Wilderness Photography: Jumpstart into a Wild Art

Paul Hassell, Pro Wilderness Photographer

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44 Lessons (2h 16m)
    • 1. Trailer

      4:28
    • 2. Welome to Jumpstart - What's the Point?

      0:24
    • 3. Preview of Camera Class (morning session)

      2:19
    • 4. Demo of the f/22 Principle

      2:40
    • 5. What is it? Eye, Mind, and Heart

      3:42
    • 6. Aperture

      3:22
    • 7. Shutter Speed

      6:58
    • 8. Exposure

      4:38
    • 9. Demo of Exposure

      4:15
    • 10. Modes (Aperture Priority)

      2:12
    • 11. Depth of Field (1 of 3)

      4:52
    • 12. Depth of Field (2 of 3)

      5:21
    • 13. Depth of Field (3 of 3)

      4:30
    • 14. Exposure Compensation

      6:02
    • 15. ISO (1 of 2)

      5:35
    • 16. ISO (2 of 2)

      0:58
    • 17. WB (1 of 3)

      3:54
    • 18. WB (2 of 3)

      6:01
    • 19. WB (3 of 3)

      1:15
    • 20. Bonus: JPEG vs RAW

      2:50
    • 21. GET OUTSIDE (assignment 1 of 4) - Shoot in Aperture Priority Mode

      1:27
    • 22. LIGHT - Intro (afternoon session)

      1:37
    • 23. LIGHT - Quality

      3:54
    • 24. LIGHT - Direction

      4:05
    • 25. LIGHT - Color

      1:28
    • 26. Subtraction

      1:12
    • 27. Composition (1 of 3) - Thirds

      6:31
    • 28. Composition (2 of 3) - Tangent about Aperture

      1:39
    • 29. Composition (3 of 3) - Lines / Movement

      2:57
    • 30. GET OUTSIDE (assignment 2 of 4) - Incorporate Principles of Composition

      1:45
    • 31. Image Vibration

      3:05
    • 32. Indoor Light

      3:59
    • 33. Sunny Days - Making the Most of It!

      1:07
    • 34. Sunny Days - Shoot in the Shade

      1:51
    • 35. Sunny Days - Fill Flash

      1:47
    • 36. Sunny Days - Reflected Light

      0:43
    • 37. Sunsets

      5:29
    • 38. Flash

      4:01
    • 39. Explore - Window Light

      1:29
    • 40. Explore - Macro

      0:45
    • 41. Explore - Telephoto

      1:04
    • 42. GET OUTSIDE (assignment 3 of 4) - Reveiw Your Work, then Re-shoot!

      1:05
    • 43. Review and Conclusion

      19_PPT_35_Review.jpg
      3:31
    • 44. BEHIND THE SCREEN (assignment 4 of 4) - Edit down to 10!

      2:49

Project Description

Create a Portfolio of 10 Wilderness Images from Your Backyard

CAMERA CLASS

  1. Create images of your backyard landscape in Aperture Priority

    After this first unit, you are fully equipped to begin creating artistic images from your backyard. You are to shoot several images of the exact same scene while changing your perspective and toggling your aperture (f/stop number) from f/4 - f/22 and noticing the difference. Be sure that your camera is anchored down solid, ideally on a tripod during those f/22 shots. Otherwise, there could be some image blurriness as a result.

PHOTOGRAPHY

  1. Incorporate the principles of composition you just learned

    Now that you have some principle of composition under you belt, begin to craft your backyard compositions while keeping in mind the rule of thirds, leading lines, and movement within the frame. After making an image, ask yourself if there is anything that can be "subtracted" from the frame. Then, move in closer or zoom your lens such that the unnecessary elements are removed.

PROBLEM SOLVING

  1. Review your work through the lens of this unit. Then re-shoot.

    With a solid grasp on the common problems encountered, go back through your images made during the first two units and begin to diagnose what errors you made. You have everything you need in this unit to interpret where your images fell short of excellent and why. Then, launch into your backyard again and continue with the image-making process.

    Do not rush this. Take a full weeks if you need to. Also, don't let the process drag on forever. If two months have passed, you may need to move on to the final step. Too much time passing without actively honing your newly acquired knowledge can dull your skills.

    Have fun!

  2. Edit your images down to 10

    Yes, edit your images down to just your 10 best.

    If you do not have 200-300 images (at least) to choose from, then continue to make images until you do. Many of you have already made 2,000-3,000 images. It's digital, so it's free. Why not shoot a lot. Hopefully, you have not been erasing any images.

    The best rule to keep in mind with selecting your best 10 is this: Does an image evoke an immediate response in you (or a family member looking on). If not, then it is probably a "blah" image. Omit that one from your top 10.

    Also, if you have 2 or 3 images in your top 10 that are very similar in lighting or subject matter, narrow that set down to just one. Editing vigorously is king in creating a dynamic and polished portfolio.

Student Projects

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Paul Hassell
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