Watercolour Pencils for Beginners: An Introduction to The Magical World of Watercolour Pencils | Imran Mughal | Skillshare

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Watercolour Pencils for Beginners: An Introduction to The Magical World of Watercolour Pencils

teacher avatar Imran Mughal, Graphic Designer & Illustrator

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

37 Lessons (3h 58m)
    • 1. Introduction

      2:33
    • 2. What are Watercolour Pencils?

      2:41
    • 3. Class Supplies

      8:13
    • 4. Application of Colour

      4:54
    • 5. Dry Mixing

      6:17
    • 6. Wet Mixing

      6:11
    • 7. Draw on Wet

      4:31
    • 8. Grinding Pigment

      8:08
    • 9. Pressure Variance

      8:13
    • 10. Brush and Spray

      8:33
    • 11. Basic Colour Mixing

      9:07
    • 12. Transparency and Layers

      9:48
    • 13. Interaction with Mediums

      9:57
    • 14. Adding Watercolour

      9:46
    • 15. Reviewing Results

      5:58
    • 16. Colour Swatching

      1:17
    • 17. Full Sketch

      2:33
    • 18. Pencil Outline

      7:27
    • 19. Adding Dry Colour

      9:24
    • 20. House Colour

      8:37
    • 21. Boat Colour

      7:33
    • 22. Final Dry Colour

      3:54
    • 23. Adding Water

      9:37
    • 24. Merging Colours

      8:00
    • 25. Vibrant Tones

      9:54
    • 26. Foreground Tones

      3:56
    • 27. Delicate Details

      5:57
    • 28. Speckled Colour

      6:25
    • 29. Lifting Darker Shades

      3:41
    • 30. Adding Interest

      8:15
    • 31. Hints of Warm Grey

      7:06
    • 32. Inking Stage

      7:31
    • 33. Hatching Lines

      8:15
    • 34. Final Dark Lines

      2:14
    • 35. Highlights

      8:25
    • 36. Class Project

      1:29
    • 37. Final Thoughts

      2:08
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About This Class

Heard of watercolour pencils? Not sure how to use them? Can’t seem to get the results you need?

If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then this class: Watercolour Pencils for Beginners is perfect for you!!!

This class is aimed at beginners and anyone else who wants to delve into the wonderful world of watercolour pencils.

We will start the class by covering the basics of what watercolour pencils are, the supplies that you need for the class exercises and then work towards some exciting techniques to produce varied and gorgeous results.

 We will look at:

  • The different methods of colour application
  • Dry and wet colour mixing
  • Drawing in different sequences to produce interesting results
  • Using various tools and techniques to achieve a range of textures and effects

 We will also look at:

  • Basic colour mixing
  • Transparency and layers
  • Colour swatching
  • And testing interactions with other mediums

We will then bring all the techniques together in a beautiful full sketch for you to follow step-by-step.

On completing the exercises within the lessons and full sketch, you will be ready to start your class project and begin your exciting adventures in this magical world of watercolour pencils.

This class will give you the direction, basic knowledge and confidence for you to be able to quickly get started in sketching with watercolour pencils.

If you need a refresh on general watercolour principles that can be applied to watercolour pencils, then have a look at my previous class: watercolour sketching for beginners before you start this class to give you a more in-depth review of brushes, surfaces, and application methods.

All materials used and demonstrated will be explained and links will be provided in the resource pack to enable easy access if required.

Please note that currently the resource pack can only be downloaded via a desktop or laptop computer and not on the Skillshare mobile app (correct as of December 2021)

My name is Imran Mughal, and I’m a graphic designer, illustrator and artist and am totally obsessed with art and art materials! You can get in touch with me through Skillshare and on my social media channels and can ask me any question you like on this class.

So sit back, relax, and lets get started!

SketchingFineArt Instagram

SketchingFineArt YouTube channel

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Imran Mughal

Graphic Designer & Illustrator

Teacher

I'm Imran - graphic designer & illustrator based in the UK. I have over 10 years experience in the field of graphic design and illustration in both traditional and digital output and absolutely love all things to do with art!

In addition to my full-time graphic designer role, I am also the art wellbeing lead for my organisation where I deliver wellbeing classes and advocate mindful colouring to relax and de-stress - check out my published colouring books for adults: https://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B084RXHLFN

In addition to my design & illustration life, I am an active father of 3, oh and I'm naturally addicted to coffee! My illustration classes are all about getting back to basics mainly with traditional mediums and escaping away to relax with art!

I love to ... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hello and welcome to my class, watercolor pencils for beginners. Heard of watercolor pencils before? Already got them but don't know how to use them? Or you've not used them for a while? If the answer to any of these questions is yes, then this class is perfect for you. My name is Imran, I'm a Graphic Designer and Illustrator, and this class is an introduction into the wonderful, magical world of watercolor pencils. We will start off this class by covering the basics of what watercolor pencils are, the supplies that you need for the class exercises, and then work towards some exciting techniques to produce varied and gorgeous results with these awesome pencils. We will be looking at the different methods of application, dry and wet color mixing, drawing in different sequences to produce interesting results, using various tools and techniques to achieve a range of textures and effects. We'll also be looking at basic color mixing, transparency and layers, color swatching, and testing interactions with other mediums. We will then bring all the techniques together in a beautiful full sketch that you can follow step-by-step. On completion of the exercises within the lessons of this class and following the step-by-step sketch, you will be ready to start your wonderful class project and begin your exciting adventures in this magical world of watercolor pencils. If you're an absolute beginner in the field of watercolor, then it may be a good idea for you to have a look at my watercolor sketching for beginners class, just to get to grips with the techniques and the basics of materials and how to apply watercolor, and this will help you in the application of watercolor pencils in this class. What are you waiting for? Grab yourself a nice drink, get yourself a nice cake, sit back, relax, and let's get started with this class. 2. What are Watercolour Pencils?: Welcome back. Let's now start off the class by discussing what are watercolor pencils. Watercolor pencils look just like standard normal colored pencils. However, the difference is within the color barrel that's inside the wood casing. This color barrel contains pigment and a binder to hold it together just like an ordinary colored pencil. But the major difference in it is that it's water-soluble, which means that it will dissolve in water. You can get many different brands of watercolored pencils, but the quality will differ from brand to brand. I would suggest that if you haven't already got your watercolor pencils, then go for a brand that's more established rather than going for a store-only brand. The reason for that is that they will produce a more saturated color. You will have much more of cleaner results and just overall, you will have a better experience using your watercolor pencils. The brand that I'm going to be using throughout this class is Faber-Castell. This is the brand that I've been using for a very long time. It's absolutely solid and I highly recommend it. You can also use other brands, such as Caran d'Ache, Prismacolor, Stylepler, just to mention a few. Just use a brand that's available that you can get in your local stores. But just make sure that it is a reputable brand and that the actual colored pencils themselves have a decent rating from other reviews. One of the most important characteristics of watercolor pencils is that the color when it's completely dried after it's been activated by water will become completely permanent. This is vital when you want to create layers of colors and achieve building values, stages by stages, to produce that gorgeous watercolor effect. Finally, watercolor pencils should be used on watercolor paper. I cannot stress this more because if you use your watercolored pencils just on normal paper, you may think, oh, these are working fine. But then when you go ahead and add that water, you are going to have a huge monstrous result. Start off with watercolor paper. Get yourself some decent quality watercolor paper. Try getting 300 GSM, which is the equivalent of 140 pounds, and you'll be good to go. That's it for the basic introduction of what watercolor pencils are. Let's now move on to the class supplies. 3. Class Supplies: Okey-dokey, welcome back. Let's now go through some of the class supplies that you will need to complete this class and follow along in the exercises within each lesson. For this class, you will need the following. Number one, a set of watercolor pencils. This can be any size, size 12, 24, 36, or even a huge 120 box of color sets of watercolor pencils. It makes no difference as long as you have a decent set that contains the primary colors, you're good to go. Any size of watercolor pencils set will do. You also need a sharpener because obviously, these are pencils and you're going to have to sharpen them. Use a good quality sharpener. If you already are accustomed to using a blade or a knife to sharpen your pencils, then you can go ahead and do that. But if you're not used to doing this, then I recommend that you don't do this option because we don't want you to get injured. Stick to a standard pencil sharpener that is a good quality one. Again, please note that all of the supplies that I go through in this class will be listed in the resource pack for you to have a look at and read up on the reviews. Do check that out if you're unsure. The brand of colored pencils will just depend on your own personal choice. As I mentioned in the previous lesson, go for a brand that is well established like the one that I'm using, the Faber-Castell or go for Caran d'Ache Luminance or Prismacolor or Staedtler or any other well established brand. Avoid using cheap watercolor pencils that are stores own brand because you just won't get that effect and experience with them. If you already have a set of watercolor pencils, then there's no need to get anymore. Just use the ones that you have to follow the lessons in this class. Number two, you will be needing some watercolor paper. With watercolor paper, there are a couple of options. You can buy watercolor paper as individual sheets, you can buy them in a pad that's glued on the top where you can remove each sheet out. You can also buy watercolor blocks and this is my go-to options because with the watercolor blocks, they're glued on all four sides and you don't have to worry about taping each corner down. If you go for the single sheet or a pad of watercolor paper, then you most likely going to have to tape it down on all four corners to avoid it from bubbling and buckling away, that will ruin the flow of your watercolor. So that's entirely up to you. If you've already got a book pad of watercolor paper, just go ahead and use that. Maybe tape it down with some masking tape or some washi tape on each corner and just put it on a board or on a hard surface and you'll be good to go. You also have three main options with watercolor paper, you get a hot pressed, a cold pressed or a rough surface. The hot pressed has the smoothest surface where you can get a lot of nice details without having any bumps and grinds on it. The cold pressed is the medium texture and then the rough surface is the maximum heavy texture. I personally use hot pressed and cold pressed and I will probably be using hot pressed throughout this class. But this is just a preference of mine, you can use which ever paper you want. I would recommend to go for the hot or cold pressed when you're using your watercolor pencils, avoid using the rough surface because you're just going to get a lot gaps when you apply your watercolor, dry with the pencil. Number three, you're going to need a pot or a jar that you can hold water in because obviously, you need water for watercolor pencils. I would recommend that you go for two jars that you have water in, where you have one for muddy water and one for clean water. However, if you don't have this at hand, then that's not a problem, just use one jar of water and just make sure that you rinse your brush thoroughly in between swatches of color. Going on to number four and yes, we need a watercolor brush. I would recommend just using any watercolor brush that you have, but just make sure that it is thick enough to be able to spread the paint. I would rather go for synthetic brushes with watercolor pencils because we're not really creating strokes using pure watercolor, we're laying down the watercolor before we add the strokes with a brush. So personally, I always prefer to use synthetic brushes. But if you have natural hair brushes, then go ahead and use that, it's entirely up to you. The main brush that I'm going to be using throughout this class is going to be my Number eight Silver Black Velvet brush and I think that works great. It's entirely up to you, which brush you want to use. Just make sure it's a watercolor brush rather than a heavy duty acrylic brush or anything different because you will get much better experience using watercolor brushes. Number five, you will need a pencil for doing some light sketching work. Just use a standard pencil, a HB or a 2B, whichever one you have lying down, you don't need a super specific pencil. I would avoid using the pencils that have darker tones of lead in them, so 4B and above, I would avoid using them because they'll just end up getting in the way and you may end up getting smudges. Number six, I would recommend having a fineliner or if you have a fountain pen then using black ink and that is for the outlining stages of the class when we come to do our full sketch. However, if you don't have a fineliner or black ink, you can also use a black colored pencil if you have that available. It's not a necessity, however to have a complete sketched look, it would be really good if you use a fineliner in this class. Again, if you don't have one, just use a black ballpoint pen or a gel pen or whatever black ink that you have available. Finally, have some paper towels at hand because we're going to be using watercolor and you're going to have liquid that may be spray all over the place so you may spill it, so it's always good to have a paper towel at hand or just a box of tissues. Now, these next items are completely optional but it would be good if you have them already. The first one is waterproof ink. Now if you've got a fountain pen, I would highly recommend that you use waterproof ink in your fountain pen because we're using watercolor and you'll see later on in the lessons, this comes really handy when we're using this with watercolor pencils. Empty water bottle spray. Now these are absolutely brilliant for producing gorgeous effect using watercolor. If you have one of these handy, then absolutely keep it to the side, ready for this class. There will be a section where we test out water bottle sprays with our watercolor pencils. White paint markers. Now, if you have paint markers like POSCA paint markers or even gel pens that are white, these are going to be brilliant for when we come to add our finishing touches to our sketches that we do in the lessons. If you have these at hand, these are great. You don't need to go out and buy them specifically for this class. But if you have them, just have them ready for doing the lessons and especially the full sketch when we come to it. As mentioned earlier, if you're used to or accustomed to using a blade to sharpen your pencils, this would be really handy to have at hand because you can do some really nice techniques with watercolor pencils using a sharp blade. Alternatively, if you just have some scissors handy, then you can go ahead and use the scissors. But if you're not used to using a sharp blade when you're doing your artwork, then I would say just don't bother using it at all. I don't want you to get injured because that's not what this class is about. This class is about enjoying yourself and not getting injured. That's it, that's the overall class supply list. Do check out the resource pack where I go into a bit more detail of my recommended supply list and the basic supply list that you need for this class. So do have a look at that. We can now move on to the next one. 4. Application of Colour: Welcome back. Let's now look at some of the basic methods of applying our watercolor to our surface. Over here, I've got a nice blue color. This specific one is called helioblue reddish and the number is 151 if it's what you want to follow along with. All I've got here in front of me is my surface, which is the hot pressed watercolor block. I got a little bit of water in my jar and then I've got a nice brush that I use regularly. This specific one is called the Black Velvet, number 8 brush, but you can use any brush that you're comfortable with and let's get started. The first method is basically the easiest method of application, and that is to just go ahead and just apply straight onto the paper. I'm going to get a bit of a zoom in on this so you can see a bit more clearer. Let's just move this to the side here. What I'm going to basically do is, I'm just going to apply the color as it is, with normal pressure, a nice little swatch, and that's basically it. You're just effectively just coloring in or applying the dry medium to the watercolor paper or whichever surface that you're using, and that's it. Once you've done that, the next step is to add the water to activate it. I'm just going to get me brush, just going to go into the water. You don't need to over saturate your brush with water, just dab it in like this so that you've got a nice bit of water there. Then it's just a case of placing your brush over that pigment, and just use light strokes to wet that beautiful dry color, and you can see it's just melting away. Look at that. Look how gorgeous that's it. It's like magic, isn't it? Just like magic, that dry medium has become beautiful liquid watercolor, and that's it. That's the first method. We're going to delve much more deeper into these methods and complete some more intricate exercises, so I thought it was best to just go through the basics of actually applying this watercolor. That was the first method where we're just doing the color on paper dry and then wetting it with a wet brush. Let's look at the second option. The second option is to just use the actual pigment from the tip of the pencil itself. What I mean by that is if you get your watercolor brush and you just add some water to it like this, so just give it a nice little drench in water, smooth that to the side, I'll bring this closer to the camera, all you need to do is just wet the tip of the pencil where you've got that beautiful, gorgeous color pigment. What you're effectively doing is, you're just taking the pigment and the color from the tip and just loading your brush with it. This is really like using normal watercolors where you have the pans and you're just using the wet brush to take the color from the pans. Now, I've taken a little bit of color. All I'm doing is I'm just twisting this brush to get that pigment going on those bristles of that brush as much as I can and then I'm just going to go in. You can see there, just applying that color, and you can see you've got a gorgeous swatch of color there. It's the same color that we're using before. That's the second method. With the intensity, it depends on how much of the actual pigment you takeoff, but again, we're going to delve into intensity and color and pressure of using your brush in the coming lessons. Let's move on to the final method. The final method is basically using color that you've already taken off and made wet and applying that color onto the surface. Let's just move this to the side and let's just do a little bit of a [NOISE] clean of our brush, so we've got nice clean brush that we've got no pigment on there. We can actually demonstrate this with what we've already got here. You can see, on that first swatch, we still got wet paint over there, so we've got wet pigment there. All I mean by this is you just take that wet pigment from that first swatch, dub you brush into it, and then bring it over here, and you can see you've got this really nice pastel light swatch of color. That was the third method. We've got three nice simple methods of just applying our watercolor from our watercolor pencils using a brush and normal water, and that's the basis of what we're going to be doing when we go into the amazing exercises that are coming next. Now, let's move on to the next one. 5. Dry Mixing: Welcome back. Let's now look at some mixing techniques. Firstly, I want to go through a dry mixing exercise. What I want you to do is get yourself a nice bits of clean paper that we can work with. I'm just going to work straight underneath what we did in our previous lesson, which was the different methods of application. We're just going to move this up a little. For this, what we're going to do is we're going to use some colors to come up with mixed colors on our actual surface. Let's just select a couple of colors here. I think I'll go for a nice green color. We've got some green and maybe use a little bit of blue. We've got a nice blue shade here and then possibly some yellow, so let's go for yellow. We've got some nice colors here. We've just got green, blue, and a yellow. What I want you to do is just get your color and apply it like we did in the first method, where we just went straight in onto the paper, apply it onto the actual paper itself. Just do a nice swatch of color over here with the green. Now you may have a different green from me or you might not even have a green at all, but whatever color you have, just apply it to the paper. It'd be nice if you do have a shade of green because that way we can get similar results when we did this exercise. There we go, just a nice bit of dry swatch there. Then what I'm going to do is I'm going to use the yellow and with the yellow, I'm just going to put a swatch of that yellow right next to that green with a little bit of gap, trying to keep it very similar. This is basically going to be a dry mixing exercise of these swatches. We've got swatch one green, swatch two yellow. Then what I'm going to do is I'm going to add in my blue color straight on top of this. I'm going to add a layer of the blue on top. You can see, as I'm adding that layer, I'll just get the [inaudible] zoom in for you so you can see this a bit better. As I'm adding that blue on top of that green, it's intensifying the color, as it says. It's just like using a normal colored pencil when you're mixing colors to get a third shade. Now we've got that lovely blue on top of the green, and overhead we've got the blue going on top of the yellow, and that should produce our secondary color of a shade of green. Just adding in a similar amount of pigment with the same amount of pressure and that's about it. What we're going to do now is we're just going to move them pencils to the side. Let's get our brushy brush. Make sure your brush is nice and clean. Use two jars of water if you have them. If you have only one jar of water, it's fine. Just make sure that you give it a good rinse. Then we can go on and do this exercise. We've got nice bits of water on our brush and all I'm going to do is going to add in that water on top of that color. You can see you've got this beautiful turquoise green color that we've achieved by just adding two colors on a dry mix onto the surface. Just like that, it's so easy to create third colors if you only have a limited number of colors in your actual set. You can just go ahead and experiment. Again, I'm just going to go in, we're going to do a bit of a rinsy rinse. Then go in and do exactly the same here, and you can see those two colors blending onto that paper and it's just all melting away together, jailing away together to produce that third color. Now, you might think, Oh, that's not very nice color, I don't like that. But the whole point is to experiment with the colors that you actually got. We've got two new colors effectively that we've created with our three basic colors. Now if you want to compare and contrast, you can do that as well. If we just maybe do a swatch of the blue here, just do a small little swatch of the blue, the small swatch of the green, and just a little swatch of the yellow. You'll be able to see and compare these new colors that we've quickly created. Again, just a nice little rinsy rinse on that. We'll just go in, just add in that water to come up with that color. You can see we've got that blue there, nice intense blue. Then wash the brush again. Go into the green, so that's the pure green that we've got. Then again, wash the brush. Then we'll go in on to that yellow, and there you go. We've got our basic colors here. You can see that's the pure colors that we had and then we created 1, 2 beautiful secondary colors. That's just the dry mixing method. What I want you to do is try this out with as many colors as you have in your actual set, just to get a bit of an idea of what you can produce. Now, you can use a little bit of color theory if you want. You can check in the actual resource pack where I've provided you with a chart of how to mix colors to produce the specific secondary or tertiary colors that you want. Again, a lot of this was covered in the basic water color class C. If you haven't checked that out, then go and have a look at that. We won't cover all those basics of actual watercolor specifics in this class, we're just going to focus on how to actually use these watercolor pencils. If you haven't tried that class before, or you want to learn a little bit more about watercolor techniques that you can apply in this class then I do recommend that you check that class out. It's quite a long in-depth class, but I go through a lot of the basics of what you need to know that you can apply in this class. That was it for the dry mixing. Let's now move on to the next one. 6. Wet Mixing: Welcome back. Let's now look at wet color mixing. Previously we did some dry color mixing by just adding the pigment straight on, mixing the colors straight onto the actual surface, then adding the water. Now what we're going to do is something a little bit different. We're going to do wet color mixing. I've got two different colors here, I've got a nice red and a nice blue. What I'll do is I'm just going to go in and do a color swatch close to this dry mixing that we did so we can compare and contrast. I'm just going to add in the actual color just like this like I did before. Again, just adding in a dry swatch of color. This method is really nice, especially if you want to achieve very light pastel-like results. But again, it all depends on how much color you're using. I've added a red and I quickly and the blue. There we go, nice and easy. Two beautiful swatches of color. Let's now just clean up our brush. What we need to do with this is work a little bit fast because this depends on how wet your color is, because the color will dry out eventually depending on the humidity of your room. What I'm going to do is I'm going to quickly go in with my water. I'm just going to wet that color to melt away. We've got a nice bit of color here and then I'm going to go in, give it clean and do the same for the blue and you've got these really nice red and blue swatches of color right on the page. Now, what we need to do now is just go and clean your brush and what we'll do is move this to the side and I'll get a bit of a zoomy zoom so you can see this a bit better and you can see here that the color is still wet. What we're going to do here is we're just going to pick up some of that red by just dabbing our brush into the color, into that pool of mixed color, and bringing it on over here. We've got that nice bits of red there and then I'm going to go in, clean my brush to make sure I have nice clean swatch of color for the next one, and go in again with that wet brush onto that pool of blue color. I'm just going to bring it in over here and mix it. You can see we've got a more palish reddish type, purple-y color that's been created by just using the wet color that we already had on the page and this is what I mean by wet color mixing. Now what we did here was we actually added one color and then added the other color. We can go ahead and do another technique and just clean up brush again. We can actually go in and mix the actual colors onto themselves like this. If we mix the colors onto themselves, you'll see that you're getting a nice range of shades coming. You've got a nice purple-y, darkish purple-y there, you've got a bit more of a red, and it's just a case of mixing your brush from one color to the other to get a range of color. Then lifting that color onto the other side of the page and you've got yourself another shade of purple. That's how easy it is. It's so easy and quick to just come up with different shades but the only thing is that you do have to work quickly because the watercolor will dry. But generally speaking, you do have a couple of minutes to do this. I'm going to recommend that you try this out. It's quite a lot fun. I'm just going to go in and maybe just take a little bit more color from this blue color that we've got the other mixing effects going on there and maybe add a little shade there. You can see we've got a third or fourth shade coming there. It's very different from there. You've got this more reddish tone here and you've got a bluish tone, all different tones of purple, blue, and red. They look absolutely fantastic. You can go ahead and carry on and mix the color directly onto the paper to just come up with a variance of colors and you've done that. We've basically got 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 already just from two colors, and how quick and easy was that. If we go in and maybe just clean our brush and let's just complete this and just take this more reddish color here at that little swatch there you can see we've got more of a red shade going on there. Just with your brush, just dab it in and just drop in a few more of those beautiful melted pigments into that color. It's looking good. Then take that color and bring that across here so you've got duplicate of this color on this side. Just bring down your screen a bit better, just do a bit of a zoom it back so that you don't miss anything. You don't want to be missing anything in these wonderful classes. Let's just do that there. Then I'm just going to maybe add a bit of that blue answer onto this to just slightly change the tint of that color and you can see we produced some beautiful results. You can see with the two colors that we had here, these two colors we've got the blue and the red, we've been able to produce 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8, wonderful, lovely tones of variants. That was the wet mixing technique. Try that out, just do a zoom back and then you can compare and contrast what the results are like once they're completely dry because they will look different. Some will look a bit more intense, where you've got the dry color mixing. When you tend to do the wet color mixing, you have more pustule, more lighter shades of dried color. Do experiment with that and we can now move on to the next one. 7. Draw on Wet: Welcome back. Let's now look at another technique of using our watercolor pencils. Just move this a little bit higher on the screen. I'm going to use the same color that I used in the first lesson, the hellish reddish blue, beautiful color that one. But this technique I'm calling this drawing on wet. Basically with this, all we need to do is we need to start off by getting our brush and getting some clean water. Just make sure that the water that you use is clean. I've just replaced the water that I had before and just laying down a little bit of clean water on the watercolor paper. It can be a little bit difficult to figure out where your water is on the watercolor paper, so do bear that in mind. Maybe just go in with a couple of swatches of just clean water on that paper and that's about it. Let's get the zoom in on this. You can see this a bit better. I've got my clean water in this area here within this vicinity. All I'm going to do is I'm just going to use my pencil and just go over that water to draw in some of these wines. You can see, as I'm drawing this end, instead of it being a dry pencil stroke of color, it's effectively dispersing and melting away into that water, and it gives you a bit of an ink effect. It looks like I'm drawing with a nice thick ink tip. This is really nice to do in your watercolor drawings and illustrations just to give a bit of variance and make it look a bit interesting. It can be quite a fun little exercise. Do try this out. That's all it is. Now you can build onto this by maybe adding in some details of the bottom here. I'm just doing this small little house with some details at the front. Then what you can do is just go in on the back add in a couple of light strokes, and then we'll bring in the watercolor brush. Now with the watercolor brush, just give it a little load of water. You can see this is effectively a wet-on-wet technique. I go through the wet-on-wet technique in my watercolor class for beginners in my other class, so if that's something you want to look at into more detail, then do check that out it's covered in a lot more depth. All we're doing is just adding speckles of water over these lines that we don't and you can see it's melting away and giving us a nice effect when we're doing our illustration. It's very different from the dry technique where we just adding in the dry pigment and then going over with water. Well, this is just giving you a nice wet look, and it can really work well in a lot of illustrations. You can say I'm just barely dragging that pigment across and it's just giving me that gorgeous pastel light color and is looking rather nice, isn't it? [LAUGHTER] Again, you can just work on this with the pencil again as it's wet. Maybe just adding a couple of lines like this, come up with some elements here. Just do a bit scribble, coordinate across and it looks so nice and vibrant. How easy was that? What I might do is I might just maybe do a couple of lines here and then maybe add in some details down here. For this exercise, all I want you to do is just practice with the pencil on wet watercolor paper and that's all it says. That's pretty much it for this one. I'm just going to add in a bit more details. You know what I'm like once I get started, I don't stop but just want to keep [LAUGHTER] adding more details. You can just keep building on this as much as you like as I said before, while the water is wet, you'll be able to get this really nice inky effect. You probably wouldn't even be able to tell that you did this with a watercolor pencil. It might be with another medium that just has blue ink in it, but I really like this look. Do give this one a go, try it out with different colors, maybe adding a little bit of green. Let's see if it got some green here. Just maybe adding some green elements down here. Just adding that variant and make it look a little bit interesting. You can just keep going on and on until we you something that you really like. Just a bit more color there, I think we'll leave it at that. Let's move on to the next one. 8. Grinding Pigment: Welcome back. Let's now look at another method of actually applying our watercolor pencils. We'll just move the previous exercise above here. Nice bit of clean paper. This is basically using your watercolor pencil and just grinding the pigment straight from the tip. Let's choose a nice color here. We've got this gorgeous red over here. This particular red is called dark red. Oh, there we go. Dark red. What I mean by this is just using the pigment and just grinding particles of that pigment straight onto the paper or into a little dish, or maybe a watercolor paint palette, and using that pigment effectively as your watercolor medium. Let's go ahead and do this. Let's just get our self may be something to put this in. This is just a lid from the jar of water that I'm using. I'm just going to use that, just for this demonstration here. Let's just place this on the page, and to grind the actual pigment from the tip, you need something sharp, so I've got this blade, knife, that have this craft knife. Do be careful when you do this. If you're not used to using a knife then, don't bother doing this at all. Maybe just use some sharpenings that you've got from a sharpener that you've used to sharpen this pencil. But this is not a necessary kind of method to go ahead and do. This is just something to give you a bit of an idea you can do with your watercolor pencils. All I'm going to do is, let's just get a bit of a zoomy zoom on this. You can see this a bit better. What I'll do is I'll do it on the paper first, I'm just using the blade hair, the sharp side of the blade at an angle. I'm just going to scrape that pigment. You can see the pigments falling off there. You're getting that pigment shaving going at the bottom and that's all it takes. Be very careful when you do this. If you decide to go ahead and do this, don't press hard with your knife or blade. I mean, you can even do this with the edge of a scissors. If you have a scissors at hand, just open the scissors or try it like that, but please be careful. Don't want you to injure yourself, and then you say, "Oh, that Imran, he told me to use some scissors and I've gone and injured myself." But, no, don't want you to do that. This is all about having a nice experience with watercolor pencils. Just very lightly, just scrape off that pigment and you can see we've got those pigment particles. I'm going to do the same and put some of the particles into my little holder here, and that's looking quite nice. Just a little bit, we don't need too much. We're not creating huge amounts of paint here to paint with. It's just a demonstration. What this can do is once we've got these shavings all done, it can produce a really nice varied stroke of watercolor, add a bit of texture and interest to your artwork. That's about it. Let's move that to the side and don't forget to cover up the blade if you're using a similar blade like me, keep it away, nice and safe. Now what we need to do is get our watercolor brush, a little bit of water. Make sure it's nice and clean so we have some gorgeous cleaned color. What I'll do is, I'll go in first into the actual dish itself. Just like that, I've added in my water and you can see I've got a nice pool of watercolor to work with. So effectively we've created liquid water that's ready to use. Now you can even do this on the paper like I've got over here and then use our third technique that we used in the first class where we used a wet and then use the wet paint to bring it over. You can see just there we've got that nice bit of wet going on. Now to create some variants in the actual strokes what we can do is you can just drag the actual color all the way across. You've got nice basic color there. Then what we can do is go in again, get our blade or our scissors or whatever we're using to do the grinding method and then just grind that pigment straight onto that strip of watercolor that we've got. Now this will work really well if you've got a lot of wet on your paper so that the actual color disperses and blends in, and you can see it creates that really nice speckled effect. You can use this to your advantage when you're creating your artwork or if you're giving some illustration work and you want some texture, it's really nice. If you're finding that the actual shavings are not melting away, so if I just get a zoomy zoom on this. No, that's a bit too much there, isn't it? Don't want to get blurry vision. Let's get that. That's better. You can see over here some of these actual speckles are melted into the water, some haven't. If I just touch with my finger, you can see I can actually go in and start creating a bit of a texture. You can create texture with your finger on to that watercolor paper and you've got this beautiful pattern, this gorgeous speckled effect in your watercolor illustrations. Now, that's all done with the watercolor pencil. How good is that? Now if you want to go ahead and maybe adding a little bit of water on top, we can go ahead and do that. Just with your watercolor brushes, give it a little clean and make sure that you've got some nice clean water, and maybe just add in a couple of dots on top of those speckles just to spread out that color to add even more interest to the actual effect that you're creating. You can see there that looks really nice. When you look at that, gorgeous that, isn't it? Never would have thought that this was all created with a pencil. Yes, indeed. Indeed we do right. I'm going to leave it that. I want you to try this out if you have a blade or if you have some scissors and you've done something similar before. If you haven't done this before and you're not that comfortable using a blade, then just use a sharpener. I could actually show you this on the other side. If we just move this on the other side, I've got my sharpener here. Just in case you're not very comfortable with the blade, what we'll do is, let's do this with another color. Maybe let's use a lovely green. I've got my sharpener here. You can see some of that pigment is coming off. You're also going to have the pencil shavings going there, but you've got a bit of that and grinding pigment, and this is probably the most safest way to do this. Just like that, tip it over onto your paper, and yes, you've got a few bits and bobs of your actual wood shavings. Now if you really bothered about that, maybe use the back of your brush and just move them away, if you really want to do that, or just use your finger to move them away. But the thing is that those wood shavings are not going to really interfere with the water because they are not soluble. I'm just going to move them away like this. Now you can see that we've got that nice and dust of green. Let's just go in again and maybe just use our watercolor brush to just dab. That's on. You can see you've got that gorgeous effect again. Just bringing it across, you've got this beautiful speckled green, gorgeous, vibrant green over here. There you go. Once that's all dry, all these kind of like them, little chips of wood pencil shavings, they'll just all fall off and it's going to look fantastic. Let's just get a zoomy zoom back on this. This was the grinding method where you grind of pigment to produce some interesting results, create some texture and variance in your work. Let's now move on to the next one. 9. Pressure Variance: Welcome back. Now, we're going to look at another technique of varying our pressure to produce darker and lighter tones of our watercolor from our watercolor pencil. Let's start with doing some darker tones first. For this, I'm going to use my favorite blue color, which you will all know by now is this [LAUGHTER] Reddish Helioblue color. What I'm going to do is I'm just going to basically do a swatch of color over here, and I'm going to go in fairly hard and heavy with the pigment. Pressure that I'm using is heavy pressure, and I'm using a lot of that pigment to fully cover this swatch that I'm making. In short, to get the most intense color, you use enough pigment. That's really the case with watercolor pencils. You've got to make sure that you lay down enough of that color before you go in with the water because that first layer of color is going to be your base color. That will be determined by how dark or light you go initially. You can see that we've got a really nice dark fully-saturated swatch of color. That's the heavy pressure, and it's fully saturated. Let's now move on to the next one. After this one, I'm just going to use medium pressure. I'm using half of the pressure that I used here. I'm just going in lighter, and I'm just going to fill in that swatch, not pressing down too hard. I don't want to be covering every area of the paper. Because if I do that, then it's going to get as saturated as this one, and it's effectively just doing a light layer. Then for the final one, all I'm going do is use a very light pressure. I'm going to ensure that I don't press down at all, and just keep that swatch really nice and light. With the lay down just of this dry pigment, you can see already we've got a lighter shade there, a medium tone there, and then a very heavy saturated tone there. What we're going to do now is we're just going to get our watercolor brush. [NOISE] Just give it a rinse, dip it into the water. You've got nice saturated brush. We're just going to go in, and we're going to paint over that swatch with the actual liquid water. Look at that. Gorgeous, isn't it? Look how beautiful that is. It's become ink, hasn't it? Beautiful blue ink. [LAUGHTER] There you go. We've got our intense saturated color down there. You can get a bit busy, it may seem, so you don't miss it. Don't want you to miss any of this because it's just amazing. We've got the most heavy pressure with the most saturated look there. Give your brush a clean. [NOISE] Clean it clean. Then just another dip inside there. Then again, going over the same color. Just like that, with the same amount of water that we used in the first one. You can see the water melts away that gorgeous color. Immediately, you can tell that we've got a complete different tone, and that's with the medium pressure. Then finally, with the lighter one. Again, [NOISE] give it a nice rinse. Then a little dip in there for the same amounts of water. Then we're going to do the same over here. Just lightly melt that color away into that beautiful inky water color, and we're looking great. Once this is all melted away, you can step back, and have a look. You can see, we've got three different tones of the same color that we used. We produced that variance by just changing the pressure, and that lay down all the saturation of that pigment that we used. How easy was that? Now, this is a huge advantage when you want to maybe add in a lighter background, where you just used a light amount of color. Then create that background color, or if you want to go in with a very nice saturated vibrant look, you can go in really heavily with the pigment. Then just add the same amount of water. Remember that we used the same amount of water on each one of these, so it's not the water content that created the difference. It was the lay down of color that created the difference. I think that's a really important point when you're using these watercolor pencils. The control really is with the pigment and color. The water can be used in more content or less to dilute the color. We will be doing some of these exercises later on in the class. But generally, as a basic principle, the more color you lay down, the darker and more saturated your results will be. Now, you can actually produce this variance by just using one of these heavier saturated layers of color. Let's just test this out over here. I'm going to do here is underneath here, I'm just going to go in with that color. I'm going to add in that heavy swatch like I did above here. Effectively, what we're going to do is we're going to go in, wet this, as we did with the one above. Instead of having to lay that color down with medium pressure and light pressure, we're just going to drag this color across the page and across the screen to see if we can produce that same variance or something similar. That will be a huge advantage when you want to have a variance within a certain area of your illustration, from going dark to light, and it can work really well. Let's test this out. We've got our swatchy-swatch over there. Let's just cleany-clean [NOISE] our brush, and nasty old dip of water in there. Add it on to that beautiful pigment, and we've got our lovely inky-inky water color that's ready to move around. There you go. We've got the same color there. Then all I'm going to do is I'm just going to get my brush. I'm not going to dip it in any more water. As it stays, hold it on this side, and just drag that color across. We're not pressing down, we're just dragging the color across. Just move this a little bit higher. Just drag it down, don't press down. Just drag it down very lightly. You can see, we've got that intense color here, and that's gradually going into a lighter tone. Now, it's not going to be as prolific as this one over here because we did this in stages. However, this gradual tone looks really nice. What you can do is if you want to lighten it up even more from one end, [NOISE] you can just go in, clean your brush, dabble it with water, and just add a few drops of water on the end. What that will do is that will just lighten up certain areas that you have where you have too much pigment. That's a great technique of just lightening the color. If we just move this across here a little bit more, what you can do is [NOISE] you can add in some water from this side. If we just go in with clean water here, and if we just bring that clean water, and just touch it on the edge of that pigment, you can see how it just melts in, gels into that water, to give us an even lighter gradient. Just like that, how easy was it to create a beautiful variance of color by just using one color and water? That's it for the pressure variance. Try this out with the other colors that you have. Go in, heavy pressure, medium pressure, light pressure. Vary the actual pigment lay down, and do a nice thick heavy pigment on one end. Drag it out all the way to the end. Add a little bit of water. Just merge them together with a few dabs with your brush, and see what results you get. That will give you a nice little experience. A starter test, if you like, with your watercolor pencils, if you haven't done this type of work before. Let's now move on to the next one. 10. Brush and Spray: Welcome back. Let's now look at using a water bottle and spray and our brush to create different textures and effects using our watercolor pencils. Let me just get a zoom in on this so we get a nice visual on the screen. I'm just going to be using this gorgeous color here. One of my favorite colors is green, yellowish. What we're going to do is we're going to do three swatchy swatches. We're going to do a swatch over here, swatch number one. Effectively, what we're going to do is we're just going to go in with two different types of water levels on our brush, and then we're going to use the water bottle to spray the swatch so that we can see what type of effect we can come up with. That's what it's all about, just experimenting with different ways of how to produce different types of results to really bring in that uniqueness and nice flow into your artwork. That's the first swatch. For the second swatch, I'm going to literally do exactly the same, but I'm going to leave a bit of a gap here. If you're following along, just do what I'm doing on the screen. They were nice little swatchy swatch. You can do this with any color. You don't have to use the same color as I am, and this will be looking great. Similar type of swatch, just using that decent amount of pressure to get that pigment on the paper and it's looking good. Getting our watercolor brush, just give it a [NOISE] nice little cleany clean like we've been doing before. What we want to do here is we're going to semi-wet the brush. What I mean by this is give it a dip into your water, put it to the side and get maybe a paper towel, you've got paper towel at hand, and just dab the paper towel with the water to get rid of that excess water. What we don't want is we don't want a completely drenched and fully soaked bristles on our brush. We just want it to be slightly wet. If we come back to the actual swatch, what we're going to do here is we're just going to lightly stroke that color and you can see it's just about melting away. I'll just get a bit more of a zoom on that. What this does is this gives a dry effect. It's effectively like using a dry brush. You can see we get these nice little stripes and speckle areas at the end, so we're not fully moisturizing that pigment. This is a nice effect to do if you're trying to achieve something a little bit different. Just like that, I'm just going in and now the water on the brush is completely depleted and it's made the brush go towards one side. What you can do is you can just go in with a little bit more water. I'm just going to touch that water in there and then give it a little shaky shake and get the excess off. Then with the paper towel that I've got here, just dab it on so that we don't have too much. Again, work on the top areas here just to drag out that pigment to get this dried effect and effectively, it's looking really good. I really like using this style, especially if I'm doing some abstract work or creating some textures. It's a wonderful way of creating textures where you've got these light little strokes of a watercolor going upwards, it works really nicely. That was the dry brush effect using a semi-wet brush. Now let's move on to the other swatch over here. For this one, we're just going to use a fully drenched brush cell. Just give it a cleany, clean, give a good dip into that water as you can see on the screen. We don't want to shake off the excess. We're just going to go straight here like we've been doing before in the earlier lessons. Go straight here over that gorgeous pigment and it's looking great. The reason I'm doing this next to the other one is so that you can see difference in results. There we go. Beautiful, smooth, gorgeous, velvety color. Let's do a slight zoomy zoom back on this, and you can see, look how nice those results are. They're very different. We've got this beautiful dry brush effect over here, and we've got a nice smooth watercolor swatch over here. Now, you can mix and match this while you're doing your illustrations. Maybe you want to have a smooth background and you want to have some texture going at the front of your illustration. That's how you can achieve this. You do have to remember that if you're adding in a background, which we will do in the full sketch, you've got to let it completely dry before you add any more watercolor on top for your next layer. But we will come to that in another exercise. The last part is the most fun part of this actual exercise, and it's going to be using our super-duper to the water bottle spray. This is just a normal water bottle. Just a little bit of a zoom back on this so you can see the whole thing. These are really cheap to get from the pound store where we can get these form. I would highly recommend that you get one of these, especially when you're testing out your watercolors. It's just a fun way to apply watercolor to paper. For this, all I'm going to do is use that same color and you're going to add in the swatch. But what we'll do is we'll leave a little bit more gap. Just like that at the same amount that we did for the other two so that we can have a result that we can compare. Just like that lay down that beautiful pigment, that dry swatch of color. The thing with this method is the more color you put down, the more the color is going to spread. You'll know what I mean when I go ahead and do this. The spray itself is quite powerful as you will be able to see. It can get all over the place. That's enough for the swatchy swatch. Let's just get our spray. What you don't want to be doing is you don't want to face the actual nozzle of that spray directly on top and press it. All you want to do is you want to do it at an angle. You can see that I've got the nozzle here. I'm just going to do it at maybe a 45 degrees angle, about this much height. I'm just going to give it a spray, and you can say that it's gone on top of that color. A little bit of a zoomy zoom on this, you can see it a bit better. Again, another 45 degree spray, full spray there, full spray there, and maybe change the angle, do it from the top. Look at that. Gorgeous. Look at that, absolutely beautiful, very nice and abstract. You can see with the spray you can manipulate that color and you don't just need to use the spray by itself. You can go in now with a brush to maneuver that pigment and to create these wonderful shapes to add in that visual interest to your actual drawing or illustration. Look at how gorgeous that is. Beautiful, isn't it? Beautiful color. Let's just do a zoomy back so we can see the whole thing. Just like that, you can spread it out, but do be careful with the spray not to press down too hard. Otherwise, you are going to get this huge splash that goes everywhere. I recommend you do this may be for backgrounds if you want a quick coverage or you just want to get a bit of a marbling effect. Then the key really is to let this completely dry. Once it's dried out, you'll be able to see that it's produced a wonderful, beautiful pattern on your page. That's about it for this one. Let's just get a zoomy back on this to recap. What we did was we did a dry brush effect over here with semi-drenched brush in water. Then we did just a standard swatch with a fully drenched brush in water. Then we did a nice little spray on top of the actual pigment to produce three very different results. Try this out with the colors that you have. Maybe do a combination of colors, maybe add a little bit of red to the color swatch before you go ahead and spray, or use the dry brush just to really experiment and get yourself familiar with these wonderful pencils. Now let's move on to the next one. 11. Basic Colour Mixing: Okay. Welcome back. Let's just do a nice little exercise of creating different colors using our basic primary colors. Now, you'll find most often than not, you won't be using all the colors that are in your set of watercolors. You may only have 12 or 24 set like I've got, or you might even have a huge range of watercolors that you have, but you may only use maybe a handful up to 10 or 11 of them. It's always good to understand how you can create colors from a limited palette. I've got the basic three primary colors here, red, blue, and yellow. This is just a nice exercise to have maybe a keep safe for when you actually go ahead and do your full sketch. Now, you don't have to do this exercise if you don't want to, it's just a nice one to have that will produce something that you can visually see when you go ahead and plan your full sketch. I'm going to do the basics of just adding a nice swatch of red over here. We've got red. Now you might have a different red from me. It makes no difference at all. This is just to indicate that we have our basic primary colors. Just get whichever red you have in your pack of watercolors. Now you will most likely have red, [LAUGHTER] blue, and yellow in any sets because these are the primary colors, so don't worry if you don't have the exact ones like me. Next, what we'll do is we'll add a swatch of blue. We've got pure red, and we've got pure blue over here. Now, the results will vary depending on the shade of blue and red that you have. You may have a darker shade or a lighter shade, but your actual results should be the same. Let's just add the yellow over here, and what we're going to do is we're just going to go in and create a type of a matrix so that we can just mix the colors. We've got the red and blue. Let's just add red and blue down here as a nice dry swatches swatch. We've got the red, and then we've got the blue on top. Similar amounts of pigment on top of this to produce our secondary colors. Then we have the blue, and we have the actual yellow to produce our next secondary color, which we all know is green. The results that you're going to get are actually going to be very similar to the ones that you're getting with the actual dry mixing that you're doing already. Just a bit more of a zoomy zoom. We've got the secondary color here. We've got the next secondary color, which is the yellow, and we just need to add the red to that one. You can do this in a different way if you like, maybe do them in boxes. I like to do them just as circlely dots. We've got the secondary colors here. Now, all we need is we need a little bit of water. So let's just put our pencils to the side, and we're going to start off by just cleaning our brush and just adding in a nice little swatch of color on them, lovely dotty dots. Clean the brush again. Make sure you keep cleaning your brush while you do this because we want the color to stay nice and clean. We don't want it to muddy up and mark into another color. Then we'll do the yellow, so quick clean of the brush, and the yellow, so fantastic. We've got three beautiful swatches on the primary on the top level. Now let's go into the next ones. We've got the red and blue, which makes a gorgeous purple color there as you can say. Just adding that water, spinning it around, fantastic. Then we have our blue and yellow making our gorgeous green. Look at that water gorgeous color. That one of my favorite colors, if not my favorite color, green. Absolutely love a bit of green lights. Let's do the next one. [NOISE] That one is going to be orange with the yellow and red. You can see, quite easily, we've been able to create these secondary colors. Now you don't need to go in and start adding more swatches from the secondary colors to create more tertiary colors or different tones, we can just go straight in and pick up the color like we did in the earlier exercise. We've got this orange here. Let's do a mixie mix of the orange, nice, a bit of light orange there. Get your brush clean. We've got the lights orange over there and then just pick up a little bit to that green. Add that green onto there, and you see we've created a third color there. Gorgeous. Let's just do a bit of a zoom back on that. It's a bit of a brownish, earthish, greenish color over there. Doing the same, let's just pick up a bit of that green, pure green, gorgeous green down there onto this little light swatch over here. Then we just add a little bit of our purplish color. You can see we've got another tone there. So you can see quickly, we've created 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 colors from these three primary. Now you can keep going on and on and adding more dry swatches. The whole purpose of this was just to indicate to you that it can quickly go ahead and create colors. Let's demonstrate the application of this. If we just get a zoom back on this. If we just do maybe a light sketch with the blue and yellow to do a slight background, so over here if we just do a light background here. Just add in a light pressure swatch like we did in the earlier lesson. Over here, so if we just go in, small little swatch for demonstration. Just a bit of blue and then we add in the yellow at the bottom again, keeping it really light, but I'm just coming in halfway. I'm just adding in the yellow halfway onto that blue, just to give it a really nice swatch. You can see we've got this green color coming up. Then maybe on the top of that, we could add in a bit of red. We've got a bit of red, we just add that, little bit, just a hint of it on the top. It's looking great. Let's get our brush. [NOISE] Clean it clean, and let's just go in onto the blues. I'm just going to wet that blue area first, I want that blue to stay nice and blue. Then I'm just going to drag that brush down from the top, not pressing hard. Just let the water do all the work. You can see we've got this really nice merging effect from blue to green. Fantastic. Look how easy that was. Just like that, it just need to neat up. Then I'm going to clean my brush. [NOISE] Clean my brush so that the colors don't mark up. Then go upwards from the blue, go into that red to create that lovely hints of purple and just spin the brush around using the bristles to just melt away them lines and look how beautiful these are, fantastic. It's looking great. Just like that, we created a really nice color gradient from one color going to another, and we did all of this by just using the primary colors. Now you can carry on working this, like maybe drag it down a little bit more if you want so that the colors mix up. But this was just to demonstrate that you can easily create lovely backgrounds. If we just do a zoom-in on this so that you can imagine this. We've got a nice background here. Then maybe we go in with our dark blue to just do a little sketch while the whole thing is wet. We might have some elements coming up here like this, just like that. You can see that that background really looks nice and soft compared to the details. Maybe we just have a lovely small mini little house over here, why not? Just carry on adding in these gorgeous elements. You don't have to follow this particular drawing that I'm doing, this was just to demonstrate to you how easy it is to just blend colors together to come up with really nice, interesting looks and visuals. Just like that, we've just created a lovely little scene using just our primary colors, and it looks rather nice. Give this a go, try out the color mixing from primary to create some nice secondary values. Do a little mini sketch. Do a couple of sketches, if you like. Have a bit of fun with this, a bit of a play around so that this acts as a warm-up exercise for your full sketch and your most exciting part of the class, which is going to be your class projects. That one's done. We can now move on to the next one. 12. Transparency and Layers: Welcome back. Let's just do a nice little demonstration now of transparency. Now, one of the properties of watercolors per se is that the watercolor generally tend to be transparent when they've dried out so that you can build values as layers upon layers, and you can see through one layer onto the base layer that will form the color and tone of your actual drawing or illustration. Let's just quickly demonstrate this. I've just got two blues here, and all I'm going to do is basically, I'm just going to do a nice little swatchy swatch with the blue to come up with a nice bits of color that we can compare our transparency layers with. This will effectively be the base layer. This may form as the background of your illustration when you go ahead and do it, maybe in your full sketch or in your class projects. If we just add that color in and maybe just add this other blue, which is a bit more vibrant just to give it a bit more body and form. I think that's about it. For that one, all we're going to do is we're just going to wet that with a little bit of water so that we have a gorgeous strip of colors. Let's just gets a zoom in on that and see it face the screen and you don't miss any of it. Let's just carry on with that. We need to just wait until this dries. Let's wait until this completely dries, because if we go ahead and add in the color, as you can see with the earlier exercise, you add in the color, it's going to start blending the two colors together. That's what we don't want. We want this to be completely dry, and that's really important. If you want to work in layers and start adding layer 1, layer 2, and create this tonal effect to bring out colors in your illustration, then you must ensure that the first layer dries completely. Now, you can build on this with as many layers as you like. I'm going to leave that entirely up to you. Let's just wait until this completely dries out. That's completely dry. That's going to be our base layer. Now, what I'm going to do is I'm going to use my three colors here. I've got green, and I'm just going to draw a little swatch that goes over the actual blue, and just like that, adding that green over the blue area, and then I'm going to continue to do this in this other area where we just have that whites of the paper. You can see just by adding the dry color, there is a slight difference where we're overlapping the color of the dry blue. It's only very slight, but this is how we build up the color values. Just like that, nice stripy strip of green over there, and then I'm going to do the same with the red. Just going to leave a little bit of a gap and then just continue that underneath so that we can visually see a difference. You can see, not sure if you can see on the camera, but as the red goes onto the blue, there's slightly darker shade being achieved. That's effectively the second layer on top of that transparent layer of color. Let's just add in the yellow, final one there. You can see the yellow is being affected by that blue quite a lot because yellow is a lighter shade. Then, if we go down here, you can say it's a lot brighter and pure when it's just on the white of the paper. Just like that, we've got our nice little swatchy swatches. Let's add in some water. I'm just going to go in and wet the area that's just on the white paper. You can see the pure color first, and then just going to drag it up like that onto the blue. Now, the difference is very subtle, and it all depends on the first layer of color that you place down. So because the blue that we've got is quite a pale blue, it's a very light tone. You may not be able to have a huge difference that's visible. You can see that the actual watercolor is wet. Once it completely dries out, you'll be able to see the final result. Just like that, I'm going to do the same for the other two. [NOISE] It's going in nice bits of water on there. I can visually see this on my actual piece of paper, but it may be a bit difficult for you to see while it's wet on the camera. Let's just continue. Then finally, we've got the yellow just going over, and you can see that as I'm doing this, it's not muddling up or lifting any of that blue, and that's because once it dries, it's permanent. That's a huge advantage of using watercolor pencils. Now, that property, as I mentioned earlier on in the class, that may not be the same for all watercolor pencils. Some watercolor pencils may not dry permanent, and that can be a huge factor when you're doing layering. Now, you can see with the yellow because it's quite light, you can see that there is a nice difference between the one that's overlaid on the blue, and that's just on pure white. As we wait for these to dry, we can repeat this on another color. What I did earlier on was, I just went in and did another swatch of color, added a nice base of orange while I was waiting for that blue to dry so that we can demonstrate the same thing on a different color and see what results we get. Again, I'm just going to go in, I'm going to add the green. You can see with the orange color because it's slightly more vibrant than the blue, you can see the results are quite different immediately. You can see that that green that's carrying the orange is a lot more prominent and you get a pretty nice difference between the layers of transparency. So that's the green one there. Let's add the reddy red. Just like that, just adding that swatch. If you want to try this out, absolutely go for it. Just drop in a couple of swatches of color, let them dry, and then use maybe three or four different colors on top just to see what results you get so that you can plan and prepare for your full sketches and your class project. Let's just add that yellow, and again with the yellow, you've got a great difference between the pure yellow and the orange-yellow. It's effectively creating a second color on top. You can see that's very nice and vibrant. A bit like a peachy type orange color. Let's just wet this as well. [NOISE] Just like that as we did before. Wet the green all the way to the top, don't need to add too much water, just so that it melts away that beautiful pigment. [NOISE] There's the red. You can see that it all depends on the base color that you use initially, and the results that you get are going to be quite different. Now, you may just want to have a very subtle difference or layer on your artwork. The best way to determine that is just to use as many colors as you have, and practice this exercise to see what results you can achieve. Let's just get a zoom back on that. You can see here, just with a wet color, you can see that the orange background compared to the blue, the results are a lot more sharp and contrasting, whereas with the blue, they're very subtle. If you just want a subtle change use a pale, lighter color. If you want more of a dramatic change, then use a stronger color. I'm just going to wait for this to dry out. I might dry this out with my hair dryer while I wait and then we can view the results and compare once it's done. Our swatches have completely dried out with my hair dryer and the table is really hot now, so I'll be careful. Let's just have a look at this. You can see now that we have a nice difference between the first overlapping layer and the swatch that has no layer underneath it. With the blue, you can see that there's a nice difference going on over there and with the orange, we've got an even sharper difference from the colors that we used. Have a play around with this and do bear in mind that each color has a different opacity level. Some colors maybe slightly more transparent than others, and some may be more opaque than others. You can see with the green and red, it's a lot more opaque compared to the yellow, but generally, it's still transparent and you can see through it. It also depends on how much pigment you use. If you do the lay-down of color really heavy, then you're going to have a more thicker layer of color with less transparency. If you do a very light thin layer of color, you're going to have much more transparencies. You just have a play around with this, add in a couple of swatches on the background, maybe four or five different colors that you have, and then use three to four of the same colors to just compare when it dries out, you can see a different style it produces and you can take advantage of this when you're doing your full sketch and your class project. Let's now move on to the next one. 13. Interaction with Mediums: Welcome back. Let's now look at how our watercolor from our watercolor pencils interact and react with different mediums. On the screen here, I've got a grid that shows different mediums in columns and this is split into two different applications. Let's take a closer look at this. On the top, I've got the actual name of the medium that I'm going to test. Starting from the left here we've got graphite. This is just normal graphite pencil. Then we've got gel pen. If you don't have a gel pen for this exercise, just use a normal biro pen. I've got waterproof ink. If you don't have any of these mediums, don't worry about it. This is just to indicate to you how a particular medium react or interact with this watercolor. Try this exercise out if you have the medium. If you don't, just have a look at the results so that you will have knowledge of what to do when you're using different mediums with watercolor. Continuing, we have a marker that is water-based. Then we have a marker that is alcohol-based. Then moving on to colored pencil that is oil-based. Again, another colored pencil that is wax-based. Finally, I've got a paint marker. If we just look at this little area down here, I've split the table into two parts. If I just divide it up so you can see it a little bit better. These first three boxes for each one of the mediums that I have listed, what we're going to do here is we're going to test with the medium going on first and then we're going to apply the watercolor on top and see what we get. Then for the second part, which is the next three boxes here, what we're going to do is we're going to add in the watercolor from the watercolor pencil first, let it completely dry, and then we're going to go in with our medium so that we have two different sets of results that we can compare. Let's go ahead and do this. Let's now start off by doing this first set of boxes, the first three, where we're going to look at adding the medium first and then going over with the watercolor pencils. Over here I've got my graphite pencil. You can test this with any pencil that you have. It makes no difference what the actual grading of that graphite says. This one is a HB that I've got. What I'm going to do in this first box is I'm just going to do a swatch, just a scribble swatch into that box. Get a good amount of that graphite on there and that's looking nice. Then in the box below that, the middle box, I'm just going to do a cross hatch. What this will do is this will show us a difference in line variation compared to the texture that is produced when we're just doing a full swatch and then finally, just add in maybe a couple of dots, random dots or stipples. Again, that will give us a varied look to see what results we get with our watercolor when we place it on top. This is what I'm going to do for each one of these mediums. Let's just put that one to the side and move to the second one. For the second one, I've got just a normal gel pen and I'm going to do exactly the same. Just like that, nice little swatchy swatch there and then it's going to be a case of just following this through on the grid to do the cross hatch and then eventually do that stipple, do thin stipples, thicker stipples, it makes no difference. This is just for demonstration purposes, so that it gives you a bit of an insight in what mediums you can or cannot use with these wonderful watercolor pencils. We'll just move on to the waterproof ink. Now waterproof ink is quite obvious that once it dries, the watercolor should work nicely on top of it. I've got my fountain pen here that's filled up with waterproof ink. Let's just do a swatch of that now. It's important to let the medium dry. Like with this waterproof ink here, it's quite a wet medium in itself. Ensure that you let your mediums dry, whichever ones you are testing, before you go ahead and apply the watercolor to it. Because if your medium is wet and liquidity, then obviously that's just going to muck and mix in with the watercolor, so that test will be a void. Basically what you need to do is ensure that everything is absolutely dry. There we go. Just a little bit of a stipply stipple. I'm going to put the pen to the side. Let's just move the page across and then now we have our marker, which is the water-based marker, and this is just a standard Crayola marker. We're going to just lay that down. Fantastic color. I said cyan, not blue. What a great color. Better come down and let's just get on with this exercise. We'll just do the crossy cross hatch that goes across and then a nice little stipply stipple that goes all the way in that box. Put that to the side. Moving on to the next one, we have the alcohol marker. This is one of my standard pro markers and just there just applying the alcohol marker. If you do have alcohol marker, just be careful how you apply them on your watercolor paper. These will tend to bleed right through. If you're using a block like I am, a watercolor block, then don't press down too hard, otherwise it's going to seep through and cause you problems on your sheets below. Let's just continue. Nice little stipply stipple. Again, with the alcohol markers, these tend to dry out fairly fast. That one is done. Next one we have the colored pencil oil-based. For this one, this is basically just the Faber-Castell Polychromos pencil, one of my favorite colored pencils. If you have already watched my previous classes, you know that I absolutely love these pencils. Just a nice lay down of that gorgeous color, gorgeous blue shade, and then doing the same over here with the crossy cross hatch, going across to finish off our table and then do a little stipply stipple of nice little dots scattered out in that oil material with pigment inside it. The next one is the colored pencil wax-based. For this, you can use Prismacolor pencils if you have them. I've actually got this current dash Luminence one, which is wax-based compared to the oil-based from the Polychromos. Just going to lay that down and do that here. You can have loads of different types of colored pencil here. You may have some Crayola color pencils. Whichever mediums you have at your disposal, just use those mediums to create a nice little exercise of testing out your watercolors and the interaction that it has with the mediums that you have at hand. It is a really nice exercise to do. Again, once this is done and all dried out, it works as a handy keep safe, so that you can use it when you come to doing your full sketch. The final one here is the paint marker. For this one, I've got this white color POSCA marker, so just give that a little shaky shake. This is a marker that I like to use with my watercolors because it's great for adding highlights. But just to demonstrate this, I want to test this out. You might not be able to see this when I apply this first on the paper because the paper is quite bright and white in color. But you may be able to see some of it. But I am applying that color. I can see this within my naked eye, but on the camera it might not be visible. Just going to add in them stipples. You can see over there that a big blob has just come out, so I've got some make sure that I wait for that to completely dry. What I might do is I might just pick that away with a bit of paper because that might take a little bit longer to dry and we don't want to be waiting here all day for things to dry, now do we? No, we don't. There you go. That marker ink or paint, if you like, is on the actual paper and this is now complete. I'll just do a zoomy zoom back on that. We've got our first section done, where we're looking at adding in the medium, and then we're going to wait for this to completely dry out and then we're going to go in with a colored watercolor pencil. On top of this, apply water, and see what results we get. But while we wait for all these liquid mediums to dry, what we can do is we can actually shift our sheet up and go ahead and apply the watercolor first to this section over here, so that we're ready to move on to this next section because, remember, this next section is watercolor first and then the medium on top. That's what I'm going to do here. I'm just going to go in and just apply my watercolor pencil. Now what I've done is I've just filled in them little boxes with a bit of pigment and then all I'm going to do now is I'm just going to go ahead and wet that watercolor, so that I have this second area prepped up and ready for the test. I'm just going to quickly go ahead and do that. 14. Adding Watercolour: [MUSIC] I've got this area nicely colored in with a light layer of watercolor. While we wait for that to dry, we can go ahead and start testing out our swatches that we did first. Let's just get a zoomie zoom in on this so we can see this a bit better. Now our mediums have actually dried out, so to the touch they feel pretty dry. They're not smudging or moving around, so I'm happy to go ahead and do that. For this one, what I'm going to do is I'm just going to go in as I did with the section below. I'm just going to go in with my watercolor pencil on top with a nice light shade of color. I can actually go ahead and do this on all of these boxes. That's all I'm going to do now, is going to go in with a nice little coating of this dried watercolor pencil. Then once this is done, we'll start adding the water and seeing what results we get. Let's do that now. [MUSIC] We've a got nice basic layer on top of our dried-up medium. What we'll do is we'll do this step-by-step to see what interaction and results we get. Let's get a zoomie zoom back on there. Over here we have our graphite. let's just get a nice cleanie clean on the brush. [NOISE] So nice, bit of water on there. Just dropped the water on that before I even started. [LAUGHTER] Let's just start melting that watercolor away and you can see on the graphite, the graphite isn't interfering with the liquid of the watercolor. I'm just giving it some light strokes right there, covering it up and it's looking great. Graphite as a medium works really well if you're using it first. Generally speaking, if you're going to use a medium on top of watercolor, it shouldn't really make a huge difference. But just for completeness, we're going to complete this exercise. Let's just finish off that watercolor layer on top of that graphite and as it's wet, you can see there's no interaction, mucking or muddying up. It's exactly where it was, where we put it and it's working very good. Let that dry and let's move on to the gel pen. [NOISE] Clean clean on the brush, make sure if you're doing this and following along with different mediums, you use a clean brush every time. I should load it up with water. Let's do the same for this. You can see immediately we're having a bleeding problem, that gel pen ink is just bleeding away into the water. The reason for that is it's not water proof. It will just gel into that color, muddy that color up and just make it into a horrible mess. I'm just going to complete it even though I know that the results here are going to not look very nice. But this is a good way to identify which mediums you shouldn't be using with your watercolor pencil. You can see even with that, it's going to start contaminating the watercolor on the next part. So what we can do with that is just do a little clean with our finger and I won't cover this up completely, I'll just cover up the dots. You can see even with a light stroke of water, you're getting this horrible muddying color. Let's say that this one is definitely not going to work if you're putting the medium first. The gel pen is an absolute flop. [LAUGHTER] Let's move on to the next one and the next one is waterproof ink. [NOISE] Let's just get a clean clean on the brush. Now, the waterproof ink should work as long as it's really is water proof, so we can test it out. The waterproof ink is here and as we expected, there is no movement of that ink when the water is applied, so you've got that gorgeous black ink underneath the orange paint. This works fantastically well. This is great, especially if you want to do illustrations in ink first and then go over with them with your watercolor pencils. This gives you that option, and this is one technique that I love to do. I love to add in my inclines first and then go over with some watercolor swatches and colors to produce that unique look. The waterproof ink works fantastically well. Let's now move on to the next one and the next one was the water-based marker. Clean the brush [NOISE] and let's go straight onto this and see what happens. You can see, as I'm adding that water, that marker ink is actually melting away into the water. The reason for that is it's because it's water based color, so the more I keep pushing that water on top of it, the more it's just going to melt away. It's not going to create a muddy color, it's just going to combine with the color that's already on there with the watercolor, orange. So you're just going to get this ugly result, so there you go. I'm not going to go into that too much. That's about it. So the marker that is water-based like Crayola and other brands, absolutely avoid using them first and then adding watercolor on top because you're just going to get a mess. The gel pen and the water-based markers are a no-no, so let's move on to the next one over here. Clean your brush. [NOISE] This one is the alcohol-based markers. Again, let's just add the water on top. With the alcohol-based marker, you can see that there is no interference with the liquid of the watercolor. That's because the alcohol-based markers generally tend to be permanent markers. As you can see, this produces a really nice effect. What the watercolor does is it adds that translucent layer on top of that blue of the marker to give it a second tone. It makes it a little bit more mute rather than it being too bright, and that works really well. But do be aware with alcohol markers that they will tend to bleed over to the next page. If you are going to use them, make sure you have a sheet of paper underneath. Let's just do a cleanie clean. [NOISE] Moving on now to the colored pencil, the oil-based Faber-Castell polychromos and we just add the water on top of there. You can see we're having no interaction because oil does not melt away in water. This is going to work really nice. Again, just wetting that watercolor on top and you can see the stipple and the across hatch. You can see that it works really nice. Using colored pencils first can give you a really nice effect and the watercolor will not ruin the actual pigment of the original colored pencil. That one is very good. Let's now move on to the next one and that one is the colored pencil, wax-based one, the luminance colored pencil. Quick clean. [NOISE] Again, we're just going to add that water on top like we've been doing and you can see there's no interaction with the wax-based colored pencil. The reason for that is wax will not melt away or dissolve in water, so it's not water soluble. This again will work very nice, just like the one before the polychromos. So if you have wax based colored pencils, you can use them first and go over them with the watercolor pencil and you should have some really interesting results. Let's move on to the final one and that one was our white paint marker. Quick clean of the brush. [NOISE] Now let's see what happens with this. If we just add the water on top, you can see that you can't really tell what's going on over here because the actual paint markers is white and you have orange color on top. I can see with the naked eye that there's no real interaction because these paint markers, these will drive waterproof and they shouldn't really react. But in terms of visually seeing this, it's probably not going to be achievable. But I can tell by just looking at this, there is no muddying up or whitening of the color. So if you want to use paint markers first and then watercolor on top, you can. Maybe do this with a colored paint marker rather than a white paint marker because you won't really be able to see much difference. But generally speaking, the paint marker has worked. Let's just do a zoom back on this to see what results we got. 15. Reviewing Results: A quick little zoom in so you can see the whole thing and let's just cover up the bottom so that it doesn't interfere with our analysis. So we tested different mediums with the medium first and the watercolor on top out of which two, which was the gel pen and the water-based marker, actually flopped and they didn't work so avoid using gel pens or water-based markers if you're going to decide to do your medium first. Whereas graphite, the waterproof ink and the alcohol-based marker and a colored pencils or oil or wax and the paint marker, if you want to start testing your sketches with giving mediums first with the watercolor paint on top, then I would recommend going for one of them. That was it for the medium first and then the watercolor pencil. Let's now see what results we get with the watercolor first and the medium on top. All I'm going to do here is I'm just going to get that same medium and I'm just going to apply the medium just like I did before on top of this water color, which has now completely dried out so let's go ahead and do that and see what results we get. [MUSIC] Now that I've completed this next section where we have the watercolor first and then the medium on top. We can see just by having a quick overview look, that each one of these mediums worked absolutely brilliantly when we use them on top of the dried watercolor, say if we just take a closer look at these. The graphite worked really nice, you can see that there is no interference, there is no fading away. It worked really good, it lay down very well indeed. Then the gel pen, even though it was a flop on the actual secondary layer when we did the gel pen first and then the watercolor. The gel pen on top of the dried watercolor works really well. It's nice and vibrant and it's great outline details when you're doing your watercolor sketching and the same goes for the waterproof ink that worked absolutely great. The advantage of using the waterproof ink is that you can actually go ahead and sketch first, add watercolor, and then once the watercolor dries, add more ink and that for me is my number 1 medium to use when sketching with watercolor pencils. With the gel pen, you can only use it once the water color has dried and then you can't add anymore watercolor on top but with the waterproof ink, you can go in as many sequences as you like, and the same works for graphite. You can start off with graphite, add watercolor, and then go on with graphite more and keep doing that cycle as much as you like. Moving onto the colored pencils and markers. With the water-based marker, the Crayola, you can see it works quite well on top of the actual dried watercolor whereas when we did it the other way round, it was an absolute disaster so if you want to add touches to your artwork with a water based marker, like a Crayola marker. You can do that. Again don't add any watercolor on top once you've done it so you will be limited to the final layer and then with the alcohol-based marker, it worked really well going on top of watercolor. Again, it worked when you've added the market first and water color on top so that was great to use interchangeably. You can go in as many cycles and layers are you like and the same applies for the colored pencils. You've got the oil-based polychromes and the luminance Rackspace pencil. These work great on top of watercolor or first, or in any order as you like and the most interesting one, I would say is the paint markers. We've got the Posca paint marker over here. You can see that when we add the Posca paint marker, you can see these gorgeous highlights in Whites and again, this is a marker that I use all the time when I want to add highlights on top of my watercolor pencil work. However, if you want to start off with these y marks and then go over with watercolor. It's going to be very subtle so I wouldn't really recommend doing it unless it's something that you really want to do, you can direct and if you've got a colored marker, then you may get different results but generally, I tend to use this marker on top to add in my final highlights but you've got the advantage of actually going over it again with watercolor to mute out the colors if that's what you want to do so let's just take a zoom back on this. There we have it. We've got our nice little matrix that shows the results that we got with our sequence of watercolor and other mediums and this is a great keep say for you to actually refer back to when you're trying to figure out which medium you want to go ahead and use with your watercolor pencils and it just gives you an indication of what not to use and what to absolutely use. Avoid the gel pen and the water-based marker when you're using the medium first, whereas with everything else, you can go in first, go in with a second layer of watercolor and do as many cycles of that as you like, try this out with your mediums that you have at hand. If you don't have these mediums, as I said before, that's not a problem. Just do it with as many mediums as you have to just give you that insight and experience into your wonderful world of watercolor pencils. Let's move on to the next one. 16. Colour Swatching: Welcome back. Before we start on the full sketch in the next lesson, I would highly recommend that you go ahead and do a complete color swatch of the watercolor pencils that you have in your set if you haven't already done so. This is really easy to do. All you need to do is divide up a sheet of watercolor paper into the number of pencils that you have, add a dry color swatch of each color that you have, and make sure that you write down the name and code of that particular color so that it works as a nice reference. One that is all done, add a nice thin layer of water on each one of those swatches to completely melt away that pigment, and then once it's dry, cut the paper out and fit it into your wallet, or into your tin of water colored pencils, and that's about it. You now have a beautiful little handy reference that you can quickly check to identify the specific shades of color and how they will look once they've completely dried. This is brilliant for planning your watercolor pencil sketches when you come to doing your class project, and will also help you when we're doing the full sketch next. Once you've done this, let's move on to the next one. 17. Full Sketch: Welcome back. It's exciting times now because we're going to go ahead and do our full sketch. On the setup that I've got here, I'll quickly go through what I've got. The most important thing on the screen is on the top left-hand side and yes, that's a nice cup of coffee because without coffee, I can't do anything. That's my most important aspect of doing any type of sketching or drawing or art, is to make sure that I have my lovely coffee on the table. Getting that out of the way, let's concentrate on the materials that I'm going to go ahead and use. Firstly, I've got my watercolor pencils here, I've got my 24 sets, Faber Castell, the ones that I've been using throughout this class. For the surface, I've decided to go with my Arches, watercolor paper, the hot-pressed one and this is the block. I've been using blocks throughout this class and if you remember earlier on in the surfaces video, the lesson that we went through, I always say that I prefer to use blocks because I don't have to tape down the paper. That's what I'm using for the surface. Then over here, let's go from the left, I've got my standard silver black velvet brush size A. Again, I've been using this one throughout the lessons, and then I've got my blade, which is my normal craft blade that if I decide to do any grinding or chipping away at some pigment to come up with some textures, have that handy. Over here I've got my Posca marker, the white marker where we did the highlights in case I want to add some highlights at the end. Then I've got my standard fountain pen filled with waterproof ink because that's why I love to do and I will most likely feature that in this final sketch. I've just got a standard HB pencil and a sharpener, just in case we need to sharpen our colored pencils or our standard pencil. On the right here, I've got a jar of clean water, and then I've got my clean water spray and a little bit of paper towel on the side just to wrap up any messes. If you've got two jars, it probably would be better, but if you've only got one jar, it will suffice because we're not using watercolors from the pan and your watercolor won't get as muddy as it regularly does with standard watercolor pens. One jar will suffice, but it will be better if you have two. Let's get started with the sketch. 18. Pencil Outline: The first thing that I'm going to do is I'm going to go ahead and open my watercolor block, and I'm going to be doing this sketch in a portrait orientation. If you're using an A4 pad of watercolor paper, use it as it is in its portrait orientation, if you want to follow along in this class. On the side here I've got my color swatch, if you remember in the color swatch lesson that we did. It's always handy to have a color swatch of your colors so that you can see what colors you want to apply or what you want to avoid in your full sketch. I'm just going to keep this on my actual colored pencils over here as a reference. Before I start, I'm going to do a little border that goes all the way around the page. This is optional. You don't need to do this. This is just a preference that I have so once the sketch is complete, it looks nice in a nice white border. I'm just going to do a one centimeter border all the way across using my pencil and ruler. Let's do that now. [MUSIC] I've got a nice one centimeter border going all the way across, and I'm going to do my sketch within this box that I've got. Firstly, the first stage is just to use a normal pencil and come up with a sketch. Follow along step-by-step if you want to. If you don't want to do the exact same sketch that I'm doing, then do your own sketch and just follow the different steps and techniques that I go through. But I'm going to keep it nice and simple so that if you do want to follow step-by-step, then do give this a go. Let's start off by maybe just adding a couple of elements over here. I'm just going to do some round foreground rocky-type elements, like little peaks that come up over here. Just like that, maybe four, might squeeze in a little fifth one if we can, we can't, that's no problem. Just like that. Just four little elements at the front. Then maybe we might have some of these pointy elements coming here. Can represent wherever you want them to be because it's your sketch. For me, I'm going to call these candy floss, little peaks. These are little candy floss peaks that I'm doing, so make it as whimsical as you like. If you watch any of my classes, I love to design these whimsical worlds. There we go. Just these triangular peaky type shapes going there. Very simple. Then maybe we do a horizon line around about halfway across the page. Just a horizontal line going across like that, that will just represent the horizon. Then maybe add in a boat boat. Let's just do a little shape for a boat. I'm just going to do a little line like this. I'm just going to Zoom in on this. You can see this a bit better, if you want to follow along. A curvy shape on one end, a curvy shape on the other, and then let's just close it off, and that's how easy it is to do this little boat boat. Then we'll have in the middle a thing coming out there. I don't know what you call these things on a boat or on a ship. I don't really know what they call it. They are just like this little post or something, but as I say, those are so. Let's just do that and maybe drop in a couple of these sails over here. Nice and easy. Not complicated at all. That's about it. I'm going to leave that, no more details are necessary. Then with the horizon line is going to make it a little bit more prominent going across there and over here. Now I've got a little rubber on the end of my pencil, so I'm just going to rub out those areas. I don't want them to interfere in my overall sketch. It's not about the pencil sketch. It's just a reference basis for us to start adding our watercolor. We've got nice bits of gap over here and then maybe add in some more peaky shapes down here. These could effectively be the river bed, the area that comes as a divider from the liquidy rivery area where the boat is to the background. From here what we can do is we can maybe drop in a house. Now I'm sure you knew that was going to draw a house because, if you know me, then you know I love drawing houses. What else would you want to draw over houses? Houses are absolutely amazing. How they draw whatever house you want. Just like that, a nice little shape with a pointy part on the top. Bring across over here, and then bring it down again. Doesn't have to be exact. We're not producing perfect symmetrical work here, perspective, perfect drawings. We're just doing this illustration so that we have something to go in and do our watercolor pencil work on. Just there, I just added a couple more details here. Again, I don't want this to be super detailed because it's not really about producing super detailed work. It's just about getting something down on your page. Maybe we'll have a little window down there and another little baby window down here, and maybe just drop in a door on this side, simple door, and then a wider window over here would look nice. I think that's okay for the main structure. Then maybe just add a cute a little chimney that goes on top over there, and I think that will look pretty nice. All these are just normal rectangle shapes. Just put together to represent a structure of a house and some elements on a house. Then maybe just put in a couple of lines for the roof tiles. But again, this wall is going to get covered off in the watercolor, and then we'll go into detail with the ink. That's it for that part. Then let's maybe add in some interest in the background areas or just bring this down on the screen here. Again, I think I'm just going to go ahead and do a few more of these pointy peaks that I did at the front. Just maybe one there, have one over here, and another one down there, a nice tall one, so it divides the page up, and there may be one hanging off behind that chimney area, and then maybe another smaller one over here, and then we'll just bring it down all the way to the end. That's about it for the structure and overall basic composition of the sketch. Just follow this along again. If you have maybe three or four peaks more than I have, that it makes no difference. If you have few more elements, it absolutely makes no difference. It's just about following the steps to produce a full sketch. Now we're done with the pencil work. Let's move on to the next part. 19. Adding Dry Colour: Okey-dokey. Now, we're going to do the watercolor part, the dry watercolor edition. This is where our color swatch becomes really important because we can plan what areas of our sketch we want to do in a particular color or a range of colors. Looking at my color swatch here, I'm going to maybe go for a greeny color at the bottom parts of this sketch. Maybe my nice green tone here and a bit of emerald green to come up with a mixture. Then as I go up on these peaks, I think I might do some nice earthy tones like this one here, this reddish tone, and then I've got a burnt ocher and a raw umber. I'm going to maybe come up with those tones over here. Then for the water area, I'm just going to be using maybe a mixture of these blues that we have, a light blue and maybe more of a brighter, sharper blue like the phthalo blue. Again, just using the colors that we have, that are already dried on our swatch to just come up with an idea of what we want to do. Then for the background, I might go really nice and vibrant with some beautiful orangey red shades. Then maybe for the sky area, we go for a purplish shade that we create with some color mixing. Let's start off, maybe starting off with the top. With the top, let's add in a nice blue, and I think I'm going to go for this blue here, this light ultramarine. If you want to follow the same colors, you can go ahead and do it. This one is the light ultramarine from my set. All I'm going to do here is, if I do a zoomy zoom in on this, you can see this a bit better. I'll just move the swatch to the side. Let's focus on our sketch. I'm just going to use the pencil tip, and just add in a dry swatch really lightly into that sky area so it just fills up the space. Now this is just that first technique that we went through in the application methods where we're just going straight onto the paper. Again, this is probably the easiest way of applying the watercolor to your sketches or art work. In fact, it's the method that I probably use 90 percent of the time. Just like that, just a light base color going on there. We'll just fill that in really quickly. I'm not pressing hard. This is with very light pressure. Don't need to press too hard, especially if you're going to be adding more colors on top. If you want to do some color mixing, that's absolutely fine. Let's just go in with a nice layer of that lovely blue, gorgeous blue there and just fill that gap up so that we don't have any gappy gaps. Let's just carry on and we're nearly done on that. It's effectively just like coloring in a picture, isn't it? We've got our initial picture down, our drawing, and we're just coloring in with our watercolor pencils. I've got the base blue. For the actual mixed color that I want to produce, I'll maybe use a bit of red or magenta. Let's go for the magenta. I want to try achieving a nice mixture of purplish shades going into blue, which I think will be nice. This color that I'm using is called magenta. I'm just going to add it on the top part of this sky area. I want to keep it nice and light. I don't want to over saturate it, because this is quite a sharp color, so just going in like this, really lightly, just dropping it in. Not worried about filling every gap because obviously once it's made wet, you can maneuver it around as you please and need to let it up. Just like that. Just adding that magenta color, and I think that's enough for the sky for this time. Now let's move on to these peaks that we've got here and I remember I said I wanted to do some orange colors. So I think I'm going to go for the deep cad orange. If we find the dark cad orange here. You've got the dark cad orange and maybe a nice bit of deep scarlet. The deep scarlet is a gorgeous color as well. In fact, what I'm going to do is I'm just going to take out any reds. That's a good idea. Just take out the actual colors that you have, and then you'll be able to see which ones you want to go ahead and use. I'm going to go for these orangey colors and reddish tones. I also like this one over here, it's a great color, that one, this one. This particular one is called dark chrome yellow. If you have this color, maybe give that one a go. All I'm going to do now is I'm just going to go in, and I'm just going to start coloring these in. I've got 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 of these peaks, and maybe just use five or four different colors to come up with a variation. I'm just going to add in that gorgeous orangey yellow over here. I'm not going to fill it up all the way to the end. I'm just going to fill in maybe half of it. You'll understand this a bit better when I go ahead and add the water. The thinking behind this is that we have a nice concentrated side on one end, and then we have a lighter tone on the other. That technique works really well when you add in droplets of water color, which I will do once we start adding in the water. Just going in, nice bits of heavy coverage over there, we want a nice bit of pigment that we can spread out. Then maybe I add a little bit of this dark red. This color is actually just called dark red, a gorgeous dark red there. I might just add a little bit of that on the base over here. Now what we're doing here is we're doing that dry color mixing technique that we did in the earlier lesson. Utilizing those techniques to come up with some nice variances. For this next one, I'm going to be using this really nice cadmium dark orange. Before we add the yellow, let's just vary it a little bit. Again, all I'm doing here is I'm just going in and I'm going to go in fairly heavy with pressure and pigment just to add in that area. When I basically repeat this process for all of these peaks here, and I'm just going to change and interchange the colors so that we have a nice bit of interesting variance on our page. So there we go. Again, with the dark red, I'm just going to darken the bottom parts of it, so that we can start merging and building some gradients from dark to light. Let's now move on to the middle one. For the middle one, what I might do is I might just go in with a lighter red actually. I found this other red here and this one is called the pale lake. It's called, I don't even know how to pronounce that. It's called geranium, like geranium or geranium, I don't know what that is but it must be a lake, so I'm just going to call it pale G lake. So there we go, a bit of pale G lake over there for this nice big peak that we have, that's just behind the little boatie boat, and just going in using the same technique. Now, you've got to remember that sometimes you might be trying something out in watercolor, you might be adding in some colors. Then when you wet them and they become the actual watercolor solution, they turn out to not be what you initially wanted or expected, and that's fine. That's all about exploring these colors and doing sketches that you get familiar with so that when you start getting a bit of practice, you know what to expect. But that's the fun of it, isn't it? You don't really know what these colors are going to turn out like when they dry. I guess that's what makes it that more exciting. Just adding in that dark red again, just to darken up that left side so when we come to merging and melting these gorgeous colors together, we have a bit of a variance. I'm going to repeat that same color for this one. Let's just get that gorgeous yellow color that we had and just go in over here, just like so, just doing exactly what we did before. Leave that area white and then go in with that dark red and maybe just darken up a little bit of that area behind the chimney. Then the next color we did was the lovely gorgeous orange. We're just going to go in and do that again over here. We've got a nice bit of a continuation that's looking gorgeous on our illustration, so just like that. Then with the darky dark red, just going in and darkening maybe just a little part of it from the back. There we have it. We've done the lay down of the initial layer of color for the sky part, and then for our main lovely shapes that go in the background. Now we can concentrate on the house area. 20. House Colour: Let's now do the house and just get a bit of a zoom-in on that. For the house, what I want to do is I want to use a nice warm gray for the brick parts of the house. Then a nice ultramarine blue for the roof. I think that will give it a nice look in contrast with the background colors that we have. Let's just get our warm gray, and let's get our ultramarine blue. This is our ultramarine blue, and this is our warm gray. It's called Warm Gray Number 2. Let's start adding in a bit of color. Just like that, I'm just going to go in, I'm going to fill this up because this is quite a light color, this warm gray. You don't need to worry about adding in anything in this initial base. It should give it a nice base coating when we come to melt it. Then if we need to add any more color on top, we can do it on the second maybe even on the third layer if it's required. Just like that. Just filling in those gaps. No coloring in the windows, just going to leave them as it is. Get that gorgeous gray pigment on there. Beautiful color, that one, nice and warm. Looks very nice and stony, doesn't it? It's like a stone house. [LAUGHTER] Make it whatever you want. There you go. Fill in that gap. Looking good. Now, you might not have this particular gray in your sets of colors. If you've got any type of gray just use that or just use any pale color. That will work absolutely fine. It's always nice to get a bit of a contrast in your paintings and drawings and illustrations. That just creates that visual interest. Let's just finish that off there, that stone, and then again, use the same color for the chimney area. For the chimney structure there, we'll just follow that same color of warm gray going across. That's looking good. Then these little things coming out on the chimney, that can be the same warm gray color. Okay, dope. That's looking nice. Let's now add in our ultramarine blue. Now for this, I'm going to do this slightly differently. I'm not just going to fill in the color. What I'm going to do is, I'm going to outline these shapes of the roof and the roof tiles with the pencil. What that will do is, that will provide me with a nice little under sketch tone that I can wet when I come to using the brush and you'll be able to see that we get a completely different effect with this. It's really great to do this in your sketches. Vary your strokes, don't just color in, just do some outlined work with the watercolor pencils, and see what results you get. You'll be surprised, you can get some absolutely gorgeous results with this technique. All I'm doing here, is I'm just outlining a nice thick line to actually do the overall shape of this roof. Again, the roof tiles, I'm just going to follow the lines that I did with my pencil. Just nice and rough, just keeping them asymmetrical as I can. It makes no difference how many of these lines you have on your roof. Just throw in as many as you can so that you can just create that visual interest, and make this look quite nice. I'm just going to maybe add a line in from the back over here. Looking good. Let's do the same for this little chimney part that comes out here and just match it with the color of the blue. Again, all I'm doing is just outlining the actual illustration part I did with the pencil. Now, my pencil is quite blunt though I'm not really that bothered. I don't really want to waste sharpening it and waste that pigment. That's another thing with colored pencils. Generally, with all colored pencils, is that when you sharpen them, you do tend to waste quite a lot of that pigment because it just goes in the sharpening bin, and that ends up in the bin so I don't want to waste it, so I can do it nice and rough. Once we wet this area, you're not going to be able to see much of the detail anyway. That's it for that one. I think with the actual door, let's just maybe do another type of blue. Maybe do this blue here. This is a nice phthalo blue. Nice and vibrant blue. Let's keep it blue. Let's do a blue house, say. For this one, I'm just going to color it in solid color with a bit of dry watercolor pigment. That's the housy-house we've done. Now, what I want to do is, I want to concentrate on these little elements that divides the page up. These little bumpy bumps that we have over here between the actual water area and the background. For that, I want to use some shades of green. You can see I've got four greens here. I've got this earth yellowish-green, my favorite green out of the set. Then I got this light green, which I don't really like. Then I got emerald and phthalo green here. I'm going to use a combination of this one, this one, and maybe a bit of this. Let's just get these greens out of the set. There we go. We've got our nice three tones of green. What I'm going to do is, I'm just going to go into these areas here, and I'm going to lay down the lightest tone first. My lightest tone is my favorite one, which is this yellowish-green. I'm just going to lay that down. Now, you'll probably have a couple of greens in your sets as well. If you want to follow this particular green technique that I'm doing, then go ahead and get your two or three greens. If you've only got two, just put the lightest green down first like I'm doing here. Then I'm leaving a gap on the top. You just get a bit more of a zoom, you zoom in on this, so you can see this a bit better. You can see I've filled in maybe just a bit more than the bottom left-hand side half, more than that half of this shape that I've drawn with that light green. Then I'm going to go in with my mid-green. That's the next level up. Just a little bit of that mid-green there underneath. You can see we just got that mid-green that's overlapping on that lighter green. Then with the dark one, I've got the beautiful emerald green. I'm just going to go in, I'm going to outline that bottom area. Now I'm going to mix that color in, I'm just going to outline that bottom area. I'm going to repeat this on all of these areas here. Just get a zoomy zoom back on there so you can see. All I'm going to do here is I'm just going to repeat that same pattern of going in with a lighter green first and going in and maybe coloring in half of that area in a curvy shape just like this. I'm going to do that for all of them first. It just makes the process a lot easier. You can see here in-between the sails of the boats, I've just got that color. I'm making sure that I'll leave that white space because once we start melting the colors, we want to have a nice dark to light on those particular areas. It's looking really nice. Again, just going in like this with that beautiful gorgeous yellowish green. It's looking quite nice. Just the colors when they dry, while you've got them all on, once you've got this whole image colored, it looks quite nice as it is. You might be thinking, "Oh, I don't want to wet this," but [LAUGHTER] it's just one of those things, isn't it? Once you start, and you start delving into this world of watercolor pencils, you realize that there's just so many possibilities you can achieve. You don't even have to wet the color, you can leave it as it is if you want, but we want to demonstrate what these pencils can do. We're adding in that second tone now, that more deeper saturated tone of green. Just a little bit there, and a bit more on the back, just like we did on the others. Just to repeat that process, make it a little bit easier so you don't have to keep switching pencils. Then finally, that beautiful emerald green can just go on, on the base of each one of these little bumpy bumps. That will finish this area quite nicely. Just the last one over there. Don't worry if one is bigger than the other, it makes no difference at all. That little section complete. Let's now move on to the boaty boat. 21. Boat Colour: For the bolty boat, I'm just going to use this really nice dark brown color that we've got here, a walnut brown. Let's just grab hold of the gorgeous walnut brown. For this one, I'm not going to bother with any details, I'm just going to put this in as heavy as I can. You'll understand why I'm doing this when I come to wetting it. Because what I'm going to do here is I'm going to go in, and use the other third technique that we went through in the application where we're lifting the color of the color that's already been made wet to add maybe dark shades to the other areas of the image. What we're doing here is we're just adding in a nice layer, good heavy layer of that walnut brown, and you'll realize when I come to do this that this is such a great technique to utilize some of that color without having to waste this. We're just going to go in just like that, and then maybe on this little poll that comes up here, you just add in a little bit more color that I don't need to completely fill that up. Then with the sales, I'm just going to leave them sales as the white color of the paper, so that part is now done. What we can do now is we can concentrate on this watery area over here. Let's have a look at our gorgeous blues. For the blues, I really want this to be nice and light for the initial layers so that we can start adding more details on. What I might do is I must just stick to the light, ultramarine blue that I've got. Let's find that. It's that one, the light ultramarine. Yeah, that's the one. Then again, just like we did for the sky, all I'm going to do is I'm just going to put a light base layer overhead, just fill it all up like gaps, and make sure that you don't have any missing areas. Because this is just going to serve the purpose of adding a initial base layer that we can build upon. Because again, if you remember, these colors are transparent when they dry, and the lighter you go with your color, the more transparent it's going to be. We don't want to go too heavy on this first initial base layer. Just like that, I'm covering all those beautiful gaps with that gorgeous pigment, and this is quite a nice blue. This is why ultramarine blue. Just making sure that I've got every area covered because I don't want to have too many white patches, and it's looking really nice. I mean, it's so fast, and easy to get coverage with these watercolor pencils. Whereas if you were using your normal watercolor paints, you can do the same thing. But the problem is that you've got to wait until they dry, and that's a huge advantage of using watercolor pencils over just normal watercolor paint. You can go in, and start adding your color dry, planning it in. If you want to make it change, you can maybe add a different color to create another color or change the look, and feel, you can do that of the entire drawing like we're doing here, without having to wait for drying times. That's a huge advantage for planning purposes. There we go, we've got a nice little base layer done there. Now what we're going to do is we're going to concentrate on these nice, gorgeous little peaks of candy floss that we have at the front part of our sketch. For this, I remember I want it to go with the beautiful earthy earth tones here. I'm going to stick to the raw, umber, burnt ocher, and this Venetian red that's I've got which is an absolutely gorgeous color, probably my first or second favorite out of the set that have caused. Let's grab hold of them. I've got my gorgeous colors here so let's just go in, and start adding these colors. I'm going to start off with the burnt ocher. Again, just like I did with the peaks above here, I'm going to use that same principle to just add in that color, nice bits of color on half of that peak. Then just like that, fill it up, leaving this section clean, and white so that we can melt it away when we start adding the water. Just add that gorgeous colors there. That's looking good. Again, I'm going to do the same for this one here, I'm just going to use that same pencil so that I don't have to keep switching pencils to make the process a lot easier, just adding that yummy color over there we've got this beautiful shade of burnt ocher. This is burnt ocher, isn't it? It might not be burnt ocher. Yes, it is. I got it right. That is burnt ocher. Now that's enough for that one. Let's just move that pencil on the side there. Let's now maybe do the super-duper, Venetian red. Now I'm sure it is called the Venetian red, isn't it? yeah, Venetian red. Gorgeous color that like I said, probably one of my favorites from the set. Just add that color. I mean look at that, even in its dry form, the color is just fantastic, isn't it? It is this gorgeous shade of reddish, brownish color, and it just looks great. Let's just fill that up over there halfway through, like before. Then we'll do the same on this page so that we have a kind of a pattern emerging, so we're following the sequence of colors in our drawing. Now again, you don't need to follow the sequence if you've got different colors that you want to try out on these peaky areas go ahead, and do that, that's absolutely fine. You don't have to follow exactly step-by-step as long as you've got something on your page that's filled up with color, and you've used a couple of the techniques that we went through in the class, then it's all good. Just like that, fill that up. Gorgeous right, move that to the side. Then finally we've got our raw umber, which is another nice color. It's slightly darker, it gives a nice bit of variance, and a difference within the look of the colors and images. Let's just add that in. Very nice. Then finally, the last one over here, let's just add this in on the end, and we're looking good. That's all done, what I'm going to do is I'm going to use that walnut color that I had before that I used for the bolty boats, just to darken the basis of place like I did with the ones on top. Just add a bit of walnut color there, and what that will do is I'll start it off nice, and dark, then it will make it more vibrant on top, and they look really nice once it's done. Just a bit of walnut over there. If you've got like a dark brown color, and you're following the similar colors that I'm using, then just use your darkest brown that you have in your set. If you haven't got dark brown, then use maybe another color or just leave it as it says, it makes no difference. I just like to do this just add that visual interest because otherwise, you don't want it to look boring. You don't just want to have one flat color. It's always nice to mix the colors with a bit of watercolor mixing. Just like that, we're just adding in that lovely dark brown, not too much, we don't want to over saturate it or make it too dark, and that's it. 22. Final Dry Colour: Final part now is these little peaky peaks. This is just going to be a repeat of what colors I used here. Well, I'm going to go a little bit brighter on the top paths of these peaks so that it gives a bit more of a visual interests. I'm just going to get hold of my three greens I had before. But in addition, I'm also going to use this beautiful cadmium yellow. This is going to effectively be the lightest highlight color of the peaks. Let's start off with a light system as we did before. Again, I'm going to start off with the lightest, but I'm going to actually go in between the actual shapes. Over here just like this. Have yellow, that beautiful sunshine, gorgeous yellow, the lights in the middle, and then I'm going to go in and add my lights green. I'm going to add my light green over here, just underneath, just overlapping it slightly, light green there, and then just filling all of the area rope on that bottom left-hand side so we have two different colors. Then I'm going to go in with the more mid-tone green that I had just over here, like that. Then finally, a little bit of emerald green, just on the base over here which will give it a nice separation of color and adding more interest. I'm just going to follow that same process. I just go in with the yellow first on all of these peaks down here. Yellow in the middle, leave the whites on the top part, and then just follow the same method all the way through. On to the next board. Just like that, nice bits of pigment not going in line. I'm going again with fairly good amounts of pressure there. I want to make these nice and bright. Then the last one over here, just go in with that yellow, making sure that we leave a gap on the top. Just like that gorgeous stuff. Now we can move in with the light green and just fill in the bottom left-hand side with that light green. We don't really need to overlap it on the yellow because we're going to meld them together anyway, so just a bit of that light greens to fill in that gap. The same goes over here on the left-hand side of this third peaky peak. Then finally, on this one, we're going in again. Not bothering to overlap over the yellow, just leave it as it is. Then finally, we have our lighter shade of green. 23. Adding Water: Okey-dokey. Let's now start adding in our water to our gorgeous colors on our page. Just get water jar opened up, move that to the side. Make sure you've got clean water and your watercolor brush is nice [NOISE] and clean, just in case you were using it before and it's dirty. You don't want to have a dirty brush. Let's just make sure our water brush is clean. Let's get a zoomy zoom on this. What we're going to do here is we're going to start off from the top. It's always a good idea to start from the top of your actual drawing and then work your way down. Otherwise, you have more chance of you doing a smudgy smudge and then you're not going to be happy. I'm just going to move my jar a bit closer to me. Let's just have a look at this. Let's just get a nice bit of water on our watercolor brush. What I'm going to do is, I'm just going to add that water on like I've been doing in the lessons of the class. Right over that darker shade of the red, over the blue, so that the color starts melting away. Look at that. How gorgeous is that? That color is just melting away. It was magenta color that we used. I'm just making sure that I work on this quite quickly because I don't want it to dry up, and then I can't rework it. Because this is just going to effectively be that base layer. If we need to add a second layer to this, then we can. Just like that, adding a bit more water to the brush and then going in here, just dragging that water down so that it maneuvers nice and easily in between those gaps and so we can close it off. There we go. What I don't want to do is I don't want to be touching the watercolor in the other areas. Otherwise, it will start murking up and bleeding from one place to another. That's the problem with using watercolor especially, generally if you have color on one side and it's wet, it's just going to start bleeding from one place to the other. Because we've laid down our color initially, we've got color that's all over the place so that you can easily muddy it up by accidentally putting a brush on one side and that can cause problems. However, even if you find that while you're painting or while you're wetting your watercolor, you do accidentally go over, it's not the end of the world. Just get a bit of paper towel or tissue, and just go ahead and just dry it off and you can start again. Just like that, [NOISE] I'm quickly moving it in. [NOISE] Now, I'm making sure that my brush is clean now because that blue area, I don't want to just get purple everywhere. I just want a nice bit of blue there. I'm going to wet that blue first. Get that blue all nice and dissolved. Get it into those white areas as much as I can without touching the orange, and then I'm going to work upwards. You can see I'm working upwards from blue to that purplish tone and it's looking nice. It gives you that two-tone gradient. Again, I'm going to clean my brush, and then I'm going to do the same here, work into that blue area where we've just got the pure blue pigment. We're just working it upwards towards the wet area of that purplish magenta shade. All we're doing here is we're just going in gorgeous little round motions to just melt that watercolor away. It's looking fantastic, isn't it? Let's just do this little edge that I've got down here. It's looking nice. We'll just finish this area on the side. Just make sure that the brush that you use is clean. Keep cleaning your brush. That really is key because if you don't clean your brush, then all these colors that you produce they're not going to be nice and clean, they're going to be all horrible and muddy. There you go. We're just going across that purplish tone. Now, that purplish tone isn't mixing too much with my blue and the reason for that is that it's dried up pretty quickly, but that's not to worry. This is just a under layer of color. We can add as much on top as we like. Just like that, I'm just going in and making sure it's nice and wet. Again, that is one thing that you've got to bear in mind. You do have to work fast with watercolors, especially watercolor pencils. If you're not using too much water initially and you're having effectively a medium dried brush, then you do need to work pretty fast. Let's just have a look at this now. You can see I've got that nice base layer covered up from that sky. Now, what we need to do is we need to wait until this completely dries before we start working on these peaks because we're going get bleeding going into the sky. But you don't have to wait for every element, what we can do is we can move this a little bit higher, and you can see the house area is not anywhere near that wet paint. We can start working on the house straight away. Let's go ahead and do that now. Just cleaning my brush, [NOISE] doing a nice clean, make sure there's no blue or magenta on there from the sky that we did. Just clean it, give it a nice dip. Again, if you have two jars of water, it would be great. You just clean and then dip into the clean water, but we're not using too much color here, so I'm not going to really bother with that. Let's go ahead and now start working on this beautiful housy house. Now I'm going to do is I'm going to work on the gray part first. I'm just going to add that watercolor to the gray part, and just make sure that I touch everywhere that we have dry pigment. It just basically melts it away just like this. You can see we're getting some nice results. Now, I don't want to be touching the blue there because then the blue is going to all melt into the gray. I'm just going to leave a slight gap in that area and then I'll wait until it dries. Just like that going in. As I said before, if you accidentally move over and it goes into the blue and it starts bleeding away, don't worry about it, just continue. Even if the whole thing becomes blue, don't worry about it at all. It's not really about creating perfect paintings or drawings. It's just about getting yourself familiar with this wonderful medium of watercolor pencils. Just like that, going in, wetting those areas that are dry, cleaning the brush, [NOISE] just adding a little bit more fresh water, so that we continue that flow of liquid because what you don't want is a dry brush, unless you want to produce a dry brush-effect like we did in the earlier class. We might do that for some of the elements later on in this drawing. Just like that, looking good, nice, and wet. We can do the same for the chimney area here. I'm just going to use the same technique. Just add that water onto there. Not too much water. You don't want to over-drench your brush because what happens then is if you're working in small details and you've got an over-drenched brush and that water is just going to go all over the place, and it will accidentally go into areas. You can see I've just slightly touched that blue but it doesn't really make much difference. I'm just going to dab that on, [NOISE] clean the brush again, and then just get a paper towel like we did in the previous lesson. Just make sure that we take the excess off so that we just have a damp brush and then go into this little tiny part of the chimney, and just give it a little stroke there just so that you have contact with the water on the actual dry pigment, and that's done. What I'm going to do now is do a zoomy zoom back on here. Let's just analyze which are the areas we can work on while these other ones dry out. I'm just going to quickly just work on this water area. What I'm going to do is I'm just going to go in [NOISE] with my brush and let's just wet that initial water area there. Just like that, go in, and just give it a nice bit of wet of water. It doesn't really matter how much water you use here. Just try not over-drenching your brush as I said before because you want to keep that pigment on the paper. If you use too much water, then what tends to happen is the pigment just goes to one side, if you're just using light pigment. We don't really want to do that. We want to [NOISE] have a little bit of color, don't we? Let's just do that again, a bit more of water there. I'm just going to quickly do this. I'm not really that bothered how neat I am. I just want that water to be wet. Because remember, once the water is wet and it dries off, it's going to be completely permanent and it won't be able to be reworked in again, so do bear that in mind. Depending on the brand of watercolor pencils that you're using, let's just carry on and get that wet going all the way across just like that. It's looking nice. I'm just going to maybe add a little bit of wety wet on this area just between the sail and the background, just so we have liquid watercolor everywhere where we don't have any dry spots. That's looking good. 24. Merging Colours: Now what we can do is we can work on these elements over here. This is where the fun part begins because we're going to have colors merging into one another. Let's just get a nice zoomy zoom in on this, so you can see how this works. Now remember when you're merging colors, try melting the lightest color first because if you go in dark first and you go into the light, the dark will overpower the light. What I'm going to do here is, I'm just going to add in my water instead of white area first because that's the white cyst, just going to add in a nice bit of water there. Then I'm going to drag that water into the yellow that we have. You can see as I'm dragging that water into the yellow, It's going across into the white area randomly, naturally, so I'm going to leave that because that's what I want in the effect of one trying to produce. Just like that, I'm just adding in all these dots of water and that's all it is. I'm just adding in the dots, I'm not spreading it or doing anything, just adding in that water color. I'm going to clean my brush, to make sure that there's nothing on there. Get a nice drench of water on that tip of the brush and then I'm going to go into the green area. I'm just going to add a few doubles of water onto that green area. Then I'm just going to add a bit of water in-between the area where it merges into the yellow and you can see that green has started melting away into that yellow watercolor. How gorgeous is that? It's brilliant isn't it? So much fun. It's like giving you this lovely modeling effect. With the same brush, is going to go into the green at the bottom, that more darker, medium shade of green. I'm just going to slight keep dabbing it without pressing and giving it a stroke with just dabbing the tip of our brush so that we start activating that water color. That water color can start moving around naturally on the paper with the colors that its next to. Just going in there. Then remember we have a nice, that's a line of that fellow green at the bottom. All am going to do there is just wet that line. Not going to add any more water, just wet it, slightly wet it, and then just move its up with a couple of dabs and you can see it's going to start melting away into that yellow, how gorgeous is that? Now we've achieved that so quickly and so easily, beautiful random patterns. Now if you want to add a bit more green into that yellow, you can, your brush will already have the green on it. Just maybe add a couple of dots of that green into the yellow and it's looking fantastic. Just like that, we've created this beautiful merging of colors melting away with our watercolor pencils and our brush. Just making sure that every area is wet, you don't want to leave anything dry and that's looking rather nice. Now I've got a bit of a little spilly there. I don't really care about that, don't worry about making everything perfect. It's just about getting that technique done and completing your illustration. I'm going to do the same for the next ones over here, so let's just go ahead and deal with that. [NOISE] Just remember that you need to ensure that the colors remain wet while you merge them, because once they dry out, you're not going to get this merging effects. I'm just going to go straight into that yellow, I'm not going to bother with the white area. I'm just going to go straight into it with a yellow. It's doing a little bit different from here, whereas over here I went into the white and then yellow over here, I'm just going to go straight into the yellow and then I'm going to clean my brush. Then I'm going to go into the green, couple of dots into the green, just dab that brush onto that watercolor and you can see it starts melting away and again, clean the brush, shake off the excess of the brush, go into that darker part. What we don't want is, we don't want this color to merge into that. You can see that there's this little gap that have gone in the middle. It's important to keep a gap if you don't want the color to go from one element to the other. I'm going to make sure that I don't want that gap to be covered, we can deal with that gap when we start inking. Again, it's going in with that brush and then just bottom fellow green, just give it a little a wety wet and that's it looking nice. Now I'm going to clean my brush completely and then just add in a little bit of water where we've got this whitespace. Then all I want to do here is I just want to touch that water on the edge of the yellow, so that light yellow can bleed into that white and create a nice marbled look and we are done on that one. Let's just quickly finish off these. Let's just work fast on this one. Let's just go in straight onto the yellow. Then what am going to do in this one is, I'm not going to clean my brush in-between, so let's just to vary it. I'm just going to go straight into that green there, so that we have a slightly different look and I'm just going to go straight into the green at the bottom, just making sure that there's a separation line in-between. Just going straight into the green, not going to bother cleaning my brush, I'm just going to keep it all in one go just like that, to produce a bit of a variance. Each one of these are going to look different, but they should look similar. That's the fun aspects of using watercolor. Sometime you don't know what results you can achieve and all I'm doing here is, I'm just flicking up that green so that it bleeds into that yellow part to come up with these gorgeous, little patterns that we're achieving. Just like that. Just do a final little addition. Then just again like I did before, I'm just going to go in with the water on that part at the end where we just have white and then slightly give it a touch on the yellow. Then it's going to start mixing and melting away. Look at that gorgeous stuff isn't it? Let's do the final one and again for the final one, clean brush. What am I do for this one is, I must start on the green. Let's start from the green, why not vary it? We've got nice blob of water around the green there. Let's just wet that green first. Let's make this one a little bit more green. Wet the green and then use same brush to wet the yellow and just move that forward. I can see we've got a bit more prominent green, bit more of a green color mix going on there. Just vary it, just test out your watercolors and see what results you get. It's always nice to produce different results with your watercolor on same drawings that you create that visual interests. What I will do now is, I've added enough of that green there, let's give the bush it clean and let's go in the other way. Clean water at the end first. Then let's just keep dabbing it on serving yellow and let that all melt away with that green color that we have, so it's looking really nice, there we go. Then maybe just flick it up from the bottom to see what random pattern we get. Lets just do a zoomy zoom back on there and there you go. You can see we've got that nice little variance going on there, while the watercolor is wet. We just need to make sure that we don't smudge anything. Let's just do a zoom back completely and have a look at the overall picture, and there you go. We have a wet paint here, we've got wet paint here. The sky should now be dry and you can see it's dry, to the touch. The house is probably a little bit more moist, so I'm going to do now is I'm going to work on these areas and these areas once everything is completely dry, so we don't want to have a muddy mess. Let's just let this dry, maybe take out the hair dryer, or I'll just go for another coffee. Let's come back when the whole thing is dry. 25. Vibrant Tones: Welcome back. That was a nice coffee and a cake. I snuck in a little cake while I was waiting for this to dry, and it was delicious. Getting back to the watercolor sketch. You can see now everything is completely dry to the touch. That's really important. Like I mentioned before, must be dry for you to work on the next elements to avoid bleeding. What I'm going to do now is, I'm going to concentrate on the peak areas where we have a vibrant color. Let's just get a zoomy zoom on this. What I'm going to do is, I'm going to do the same technique that I did, with these elements at the bottom with the green and the yellow. We're going to basically just repeat what we did there using the same technique. Let's just get a nice little dip on the brush with some clean water, and let's just zoom in maybe a little bit more so you can see this. For this one, I'm going to start in with that orange color, just like I did before. Starting in with the lightest, giving it a little bit of a wet looking great, melting that color away, looking absolutely fantastic. As that's done, I'm going to go in straight with the brush and I'm not going to clean the brush again. I'm just going to go in into that dark red and give that a nice bits of a wet, and you can see it's looking gorgeous. Look at that color, beautiful. Now, that is quite a prominent dark red. What we need to do is clean our brush before we go any further. A nice cleanly clean, and now what we want to do is, we want to add in a little bit of clean water here on the white as we did before. We've got to make sure that we don't touch this area on the next peak where we've got this red. Otherwise it's going to bleed into that and it's not going to look very nice. Just like that, a bit of clean water and then just double it into light yellow, orangey yellow color, and it's looking fantastic. What I'm going to do now is, with the tip of my brush, I'm just going to go in, and just merge these two colors like I did before, and just softly just give them a little touch to encourage that color going into one another and you can see, it's creating that beautiful marbled effect. Just like that, I'm going to leave it as it is, it's looking great. We're just going to repeat this process now. On the next two, I'll just quickly show you on here, clean brush, going in to the orange first and just making sure we melt everything away, so that we don't have any dry residue of pigment on that paper. Lovely orange there, I'm going to go straight into that red, and then with that brush, I'm going to clean the brush, give it a nice soaking water. We've got some water, here, add it onto the white and basically repeat what we did before. I'll just add it on to that white, dab it into the orange, so that the orange goes into the white area, also remove that little spilly spill. Just like that it bleeds nicely into the white area, the light area. That water is doing all the work for you. Just like that. Looking great, and we can see. You can see that you may have a bit of a harsh line, if you don't melt the colors properly. Wherever you see harsh lines, just give it another dab with your brush really softly, and it's looking fantastic. Look at that gorgeous marble. What I'm going to do now is do the same with the dark red, so that the dark red merges into that beautiful orange, and we have ourselves a gorgeous marbling effect, and again, just bringing it into the orange, don't want to mix it completely. We want to see that separation of color, so that it brings it to a nice vibrant look. Let's just give our brush a cleany clean, so dip it into water. Let's just continue this process, go straight onto the red. This time beautiful. Look at that color, melting away. It's like butter, isn't it? It's just like melting butter. [LAUGHTER] That's a calm down, getting a bit excited there, and going into that dark red. I think it's that cake that I had when I had my little break. It was a gorgeous cake. It was a Victorious Sponge. Can't beat a bit of Victorious Sponge with a fresh cream and jam. That's reminding me of the jam actually, that color beautiful. [LAUGHTER] Let's carry on. Again, I've just darkened the red. I'm going to go in with my brush, give it a cleany clean, and make sure that I dip it in, get nice bits of water on that bristle and go into the white area. Now, just lay that white area with clean water, and then we can do our little technique of just dabbing it onto the red, and then that will slowly bleed away, merge into that clean water and creates a gorgeous effect of saturated color into a more lighter color. Look how easy that is. Just put some quick strokes and just a bit of dibble-double into the actual color with water. It creates a beautiful effect. Once it's dry, it's going to look fantastic. I mean, it even looks fantastic while it's wet, but unfortunately with water, as we all know, it's going to dry out and then it's going to look a little bit different. Just going again to the darker area, and then just doing that dibble-double and it's looking great. Just making sure that we don't have any of the dry pigment there, because if we leave the dry pigment, then later on, if we decide to do a light glaze, that's going to interfere. Just carrying on with that, not overdoing it, just keeping it nice and subtle. We've got self, some gorgeous marbling effect. I mean just look at that beautiful stuff, isn't it? Let's just continue bits of a clean. [NOISE] For this area now, you can see behind the chimney area, we've no wet that blue parts, so we've of got to be careful now not to add water to that blue part because that will stop mudding up the color. What I'm going to do now is, I'm just going to clean my brush, dab my brush onto my paper towel so that I don't have too much water on it, and then doing the same thing again, let's just do a bit of a zoomy zoom so you can see this. Going into that yellow area, just melting away with the brush, making sure that we don't have too much water, because we don't want it overflowing onto those details. Then just quickly going again with another dab of water into that white area there, just around that chimney, making sure that we're not touching the blue, and then just to use that dabbing effect to get that yellow, beautiful, gorgeous, yellowy orange color into that white. Just again here, just dabbing it slightly to bring it across. Then all I'm going to do is, we've got this reddish part down here and it's going to go in and I'm just going to give it a nice smoothing of the brush. We don't need to worry too much about merging the color with the yellow because, it's just a little bit showing there. Maybe bring a bit of this color that's on the brush up here, and you could say I'm just dabbing that on. If you remember in the earlier lessons, we were using that picking up technique where we just pick up the color, and then move it along in a wet-on-wet techniques. That's what I'm doing here. I'm just picking up this dark color. I'm just adding those dots up here so that it looks really good. I'm going to leave it at that. Let that settle, and we can carry on with the last final peak. This is the final one. Add it on to that beautiful orange. Then I'm going to go into that red. Again, being careful not to touch the blue of the roof there. That's looking quite nice. Now, you may think that there's loads of these white spaces everywhere, but don't worry about that. It's not about perfect painting, as I keep mentioning. It's just about getting a better practice with watercolor pencils. We just want to add a bit more water now into that white area, just making sure that we don't touch the blue and over here, just drop it in, and it's okay because that gray area is already been dried with watercolors, and that shouldn't interfere unless we have some dry bits on it. You can see, we can be a bit more loose with this area. Then, we just want to dab that orange onto it and that orange will flow nicely into that liquid area. Look at that gorgeous, isn't it? How easy was that? Just letting that orange flow, and what I'm going do is I'm going to keep dabbing that orange into this area here as well, so that we don't lose the color in this parts of the drawing. Again, I'm just going to take a bit more orange onto the brush from this area, just dab it on so that we can have a little bit of color coming in across this area, just to make sure it looks nice and complete. Just maybe a bit more on the saturated part here. Just dab it on here, you can see we've got a bit more orange in that area, and I think that about it. All we need to do now is just merge the red inside the orange. It's looking fantastic. 26. Foreground Tones: Isn't it gorgeous? It's just so much fun today. Again, you can try this with different colors. Maybe try cooler colors. I like to use warm colors and then alternate with a background. But there's no hard rule of what colors you've got to use. Just have a bit of fun with this. Let's just do a zoomy zoom back so you can see what we've done so far. There we have it. We've got a gorgeous vibrant color in the background of those peaks. What I'm going do now is while we wait for that area to dry, I'm just going to do exactly the same in these areas. Let's just do a cleany clean of the brush, and do a bit of a zoom in and see if we can quickly complete this area. It's going to be exactly the same technique. I'll just do the first one and then I'll just repeat on the others so that you can quickly have a look at this. Clean brush. Let's get into that gorgeous color, that beautiful color and just go in. What I'm going to do is, with this one, I'm just going to go straight into this dark brown because this was a dark brown that walnut brown. That's quite prominent. I'm just going to bring my brush down into it like this so that it melts immediately into it so that I don't have to lift it up with merge. As you can see, we've got that all light tone and then it eventually goes into the dark. Then again, clean the brush. We're just going to add that water all the way to the edge. We can just start mixing it straight away. Just dibble, double there, and bring that lighter color across. It's looking fantastic. So I can see a bit more of dry paint there. Let's just maybe add a few more bits and bobs. Again, just making sure that we have a gap over here from one peak to another so we don't get merging across the elements because will go all over the place and you are not going to be happy. Again, just going in and making sure that all the dry parts have been activated by the water. It's looking fantastic. I'm just going to quickly do this now for the rest of these peaks. It's just doing the same technique and then we'll have a look at it once it's done. [MUSIC] Now we've finished our foreground area. You can see that it's looking absolutely gorgeous. You can see that by adding that walnut brown in the bottom left-hand corners of these colors really gives it that extra depth and makes it looks so much more interesting than just using a flat color. Then when you leave the right-hand side lights with just normal water and then just dab it in so that you get this crossing over of dark to light and all this marbling effect. It looks absolutely beautiful. Let's just get a zoom back so we can see the whole thing. Okey-dokey. Now you can see that when you look back you can see we've got some gorgeous vibrant colors that are scattered all across this image and it's located rather nice. All we need to do now is have another break and let all of these dry. I would not use a hairdryer to dry this because what a hairdryer will do is it will start moving that color all the way around. Just be patient with it. Just let it dry. I could take maybe a couple of hours depending on the humidity of your room and how much water you've used. I would say, take a break, have a drink, make yourself a nice milkshake case of a cake or whatever you fancy. Go do that. Have a bit of a rest because that's exactly what I'm going to do. Then we'll come back to it and carry on working once everything is gorgeous and dry. I'll see you after then. 27. Delicate Details: Welcome back. Now, our lovely little illustration has completely dried out. You can see over here we've got these gorgeous effects that we created with our beautiful color. The next stage now is to just work on these little details that we've got left over in order, so that we have everything filled up for that second layer of wonderfulness. Let's start off by getting a zoom on this. What I'm going to do is I'm going to go ahead and start doing the coloring in of the roof and this little chimney bit over here. Let's just get a, little dab of the brush, make sure it's clean. Of course, as we've been saying throughout the class, a clean brush will give you clean result. For this area, if you remember, I said we're going to do a slightly different sequence or technique. We've got the lines that we've already drawn on with the watercolor pencil and it's just a case of, if I get a bit more closer to this, you'll be able to appreciate this. All I'm going to do here is I'm not going to go in heavy with the brush. The brush is nicely drenched. I'm just going to follow the lines. Just like this, I'm just going to wet the line itself. You can see, as I'm wetting the line, I'm getting a slight bit of a tone from that blue going into the white area. That's all it is that I'm doing. I'm just wetting that line, making sure that line gets completely melted away. But I'm not maneuvering the pigment. I'm just letting it flow as it wants to, to create this division between the dark line and the light of the middle part of the paper. We've just got this nice area, nice light effect occurring and that's it. This is the effect that I want, I want it to be a very light shade of blue, where the white is and the areas where we've got the pigment to be nice and dark. Again, I'm just following the line with the tip of the brush so there's no maneuvering the paint. All we're doing is just following that line, getting it nice and wet and you can see the little speckles of water with a little bit of pigment in them have started moving around. Again, just following the lines, nice and easy. Just follow it through and make sure that there's nothing there that that's untouched with water. Just like that, fantastic. You can see that I've got this whitespace here, but I like that, so I'm just going to leave it as it is. I'm not wanting to cover the entire thing, I just want to follow the lines. We're going to tilt my paper to the side so it makes it a little bit easier for me to do and I'm just going to follow that same process of just wetting the line. We don't need too much water to do this. We just need a slightly drenched brush. I'm just going to follow the lines through, to maintain the design that we've put down with the watercolor pencil. You can see this is a complete different effect to what we've been doing so far. We've been melting colors away, we're just using one color with the water to produce this lovely ink effect, if you like. It's like an ink that we're using to just draw with. Just like that, I've not added anymore water yet, I've still got a little bit of water on my brush. As much as that water will add onto the paper, we can carry on. Just go like that. Just make sure that every part of that dry color has been made wet with that water color brush. We've done these lines that are coming across. Let's just do the lines that go in the other way. I'm just going to tilt it, to give myself a good angle. I'm just going to maybe add just a touch of water. Just a touch of water like that. You can see, I've got a nice wet on the brush there. Then, I'm just going to follow the lines going downwards and let that water come up with these beautiful marks. Just like that, follow these lines from top to bottom. Do it a couple of times if you want to, or you just do it once it's entirely up to you. It depends on what type of spread of pigment you're after and this is what I want. I want these white gaps to show in-between the boxes if you like. I want those white gaps to show with just of the bit melt on the watercolor pigment and I think it's looking rather nice. Just finishing this off on this last line. Then we've got the edge that's down here, and that is looking pretty good. I'm going to do the same for this chimney area. But what I'm going to do is, I'm going to tilt my page completely, the other way around because I don't want my hand to smudge this area. Just put that to see if we can get it closer. Bits of blur. Let's get rid of that good stuff. Again, I'm not going to dip my brush in water anymore because I know I've got enough of that. Very delicately, just go in and just wet those lines, just like that. You can see how quickly we've got a beautiful in keyboards or call us. Let's just get a zoom back on that. You can see, that's looking fantastic. Let's now maybe just do the door. The door is just going to be a standard filled, so we'll just add in a little bit more water back. All I'm going to here is, I'm just going to add in that water and just melt away that color. I'm going to try leaving a bit of a gap between this element here so that we don't get that water emerging incidents element. You're going to do everything quickly now because we've basically gone through most of the techniques. We don't need to repeat ourselves, so you can just do that. We get nice and wet. Fantastic. 28. Speckled Colour: Okay, now let's do a zoom back on this. The only other elements we've got left now is, we've got these ones, these green ones that separate the page and we've got the boat. I'm going to leave the boat to the end, because we're going to do something a little bit different with the boat. Let's go ahead and do these small green elements. The green elements are going to be exactly the same in terms of using the technique that we did here. I'll just do a couple of them, and then we can speed through the others. Let's just get a close on this. Clean the brush to make sure there's no blue pigment from the roof and the door, and just do a little dip like that so that we have a nice wet brush. Let's go straight into this now. What I'm going to do here is I'm not bothered about having too much of a white highlight. All I'm going to do is I'm going to start from the dark, just going to start dropping in those water dots in that dark area. Then I'm just going to move it towards the top where we've got the lights up and then just through them same dots in the white area. I'm not going to add any water, I'm just going to add a couple of dots like this. You can see it's effectively like a speckled look, so we've just got these little dots that go on the top. What I'm going to do with the bottom part where we've got that nice dark green, the phthalo green, I'm just going to do that flick movement where I did before. I'm just going to flick it up as the brush is wet, so that it merges in with the lighter shades on top. Then maybe just close it off by doing a little stroke at the bottom and that's it. Let's just continue doing that on the next one. Clean brush and just these dots starting in the middle. Whereas if you remember where the other elements we started in the lighter shade, over here we're starting in the mid-tone shade, just to vary it a little bit and do a slightly different technique. Then whatever pigment that your brush has collected now by tapping this middle area, just use that pigment to just add a couple of dots on the top to effectively give a speckled look on top of these little peaks and that looks rather nice. It gives it a bit of a variation. Then close it off again with the phthalo, the dark phthalo at the bottom, maybe just flick it up into the water part of that liquid and we're looking nice. I'm just going to continue doing that here. I still got a bit wet on the brush, so I'm just going to go in, give that a dabble and let's just continue. Just like that, wet in the area, there's not much here to wet because we're behind the sails of the boat. Then just do a couple of dots in that white space. They don't have to be perfect, they can gel into another that's no problem. It's just to create a slightly different visual look. Then flick that darker green upwards so that we wet it and it merges with the lighter tones. Now I'm going to clean my brush. [NOISE] I'm going to quickly go ahead and do these remainder three. Let's just add in a nice blob of water over there, another blob of water over here. Just get that stuff nice and wet. Get another blob of water down there. You can see we've quickly done that. With all three of them, I'm just going to move that slightly up and just keep adding them dots into that white area so that we can work a little bit quickly and just make sure that there's no dry pigment anywhere on those elements. Just dots on the white areas. Twist the brush around to get all that color moving. Again, just over here, making sure that there's no dry elements. Then just do a couple of dots, a couple of brush stipples all the way on the top. Then we can finish off by just giving it a little stroke on the dark green and then flicking it up, creating that beautiful merging color. Again here, flick that dark green up, go across, flick it up, and go across. We are pretty much done on that. Just a couple more touches and I think that's looking rather nice. Let's do a zoom back on there. You can see we did that so quickly. It's produced a bit of a variance in the look and feel. If we just get more of zoom back, you can see when we look at the whole picture, we've got different techniques that we've used at the bottom here, similar ones on these peaks. A completely different style in the middle where we just went straight in with water. Slightly different look over here. Then again, more techniques used in variation to create a nice page of beautiful color. What I'm going to do now is I'm going to go ahead and maybe just do this little pole on the boat because we want to leave the bottom part of that boat towards the end when everything has dried out. What I can do is I'm just going to give my brush a clean, and I don't need much water for this. I'm just going to make sure that I get rid of that excess. You can see I've just got a nice damp brush. With that damp brush, all I'm going to do is just follow the line that I put here and just draw it completely down to make sure that we don't have any dry pigment on this, just like that. Just add a little bit of dot there to finish off that piece. Then maybe just with that paint that I've got the brush, just do a little line underneath for where that sail is, making sure that I don't touch the green. Just a light little line there and maybe a light little line over here, just to give it a bit of a shadow or an indication that we have some sails. I think we're going to leave that as it is, and we've just got to wait and let it dry now. Probably I'm going to go and have another coffee. [LAUGHTER] I'll see you once this whole thing is dried and then we're going to be doing the exciting part of adding more interest with the second layers of color. I'll see you when that's ready. 29. Lifting Darker Shades: Welcome back. We've now got gorgeous dry watercolor here, so we can move on to the boaty boat. Let's just get a bit of a zoomy zoom in on this, get my brush clean and give it a nice stretch in water. What I'm going to do here is, I'm going to do this special final technique on the dry watercolor. All I'm doing here is I'm just going to wet that brown, that gorgeous walnut brown on the base parts of that boat. Literally, the next step is going to be to lift that color. Now if I got a bit more closer to this, you can see that we've got this beautiful wet paint on that area and we're going to effectively use this as a water palette. You've got this color there that we can use to lift and puts on to other places within the actual painting itself. What I'm going to do with this brown, I'm going to go in, in these peaky areas here and my brush is going to be loaded with the brown that I've just taken from here. I'm just going to load up a bit more brown. You can see I've got that liquid brown there. I'm just moving it along left and right and I can lift that onto the tip of my brush and then I can just go in over here and maybe darken areas in this bottom left-hand side and look how easy that is. We're utilizing the paint that we've got within certain elements of our illustration to just come up with a secondary glaze to add in some dark areas. Just like that, I'm just adding in dark areas in the bottom left-hand corner and I have not used any more of my watercolor pencil or I've not grinded at a pigment. I've just gone in and used the color from the boats over here. Again, I'm just going to go in and you're going to take a little bit more of that color while it's wet. I'm just going to go in and add in a little bit of dark to just give some contrast look over here. This one color looks great. This is just illustrating that you can utilize your colors as you create your watercolor painting using your watercolor pencils. You don't always have to go in and grind color or start using the tip of the pencil. If you want a quick little fix, it's really easy to do. You can see now that the saturation is being reduced. As I'm using the strokes on hay, and you can see the brown is very subtle and it looks really nice. Whereas over here when we started off, we had the color, it was fairly dark. Then as you keep using that color across, it's going to lighten up and it looks quite nice. I might just use a little bit more here. I'm not going to lift anymore from the boats because I don't want to over saturate it with the dark colors. To just gets a zoom back on this and you can see that the brown on the boat now is drying away nicely, you can maneuver it around if you want, but it's just a case of showing you that you can use different parts of your painting elements to add a bit more interest or darkness where you like. Now we finished the dry part of the watercolor painting that we're doing, the lovely illustration that we've got here, I'll just do a zoomy zoom back. The next stage now is going to be the exciting stage of adding in our funky little details with our watercolor pencils in the second layer of color. We'll wait until this dries off and then we can start doing that next. 30. Adding Interest: Welcome back. Now you can see we have a lovely dry illustration and we're ready to move on to the next techniques. For this one, I'm going to sharpen my pencil. I'm going to use my favorite blue Helioish reddish blue, I think that's why it's called Helioish or Hellish, something like that. But we're going to give it a nicely little shopping sharpen, so that we have a decent points on it. You can see over here, we've got ourself, a nice sharp point. What we're going to do here is we're going to do a technique that we covered in the earlier lesson, which is the drawing on wet techniques. Before we go ahead and do this, all we need to do is we need to give it a layer of water. I'm just going to give me water jar. Then let's get a zoom on this so that you can see what I'm talking about and I'm going to concentrate on the water area of our illustrations. You can see that initial base layer that I put down was a nice light standard layer. Now I'm going to go in with some detail work using the wet technique where we draw straight onto wet with our colored pencils. It's going to get a nice amount of water for this. Remember, in order to do this, we need to make sure that our surface is wet. If it's dry, then it's not going to work. So just like that and you get a good amount of water and put it on. That color that we've already got on should not interfere or melt or start dissolving into this water liquid because it should dry, completely permanent. You can see, we're not even moving that color, it's staying exactly where it should looking fantastic. So just quickly, I'm going to work quick on this. Do try this out. If you following this step-by-step, it's a really nice technique to follow and you can get some gorgeous interesting results with this. So not sure if you can see on the camera, but it's got a nice little glaze of water now in this water parts area of the illustration. We can quickly work with this. Let's see what we get searched for lateral side. It's going to go in with my pencil and you can start adding in color into this area that divides the water part with the green elements on top. You can see just roughly just adding again that pencil line is coming in like this and you can see it's melting as it's going on to that water and giving it a really nice effect just like that underneath the boats to add a bit of a shadow area and then just lightly come up with some lines that are going across. You can see it's already started adding that visual interest on that paintings. It just like that random lines going across, not say thick, keep them thin. I'm just using the edge of the nib to keep them nice and thin. Then what we can do is go in with the water. Just a bit water on the brush. We can start softening these up and you can see we are getting a gorgeous effect. Now you could have gone in dry and maybe moistened it with your water. But why I like to do is I like to go in the dry on wet. So what that does is it gives it that inky look like I was talking about in the earlier lesson. I really liked that work. All I'm doing here is I'm just encouraging with my brush those areas that I have put down that color. You can see it's already started changing the dynamic of this illustration before it was just plain light shade of blue. Now we got all these lovely elements. What I can do now is I'll just move this to the side. We can start now using other blues to really add some interest and variations so I have got this light to blue here. This one's called the phthalo blues it's lighter than the actual blue that I was using before. Or it just adds a bit more of interest and just gives a bit more brightness really. The actual overall composition. It's always nice because you've got this big space here to add a little bit of interests to just make it look quite funky really [LAUGHTER]. So just like that as that layer is still a bit wet, dabbing my points of my pencil, answer the actual surface and you can see, it's coming up with some really nice marks. It just like that. A little about that. A little about that, going to go in now with the ultramarine and the ultramarine blue was what we had as the base layer, if I remember correctly. I'm just going to add in a little bit more here, just a bit more get it nice and vibrant and colorful. [NOISE] Then I'm just going to go in with the water. Just a quick [NOISE] dip the dip of the water and just start melting that color and maintaining these line marks that we put underneath. Because if you remember, if we just melt the color and we'll just melted completely, and you won't really get many of these kind of undertone lines of sketchy lines underneath and that's what I'm trying to achieve. If you have a look at this, you can see now if you just take a look, it look absolutely fantastic. I'm just making sure that there's no dry areas left where I just added the blue and it's looking rather nice. Now the next step to this would be to just maybe add a little bit of green to just mark that color into the shadow reflection of these green elements. Let's do that next. All I'm going to do is just again, add a little bit more water to this. It's Just kept more of a Zoom. So you can see clearly suggest again, just tapping a little bit of water, clean water on this edge where I want the green to go, just to add a bit of reflection. I've got my fellow green now. I'm just going to go in and just adding some of these green lines to show that we have a bit of a reflection of these little elements that we've got, I mean, It's not realism here, we're just doing a kind of sketchy illustration. You don't even have to do this, but highlights, mixing the colors just to give it a bit of a nicer locks, you can see just by adding those green dots, we've created a kind of reflection. Well, it's just an illusion of a reflection is it says, let's just get our brush and I don't know where I put my brush now. So where's my brush gone? It's in my hand oh God. Just getting too excited. I was in my hand all the time. So just like that with very light strokes, just moving that pigment across so that it doesn't look too odd and blends in nicely into the illustration is moving it in and out left and right so that we have a slight little merging of color on this drawing on wet technique. Eventually what we're doing is a wet on wet technique. That's what we're doing here with that color. We can do the same for the brown of the boat. Let's just grab hold of our walnut brown. With the walnut brown, we are just going to do exactly the same, just add in a couple of lines here, just a kind of indicate a bit of a reflection in that watery area. Then with my brush to give it a clean [NOISE] just going to wet them brown slightly. It looks like we've got these kind of reflected speckles just glistening in that water. So lots about say for that. You can see just adding these little touches using this technique it works very well in date. Let's just get a zoom back on this to see the whole picture. That's all looking rather good. So smoother that pencil out the way and my water pots. [LAUGHTER] smooth that out of the way and yes. You can see we've just added those details really to bring it out and add that third dimension to this overall image. What we're going to do next is we're going to go in with a little bits of shadow work and use another technique that we went through in the lessons. That technique we're going to look at on the next bond. 31. Hints of Warm Grey: Welcome back. What we're going to do now is we're going to just add in some dark areas by using another technique that we covered, and that is basically taking the pigment straight off the tip of our pencil. For this one, I'm going to be using the dark-gray shade that I've got and that is called a warm gray 5 in this set. Just going to give my brush a nice little double of water on it, get it nicely drenched. You can see now all I'm doing is, I'm basically drawing on the brush with the actual pigment. This is the quickest way to do this. Just use your actual pencil tip and just give that brush a stroke while you're twisting the brush. What will happen here is that, that pigment is going to go straight onto the brush. Just like that. Load it up and get as much of that pigment on so it's looking greatly. You don't want to get absolutely spilling onto your image. You don't want to be doing that, no. Another thing to remember with this technique is, try to avoid getting the wood casing of your pencils wet, because what happens is if they become wet or saturated with water, then they tend to take longer to dry. What sometimes happens is that the actual wood fibers in that shrink and then the pressure on the pigment that's inside the barrel and what sometimes can happen is that that pigment with that pressure will crack the actual pigment barrel. You don't want that to ruin the pencil. Avoid getting water onto the word area, just keep it to the pigment and if you do get someone like IFA, just wipe it away quickly on your, well, don't wipe it away on your fingers, bro get yourself a paper towel and just wipe it off so that you have a nice dry wood casing. Thus we're going to move that to the side. My actual brush has got a nice piece of gray on. Now, another thing to do is maybe just get some scrap paper and just test the actual saturation because what you don't want is you don't want to go in with a really saturated dark color. You may want to work in a lighter tone. You can see that's quite a dark gray. What I might do is I might just add another dab of water to this just to lighten it out, and this effectively works like a color palette that you've got to mix your colors in. I'm liking that shade as it is. Just like that, using my brush now, if you just move this to the top, maybe add some of these gray shadows, very subtle gray shadows here and maybe some down here, and again, just picking it off from that card just bringing it right down. Just dropping them in makes it so nice and subtle and you don't get no harsh lines. Just like that. Dropping it sends it here and it's looking really nice. That's just adding in a piece of that warm gray to just intensify the dark areas of these peaks. I've just got a little bit more of that, let's just use it all up. We're done on that. Now what I want to do is I want to do the same for this area. Again, I'm just going to pick up a little bit more color from the tip of my lovely gray pencil. Just like that, I'm going to repeat the pattern. What I'll do is I'll just get the paper and just repeat the pattern. Alternatively, if you don't want to do it like this if you need a little bit more color, then what you can do is you can just go ahead and just draw onto that paper with the actual pigment itself and then just use this effectively as a color picker. We'll just drench our brush in water, give that some mixing mix. You can see now, we've got a lot more of a saturated color there that we can play around with and work with. But again, do this only if you need a lot more on your actual image. I don't really need that much. I just want to indicate the CSL. That's about it for the saturation. I'm happy with that brush loaded and I'm just going to add some dots in here now. You can see here, I'm going to add these little dots. Start stippling scattered dots just across here, and these will dry out really nice to give it that additional interest. Just like that, I don't need to load my brush again, I'm just going to use whatever's left on the actual tip of the brush because we don't want to overdo it and ruin the beautiful blending that we got before. Again, just moving it straight down here. Couple of dotted dots. Bit of brush stipples that just add that visual interest. That's another technique that you can do. Let's just get a zoomy zoom back on there. Fantastic. Let's just fit in the frame. Looking good. Now basically, that's pretty much it for the actual paint part. What I'm going to do now is I'm just going to let this dry but before I let this dry, I might just add in a little bit of color where the windows are just to give them a bit of a brighter look. Let's just find ourself a nice color today. With that, I shall look at my colors, and I think I'll use a nice pale yellow. This one is a light yellow glaze. With that one, I'm just going to clean my brush. [NOISE] Just gets zoomy zoom back and I just need a little bit of color here. Again, I'm just going to pick that color from the actual tip, and you can see this is a huge tip, isn't it? [LAUGHTER] At this point, it looks a bit funny that it doesn't compare to only other pencils, I just compare it to the green one. You can see that looks like a normal pencil. This one looks like it's been at war with the color army or whatever. [NOISE] What we can see it's been completely chiseled, I did this with my actual blade. Sometimes if you need a bit more of the pigment showing it's always good to just chip away at that wood casing with a blade and you've got a lot more that's visible and you've got more access to it. Again, I'm just going to very gently and lightly, moisten that and just put it on to the actual bristles of the brush to get that color on there. That's enough, move that to the side, and then just for these windows, just add a little dotty dot, and that's all we need. You don't need anything too saturated or too vibrant. Just a little bit of yellow to add a bit of interest and just completely actual pull it out. I'm going to leave that as it is, just put my brush away and let's get a final zoomy zoom back on this one. It's looking great. We'll wait for that to dry, and then that's the color part done. Then we can move on to the final outlining work with our lovely inky ink. I'll see you once this is dried. 32. Inking Stage: Welcome back. Now we have a lovely dry surface with no moistness or wetness at all. It's fully dry and we can move on to the final stage of making this look like a nice, sketchy illustration. As I said before, I've decided that I'm not going to add any more color using the watercolor pencils. If you however, want to add more details with the watercolor pencils then go ahead and do this, add another layer, maybe add another glaze of watercolor, using watercolor from the tip of the pencil, or maybe just use water on first like we did on the water area here and then just draw on wet. Any way you like, go ahead and do it, but I'm going to leave it at this stage. The final stage now just to add in a little bit more details and give it a bit of an uplift is to outline with black ink. Now, if you're going to outline in black ink then I'm going to strongly suggest that you try using a waterproof ink. The one that I'm using in my fountain pen here is absolutely waterproof. Check out the resource pack for all my recommended items. I suggest when you're doing this class, but if you haven't got a fountain pen and waterproof ink, you can also get fine liners that contain waterproof ink in them. But at the end of the day, it's absolutely not a must to do this. So whichever fine liner you have lying around or if you've got a black gel pen, just go ahead and use that. Just make sure that once your ink is down and if it's not waterproof, then don't add any more water on top. Otherwise, it's going to ruin your beautiful drawing and you're not going to be happy at all. I'm going to go ahead and start doing this now, let's just get a zoom in on this. What I'm going to do is I'm going to start off with the most detailed part of this drawing and it's going to be our lovely house. Just with my fountain pen, I'm just going to go in, I'm going to just start outlining the edges of the house just like this. Now I'm not going to be super neat about it, because again, this is just a sketch, not a perfect perspective drawing, tilt my page and just like that in a nice smooth motion just outline those areas so that they look nice and prominent, then I go into the door now. Then I'm going to go to the top part of that window, just like this, following them lines in that one direction so that it's easier to do and you can spend a bit more time on this outline process than I am if you like. I personally like to have it very nice and sketchy, I don't like to bother too much of being super perfectionist at this stage. Just like that, go in again with those diagonal lines just to ease the actual task. Just like down the chimney now going up and across and then maybe just go across on these ones as well to complete these off. So tilting it back, looking very good, and let's get that chimney sorted so just bring them down, and then we've got the front part of the diagonal roof area just like that. Nice bits of gorgeous black lines on there, it really adds that finishing touch to the illustration. We've just got a little bit more there, and that's about it, these details are inside here, I'm going to leave them as they are because they look quite nice as it is. Let's just finish them windows off. Turn it around straight line across there, another one across there, and then maybe throw in those window frame bars over there, this little one here, again, straight across super duper. Now, if you haven't got a thick broad point like I have and you've just got a really thin pen, then go ahead and use that. It's not really that important to get the outline right. It's more important about getting that watercolor pencil on your paper and experimenting with that. Like I said before, this is just a finishing touch just to give you a bit of polish at the end. Now you don't really have to even use ink to do this. You could even do this with a black, normal, regular colored pencil. If you have regular colored pencils and you've got a black color, then just outline using that. I would avoid outlining using your watercolor pencils because just in case with the watercolor pencils if you accidentally get a little bit of water on them, it will smudge that watercolor everywhere. So I would recommend, go for just a normal, maybe fabric cast-off polychromos black pencil if you have one at hand or any other pencil, even a Crayola pencil would do. But just something that's nice and dark that would look really good. Let's just get this door out of the way now and I might need to throw in a couple of lines in that door just to give it a bit more detail, and maybe on the roof area here, let's just maybe add a black line there just to separate it and then a cross over here. I think that's looking rather nice. What I might do now is I might just add in a few brick details and I'm just going to use the backside of my nip here just to give a bit of line variation to come up with these thin little strokes. Again, you don't need to do this if you don't want to do this and if you have a colored pencil that's similar to the color of your actual background, we've got this stony gray color, you could even add those details in with a standard colored pencil and that can often look quite nice. I tend to do that sometimes when I'm doing more of a bigger painting piece or I just want to color match all the outlines instead of doing them all in black, and that can work out quite nice as well. Just a bit of brick detail on here. Just a couple of random lines going up and down alternating that beautiful brick layout and that side is done. Same again over here on this side, just throw them random lines in and then maybe a few on that chimney that's coming out there, and that's it. The house is done, let's now move on to the boat and we're going to use the same principle. Just going to zoom in on that and just going to pick up some details on the sales over here, just like that, and then just underneath that brown line that we did at the bottom, choose to close it off. Nice and simple, nothing too complicated. We don't want to add in too many details to get them overpowered. This is just a final quick sketch of the techniques that we learned in the class. Just like that, on the actual base of the boats, maybe just move my line up and down to give an impression of the waves of that water. Close it off from the top and it's looking very nice. We got that little pole in there, let's just outline that as well. Just outline the pole from both sides just so that it looks a little bit more prominent and then maybe, I might just throw in a couple of lines on the actual boat here just to give you a bit of a look of wood panels coming across. There you go, super-duper. Let's just get a zoom back. 33. Hatching Lines: Now what I'm going to do is I'm going to work on these green elements and I'm going to use exactly the same lines that I produced on the first one and repeat it on the others. Let's just quickly do a zoomie zoom in on that. Then this one, what I'm going to do is we're going to add a little bit of texture work with my ink, and just do a little bit of hatching lines and maybe add some crosshatching. Let's just go ahead and do that on this first one, and then just cover up that area and then create the outline. Then just like that, I'm just going to add in some lines that represent some hatching lines one direction, and then I'll turn the page and go in the other direction. Just adds that textural look to it, sketchy look. I think that's it, I'd say. Then maybe a couple of lines just going straight across. Just to make it look a bit more interesting. Then I'm going to finish it off with some dotty dots just at the end. What I'm going to do now is I'm just going to repeat exactly what I did on this one, on all of these green elements that go across. I'll see you once have done that. [MUSIC] You can say I quickly did exactly that same textural pattern with my pen all the way across on the similar elements and it's looking really nice. You can see that it just brings it out that next step further and gives it a bit more visual interests. I'm just going to get a bit of a zoom back now so that we can move to these lovely picky peaks. But what we'll do is because the ink is actually a little bit wet because it's flowing ink, I'm going to let that dry and maybe stir actually on these elements here. Let's just do a bit of a zoomie zoom on this, and with these elements here, I'm going to do exactly the same thing. Well, I'm going to do maybe a slight textural pattern as wiggly lines rather than crisscross, crosshatching just to give it a bit of variance. Let's work on this one, and then we're going to repeat the same pattern going all the way across these pics over here. Just do a bit of a zoomie zoom so you can see this a bit better. I'm just going to go in straight and outline like I've done before. I'm not really bothered where my outline ends off because again, it's just a sketch. We're not doing drawings from real life or anything like that so it's all good. Just like that, I'm going to go in now top left-hand side and just create a patent look over here. I'm just going to bring in these lines, like this broken up line over here, and then just keep adding more lines just to give it this nice random textural look just adds that extra additional layer of interest to the actual drawing elements and then just add a bit of speckles with some stippling down here. That's about it. You can see just by adding these few lines, do a nice big outline on the outside of it, on the edge, then just go in and then just do these squiggly wiggly lines to add in that visual interest. I'm going to go ahead and repeat that on all of these pics over here, and I'll see you once that is done. [MUSIC] Okey-dokey. Now, you can see I've repeated that random pattern on the left-hand side and just finished it off with a few staples, continued that all the way across. It looks rather nice. If you just get to zoom back and have a look at the entire picture, you can see all that's done is added that nice outline look and just giving it a bit of an uplift, added a bit of texture and just overall made the illustration look that little bit more interesting. Now the ink should have dried on these areas and on the house but what we can do is we can just continue at the bottom here before we do the peaks on the top. Again, it's going to get a zoomie zoom in on here, and then on these ones, I'm just going to follow the similar pattern of the crisscross just to add that finished look. Let's do that on this one here. Just go ahead and outline the actual shape of that little thing that we drew. Then just with the back of my pen, just to get some thin lines, just going to throw in some of them lines, render lines, very light and subtle, not too heavy and then just go the opposite direction. Just like that. Then maybe throw in a couple of heavier lines going across like this, and it looks really good. Then let's just add a few stiffly stipples here just to give that additional layer of detail and visual interest, and that's about it for that. I'm just going to follow this same pattern all the way across the rest of this and I'll see you once that's done. [MUSIC] Okey-dokey. You can see now that texture has been added a bit crosshatching and stippling and you can see this nice little variants that we have going on with crosshatching. Then we've got this nice random look up here, and it looks quite nice. Just going to move up the page, I'm going to basically do a similar pattern over here for these pics at the background. Just vary them slightly and then repeat them. Let's just get a zoom in on that first gorgeous yellow pico over there, that's about it. Then let's just go ahead and outline this. Follow the shape of that pattern and it makes no difference whether you've got a nice sharp white edge like I've got down here or whether it's completely enclosed, it just adds to that visual look, makes it look a bit more interesting. With this one over here, what I'm going to do is I'm just going to start off by maybe doing a few cross hatches like this just some lines going across. My pen has stopped working. [LAUGHTER] That's always the issue with fountain pens. They can get stuck so I'm just going to give it a little scribbly scribble, encourage that fountain pen flow of ink. What can also happen is because the wet paint on the actual page is nice and dry and it can add a layer of resistance if you are using a fountain pen. Then sometimes you can get into the same trouble that I'm getting into, so sometimes it might be better off just to use a normal fine liner with a broad tip. That's actually started working now so that was great. Just like this, just going to add in a few of them lines on the top, and then at the bottom, I'm just going to come in with a few random lines like this, just to give a slightly different texture and pattern, just let it flow down. Beautiful, look at that gorgeous stuff. Then just add in some staples just to finish it off. Diagonal lines, straight lines and then just a few stippled just to give it that different look. I'm going to follow that same pattern across all these topics, and I'll see you once that's done. [MUSIC] Okey-dokey. Now we've finished and we've done all the texture work on the elements on the actual page itself. Let's just do a zoom back so you can take a look and that's looking very good. 34. Final Dark Lines: The only thing that we've got left now to do is a few lines on the actual water area here. You're going to tilt that to the side and then just get to zoom in on this. For this one, all I'm going to do is I'm going to start adding in some lines that go across to give the shadow type look. Lightly, not over do it because we don't want to lose that beautiful texture that we've got that we created with the green and the techniques that we used on drawing on wet, like that. A couple of lines here, and then on this side, a few more lines underneath them, little round greeny things, and then bringing it across here. Then underneath the boat, doing the same thing, following along that current of water that we've got in here. Then randomly place a few, that break up, that flow, and what it'll do is it'll look like we've got this nice smooth flowing liquidity stuff on [LAUGHTER] our page, and just like that, we've just added in that gorgeous texture like this, we're continuing. Very nice and light and subtle. You can see, when you look back, it dds that extra layer of depth. Again, maybe a few more down here and I might do some squiggly wiggly ones and maybe some heavier ones here, a little bit heavier with the ink, just to give that effect. Throw in a few heavier lines, maybe underneath the boat as well. I think we're doing good. We can also do it, we can maybe throw in a couple of random lines on the sails. Here using in the back of the actual pen nib, scraping in a couple of them light random lines. It gives it that look of movement. You look at that, if you zoom back and have a look, that's looking fantastic. Now, I've done the ink work with my fountain pen. The final thing now is to do some final touches of highlights, and let's move on to that one next. 35. Highlights: Welcome back. Now we're ready to just do our final highlights, and for this, I'm going to be using my paint markers that I demonstrated in the earlier lesson. These are just a white paint markers, just to add in a few speckles of white highlight. You can also do this with a white gel pen. But I prefer to use the paint markers because they're much more opaque and I can get a variance because I have a thick one and a thin one. Let's start off with the thin one first. Let's just get to zoom in on this. What I want to do is I want to start with the water area because we've got some nice areas we can highlight. Just a quick shaky shake. [NOISE] Using this nice fine tip, what I'm going to do is wherever I've got the black areas, I'm just going to go in and just add in a line of white, just to give it that highlight and make it pop out a little bit more, so just some black there. Then we've also got some black over here. Then all this is doing is it's just making the black pop out a little bit more. Then this horizon line, what we can do is you can just do a full flat line that goes all the way across, so that it looks a lot more prominent, just like that. Then under the boat, we can add in some speckles of highlights here to represent some kind of splishy splashes of liquid. Just like that, a few stipples, and then maybe just a few broken lines under the boat, under those black lines that we did, and maybe just add a couple of lines on the actual boat itself just to give it a more visual interest. Then just randomly in the areas where we've got a few more dark areas or a bit more pigment, we can just break it up with that white, and it looks very good. Just like this, just throw in a couple of them a random lines, and it's looking quite nice. What I want to do now is that was with the thin one. Let's do a few heavier spots. So shaky shake. [NOISE] We'll be able to get some nice, decent amounts of highlights here. Just under the line there just to make that a bit more prominent, you can see, I'm just adding that nice white line that goes across just like that. We'll just complete it over here. We'll just make it a bit more solid. Looking good. Then under the boat again, thicker line there. How about a thicker line down here? You can see that just adding these thicker lines add so much more depth to your work. It makes a sketch really pop out. Then maybe just have this area here where we've got a reflection of these white sails, could just maybe do some concentrated lines down here. That represents those sails, just to give it a bit of interest, and add that dynamic. Over here we've got the reflection of the actual house, so we could also maybe add in a little bit more down here and then some more hair, just to make it look a little bit more better. I think that's about it. You don't want to be overdoing it because if you overdo it, then it's just going to look like a mess. When we zoom back, you can see it's just added so much more detail by just adding a few of those white marks. I'm going to let this dry because it is paint from the marker, and let's concentrate on these areas here now. Just with these areas, very subtly, all I'm going to do is I'm just going to add in a couple of white dots just to add a pattern on these peaks. Again, over here, so that we have some nice dark on the left, the black lines, and we got some nice white highlight dots on the right. Then it's just going in like that. It's going to repeat that in these colored areas. You can see on this one we've got this nice white strip that effectively works as a highlight line. It looks really nice that we could even add the highlight line in with the marker if we want. I'm not going to really do too much on that. Then maybe on this one at the end, just a couple of little dots. What we can do is actually we could just add a line here, just like that, so that I follow suit on all of them so it doesn't look too random. Just add that strong line. You don't have to do this because on your actual drawing you may have complete color. I did this pretty quick for this demonstration, you can see, I've got nice wide gaps, but I can actually fix them with this white pen. That's the advantage of using these paint markers. Let's just maybe add a couple of dotty dots, just here in the darker area, so that they stand out on this cross hatch that we did, and that will really make it pop, and really add that visual interest and make it look really nice. There's no point putting white on this light area key, just won't be able to see it. Put it in the darker areas where you can see it pop. That's looking nice. Again, couple more speckles of the white over here, just where we've got the darker colors, just to maybe add in that element of interest and make it look a bit better. Keep adding that on. Now you can see if we do a zoomy zoom back on the overall composition, it looks really good by just adding those white speckles. Let's just move the camera again and zoom it up on the top over here. On the house we don't need to add any white dots on the house because it's further away, but on these elements here we can add a few more of the white but we'll add them in the actual lighter areas, so that they don't pop too much and they just subtly blend in where we have this beautiful color. Just like that, I'm just going to add the dotty dots, on the lightest part these peaks, and it's going to look really nice. Just a couple of them stippled dots going all the way to the top. Over here it looks like we've got a white ice cream cone. Well, it makes no difference. You can even add a few more of these lines to maybe fix that up. It looks like we actually did that on purpose. So very good. We can actually do that here as well. Just maybe add in a couple of white lines, if you want to, if you've got the same kind of flow of ink like I have. But again, it's going to be completely random, and it's going to depend higher watercolor dried and what kind of humidity you had in your room when you're doing this. But just play it as it goes. You don't have to mess around with the white marker to try fixing this and that. That's not what this class is about. It's not about fixing anything. It's just about getting on with the beautiful watercolor pencils. See what results you get. So stiffly stippled there, little bit more there might just follow that line down there. Then, again, over here on the yellow area here, this gorgeous mustardy, beautiful yellow. That's enough for that one. Then just on the lovely orange, that gorgeous copper orange, nice few dots of white. I think that's about enough. Let's get to zoomy zoom back. Let's just check out the whole illustration and look at our amazing work. There you have it. We have now completed our illustration. We can get ourself a nice treat and a nice cake now. [LAUGHTER] Anyway, we went through the techniques that we did in the earlier lessons, and we just brought them together in this nice little sketch. This would have given you that first-hand experience and feel of using watercolor pencils with other mediums, so that now you're going to be ready to complete your class project. If you want to do this, you can actually go ahead and outline this border with black pen. I'm not going to do that yet, I'm going to wait for all this paint markers stuff to dry. Once everything is completely dry, I'm just going to go ahead and outline where we've got the edge of the color. But now it's the exciting time and you will be ready for your class project. Let's move on to that one next. 36. Class Project: Okey doke, welcome back. Now, it's exciting times. Yes, it is indeed. We are going to diving in our class projects. In simple steps, the class project is as follows. Number one, complete as many of the exercises from lessons 3-14. Number two, complete a color swatch for your watercolor pencils set if you haven't already done so. Number three, complete the full sketch from lessons 16-34 as best as you can. Just try to follow the steps that I did. If you miss out a certain step, don't worry about it. Just try your best to do a complete full sketch, and color as much of it as you can. Number four, complete your own full illustration using the techniques demonstrated in the class. Finally, number five, take pictures of all of your work that you've created and upload them on the class project gallery for all of us to have a look at your wonderful artwork. Then when you get a chance, leave a review on the class when you have completed all of the above, so that other students can find your insights, and learn from your experiences, and take the class themselves. There it is, the class project all done nice, and easy. What are you waiting for? Grab your watercolor pencils, get your watercolor paper, and start this wonderful journey. Let's wrap up this class with some final thoughts. Let's move on to the next. 37. Final Thoughts: Welcome back. Let's just go through a few final thoughts, and some of the overall class and the lessons that you just went through. Hopefully, you would have completed the exercises in the class, that beautiful techniques that we went through in dry mixing, wet mixing, layers, transparency, using the pencils on wet rather than on dry, and coming up with a huge variance and wealth of experience, and first-hand understanding of how to use these wonderful pencils. Then you would have gone through the beautiful full sketch step-by-step and produced this wonderful little illustration for you to really get warmed up and all ready for your amazing class project. Hopefully, you would have had a go at your class project and produce some beautiful pieces of art work. Don't worry if you've just started in the field of watercolors or watercolor pencils. This is just the beginning of your journey in this magical world. Just carry on with it, build the experience by practicing the exercises and doing as many sketches as you can, and post those sketches gradually on the project gallery so that we can all see, learn from each other. You can ask me any question that you want on watercolor pencils or on the exercises that we've covered. Also, let's all stay connected on social media so follow me on my social media channels. Also, check out my other classes that are exclusive on Skillshare where I go through many different traditional mediums such as graphites, inking, fountain pens, colored pencils, and also watercolors, and now, water color pencils. I hope you enjoyed this class and you've learned something from it. Please carry on with watercolor pencil sketching. As I said before, ask me any question that you like in the class project gallery. Do check out my other classes whenever you get the chance. Let's stay in touch and learn from each other. Thank you so much for your time. Thank you so much for your support. Hopefully, I'll see you on the next one. Take care of yourself, and peace.