluate the six levels of Bloom's Taxonomy. You can see that the verbs are getting more and more observable as we move up the taxonomy, we can use the statement as it is. We could also try Judge the usefulness of Bloom's Taxonomy in education today, or Revise the Bloom's Taxonomy model for a specific kind of skill or topic of your choice. 'Create' is level 6. Let's take a level 6 learning objective. Create a series of learning objectives Using Bloom's Taxonomy. Like the 'Evaluate' example, we can use this statement as it is. We could also try, Propose an additional level to add to Bloom's Taxonomy, or Design your own physical representation or model of Bloom's taxonomy. In the resources section, there will be an activity that you can complete to check that you have met the learning objectives of this lesson. Remember that you can share this work with others to get feedback as you work towards your final project. 5. Lesson 3: Identifying, Improving, and Creating your own Learning Objectives: Identifying, Improving, and Creating Learning Objectives. By the time you finish this lesson, you will be able to select learning objectives from a list, improve a given set of learning objectives, and create learning objectives for a given lesson topic. Select Learning Objectives From a List Remember how you can identify a learning objective... Ask yourself a few key questions. Does the learning objective state what the learner will be able to do after the presentation? Is it measurable? Is it realistic, given the amount of time you have? You can also revisit your first resource work to help reinforce your learning. Improve a Given Set of Learning Objectives Sometimes it can be difficult to determine a well-written learning objective from a poorly written one. Remember in lesson two, we rewrote a series of learning objectives using Bloom's Taxonomy. We did it by taking the key verb from the given objective and either changing it to an observable action or explaining how to demonstrate the learning in more detail. You can revisit your second resource worked to help reinforce this learning. Create Learning Objectives for a Given Lesson Topic In the 'Resources' section, you will find an assignment to help you prepare for your project. You will be creating a set of learning objectives for a given and specific skill. When you attempt your very own project, you will get to choose the activity. It's time to move on to your project! You can use the resources I've provided for you to plan your own learning objectives for a lesson of your choice. Maybe you want to teach a yoga class or give a presentation at the office, or plan a lesson for your learners. In any of these situations, and more, you can improve your communication by using learning objectives to organize your message. 6. Conclusion: Throughout this class, you've had the opportunity to practice, identifying, modifying, and creating your own learning objectives for your own projects. I really encourage you to share these projects in our project gallery. And you can get feedback from your fellow students or from me. Thank you so much for taking the time with me today. I really appreciate it. Happy writing.