Worship Piano for Beginners - Play Worship Songs on Keys! | Rio Watanabe | Skillshare

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Worship Piano for Beginners - Play Worship Songs on Keys!

teacher avatar Rio Watanabe, MMus, Pianist, 2,000+ students

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

33 Lessons (2h 10m)
    • 1. Intro / Promo Video

      1:58
    • 2. Welcome! -Getting Started-

      2:12
    • 3. Note Names of All the White Notes

      2:40
    • 4. Note Names of All the Black Notes

      3:51
    • 5. [Practice Activity] Notes Mastery

      2:38
    • 6. Half Steps & Whole Steps

      1:57
    • 7. Common Intervals

      5:20
    • 8. [Practice Activity] Intervals Mastery

      4:39
    • 9. Major & Minor Chords

      7:34
    • 10. [Practice Activity] Major & Minor Chords Mastery

      4:47
    • 11. How to Read Lead Sheets (aka. Chord Charts)

      4:17
    • 12. [Practice Activity] Playing Cornerstone from Lead Sheets - Part 1

      6:00
    • 13. [Practice Activity] Piano Technique in Jumping Chords

      2:38
    • 14. Playing Cornerstone from Lead Sheets {Part 2: Verse}

      4:41
    • 15. Playing Cornerstone {Part 3: C, F, G, Am Chords}

      5:42
    • 16. Playing Cornerstone {Part 4: Third Line}

      2:57
    • 17. Piano Technique #2 for Jumping Chords

      1:26
    • 18. Let's Play the Whole Verse!

      1:15
    • 19. Piano Technique #3: Reference Points in Learning Chords Quickly

      3:31
    • 20. Geography of the Piano

      2:23
    • 21. Playing with Both Hands Together

      7:18
    • 22. Playing with Both Hands Together: Part 2

      6:04
    • 23. Playing the whole song with Both Hands

      2:46
    • 24. Playing Quarter, Half, and Whole Notes

      5:31
    • 25. Time Signature

      3:37
    • 26. Playing Cornerstone with Whole Notes

      4:55
    • 27. Playing Cornerstone with Half Notes

      1:47
    • 28. Playing Cornerstone with Half & Whole Notes

      6:09
    • 29. Playing Entire Verse in Rhythm

      4:53
    • 30. Playing the Chorus in Rhythm {Part 1}

      4:24
    • 31. Playing Cornerstone's Chorus in Rhythm {Part 2}

      3:09
    • 32. Playing the Whole Chorus in Rhythm

      3:44
    • 33. Playing the Whole Song with Both Hands

      3:41
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About This Class

Learn notes, chords, rhythm & read chord charts. Easy to follow, concise, step-by-step keyboard lessons for beginners.

Play your first worship songĀ on the piano!

By the end of this course, you will be able to play easy worship songs like Cornerstone (Hillsong) on the piano. You will be learning the the technique and music theory required to play easy worship songs through my step-by-step, easy to follow method.

Brand new to the piano? Have a little background in classical piano?

This course is for you! This is a course for beginners, where you will learn the music fundamentals such as notes, chords and rhythm.

_________________________________________________

You will learn how to:

  • Name notes on the Piano

  • Master Sharps and Flats on the Piano

  • Play Intervals and Basic Chords

  • Read and Play from Lead Sheets

  • Play Cornerstone from Hillsong

  • Play with Both Hands Together

  • Learn the Fundamentals of Rhythm and Counting

_________________________________________________

Structure and Content of This Course:

This course has 2 components:

Music Theory + Hands-On Practice Activity Lessons.

(In the Hands-On Practice Lessons, will learn the technique on how you can learn & play chords faster, and more efficiently.)

_________________________________________________

****IMPORTANT****

*Please note, that this is not a "learn piano overnight" course. In order to master the concepts and skills, it requires active participation and practice! Good luck and have fun! :)

_________________________________________________

I am so looking forward to meet you, and to share this musical adventure together! See you on the inside!

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Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Rio Watanabe

MMus, Pianist, 2,000+ students

Teacher

♫ Hi! I'm a pianist & educator based in the Netherlands. I'm a passionate worship musician with over 10 years of teaching experience. With over 2,000 students enrolled in my Udemy course, I'm excited to be sharing my knowledge and skills with you here on Skillshare, too!

♫ Would love to connect with you via my IG @rio__watanabe

♫ Don't forget to follow my Skillshare profile so you can access my future courses, too!

 

••• Professional Bio •••

Rio Watanabe-van Dorth holds a Master’s degree in classical piano performance from the Utrecht Conservatory in the Netherlands, where she studied under the renowned Dutch pianis... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Intro / Promo Video: Welcome. This is an easy to follow step-by-step in depth course for beginners. It is designed to help you master the fundamental technique and music theory to be able to play your favorite worship songs. My name is Rio and I'm a pianist, worship keyboardist, and instructor based in the Netherlands. This course has two key components. One component is the music theory and the technique part. And the other one is the more hands-on, practical practice activity lessons. In the theory and technique lessons, you will learn about chords, playing from lead sheets, about rhythm, key signatures and much more. These lessons will be coupled with a more hands-on, practice activity lessons where I will be guiding you step-by-step, so that you will be able to play your first worship song. By the end of this course, you'll be able to play songs such as Cornerstone from Hillsong. The ideal student for this course is anyone who is interested in being able to play worship songs on the piano. And if you are a complete beginner, don't worry, because this course is designed to help you even if you've never had music lessons in your life. And if you've had a few lessons, or even checking out lessons on YouTube, and you know a little bit, but you really want to solidify your piano skills, Then this course is for you as well! I'm so excited to be able to share this musical adventure with you. And I can't wait to see it in the inside. See you soon! 2. Welcome! -Getting Started-: When you played it, I'm so excited that you're here and that we are going to be sharing this exciting music essentially together. So this course is going to span all the way from the basics about learning notes and about chords, and all the way until you are able to play worship songs on the piano. So I've made this course in sequential order. So the best way to learn and best way to take this course would be to start from less than one and just go in order 123 and so on. And not skipping around because I will be adding more information and more skills in like a pyramid from beginning till the end. So this lesson consists of two key components. One is the more theoretical information-based lessons, and the other one is the more hands on activities. And in a theoretical ones is a concept cover will be mostly music theory. And the other one is going to be more hands on and practicing and gaining skills and techniques on the piano. And I've labeled these lessons as practice activities. So you will see that in the course and these practice activities, I would really like you to actually sit down at the piano and go through the techniques along with me as I explained the concept. And one important tip is I would really like you to practice between each of the lessons. And you can even put the practice lesson activities on repeats so that you can really solidify the concepts and really soak up the information. And my recommendation for you is to practice about 10 to 15 minutes per day and he can't do it every day. If you can even get in a few times per week, then that will really help you in your growth. So without further ado, let's get started. 3. Note Names of All the White Notes : Welcome to the first lesson. In this lesson, we'll be learning about the white notes on the piano. So there are 88 keys on the piano, from bottom to the top. And on the piano, the left side of the piano is going to be the lower part, and the right side of the piano is going to be the higher part of the piano. So let's first take a look at the black notes. So here are a cluster of two black notes, three black notes, two black notes, three black notes. And the pattern continues from the bottom to the top of the keyboard. So how do we name the notes on the piano? Well, we use the letters of the alphabet. So let's take a look at these two black notes right here. If we want to name the white, know that it's right next to these two black notes, two, this is the note C. So the same thing goes over here. The two black notes right here and the white no, right next to it. That is the note C. Same thing over here. Two black notes. The white note that it's right next to it, to the left, that is the note C. Again. Let's take a look at these cluster of three black notes. So the white note that is right next to it, to the left, that is the note F. And the white note that it's right next to the cluster of these three black notes in the left. That is also the note F, F, and so on throughout the whole keyboard. All right, what about the other white now? So when we are naming the notes in the piano, it follows the order of the alphabet c, d, e, f, g. But then you come back to a again. And then back to C, D, E, F, G, a, B, C. So he wanted to start naming the notes from it will be like this, a, B, C, D, and a, B, C and so forth. So now you know all the names of the Weitnauer. 4. Note Names of All the Black Notes: In this lesson, we'll be learning about the black notes on the piano, and also about sharps and flats. So now how do we identify the black dots? Well, let's take a look at this black note, for example. In order to name this black, now, we have to take a look at the what note that is right next to it. So we can either choose this one or this one. Let's choose this one for this example. Well, the relationship between this black NOW and this went note they are right next to each other and this black node is a little bit above or higher then this white note. So one important thing to know about the keyboard is that this direction is above to the right. And this direction, or the left is the down or lower on the piano. So if we are looking at this note, this black node is above or higher than this whiteness. So when this black node is higher than this white note, then we call this the sharp. So the same thing goes for this node. So this node is called a. And if you take a look at this black node that is above or higher than this white notes. Then this black node is going to be called a sharp. So in order to remember the name sharp, I like to think of sounds that are sharp, such as baby cries or reaching. They tend to be high and they tend to be very sharp sounds. So that helps me to remember that when a note is sharp, it also gets higher in pitch. So what about this node termination to this white note right here? Well, this black node is lower than this white note. This black node is going to be called a flat. So same thing goes every year for the note G, the black node that is right next to it, to the left. That is going to be called flat. Same thing over here. For the note. Black note that is right above to the right, that is going to be the black note that is right next to it, to the left, that's going to be flat. There are two exceptions to this rule and which aren't. And these denotes, as you can see, there is no black note to the right of this note. It's just a normal white note. So they want the play B sharp, then it simply becomes a scene. And if he wants to play a C flat, there's no black note that it's left. So we're going to call it simply be. So C-flat is the same thing as b, and b is the same thing as C. So let's take a look at things. Do nouns right here. If we want the play. There is no black note right next to it, to its right, but it is simply a whatnot. So sharp is the same thing as. And if you take a look at the note, and if you want to play F flat, it's not a black note, but it's a white node is simply the note. So now you know all of the notes of the piano. 5. [Practice Activity] Notes Mastery: Great job so far. So now you know about white notes and black notes, and also about sharps and flats. So let's move on to the practice activity. So I would like you to sit down at your piano and to go through this exercise with me together. In this lesson, we will be practicing the note names. So what I would like you to do is after I play a note, I would like you to pause the video and to guess what the note is, and then press play again, and I will tell you the note name. So let's begin. This is a C. This is a G sharp or a flat. This is a F sharp or G flat. And as you can see, it's right next to the c. So a, b, c, d. This is a, B, right next to the a. This is a G sharp, or a flat. This is a, a sharp or a B flat. This is a F. And it could be also called E sharp, but normally we call it an F. This is a C sharp or a flat. This is a, this is n. A great job. 6. Half Steps & Whole Steps: In this lesson, we'll be learning about half of them. Let's begin. Half-steps, and whole-steps are the basic components of intervals. So let's begin by talking about half-steps. So nodes that are half steps apart are always right next to each other, like these two notes. So the C and the C sharp are half steps apart. And so are two notes because they are right next to each other. And so are these T-notes. You can see that there are no other nodes. These thinner. So half-steps are always right next to each other. Let's be volunteer whole steps. So an example of a whole step would be these two notes. A whole step is composed of two half-steps. So 1.5 step, two half-steps makes a whole step. So can you find more whole steps on the keyboard? What about starting from the node? Well, we simply have to count two half-steps up from E, 1.5 step, two half-steps. And now we have one whole step. What about starting from a black note like this one? Well, the same rule place two half-steps moving from the starting note. One half-step, two half-steps. And now we have a whole step. So now we know about half-steps and whole-steps. 7. Common Intervals: In this lesson, we will be learning about interval. So what our interval? Well, intervals are simply the distance between any two melody on the piano. So this is an interval. This is also an interval. This is also an integral. This is an integral as well. Also an interval. In this lesson, we'll be learning the most common types of intervals. And they are minor second, major, second, minor third, major third, perfect fourth, and perfect fifth. So let's begin with a minor seconds. So an example would be these two notes. So notes that are minor seconds apart are always half-step apart. So can you find other minor second intervals? Well, these two are minor second intervals because they are right next to each other and they are half stuff apart. These two are also minus second intervals and so are these two nodes. So let's move on to a major second. A major second interval would be these two notes. So as you can see, a major second interval is composed of one whole step. And as we remember, a whole step is composed of two half-steps, one tin. So any nodes that are whole steps apart, our major second intervals. So let's figure out a major second interval from this note. So let's count two half-steps up from this note. One half-step, half-steps. And now you have nodes that are whole steps apart and you have a major second interval. Let's move on to a minor third. So this is a minor third interval. So let's count how many half-steps a minor third is composed of one. So a minor third is composed of three half-steps. So let's find another minor third interval. Let's pick this node. So let's count 3.5 steps again, 123. And now you have another minor third interval. The next interval we will learn about is a major third. Major third interval. Let's go how many half-steps are in a major third interval? One form. So any major third interval has 4.5 steps in between. So let's try to find a major third interval from this note, 1234 half-steps, and now you have a major third interval. So the next interval we will learn about is a perfect fourth. I'll begin with an example. This is a perfect fourth interval. So let's count how many half-steps compose a perfect fourth interval, one through four. So five half-steps make up a perfect fourth. And last but not least, let's talk about perfect fifth. And let's count how many half steps there are in a perfect fifth interval, 1234567. So seven half-steps make a perfect fifth interval. And the same rule applies if you start counting from any other note on the piano. So let's find a perfect fifth interval from this node. So let's count seven half-steps up from this note. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. And now you have a perfect fifth interval. And one thing to know is that don't forget to count the first note when counting intervals. So here, starting from this note, then he also wanted to impress on this note. And the note that is right next to it to count as 1.5 step, two half-steps, 3.5 steps, and so forth. So now you know about the most common intervals on the piano. 8. [Practice Activity] Intervals Mastery: In this lesson, we will be practicing the names of the intervals. I will play an interval and I would like you to pause the video and to guess what the interval name is and press play again and I'll tell you the answer. So let's begin. This is a major third. And the way you know it is by counting the half-steps, 1, 2, 3, 4, 4.5 steps in between. So a major third. The next one. This is a minor second. And notes are right next to each other and they are half steps apart, so it's a minor second. A minor second. Again. There are no nodes in between these two nodes, and they are half-step subparts. And this is also a minor second. Major second. So if we count the half steps in between, including the first note, one to 2.5 steps in between. So it is a major second. And an important thing to remember is that a major second is always a whole step apart. A minor third. So let's count the half steps, 1, 2, 3 half steps in between. So a minor third. So let's count the half steps in between again, 123455 half-steps. So that makes a perfect fourth or a perfect 5.5th, 1234567 steps in between. So a perfect fifth. A perfect fifth again. And as you can see, this is very similar to this one, but just a half-step shifted up for both of the notes. So you can tell by how my hand licks and how far apart the two naughts are, that this might be actually a perfect trim. Again, well, let's count the half steps again. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 half-steps. So a perfect fifth. A perfect fifth again. But just to make sure let's count the half steps. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 half-steps. So a perfect fifth. A major third, 134 half-steps. Major third. A major third, again, invoke way to easily figure out is to look at the previous one and see how I've just shifted down the two nodes. Half step lower. So there's a big chance this is also a major third, but let's count that intervals 1, 2, 3, 4, 4.5 steps apart. A major third, again. Great job. So you can repeat this exercise a few times by using this video and practicing naming the intervals. 9. Major & Minor Chords: In this lesson, we will be learning about minor and major chords. Chords are three or more notes played at the same time. So an example of a chord would be this, or even this, because this is three or more notes played at the same time. This is also a court. And even on the black nodes, this is a chord and even this is a CT, because it's three or more notes played at the same time. So there are different kinds of chords. But today we are going to talk about triads, which are chords created from three notes, tri, meaning three. And the two kinds of triads we're going to talk about today are major chords and minor chords. So let's start talking about major chords. I'll give you an example of a major chord. Here is a C major chord, and I call it a C major chord because I'm looking at the bottom now, which is a C. And if I'm playing an F major chord, and I call it an F major because the bottom know is an F. And same thing goes for G major chord because the bottom note is a key. So how do we construct a major chord? While let's take a look at the C major chord. A major chord consists a major third on the bottom and a minor third interval on the top. Major third intervals, as we remember, are created from 1, 2, 3, 4 half-steps. And minor third intervals are consisting of 1, 2, 3 half steps. So a major third interval on the bottom and a minor third interval on the top gives you a major chord. And this concept applies to any other major chords. So let's try to create an, a major core. So since it is an, a major chord, I'm going to play the note on the bottom. And then I want to create a major third interval on the bottom. So I'm going to count the half steps starting from day 1, 2, 3, 4, four half-steps up from, gives you C sharp. So which node should we play for the third note? Well, we want to have a minor third interval on the top. So we are going to start counting from the middle note, 1, 2, 3 half steps. And that is going to give me a minor third interval on the top. So a major third interval on the bottom in a minor third interval on the top. And that gives you a major chord and in this case a, a major core. What about chords played on black notes such as this one? Well, the same concept applies. From the bottom note, F-sharp. We are going to start counting the half steps again. So we have 1234 half-steps, which gives you a major third. And from the middle note, we're going to start counting the half-steps, 1, 2, 3. And that gives you a minor third interval. So we have a major third interval on the bottom and a minor third interval on the top, which gives you a major chord. So let's take a look at minor courts. So let's start out with the a minor chord. Well, instead of having a major third on the bottom minor chord, F minor third intervals on the bottom. So if we were to start counting from the bottom, note 123 half-steps, that gives you a minor third interval on the bottom. And if we start counting from the middle note, 1234 half-steps, that gives you a major third interval on the top. So a minor third interval on the bottom, and a major third interval on the top, which gives you a minor chord. All right, so let's try to play a minor chord on black notes. So let's start with the a flat. All right, Well, we are going to count how many half-steps it takes from a flat to create a minor third interval. So 1, 2, 3 half steps, that gives you a minor third. And from the middle note, we're going to count the half steps again. 12344 half-steps gives you a major third interval. So now we have a minor third interval on the bottom and a major third interval on the top, which gives you a minor chord. So if you want to change this minor chord into a major chord, one simple trick to do that is to simply change the middle note, which is now on a b, to go to a, C, which is a half-step higher. A minor chord goes to a major chord by simply moving the middle note. And this concept applies to any other major and minor chords. So let's take the C major chord. If we move the middle note half step lower, it gives you a minor chord. And if you are starting from a minor chord, and if he wants to go to a major court, then you move the middle note a half-step higher, and that gives you a major chord. So let's just do one more example that a major. So since we are starting with a major chord, and if he wants to play a minor chord, that we're going to simply move the middle note half step lower. And that gives you a minor chord, that a minor chord. And if you are starting from the E minor chord and we want to play a major chord, then we simply have to move the middle singer one half-step higher. And that gives you a, a major chord. Great. So now you know about major and minor chord. 10. [Practice Activity] Major & Minor Chords Mastery: Welcome to the practice activity for major and minor chords. So I would like you to sit down at your own piano and to go through this exercise together. So let's get started. So what I would like you to do is after I play each chord, I would like you to guess if it is a major or a minor chord. All right, let's begin. This is a major port. And specifically it is a major chord because it has the notes eight on the bottom. And the reason it is an, a major chord is because it has 1234 half-steps, or a major third on the bottom and a 1, 2, 3, 3.5 steps between the middle and the top note, which gives you a minor third. Major third on the bottom. Minor third on the top image card. Next one. This is a minor chord. Minor third on the bottom. Major third on the top. This is a, a flat minor chord. They can also be called a G sharp minor chord because when we take a look at the bottom note, this note can be called an, a flat. G sharp. This is a, a flat or G-sharp major chord. And if you compare this chord from the previous one, all I did was move the middle finger to the right by 1.5 step. And remember the rule that if you want to make a minor chord, a major chord, or you have to do is move the middle note, 1.5 step to the right. This is a E major chord. Major third on the bottom. Minor third on the top. This is a E minor chord. And if we compare to the previous chord, which was E major, all I did was move the middle note down to the left by a half-step. And this gives you a E minor chord. This is a C sharp major chord, or a D flat major chord. Major third on the bottom, minor third on the top. And the bottom note can be labeled as C sharp or D flat. This is a D major chord. Major third on the bottom, minus third on the top. This is an F sharp major chord or a G flat major chord. Major third interval on the bottom, 1234 half-steps than a minor third interval on the top, 123 half-steps. So feel free to repeat this lesson many times and to practice distinguishing between major and minor chords. 11. How to Read Lead Sheets (aka. Chord Charts): In this lesson, we will be learning how to read core charts so that you can play the piano and singing along to your favorite worship songs. So let's take a look at Cornerstone by Hill's song. So you can see that the chord symbols, such as C, F, G, and so forth, are spread along with the lyrics on the page. So if it says simply C or F, then that indicates that you should play a major chord. But if there is a little M next to the letter, such as on the third line, a, M, then that means that you should play the a minor chord. So let's begin in the first line. My hope is built on nothing less. So above the my, there is the letter C. So that indicates that when I seeing my, than I should play the C major chord. So it would sound like this. My hope is built on nothing less. And in the next line, it says f above, then Jesus blood. So since the courts are aligned with the lyrics, I seeing that then Jesus blood, then I should play the F major chord and then come to righteousness. And I should play the G major chord, right? So put together, it would sound like this. My hope is, and of course you can practice this much slower. My hope is nothing. And then we will practice a lot more in the next activity. So don't worry if you can't play yet. But we will just be going over the concepts of how Cauchy's work. So let's take a look at the next line. I dare not trust. Well, above the eye it says a m. And remember, if it has a little M next to the letter, then that means that it is a, a minor chord. So I have to play the E minor chord when I seeing, I dare not trust. Hi there, not true. And then comes the G chord again, the sweetest frame. And then above the trust is the G major chord. Jesus. So put together, it's going to sound like this. My hope is, nothing like the sweetest frame a end-users. So one question you may ask is, which fingers should I use to play the court? Well, if you are relatively it with your left hand, then you can play with your middle finger and thumb. And if you're going to play with your right hand, you can play with your thumb. So it's the same thing except the mirror image. So in the next lesson, we will go further into how you can play along. So don't worry if he can't play yet because we will work on it further. Great job so far. 12. [Practice Activity] Playing Cornerstone from Lead Sheets - Part 1: Great job so far. Now you are able to read coccyx. So let's move on to actually playing cornerstone on the piano. So let's begin with the first verse. So now we are going to play the chords in the right head. And when we take a look at verse one above, my hope, there is the letter C. And that means we're going to play the chord C major when we seeing the word my. So let's try to find the chord C major on the piano. So as we remember, if it's a C major chord, then the bottom know is going to be a C. And we're going to skip the D. And we're going to play that. I'm going to skip the end. We're going to play G. So we have great. So do you have that on the piano? So let's have you play the C major chord on your piano. All right, great, So let's sing together and play the C major chord. So I'm going to count off four and I'm going to start singing. And when I seeing my, I would like you to play the C major chord. So let's have you first place your hand on the court itself so that you already the thumb on the middle finger on the E, and your pinky on the G. All right, Ready? One, 234. Let's create jobs. So let's do it one more time. I'm going to count off again. So let's get your hand ready on the right position. 1, 2, 3, 4. So as you can see that the cord comes slightly before my, so it's going to come like this. 1, 2, 3, 4 and play. All right, Ready? One, 234. That's it. So let's move on to the next one. So the next line is then Jesus blood. So as you can see above, then there's a letter F. And since there is no little m with written next to the f, that means we're simply going to play F major chord. So let's have you find the F-Major chord on the piano. So the bottom know is going to be f. The middle note is going to be, and the top NO, is going to be. Just like in the C major chord. You can see that the nodes are skipping. So we have n and then you skip the G, and then you have a gift, the b. And then he plays. So let's play the C Major again. So it's the same pattern. See, skip the next note. Skip this now. And then G. So the hand position is going to look exactly the same. This one with the thumb and the pinky, and this one. So let's play the second line. So it's going to go like this. So as you can see, I'm going to play the F slightly before I seeing then. So let's first prepare the hand on the F-Major chord and then work on a play after counting off to four, 1, 2, 3, 4, and that's it. Great. So let's go back to the beginning again, which is my hope is built. And then let's move on to the second line. So we're going to play the first line and the second line. All right, So let's begin. We're going to start by putting the hand on the C major. So are you ready? Do you have your hand on the C major chord? Let's begin 1234. And now let's have you move your head to the F-Major, which is here, ready? And then the TV play the F-Major. Great job. So as you can see, the most challenging part is moving from one chord to another because you have to jump from one position to the other. So in the next section we will go from how we can move from one chord to another. 13. [Practice Activity] Piano Technique in Jumping Chords: Alright, so let's practice moving from the C major chord to the F-Major chord. So let's have you find the C major chord again. So the bottom note is C, E, G. All right, so we want to go from the C major chord to the F major chord. So I'm going to teach you one trick that really helps in placing your hand in different positions. And that is to find a reference point. And a reference point in this case is going to be my thumb. On the C major is on the sea. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to look at the thumb as my reference point, even when moving to a different chord. So I'm going to keep looking at my thumb in this transition. So as you can see, is moving from C to. So I would like you to go back and forth on the C major chord to the F-Major chord. And keep looking at your thumb and keep the hand position in the same shape. Because what you're doing is essentially you have this shape and then you are moving it from one position to the other and maintaining the same shape of the head. So let's go back to C and then follow your thumb, and then place your thumb on the F, and then play the F major chord. So let's have you do it a few times to F-major and back to C major, and again to F-major. So what I would like you to do is to pause this video and to practice going from C major to F major and back and forth. Great. I'll see you in the next section. 14. Playing Cornerstone from Lead Sheets {Part 2: Verse}: So I hope it went well and practicing this transition between C major and F-major. So we're going to take a look at the third chord in cornerstone, and that is a G major. So when we take a look at our lead sheet, the G-major is above a righteousness. So when we sing righteousness, then we're going to play the G major. So let's have you first find the G major chord on the piano. So the bottom know is going to be a G, which is going to be play with your thumb. And the middle though, is going to be the B and the top NO, is going to be the D. And let's quickly review why this is called a G major chord. So in the previous sections, we learn about the construction of a major chord. And you remember that the bottom note form a major third and the top two nodes form a minor third. So let's take a look first at the bottom two nodes and why that is a major third. So when we count the half steps from G to B, then is one. Right? So that makes a major third on the bottom and the top to note, when we count the half steps, it's 1, 2, 3, 3.5 steps being a minor third. So we reviewed the construction of a major chord. So let's put it in the song from the beginning. The first court was the C major chord. On my hope is, so let's begin. 1234. My hope. And so what I just did was move from the F-Major chord to the G major chord. And thankfully, this transition from F major chord to G major chord is much easier than from the C major chord to the F major chord. So let's have you practice a transition Between F major chord and a G major chord. So let's begin on F-major. And then what we just have to do is slightly shift your hand to the right. And if we remember the reference point idea from the previous section, when we look at our thumb, thumb is simply moving from the F, g, and meanwhile, the shape of the hand stays exactly the same. Great. So let's play the entire first line and second line together. Beginning with the C major chord. Ready? One, 234 pages. So if that was a little too fast for you, you can stop this video and repeat going from C major, major and then a major a few times to practice going back and forth among these three chords. So let's do that one more time, very slowly before we end this lesson. 1, 2, 3, 4. Great job. So you can repeat in this last section of the video and play along as I play to practice the transitions among these three chords. 15. Playing Cornerstone {Part 3: C, F, G, Am Chords}: All right, so you're making great progress because now we are on the third line where we have our first minor chord. And when we take a look at the third line in cornerstone, which is, I dare not trust. We see that it says a M above. I dare not. And as we remember, the small m indicates that it is a minor chord. So let's quickly review the construction of a minor chord. So an, a minor chord consists. And so in a minor chord, the bottom to create a minor third, and the top two nodes create a major third. A minor third consists of 13 half-steps, and a major third consist of one before half-steps. And now we have a, a minor chord. So let's play the third line. I do not trust together. So I would like you to place your hand on the a minor chord and the notes are, and now I'm going to count off to four again. And then I would like you to play the a minor chord, 12341 more time. 1234. Great. And now we're going to do it with singing. 1234. That's it. One more time. 1234. Great. So now we have come to the third line. So let's begin from the beginning, and let's try to play all four chords in a row. So let's quickly view the four chords again. The first one being C major, the next one is F-major, then G major, and then finally, a minor and D. You notice how all the chords have the same shape in your hand, but simply they are moving along the white notes on the keyboard. So let's have you play these four points together with me. So beginning with the C major. And then we're going to move your hand to the F-major and a OneNote to the right major. And then one more, one more note to the right, a minor. So that's practice going back and forth. C Major, F major, G major, a minor. So I would like you to pause this video and then practice going back and forth on these four chords. Alright, so after you've practiced these four chords, Let's play and sing along until the third line. All right, let's begin with the first line. 1, 2, 3, 4. Great job. So let's do it one more time. And if it's a little bit fast for you, I'm going to do it a bit slower this time. Ready? One, 234. And already prepared here to the next one. Is prepared to the next one. Great. So the trick here is to prepare the next chord with moving your hand position slightly before singing an LQ. So let's do it one more time. 1, 2, 3, 4. Great job. So now you've learned three lines of cornerstone. We'll move on to the next part in the song, in the next section. 16. Playing Cornerstone {Part 4: Third Line}: All right, We're making great progress. So now we are on the third line where Liao Guan to saying the sweetest frame and the cord above sweetest is G. So let's play the entire third line. So we had, and then on sweetness. So we're gonna do, is we're going to simply move the hand back to the G major chord again, which we already had. So it's going to be great. And the great thing about learning the piano is that techniques that you have learned already can be applied to other areas. So do you member in the second mind, we practice going from F major chord to chord and simply sliding our hand in the same position across the keyboard. Well, we're going to do the same thing again from a minor chord to a G major chord. But only this time we're going from the right to the left and still keeping the same shape of our hand. So we have the great. And then let's move on to the last line. Very exciting. So above. But we have F, which we already had the truth, and about trust. We have G-Major again, which we already had before. And then on name, we go back to C major. So the last line is going to be F major, G major, C major. So these chords we have had already, but I would like you to practice going from F major, G major, and C Major by pausing this video. All right, so let's play F-major, G major, C major together with C. So I'm going to count off again. 1, 2, 3, 4. Great job. I'll see you in the next section. 17. Piano Technique #2 for Jumping Chords: In this lesson, we will be learning the technique to be able to play them last line of cornerstones smoothly. So what do you think is the most challenging part in the last line? Well, I think it is the jump from G major to C major because you have to go in such a big distance. In such a case, what it can do is to look for reference points. Again, the reference points in G-Major, C-Major are going to be the G and the C. So I went to follow my thumb going from G to C. And you can even practice by just playing with your thumb. See, sort of like that game where you have to go between the fingers like this. You're basically practicing your aim at going from one location to another. So after you practice moving your thumb from one location to another, then you add the other notes. And hopefully you can aim from one chord to another much more smoothly. Alright, great job. I'll see you in the next section. 18. Let's Play the Whole Verse!: All right, you've come such a long way. I'm so proud of you. So now you are able to play that entire verse of Cornerstone. And thankfully verse one and verse 2, they both have the same chord, so you can play both first one and verse two. So let's play the entire verse together. From the beginning. I will count off until 41234. I'm not saying the Angie's a great job. And feel free to repeat this lesson many times so that you feel really comfortable playing the Good luck. 19. Piano Technique #3: Reference Points in Learning Chords Quickly: So in this section we're going to talk about techniques that is going to help you learn songs faster and more efficiently. So one technique we already learned in the previous section is they use a reference points when he have courts that are jumping, such as from the C major chord to the F-Major chord. Then we learned that you can look at the bottom notes of each chord and to follow the movements of the thumb. And to practice simply playing the thumb back and forth, back and forth. And then afterwards adding the other nodes. So another technique that you can use is to expand on this concept and to play a whole, entire section, but only playing the bottom notes of all the courts. So I'll start with an example. In the first verse. It would go like this. My hope is nothing. And then you choose the sweetest end uses. So what I am doing is simply playing the bottom notes of each chord. So I would like you to pause this video and to practice only playing the bottom Coit, the bottom nodes as using along at two cornerstone. All right, so once you have done that, let's add the middle note to each of the court. So instead of simply playing, my hope is built on nothing less than Jesus blood and so on. Then you're going to play the bottom T-notes. So that's going to be like this. My hope is the thing. Then the sweetness. The end-users. Of course in the beginning you would have to practice much slower. But at this point, I would like you to pause the video and to practice only playing the bottom two nodes of each court. All right, Great job. So once you've gotten the bottom two nodes, then you can add the pinky as well. So instead of playing simply tin out, then now you can play the entire court. So then it would go like and so forth. So this is a great technique to use for any song that you will be approaching in the feature. So I'll see you in the next section. 20. Geography of the Piano: In this section, we will be learning how to play with both left-hand and right-hand. So before we begin, I would like to quickly talk about the geography of the keyboard and to figure out where the middle C is. Because the middle C is going to help us determine where the left-hand and the right-hand should play. So the middle C is right here, and it is in the middle area of the keyboard. And usually the logo of the piano tends to be printed in the middle of digital keyboards. And if you have an acoustic piano and he opened the lid, you can see the logo is going to be printed usually in the middle. But of course that's not always the case. So let's try to find the middle see by looking at the other sees on the keyboard. So the other sees on the keyboard are Starting from the top of these. So in order to find the middle C, we're going to start by counting how many seeds there are from the top of the keyboard. So here's one. Here's the second, third, fourth, and the fifth. So the middle C is the fifth. See from the top. And if we count all the seeds from the bottom, one, and here's the second 1, third, 1, fourth, 1. So the middle C is the fourth c from the bottom. Great. So now we know how to find the middle c. And this is going to help us orientate our hands on the keyboard. So the right hand tends to play above the middle c, and the left-hand tends to play below the middle C. But of course this is not a strict rule, but just a reference point that the right-hand tends to play on this side and the left-hand tends to play on this side. 21. Playing with Both Hands Together: All right, so now that we are familiar with the geography of a keyboard and where the left-hand and the right-hand should be. We are going to begin by playing Cornerstone with both hands together. Alright, so let's quickly review what the right-hand shift you first. So in the beginning, the first chord was C major. So C major is played like this, with the notes being see on the bottom and the G. All right, so the nodes that we are going to play in the left-hand are always going to be the same now as you are playing in your right hand. So if it is a C major chord and we are playing the C note with your thumb. Just like this. Then, since we are playing the C now with the thumb, we're also going to play the note with your left hand. To simplify this exercise, we will simply play the note with your index finger and your left hand. So as you can see, this is the middle of the keyboard. And I played my C major chord in the middle of the keyboard. The Central see, the middle C. The C that I want to play with my left hand is exactly the next scene to the left side of the keyboard. So let's try to play both hands together at the same time. So let's prepare the Cordillera hand and the thing air in your left hand. And I'm going to count off to four. And I would like you to play of health the other 12341 more time. The C major chord and the right-hand and the note C in your left hand. 1234. Great. So feel free to pause this video and to practice playing both hands if you would like. And let's move on to the next part. So as we remember, the first chord in the second line is F-major. By then Jesus blood. So the F-Major chord was a and C. And my thumb is playing the note F. So what I'm going to do is I'm also going to play the note F with my left hand. So if I play the F major chord and the right hand and the note F, unless it would sound like this. So let's have you practice this with both hands together on the counter for 12341 more time, 1234. So now let's go back and forth between the C major chord and the F-Major chord. So we begin with this position. And then that is going to go the piano or to the right, to this position. Alright, this is going to be a little bit challenging because there is a skip involved. But let's give it a shot, beginning with C major 1234. And then moving on to F-major. One more time. C Major. F major. So feel free to stop this video or pause this video and to practice the transition between C major chord and F-Major chord. A few types. Great, So let's move on and it played with both hands with singing. All right, Let's give it a shot. So first repair your hands on the keyboard. And I'm going to count off to 41234. My hope is nothing. Now prepare for a lead score, which is F. So feel free to pause the video again and to, and to play the first two lines again. All right, so let's move on to the next chord, which is G major. So he Major in the right-hand is played by d. And so the left hand is going to play what my right hand and my thumb is playing with. So it's going to sound like like this. So put together from the beginning, it's going to be like this. Alright, now let's do it together. So I would like you to prepare hand on the c major, both hands. And I'm going to count off to 41234. Now off to f. And the g. Great. One more time. Back to see again from the beginning, 1, 2, 3, 4 to gray. So now you've played the first two lines of Cornerstone with both hands together. 22. Playing with Both Hands Together: Part 2: Now let's play the second half of the verse with both hands together. So by, I dare not trust, we are going to play the a minor chord, which is C. And the bottom note of the a minor chord played by that sum is a. So with your left hand, you are going to play the note a. So it's going to sound like this. On, I dare not trust. So let's have you play the E minor chord. And I'm going to seeing either not 1234. Great. So the next chord by sweetest frame is key. So all we have to do is from a minor move all the nodes to the left. So I'm a minor, denotes the left, and that gives you the G major chord. So let's try to play and sing together. 1234. Hi there. To the G Suite is great and feel free to pause the video to practice the transition between these two coils as well. Let's move on to the very last line, but holy trust in Jesus name. And the first chord in this line is F major. So we have this before. So this is how it sounds, F-major with both hands. And an unstressed G-Major again, which we had in Jesus. And then now we go back to C, which we had in the very beginning. So the very last line is going to be F major, G major, C major. So feel free to stop the video and practice going from F major, G major and to see major, and especially the last two chords, a little tricky from key major to C major because there's a big jump. All right, so I'm going to tell you a little trick on how to practice a big jump going from G major to C major. So in the previous session, we talked about the reference points and following the ASAM, right? Well, there's another trick that you can use, which is to look at the common nodes between two chords. So if we are going from E major to C major, then three notes are G major. These three notes are C major. And can you see that both of the corals have as the common note? Well, that can also help you to go from one corner to the other. So from G, If you take a look at just some, you are playing the GMAT ISAF on the G-Major chord. But when we are playing the C major chord, you are playing G with your pinky. So what she can lead to practice this is to first play the G with your thumb, which you are doing an a G major chord. And then moving on to play with your pinky, which you are doing in the C major chord. So firstly the thumb, and then with your pinky. And then thinking, so let's have you pause the video and to practice this. All right, so once you have practiced this, then you can add the other nodes and see if the exercise has helped you to play from one corner to the other. All right, so after this exercise, I would like you to put the left hand as well. So key major, both hands. Both hands. Alright, let's do it together. Ready? And G major, C major. All right, so let's play the entire last line with playing and singing. So the last line begins with the F-Major chord. So I would like you to place your hand on the F-Major for both hands, like this. And let's play together 1234. But the church is great, Let's say overtime. All right, Let's do it one more time. 12345. Somehow we've made it to the end of first wine now. So in the next section, Let's try to play the whole verse together. 23. Playing the whole song with Both Hands: All right, so this is the moment where we are going to play the entire verse with both hands together. All right, ready? Let's give it a shot. So let's prepare our hands on the C major chord with both hands. I'm going to count off to four, 1, 2, 3, 4 to f, and a minor to F. The Kanji's gray. And for those of you who would like to practice a bit slower, let's do that this time. 1234. My hope is and here already prepared for that. Prepare for the G and then a minor, G-Major, those F grades. So you can repeat this section of the video and play together and to practice. So now let's do it up to tempo a little bit. Correct? So 1, 2, 3, 4. Nothing like the PNGs. Great job. I'll see you in the next section. 24. Playing Quarter, Half, and Whole Notes: In this lesson, we are going to be talking about rhythm. So a basic unit of them is called the beat. And here I have my iPhone and I have downloaded the metronome app. And I'm going to set it to you 120 beats per minute. And it's going to sound like this. So now it is clicking at 100 beats per minute or VPN. So if I set it at 60, is going to sound like this. So you can see that it is much slower and it is actually beating at half of the rate as when it was at 120. So it is clicking at 60 beats per minute, or it is clicking at the same rate as the seconds arm on o'clock. So let's take a look at these four circles on the screen and assume that each of these is a beat. So we are going to come along as the circles light up. So let's begin. Ready, and 1234, 12341234. Great. So each of these circles represents a quarter note. And a quarter note looks like this. It's a black node with a stem coming out of it. So let's have you play along to quarter notes. So let's take g and 13131. Great. So let's take a look at the next kind of a node, which is a half-note, which looks like this, a white note with a stem coming out of it. And a half note has a length value, which is twice as long as a quarter note. So to quarter note equals 1.5 note. So if we were to play a half, no, it's going to sound like this. Rally and Q 3412341234. So let's have you play along quarter notes and half notes. Let's first begin with a coordinate. Ready? And 1, 3, 1, 4, 1 to 1. Great. Let's have you play half notes now. So remember that is twice as long as quarter notes. So you will be playing on the cart one by holding our county and play in again on count three and holding on count for several be 123412341234121212. So now let's take a look at the next kind of a node, which is called a whole note. And a whole note is worth four coordinates. So it's going to sound like this. Ready? And 1234123412341234. Great. So did you notice that I am holding the note from one all the way until four. So I am holy a note for four beats. So let's have you play whole notes together with me. Ready? And 1234123412341234. Great. So basically what you're doing is holding the note from cow one all the way until count for great job. So now you are familiar with the concept of quarter notes. Half notes, and whole notes. 25. Time Signature: In this lesson, we are going to talk about time signatures, mainly for 434. So let's take a look at this notation. So the bottom note signifies that we're going to be looking at quarter note because 1 fourth is a quarter. And then the top no signifies that there are four of these quarter notes in one measure. So take a look at these boxes right here. And I'm going to put four balls or four quarter notes in each box. Each of these boxes represents one measure. So when we take a look at lead sheets, you can see that there are vertical lines spread along the lead sheet itself. So when a section is surrounded by one line and then ending in another line, that represents one measure. So between two lines is always one measure. And because cornerstone is written in for four, it means that there are four beats or four quarter notes per measure, or four quarter notes between two of these vertical lines. So if we were to take a look at another song which is written in 34, then that means that there are only three beats between two of these vertical lines. So let's go back to cornerstone. And we can see that in the first box or in the section between two of these mines, there is one chord written in it, which is the C major chord. So since this song is written in 44, and we mentioned earlier that there are four beats in one measure that then we are going to hold this C major chord for four counts. So then it's going to sound like this, 1, 2, 3, 4. So let's take a look at the space between the next two lines. And you see that there is no cord written there. In that case, it means that we are still going to play the same chord that was written in the previous measure. In this case, the C major chord. So it's going to go like this. 1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 3, 4. And in the second line, we have that F-Major chord. And again, it's only F-major in one measure or between two of these vertical lines. So we're going to hold F-major for four counts, 1234. And then the next chord is G major. And as you can see, there is only one chord between these two lines. So we're going to play G major for four counts throughout the whole measure, 1, 2, 3, 4. So, so far we have 1234123412341234. So Theia in the next section. 26. Playing Cornerstone with Whole Notes: In this lesson, we are going to play a cornerstones first few lines using a whole note length of the courts. So a whole note is the same length as four coordinates or four beats. So when we are going to play the C major chord for the length of a whole note. There. We're going to hold it for four beats. So it's going to be like this. 12341234. Same thing goes for F-major, 1, 2, 3, 4, and G-Major 1234. Great. So in the beginning we have C major, which is between two of these lines. And I'm going to hold it for four counts, 1234. Then in the next section or in the next measure between the next two lines, it's also see majors. I'm going to play C major for four counts again, 1234. And in the second mile, we have F major chord between the two lines. So I'm going to play F major for four counts, 1234, and then righteousness. We have G major chord. And it's the only court that in standing between the two lines again. So going to play G major for four counts, 1234. And in particular, we have C major chord for four counts. Again, major chord for four counts, and then major chord for four counts. And then G-Major chord for four counts. So let's have you play the chords and counting out loud to four. So we will be playing the chord at the length of a whole note. All right, Ready? One, 23 for 34. And again see 1, 2, 3, 4, and 3. 4 and G-Major 1234. Great. So we have just played the first two lines of Cornerstone at the length of whole notes. Great, so if this is a little bit too challenging for you, Let's do a little bit slower. All right, let's begin at the C major chord. Again. Ready? 1, 2, 3, 4, and C major for four counts, 3, 4. And again, 234234 and G-Major 2, 3, 4. And what you can do is you can use the metronome app, just like I have on my iPhone app. And then you can set it to whatever tempo you would like. Let's start it at 50 to VPM. And then you can practice among the methionine. So let's give it a shot. 34234 against 343434234. Again, for n 234234 are here in the next section. 27. Playing Cornerstone with Half Notes: So if we wanted to play, cornerstone is in half-note, how would that sound? Well, instead of holding a C chord for four counts like 1, 2, 3, 4, then we will only hold it for two counts instead, like this, 1, 2, 3, 4. And then same thing in the next measure, 124. And then if we were to put a metronome on using my iPhone app, I will be holding each of the chords for two of these beads. Ready? And 1234. So let's have you play along to the metronome, beats 2.5 notes. Ready? Valley. Again. Great. So you can also do this exercise on your own. And feel free to go back on this video and the repeat this past section to practice playing chords on half-note. Good luck. 28. Playing Cornerstone with Half & Whole Notes: So great job on practicing whole notes and half notes. So let's take a look at Cornerstone again to the third and the fourth line. Because here we are going to have both half notes and whole notes mixed together. So let's take a look at the third line. I dare not trust. Well, the first chord in this line is a, a minor chord. And as we remember it, a, C, and E. So we are going to play this chord for four counts, just like in the first half of the song. One, 234, great, So this part is still the same. And the next chord, the G major, is still the same by holding it for four counts, 1234. So let's practice this line first going from a minor to G minor. Ready? So let's first put our hands on a minor. And 123412341, 341 more time from a minor. 12341234, again, 12341234. Great. So that part is the part for the switch. And now comes holy trust in Jesus name. So here is where the half notes come in place. And do you remember that when we play half notes, then we only hold the court for two counts. Well, when we look at the chord, when we look at the measure with but holy trust. Do you see that for the first time, there are two chords per one measure or two chords between two of these lines. So that means instead of having one chord held for four beats for the entire measure, we are going to have two chords with two beats each fitted in, in one measure. So when we are going to play that, it's going to sound like this. F-major for two counts, so 12 and then one to G-Major for two counts that are going to sound like this to four. So instead of holding 41234, I'm going to move to the G chord on the third count. So each core gets two beats, 1234. So played with a metronome. It's going to sound like this. Ready? And F-major. Just like that. So let's have you practice with the metronome going from F major to G major with half no length, each. 34 major. Major. Again, nature. Nature. And if this is too fast for you, I am now at 50 to BPM. We can even make it a little slower. Let's try out 46 BPM. Ready? Queue 34244. Again. Four, great. So let's try to have your count out loud and play at the same time. I will, of course help you by counting out loud. So let's begin. 3444. And again, now that you are able to play to half-note length villi in one measure. Let's take a look at the very last chord in the first place, and that is C major chord. And simply, again, we are going to hold this for four counts, 1234. So the last line, but holy trust in Jesus name is going to sound like this. 12341234. Great. So let's have you practice this together with me. Ready? 123412341234, credit. So now you are able to play the entire verse cornerstone. 29. Playing Entire Verse in Rhythm: So let's play that entire verse of Cornerstone from the very beginning. Ready? 123434341234123412341234123 For 34. Great. So now I'm going to walk you through what I just did from the very beginning. So C major chord for four counts, 1234, again, C major chord for four counts, or the length of a whole note, 1, 2, 3, 4. Then Jesus blood, F-Major chord for four counts or a whole note length 1, 2, 3, 4, and righteousness. G major chord for four counts, 1234. I dare not a minor chord for four counts or for the length of a whole note. 34. And then at the sweetest frame, G major chord, 1234. And then here comes the half note lengths chords for two counts, 12, and then G-Major for two counts again. And then finally back to C major for four counts, 1234. So now that you are able to play the entire verse together, Let's practice a few times together with the metronome with counting from the very beginning. 123131234123412341234. Great. And now I'm going to keep the metronome on and then sing along and playing together to cornerstone. So you can also play along as I seen, to cornerstone, to three. Again, when two, with grace. So I moved on diverse too, but it is exactly the same chords as verse 1. So you can keep on playing the same courts. So great job. So now you are able to play the verse of hostile. 30. Playing the Chorus in Rhythm {Part 1}: So let's move on to playing the chorus of Cornerstone and the McCoys. We are going to have courts that are both length of whole notes and half notes. So let's give it a shot. I'll start out with the demonstration. Here. Is gray. So did you notice that I helped some of the courts longer than the others? Well, in the beginning, I held it for two counts each, or two quarter notes each. So I was playing the chords and the length of half notes. So let's take a closer look at the first line. Christ alone, cornerstone. So the first chord, which is a F-major corn, is going to be held for the length of half note. So for 2D curve. So then notice that the F is written exactly above that L. So when I say a loan, then you can play the F-Major chord. Cost. Yeah, exactly right there are my time. Christ. That's it. Great. So we are going to hold it for two counts, meaning it's going to be helpful to count just like this curve. So what for t clicks? You can hold the F-Major chord ready. Caused. Great. So after two weeks we are moving on to a minor. So it will sound like this curve. So let's do it together. First from F-major, rarely, and that's it. And then on stone, we are moving to the G major chord. So I'll demonstrate rarely n cost. So let's do it together this time. Ready and Christ. And for those of you who would like to play a little flower, I'll do that this time. Ready and go one more time. Great. So on Week made strong, we're going to play the C major chord. So the chord progression is going to be F major, a minor, G major, and then back to C major. All right, ready? And Christ? Minor, C major. That set. So now we can play the first line of the chorus. 31. Playing Cornerstone's Chorus in Rhythm {Part 2}: All right, great job so far. So now let's move on to the second line of the course. I will start out with the demonstration from the very beginning of the course. So as you can see, that the order of the cords or the gourd progression is exactly the same. So it's repeating. A minor G, C, a minor G, C. So that's always great when the courts are repeating because we can do the same thing. So let's start from week made strong at the strong where we're going to start out with the F-Major chord again. And we are going to hold the F-Major chord four to count, just like in the beginning. Ready week. And then a minor for two pounds illness. And then G-Major for two pounds. So one more time, little bit slower this time, we may use more gray. So let's do the whole, entire two lines to gather. So without singing, It's going to be major minor, G major, C major, and that do major, a minor major. So let's do that without singing. First, reading. Ready, and major minor, major, major, minor major gray. So now let's play along to the singing. Ready. Great job. So you can put this video on pause and to practice this chord progression. And you can also put this last section on rekey and T play along and practice. Great job so far. 32. Playing the Whole Chorus in Rhythm : All right, so let's play until the very end of the course. And thankfully, we are going to repeat the exact same court again. F, a minor key, C, all the way till the end. So I'll start out with the demonstration of the entire course. So we are repeating the a minor key, C chord progression again, except there is one small difference. And that is that the G chord and the C chord at the very end are going to be held for whole note length instead of half-note links. So He is Lord, Lord of all. We are going to hold the G-Major Cohen. He is a lord. 2, 3, 4. You see that I am holding it for four clicks. G-major 2, 3, 4, and then C major to foil. So I'm going to concentrate on the last line. Through the storm. He is lower, lower on that part. So let's do the very last line through. So the F-measure is held for T-account. Is the a minor also for two pounds, and then the G-Major for four counts, 1234, and back to C major for four counts, again, 123. So let's play the last line together with counting only Ready? One, 234 major, a minor, or major for forecast 2, 3, 4, and then C major for 234 again. And again for counts. Great, So we're seeing, it's going to sound like this through the great jazz. Now you can play the verse and chorus of Cornerstone using both half notes and whole notes. 33. Playing the Whole Song with Both Hands: So the next challenge is going to be being able to play Cornerstone with accounting in mind from the very beginning with both hands. So are you ready for the challenge? Let's give it a shot. I'll start out with a demonstration. So in the verse we start out with a C major chord. And remember that I was going to play the C note with my left hand, right here. All right. One, 234234, again, 1234. And then F-major 2, 3, 4, and G-Major 2, 3 4 and A-Minor 2, 3 4 and G-Major 2, 3, 4, 1, 2 and 4, 1, 2, 3, 4. So that was the verse. And I will also demonstrate the chorus. 123424242341234. 344 counts 2344 pounds, 234. That. So let's play together a little bit slower. And I will see, and I would like you to try counting along. And I'm going to put on the metronome at 58 BPM. So let's begin from the beginning, 1234. And then moving out likewise, ready? Great. Now we are able to save both servers and the core half corner cell. So feel free to pause the video and practice along for the media.