Watercolor Winter Hats: 6 Whimsical Illustrations | Daniela Mellen | Skillshare

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Watercolor Winter Hats: 6 Whimsical Illustrations

teacher avatar Daniela Mellen, Artist & Author

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

30 Lessons (1h 44m)
    • 1. Watercolor Winter Hats Class Intro

      1:03
    • 2. Class Supplies

      1:28
    • 3. Using the Template

      1:21
    • 4. Hat #1: Santa Hat

      5:59
    • 5. Santa Hat: Layer 2

      3:25
    • 6. Santa Hat: Layer 3

      4:43
    • 7. Hat #2: Snowman Hat

      2:12
    • 8. Hat #2: Layer 2

      4:20
    • 9. Hat #2: Layer 3

      5:46
    • 10. Hat #2: Layer 4

      2:51
    • 11. Hat #2: Layer 5

      1:51
    • 12. Hat #3: Pom Pom Hat

      3:00
    • 13. Hat #3: Layer 2

      2:02
    • 14. Hat #3: Layer 3

      5:17
    • 15. Hat #3: Layer 4

      2:57
    • 16. Hat #4: Beanie

      3:30
    • 17. Hat #4: Layer 2

      1:10
    • 18. Hat #4: Layer 3

      6:29
    • 19. Hat #4: Layer 4

      3:03
    • 20. Hat #5: Cat Hat

      3:15
    • 21. Cat Hat: Layer 2

      1:17
    • 22. Cat Hat: Layer 3

      3:28
    • 23. Cat Hat: Layer 4

      2:15
    • 24. Hat #6: Bear Hat

      4:24
    • 25. Bear Hat: Layer 2

      3:57
    • 26. Bear Hat: Layer 3

      3:45
    • 27. Bear Hat: Layer 4

      5:04
    • 28. Bear Hat: Layer 5

      5:58
    • 29. Bear Hat: Layer 6

      5:35
    • 30. Class Wrap Up

      2:18
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About This Class

Watercolor Winter Hats is a class that details watercolor techniques to paint six winter hat illustrations. I’ll demonstrate watercolor skills such as wet-on-wet technique, wet-on-dry, creating smooth blends, and pouncing. This class emphasizes creating fabric textures inspired by  knit, fur, fleece, wool, and Berber fleece. Included are step-by-step lessons for:

  1. Santa Hat
  2. Snowman Hat
  3. Pom-Pom Hat
  4. Beanie
  5. Cat Hat
  6. Bear Hat

There is a downloadable Class Supply List & Class Templates to help you paint your own watercolor hat. Also included is a link for videos for two bonus hats on youtube: a beret and a snowboarder’s hat.

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Daniela Mellen

Artist & Author

Teacher

I'm an artist and author living in coastal Florida and surrounded by plants, animals, marine life, and the warm sun - all things that inspire me.

I am drawn to creating things and love to get lost in projects. Each day is a opportunity to learn something new, build on existing skills, and branch out to new ones. I was formally trained as a educator which is my passion and incorporating art into teaching makes my life complete.

I upload art classes every Friday, here on Skillshare. You'll see handmade books, memory keeping, watercolor, acrylic paint, unique art supplies, and photography composition. Thanks for joining me and I look forward to seeing your work.

Check out my blog for additional info on my website danielamellen.com or my YouTube Channel for additional c... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Watercolor Winter Hats Class Intro: Hello, I'm Daniel a melon and author and artist. In today's class, watercolor winter hats. I'll show techniques to paint six whimsical illustrations inspired by the fashionable and humble hat. Two of the six hats are inspired by the Christmas season, and the others are fun hats that you may recognize from your childhood are just current events. I'll take you through all the steps of these paintings, using the template to modifying it. If that's what you like to, painting a hat and great colors and textures will use standard watercolors supplies and techniques. But using lots of layers to create a complex image. I even have a couple of bonus images for you to inspire you to create your own painting. Now, let's get started. 2. Class Supplies: Here are the supplies for our watercolor winter hats. There's three pages of templates that have all six hats printed out. So just you can select the hats you want and for printing them out. And you could use this template to either trace your hat onto your watercolour paper or you could cut them out and use it as a stencil. If you're gonna Trace it, you'll need a light source. And here I have a light pad, but any light source will work so you could take them on a window when you have light coming in. You would take your template on and then trace over it. And we'll go over this in the using the template chapter. I have some watercolor paper and each hat fits nicely on an eight by ten watercolor paper. I also have my watercolor pigments, and there'll be a class download of a class supplies with a specific pigments that I used today. I have three brushes, six u1 and a very tiny five over 0. And then I have a pencil and eraser. I'm going to use a watercolor pencil to create my images because I don't want any pencil marks remaining. And the watercolor pencil will be very light and it will dissolve in the water. But you can use a pencil and eraser and then just don't put any watercolor pigment over your pencil. And then you'll be able to erase it easily from your paper. The next chapter, we'll go over using the template. 3. Using the Template: Now to use the template, I simply take whatever template of the pages I'm going to use by selecting which hat I'd like to use and set that onto my light source. I can take it to a window or to a glass frame and his pad light underneath it. And then I take my watercolor paper. I'm using an eight by ten and class today. And I put that over my template. And when I illuminate the background, I can see the template and where I want to put it on my paper. From here, I'll take my pencil and it doesn't matter if it's a watercolor pencil or a standard pencil. Because either way it's the same procedure. You just want to lightly trace your lines. Be careful not to etch the paper you don't want to dig in. Just wanna use lines very lightly. Now you could modify the template. So from here, if I don't want these lines to be straight, I could make them more jagged or scalloped. I could alter the shape. If I want this tail to be longer, I could do that as well. And I can do any modifications and now is the time to do that for we add our paint. So I did the first one. I'll do that for every one of the images. And then we'll start painting each hat as we go. 4. Hat #1: Santa Hat: For first hat, we're gonna paint this santa hat in traditional colors. So it will be a Red Hat and we'll try and make it look like it has a white brim. Will do this in stages just like we do all the hats. First thing I'm gonna do is create my color. So with my large number six brush and we'll put a little puddle of water on my palette and I'll mix parallely in red. My first layer is going to be lighter than the ongoing layers, but I still want a nice intense color. I'm also gonna take a little bit of sepia and put that on my palette. And that'll give us a nice shadow color to use. Mix a little paralleling read into that as well. And you can see the rich color we have here. I'm gonna take my brush and I still have a little bit of this brown color on it from mixing it, just going to pick up a little that parallely in red. I'll rinse my brush. And then with a wet brush, I'm going to treat the hat as two segments. We have the tail here of a hat that's closest to us, and then the part that sits on your head. So the reason I look at it in two parts is because there are two sections and each one is going to have its own highlight. So in the top section is going to, the highlight is going to be right here in the center. So I'll make a circle and I won't fill in that shape to wet the paper just yet. And I'll do the same thing on the bottom here. And because the bottom piece is a little bigger, I'm making that highlight, that circle even bigger than the first one. I'm going to pick up my color, and here's my first layer. I'm gonna go right up to this line that we need. And I going right up to it because I'm using a watercolor pencil so that colour will dissolve a little bit. I'm just going to bring my outline and I'm gonna go right just the tail of the hat. And I make my shape and I'll turn my paper accordingly and just deposit that color. Now where I went on the paper, the pigment will run. Could it go down just a little further? Dip my brush and water, so I have a little bit of a lighter color and go around this area here, I can leave some little spots of white. And then I'm gonna go and pick up that color and really work on just depositing color on the edge. Where the paper is dry. It absorbs more of the pigment and where it's wet, it runs. So now that I've created the shape on this first layer, I'm gonna rinse my brush so its clear. And I'm gonna go inside this circle is first highlight and wet. And then would that damp brush? I'm just gonna go around that highlight. I just don't want any harsh lines and that creates a nice blend. Now to work on the second part, the larger part of the hat, I still have my hollow dry highlight and center. And I'm going to pick up this red. And I'm going to leave the tiniest gap in between the top hat and the body of this hat. And I'm going to create that shape. I'll bring this line right up to the fold. And when I go underneath that fold, I wanna leave another gap just between those two parts before I join them. And so I'm just carving out the shape. And this is the most time-consuming part of this hat. I'll go around combining two pieces of the hat and creating that shape. And then once I'm happy with the perimeter of that shape, I'll just very carefully go in and fill in those lines. I'm still leaving the gap between the different parts of the hat. Still leaving some white spots because I liked that look for watercolor. If you don't like that, look, feel free to fill it in thoroughly. And then once I have that first layer down on the hat, that's nice and still a little wet, not too wet. I'm gonna go into the darker color and deposit some of that darker color where there would be shadows. So underneath the tail of the hat there'll be a shadow. And underneath the fold there'll be a shadow. And then I like to put just a teeny bit of that brownish red right by the brim. I like to make that dream a little scallops. Because there'll be some shadow from that furry cuff. I'll rinse my brush, pick up a little more of this red and bring that back in. And I like to go around the perimeter and then work it into the side of the hat, into the center little. I'd like to have a nice intensity on my color. I can go over that brownish layer and because it's pretty big, it dries fairly quickly. But I really like that intense color that we're getting. I'll rinse my brush. Go on the centre here of this highlight, and then just pull those edges. Just want those parts to blend, form a nice little highlight and I can go back in with my Shadow Color and deposit that accordingly. And again, this is where you play with it. Do you get that shadow that you like? Just like that. I also put a little shadow color here by the palm, palm media little up here. And I'll at this layer, completely dry. 5. Santa Hat: Layer 2: So now that our first layer has dried, and I try and make sure it's really dry because I tend to smear the red. It's such a vibrant color and it reactivates very easily with what wed, whereas some other colors don't react or react weaker. So it's just something I like to be careful with. Now I want to work on the brim and that palm, palm and I'm gonna do this in layers. Get a wet around the cuff, but not wetting the edge just yet. And I'll whet around the palm, palm just the perimeter. Then I'm gonna mix a little color on my palette and would take a little Prussian blue, just very light. I'll take a teeny bit of black with that. Just enough to tone down that blue somewhat. So it's kind of the hint of Gray. And I have one more brushed full of water. And now with my number six brush, I'll start with the brim of the hat here. I'm gonna go and I'm going to activate that watercolor pencil on the edge. If I was doing this with regular pencil, I would go just barely up to it, leaving a little spot of border in between so that I could erase my pencil marks without a problem. But it come back in and it's a very light color and it will dry even lighter. It's kind of a bluish gray. But it come back in after I do my first layer, just reactivate that watercolor pencil. And because it's a watercolor pencil, it'll blur and fade a little as we go on. Then we'll get my brush and water, not really clean it and just blend out that line that I made already. I'll go and bring some more of that wetness up almost to the top of that brim. And now it's very wet and I want to let that soak in a little. Gonna go to the palm palm, pick up that bluish-gray and do the same thing around the perimeter of the palm. Palm. Go around the perimeter leaving white spots. And then I'll come in and make an effort to really activate that edge. Watercolor pencil. Rinse my brush. And because it's smaller area of removed some of the water. And I just want to blend around. And now I'm going to move back to that cough while it's still wet, that brim. I'm gonna take a little bit of his violet, just a little bit. I want to change that color ever so slightly. And in certain areas while it's wet, I am going to deposit a little bit of pigment. And I just wanna do it around the edge. And I just wanna do it in certain areas. This will just give a little bit of shadow when it dries. I'm gonna rinse my brush and switched my number one brush. And now I'm gonna move my paper altogether. And I'm just going to make sure to activate all that watercolor pencil and make it blur. And once I've done this around the brim and around the palm, palm, I'll let this layer dry and then we'll come back and add just a few details. 6. Santa Hat: Layer 3: So now that this layer is dry, I'm taking my very small brush here. This is a five over 0, like a very small faint liner, gonna take a little black. You could also use Payne's gray and put that on my palate. And we're going to add some Prussian blue to that. And so that's a really rich color and that's really too rich for what I want. So I'm just going to mix it with what ever remained on the palate. And if I don't have very much, I'll just add water. And so now I'm doing wet and dry painting. So I have my wet brush with my pale grayish blue that is maybe two shades deeper than the blue that we've already put down. And I'm going to start with my palm, palm this time. The first thing I'm gonna do is very gently go around the edge with very light touch. And I'm covering the watercolor pencil ever so slightly. Now this color is very faint, and so it will dry. Very faint. And now I'm gonna do the same outline here on the brim. Here I can exaggerate any curves if I want. I'm just pulling this around. I'll go back. Barely touching the paper here. I'm gonna take my big brush, wet it, and pick up some of that color that I already put down. And now I just want to pull some brush strokes, really making a lot of texture right around the edge of the brim. And I'm going to be very heavy handed on the sides, left side and the right side. And just a little bit around on the bottom. And they'll just pull a few little textures here and there throughout the brim. I'll do the same thing on the palm. Palm, where I'm gonna pull some fixed spots on the left and right side. And then just a little bit of texture here and there. I'll rinse my brush and I'm gonna go back to my very small brush now. And I'm going to take that deeper color that we made and pick that up. And now I just want to introduce that around the edge. And I like to do this because sometimes it's not necessary depending on how dark I make the color originally, but it creates very nice finish edge. So I outlined my palm, palm again. And just in certain areas I'm going to pull that color creates just a little variation. And I do that with the side of my brush instead of the point. Then I'll rinse my brush, shake off the water, and blend out any edges there. Again, I'm looking for texture and different intensity, so I can go back in and deposit a little more intensity if I blend it out and blended it. And then I'll flip this over and do the same thing here with the Bram. And for the brim, I really like to just work on the edge here. So this is the far right of the brim of our illustration. And I pull in kind of in curved lines with my pigment. And then I go back with a damped brush and just blend that a little bit out. I can go back in and a little more pigment just to make it a little more intense on the edge. And then I'll do the same thing to this side here. I echo the shape of the top of that red hat. So my curve swings around. Can go back in a few times, pick up a little more intensity because I know it's going to dry lighter, wet my brush, gently blend it out. And then I'll go back in. Just add a little more intensity right to the edge where it will be darkest. Then I can flip this over. And I can see here that I want to continue just this light outline all the way around the bottom of that had pull that color, blend out any edges. And there I have my Santa hat. I'll let this completely dry. And then at the end in the final chapter, we'll take a look at all our completed paintings. 7. Hat #2: Snowman Hat: For a second image here we have a snowman hat, typically like the Frosty the Snowman. So I'm gonna make the head very dark with dark grays and blues. I went to have a goldfish ribbon, and then I want the brilliant colors of the holly here. You can choose whatever colors you want. I'm going to start with the ribbon. So with my number six brush, go take my water and activate the top of the band. And then I want to leave a tiny little space at the bottom in-between where this ribbon meets the hat. And I'm just going to leave that just dry. And I'm also leaving a little spot around the holly berries. I'm going to keep my paper upside down for now. I'm gonna put a little lemon yellow on my palette. And then on another puddle, I'm going to take some of this yellow ochre. A little deeper version. I'll go back in with some more lemon yellow. And I'm gonna take the lemon yellow and I'm going to start on either side and deposit a good amount of that in. There was a point of my brush. I'm gonna bring that right up to that top of that ribbon line that we did with the watercolor and still leave the gap on the base. Between the base of the hat. I'll rinse my brush and I still have a little spot in between and it's wet. But the colors are not blending enough. So I'm just going to wet inside that space and then very gently coax it from either side. I like the highlights so I don't want to lose that. Could come back in and pick up that yellow ochre. And I'm going to deposit it right on the edge on both sides. And I'm going to let that blend that my pigment is wet on that paper and it'll create a nice edge. I can tilt my paper to help it along. But right now, I just want to let this dry. 8. Hat #2: Layer 2: So now that our band is dry, I want to work on the hat and this is the most time consuming because it's the largest area. So again, I want to look at where I want to put my highlights and I wanna put my highlight kind of in the top of the hat. And also on the brim here. I want it to be dark underneath. And I want it to be kind of light going all the way across and sort of achieve that. I'm going to work on each portion at a time. I'll start with the top of my hat and I'm going to put water down, not hitting any of the lines, but leaving a good portion here, a large oval dry on the paper. And that gives me more control. And I'm just gonna go around wedding a little area so that the water and the pigment can bleed and run and do its own thing. Gonna mix my color right on my palette here. I'm going to take black and you can use Payne's gray as well, get whatever intensity you want. And then I'm going to mix a little violet in with this. So I have my black had a brush full of water. And then I'm going to add some of his violet. And so now I'm going to take this, I'm going to start at the left-hand side of the hat, which is now the top. Because the way I have my paper oriented and I'm going to deposit that pigment in creating that shape. And I want to create that shape going right to the edge where I have that watercolor pencil line. And it's not a straight line for the hat. It's kind of lumpy and bumpy. And I'm leaving a little gap between the holly leaf border here. And then I'll come back in, pick up more pigment, re-weight everything I've done. And just extend that border. I like to re-weight everything I've done so that I get more intensity on the color. And I'm still letting the watercolor do the work. Then I'm going to make a nice sharp point by rolling my brush. And I'm gonna leave a tiny little gap between my ribbon and the top of this hat. And I'll leave a figure gap and then I can go in and adjust it after I have my pigment down. And again, I want to leave a small gap between my holly leaves as well. So now I've done the entire circumference of the top of this had I'll do the same procedure where I'll pick up more pigment. I'll go in and deposited and work my way to the inside of that hat. Now I know I want there to be a highlight there. So I'll save that for a moment and just work on creating that bottom shape. There, pick up some more of the black and deposit it just like this. So it's a little more intense in these sections. Going to pick up more pigment, go right around the perimeter with this intensity. Continuous all the way around. Then I'm gonna rinse my brush. I wanted to be clear. I've got a wet inside that highlight that I made. And just pull my color around. And then I can come back in and add more pigment around the rest of the head. And again, this is totally up to you, whatever your preferences for creating intensity in color. I'll do that one more time with a little more pigment and then I'll let this layer dry, or at least set it aside, and then we'll work on the next layer of the hat. 9. Hat #2: Layer 3: So we're gonna work on the next section of the hat. I'm going to treat this as one section, working it in two parts just because it's similar. So I wouldn't do the bottom section here. And I want the pigment to come right from this watercolor pencil line and fade as it goes down. And it'll be darkest at the bottom. So there'll be a nice big highlight here. Going to wet my brush, my number six brush. And I'm just going to start with that section first. So I'm activating that watercolor pencil line. And if I was using regular color pencil, I would just leave a little space o activated here on the bottom as well. I can go back in and work it in some areas if it's not what I want. And then I'm just going to add a little water to my black here. Pick it up and put it down on my palette. Going to set this precious side, and I'll come back to that in a moment. And I want to use my small brush, my number one brush. I'm gonna pick up the pigment. And I'm going to follow that line that I made. I'm using the tip of the brush on the line. And when I'm confident in that, I'll push down the other part of the brush to get that thick stroke. Not every brush is great for this technique, but ones with a sharp point. With that, the brush has a little give work very well. If you don't have a brush for that, if you're number one brush isn't quite that long or doesn't have that give or you're not comfortable. Just draw that line very gently and then go back and add a little more pigment to it. The important thing is you want to create that shape of that shadow. And then I'm gonna come in here with that brush and make that line for the base. Now the color will blend up a little and I'll go back in with another layer. And then I'm gonna rinse my brush and do the same thing but with no pigment on the brush. Whatever. I'm pigment I'm dragging Now. I'm just dragging from the existing pigment that was down on the paper, not from the brush. I can come back in here and introduce a little more pigment on from the top because that's where my shadow is for this hat. And then I always want to make sure that the center is wet and moving. Pigment is running. There's no straight edges, so I don't have to worry about that. Lastly, I want to work on the center part of this hat, this brim, and the topmost part is going to be the darkest. So I'm gonna go in there while it's dry and while I have my number one pointy brush. And I'm gonna just create that edge right up top on that watercolor pigment line. Go all the way around the top, right to the side bottom. I'll go underneath this Holly Barry. And all the way here to the side bottom, leaving a little gap between the base of that hat. A little dry paper. Dip my brush and water once and extend this. Just to make that edge a little bit lighter. And then we'll go in there and just introduce water making a very light blend. I want to leave a little gap between the top layer and the bottom layer. And if I do combine the two, as you can see here, it's doing that. It's not a problem. I can take a little paper towel, make a little cotton ball shape, press it down on the offending section and dry it. And so all I'm doing is really drawing that paper. I can go in there and scrub up that little dark section and try and get it up. It might not come up. But if I do this with a paper towel, I'm drawing that section. So now I can go in with a little pale grey and introduce it back so that it creates that blend. It doesn't look harsh anymore. Now I'm gonna come back in with my pigment and just introduce it right up top of the brim. Again, I want the darkest part. Up top of the hat. I have a little gap of white in between the bottom section and the middle section. And then because I use that paper towel, I have to go over this bottom section one more time just to create that intensity. Particularly because of the area that I picked up. I'll go over it with the intense color and then I'll blend out the edges so I get a nice soft blend. And I'll do this until I'm happy with it. Can come in here and add just a little more pigment to the top of the hat. And then I'll let this color dry. If you want it to be supersaturated, we can go in with another layer. So consider that if you'd like that look, and I'm going to let it dry right here. 10. Hat #2: Layer 4: And so now I'm going to work on a little holly leaves with my number one brush. I'm gonna go in here with some of this yellow green. It's just a light green. And I'm gonna go in there and create a base coat. So for each holly leaf, I'm going to go all the way around the perimeter, activating that watercolor pencil, a wet my brush, and then blend out that color. And then I'm going to pick up some of this deep rain. It's a nice rich green. I'm going to start at the base and deposited in. And then I'm just gonna go around the perimeter with it as well. Rinse my brush, pick up a little more of that yellow, green, and just blend that around. So I get a little bit of variation in between. I'll come down and do the same thing here with the second leaf. Again, I go around the perimeter, I activate all that watercolor, pencil, dip my brush and water, move that pigment around. Then I come with that deep green and deposit it. And then I work around the edge as well. I'll come over here to this first one and sharpen up any of the points, create little smooth edges. Then I can go back to the second one and do the same thing. The holly points are nice and sharp and I like the variation of the two greens. Then I'll come back in with some of this deep green. And from the center, from the base center, I'll just pull those veins. Go back in with a little bit of this yellow, green. Blend out anything except the vein just along the edges here. And I'll let that layer dry. 12. Hat #3: Pom Pom Hat: For my palm, palm hat, I'm gonna make the palm poems look white. And I'm gonna have a nice pink hat. And I went to looks like it's kind of knit, sew these lines. I'm going to try and turn into knit line marks with a little darker shade of pink that I used for the hat. So the first thing I'm gonna do is I'm going to wet my hat, leaving the palm palms dry with i number six, brush, I'm gonna go in there. I'm going to activate all the pigment and I may lose the lines. But I'm not trying to work at losing them. I'm just trying to really fade them a little bit. So I'm coming here and I'm wedding the entire area for the first layer of my pink. And I'm putting on this hat. Do the same thing on the bottom, as well as the brim. So I've saturated the paper fairly nicely. I can still see lines. So I still have my guides. Now because of the shape of a hat, I want the lightest color to be in this section and the front section, the darkest color to be underneath here. But I'm not going to worry too much about that For my first layer because my first layer itself is going to be very light. Because I want to do this in pink. I'm going to take some of his brilliant pink. It's almost like a very light bubblegum pink. And I'm gonna take just a little bit parallely in red with that, just to tone it down so it's not quite so blueish. Come back in at a brush full of water. And I'm going to start on the outside here of the section of the hat, just going around the perimeter. Do the same thing here on the brim. Picking up more pigment as I go and keeping it nice and wet and just moving through. I'll do the same thing underneath here and the shadow area. Don't have to be super careful. Just trying to introduce a little bit of pig to this section. And then I'm gonna go back in and I'm just going to carefully put more intensity and more pigment around the perimeter of both the band and that top of the hat. And then up here above the band where the shadow would be when the hats folded over on itself. Take another bit and SCO over here and the base, and because it's wet, it will move around a lot. So I'm not going to really play around too much. But this is the overall effect that I want. I want the perimeter darker, just slightly, the center light and just a little bit of shadow from our first layer. And I'm gonna let this one completely dry. 13. Hat #3: Layer 2: So now our first layer is dried and as you can see, it's a little darker on some of the areas that I wanted it to be, but it's not really controlled. And that's okay for our first layer. Right now I want to work on the first layer of these palm palms. So I'm going to turn this around and I'm just going to create a little bit of puddle here and just put it in a little Prussian blue. Just barely enough to show. And then I'll add a little violet to that to turn that a little bit of an interesting color. I'm going to take my brush. I'm just gonna go around the perimeter here of both of these palm palms, creating that shape. Then I'll rinse my brush and just drag that color around. It creates some nice shadow's. Going to switch to my pointing number one brush. I'm gonna make a little bit more color. I don't really want it to be more intense. I just need more pigment, a more, a bigger supply. And then I'm going to wet my brush point. And I'm gonna go over each of these little sections here that I created in my sketch. I am just trying to activate it, blur it, and have that color run a little bit around my piece. I can introduce a little more of his blue pigment just on some of the edges. And I'll do the same thing to this bump bone. We're trying to create a white palm palm. So really all we're doing is trying to paint the shadows from that white, since it's not pure white, there's some texture there. And I'll go in and add some of that blue. Wet my brush and blend it out. And I'll leave that for now. And we'll let this layer completely dry. 14. Hat #3: Layer 3: So now my hat is dry. My first layer, right palm poems are dry and now it can work on my details. Could take my number one brush and I'm gonna make the knit color that we're going to use. So I have a little bit of this pink on my palette that I really like the color but isn't certainly not enough and it's not dark enough. It's the original pink that we used. I'm gonna take a little crimson Lake and mix it in with that, trying to get between 1.51 shades darker. I don't want too much darker just yet. And then I'm going to pick up that color. And I'm gonna start with a line that goes down the center here and it's just slightly rounded. With my brush, I'm going to just use brushstrokes on the dry hat. And I'm going to make two brushstrokes going down. So I want them to make kinda like chevrons. So the first line going down, I'm just going to make these little points. And I'm trying to separate them fairly evenly and trying to make the length of them fairly even. I'm not gonna beat myself up about if they're not perfect. The second part of this is I'm gonna make a little v connecting the left and the right angles here. Then I'm going to choose one side of the hat. And I'm going to work on that, continuing that for all these lines. And I like to go down one length of a line, going one direction, I find it a little easier. And then with the next one, I can bring it up and connected. And I take my time to do this and do the same thing over and over again. Speed this along so you can see the process but not get bogged down. And the timing for the last piece here, I'm going to just go one direction. Then I'll do the same thing here for this band in the front. Except I'm going to bring this line a little longer because it's the front end closest to us. All the way down and all the way up. And once again, I'll speed this along. After I have all of those stitches done, I'm going to take the pink that's on my palate, maybe add a little more crimson lakes and say don't seem to have too much pigment left. So I'll mix up a little more of that brilliant pink and that crimson Lake. And I just want to create that shadow underneath here. So I'm going to echo the shape right from above here from this brim. And then I'll just wet it and blend it out. Well, let this dry and then we'll come back and do a little detail work to the pomp oms. 15. Hat #3: Layer 4: So now the pomp oms have a nice little bit of color. I'm gonna go in there with my appointing number one brush and just want to add a little detail work. So I'll add a little more Prussian blue to what's on my palate. A little more Violet. And I have a right combination. I'll add just a little bit of water just to tone it down a slight bit. And then I'm gonna come in here and very gently, barely touching the paper. Make my outline again. Because of the way I have this, I like to do all my curves the same direction. First, turning my paper needed. And then I'll finish that second arc on the curve. And then I'll take my brush and very barely touching the paper, I'll make another row of those arcs. I can make it a little heavier on one side. Little sections. Throw in some little fur on the others. And I'll do the same thing to this palm. Palm, create all my arcs. And I go back, create a second row. And just throw in some other additional ones. I like to go in there with a little bit of gray, fairly light. And with a very sharp point, I'll just add another row all the way around. And this second color just gives a nice little variation. Don't even need too many strokes because it's nice and light. It will dry, just faint with a little bit of texture. While I'm here, I'm going to pick up a little of that pink, reactivate it with some water. And I just want to outline with a very gentle stroke that brim. Just like this. The step is optional. Go right around the perimeter. And I can go right around the entire perimeter of that pink hat with a very light hand. Can go back in and a little more shadow. And so I'm happy with how it looks. And then I'll let this layer completely dry. 16. Hat #4: Beanie: And for the Beanie, as you can see here on the sketch, I only did the perimeter and the major shapes. I didn't do the detail work and we'll do that in another layer. Because for now all I want is to get that first layer down. Select the color for your beanie. And I'm just gonna do a green. So with a big, big brush, I'm gonna create my first layer similar to the way we did in the last chapter, where I'm going to wet each section. I'm not going to wet this little label here. I'm gonna make that a brown. But I'm gonna make the rest of my beanie green. Put a little water on my palette. And I'm taking this deep green. I'll take a little Prussian blue with that, just to change that color slightly. Not very much. And then I'm gonna come around depositing the thickest color right on that watercolor pencil mark. And letting the rest of it bleed will work it so that the center is just slightly lighter than the edge, but there are no harsh lines and we're getting a nice base layer. Setting the tone for the rest of the beanie. Again, I'm just adding a little more pigment to the edges. Turn it to the side. I want a little more intensity here under this brand for a shadow. Just deposit that. Dip my brush and water and blend out this edge. And I really quite like that very light area in the center. So I think I'm going to leave it when it dries, the pigment may run a little more. But for now I'll leave it just like this. Going to wet my brush and do the same thing here to the brim. Going to activate the edge. Put my first layer of wetness down. Avoiding that center layer. And trying to avoid the two sections of a hat running together. If they run together, it's not a big deal. We can change that up later. Create that nice color for the base layer. And then I want to go in here with more of this Deep Green and just work on the edges to create a little bit of a shadow. Go in there, pick up the pigment deposited along the edge, pre that nice little label. And then let this layer dry. 17. Hat #4: Layer 2: So now I want to add the first layer to this little label here. And normally this is kinda like a little bit of a leather look label. So I'm going to Little Sepp yet and a little yellow ochre to my palette. So I get that color, that leathery look. I'm going to put some pigment down. Right inside that little label. I'll leave some spots. Drive the paper and just put that label in. Could a switched my smaller brush, take a little sepia, mix it into that color so it's just a shader to darker. And then just deposited along the edges. Msc is a nice little effect and we'll let this layer dry. 18. Hat #4: Layer 3: And now for the beanie to add our detail work and this is what we time-consuming, gonna mix my color first. So with my number six brush, I'm gonna take some more of this Deep Green and I'm gonna mix it into the green that already exists on our palate. And because I want this to be a little more deeper, gonna mix in a little of the opposite on the colour wheel of this. So I'll add a little powerline read. Can add a little more green till I get that right blend. And there we go. I'm going to take my number one brush here. And the first thing I'm gonna do is I'm going to outline the top of this hat just so the light stroke. And this is only a couple of shades darker. So I just want to barely touch that edge. Continue all the way around the top of that hat with a nice rich color that we have. And then for these two lines that we have here, I'm just going to create those with that number one brush as well. Now from here, I want to outline the bottom edge of where that had hits the brim. Just like this. The only areas I'm going to worry about not making a straight line or just the corners here, and I just want to blend those out slightly with a damp brush. Then I'm going to pick up more pigment and I wanna be able to control it on this brush. And I'm going to face my hat towards me. And I'm going to face it. So it's kinda straight down. And I'm gonna pull with a thinner stroke than I have here for the top of this head, that a pull those two lines straight down. Just like this. But I'm going to come back in, pick up some more pigment and go over this top piece as well. So I have a thicker top piece and then this thin line coming down right to the brim on both pieces. And then I'm going to divide each of these three sections in half with a line that goes right from the top center here, this point breakdown that length of the hat. I'll do this over here as well. And over here, just to get the right angle, I'll do it in sections. So there I have my beanie. And now I'm going to work on each individual section. I like to start in the center here, these two halves there going to be mirror images of each other. So I like to do one and then the other. I'm going to go down about half an inch and I'm going to bring an arc towards the center. So here's my arc. And I'll do the same thing on this side. And then after I had my arcs, I'll just bring that rate down. Trying not to touch the other lines just to make that straight line. And because this shade is only a shader to darker than the one we have here. The color dries somewhat faint, and I can go back in and thicken up that line. Then I'm gonna take my brush and I'm gonna do the same thing again, another arc, straight down. And then I'll mirror it. And the mirror doesn't have to be exact. I'm just trying to balance it out. And then I'll do the same thing again, the arc and down and down. And then I'll do one more, the ark and down in between. The ark and down in between. And it'll do the same thing over here as well. I'm going to start from this middle section, this middle line that we made dividing up these two. And I'll start from the top arc. And I am going to bring it down. And this time I'm going to bring it out and bring it down, dividing it in half, bring it out, and bring it down. And I can come in here and deepen up that major vane on the hotline. Now for here, I'm going to divide the remaining sections. Just did half. Pull that color down, just in half. And then I'm going to switch to my very small brush. And I want to very carefully add another line in between each of these lines, trying not to cross paths. I just want these lines to all go down. And this is the effect that gives the beanie. And for this, these little lines I like to start on one side of the hat and work my way down. If I touch the beanie, I don't worry about it. If I touched the lines, I just continue making these lines. And we'll be some areas that are too thin to go and make those lines. And so I'll just skip over it. At times it might be better to come up from the bottom rather than start at the top. And I will just do that as well. I'll take a peek and I can see it's not quite balanced. So I want to add one more right here, this thick part. And it's just a different shadows that really make it work. I must have gotten some on my hand. So I'll just put a little water on my palette, trying to fade out my little swatch, and then pick it up with a paper towel. I'll be back in a moment and we'll work on the bottom of the brim. 19. Hat #4: Layer 4: So now on the brim, it's not as complicated as the top of the hat. It's just parallel lines and there is beauty in that simplicity. I'm going to start though with my number one brush. I'm gonna add a little more of this pigment. And I'm going to take my time and I like to start from the center of my hat. And I'm just gonna make sure that line comes from the top of the brain to the bottom of the brim very faintly. Just going to pull it down from there. I like to divide those sections in half again. So I'll do 1.5 of the hat, keeping, dividing each piece in half. And as I get further to the outside eye fo the arc of this outside of the head. Again, I'm just dividing each of these sections in half, trying to keep my lines parallel. I'll divide these in half, just avoiding that label. And as you can see, they're not as tightly spaced as the top of the hat. And that's okay because it's the brim. So then I'll go to the left-hand side and do the same thing. I divided what I had left in half. And then I divided both of those in half. And so on. Again, I'm not trying to do as many lines as in the top of the hat. Just so that it looks balanced. And then I'm going to take the pigment on my brush. And I am going to go around the perimeter of both the brim and the top of the hat. I'm filling in the little gap that we left dry. That gives a nice effect, a little shadow effect. Because the pigment really seeps into the white paper. Go around the top of the hat. Just the perimeter. It fills in any edges and really sharpens that look. And then lastly, I'm just going to vary with a light hand go around this label. I like to rinse my brush. The step is optional. I come in here with whatever Brown, sappy I have on my palette. Take a brush and I'm just going to create some texture. On this label. I'll avoid the spots where I left the highlight. And it makes it look a little washed, little worn. And there we have our watercolor beanie. 20. Hat #5: Cat Hat: So for our cat hat, the first thing I wanna do is decide on a color because it's supposed to be a cat and cute. You really have a lot of leeway. I'm gonna do a very pale blue with a pink knows. I'm gonna make the ears the same color as the hat, but you could always make them different colors. So the first thing we're gonna do is I'm going to wet my entire hat, the ears, and every area that I want to paint that same color. So what the ears and all what this part leaving out the nose. I can do the whiskers either darker or lighter. And if I do the lives whiskers later, I'll probably use a gel pen to make the whiskers. So once I have that first layer of water down on my shape, I'll mix my color. Gonna come over here and take little surly and blue. Mix it and put it on my palette. And that's a little too bright for me. So it makes a little Prussian blue with that. And that's getting better to the shape on the shade I want. I'm gonna make some brilliant pink with that. And that turns it down considerably. You could use a little orange to turn it down, tone it down as well, which is the opposite of blue on the color wheel. So we'll just add just a little bit of that. Then to take this color, I'm gonna deposit it all around this area of the hat that I want to make blue. These are very loose strokes. I am careful to stay within the lines and too wet that exterior color. Turn my piece around. And I'm really focusing on the perimeter because as we know, we want the darkest colors to be on the perimeter. And I'll move right to the brim. Again. I'm avoiding the nose. Come back in with that pigment and really work on the edge. And so I'm happy that I have that first layer down. I'm going to let it completely dry. Again. I want to go in there and just deposit a little pigment behind the brim and around the edge. And then I'll let this dry. 21. Cat Hat: Layer 2: So now the first layer is dry. I can go in there and make the nose. I'm going to go in there and I'm going to wet my nose just to make it completely wet on the paper where their nose is. But I'm going to leave a little gap between the nose and the brim of the hat. And now once I have that, I'm going to add a little bit of pigment. I'll mix a little brilliant pink on my palette. Deposit that in around the perimeter. And yet I want to keep that little space between the nose and the brim. And then I'll come in here and a little paralleling read, mix it with my brilliant pink and then just deposited in places. And this gives a cute little variation. It takes advantage of the watercolor nature. And once I have this down, I'll let this layer completely dry. 22. Cat Hat: Layer 3: So now I want to add just a little more dimension to my hat. You could, of course, stop here if you want, but I'd like it to have a little more dimension. So I'm gonna take a little Prussian Blue and mix it in with my existing Blue. Mostly would take a little Violet and mix it in with that as well. Just change the color slightly, gives it a little more intensity. Then I'll mix in some water with that. And now I'm going to treat each piece of the hat individually with wet brush and clear water. I'm gonna go in here and just line this ear. I'll pick up my pigment and I'll put it right here at the base. I can help it along an outline just around the ear. Now, go in and rinse my brush and just blend that edge out. So I'm almost creating a glaze everywhere with no pigment, with just the water. And then it can go in there with that deep color and create a little shadow in the areas where I want it. And I'm just paying attention so that there are no harsh lines. I like taking that deep color and just sharpening up that shape. And then I just go in there and blend out the edges. And I'll do this for each section. I start with my water layer. And then for the smaller areas with a smaller brush, I'll just introduce that pigment. I'll pull that around, creating that shape and then blending out any harsh areas. And I'll do this for each section. I can speed this along so you can see these remaining two sections. And I also take advantage of these lines that I have here, creates a tiny space between the ears and the blue of this hat. There I have all my intensity deposited right where I want the pigment. And I can let this layer completely dry. And then we'll come back and add just a few details. 23. Cat Hat: Layer 4: And now that this layer is dry, you can add your details. Going to take my number one brush to reactivate that blue on my palette. And I'm going to add just a little Prussian blue to that just to increase a little more intensity. And I'm just gonna do a faint outline all the way around the hat. This is not a knit hat and that's not the look I'm going for. I'm kind of going for like a fleece hat where you don't see any stitches. It's kind of a non-woven material. Going to outline each section. This tidies up any edges, gives a little more definition. A little shade will shadow. To the same thing with the ears. And now you can decide when you want to do the whiskers. If you wanna do the whiskers with either a black or a deep blue, since the hat is blue, or you wanna use a white gel pen to do your whiskers? Originally I thought I'd use a gel pen, but I think I'm gonna do them in a book, shade of black, darker gray. So put a little water on my palette. Pick up a little of this black. And I'm going to mix in a little of that blue to tie it in. And then I'm just going to follow that guy that we had to make my whiskers. And these are supposed to look like they're either stamped or painted or embroidered on the hat. They're not really textured. It's just to make it recognizable as a cat. And there we have our cat hat. 24. Hat #6: Bear Hat: For our sixth Pat, I'm gonna do a cute little bear here, and I'm really emphasizing the shape. You could smooth it out if you wanted it to look more fleece. I wanted to look like this fabric that is kind of TeddyBear fabric. But you can do your bare in any color. I'm gonna do it in traditional browns and I'm going to have a nice white brim. So with a wet brush, I'm just gonna go over the face. I'm going to avoid the little muzzle here and I'm going to avoid the eyes. So I'm kind of just wedding the center of the face not going too close to the edge. And I'll just put a little in the ears as well. So the first thing I'm gonna do is I'm going to take some of this yellow ochre on my palate and that gives a nice rich golden background. And then I'm gonna, just gonna play around with the amounts of different pigment I add to it. I still want to eat a light color, but I do want it to be a little more brown than golden. So I'm putting a little step IA in with my yellow, yellow ochre and a lot of brush full of water. And then very carefully, and I'm using my larger brush here, I'm gonna go around the perimeter and create the shape of that bear. And I want to really activate that watercolor pencil because the color is so close to what we're using for the bear. It's not really a problem with it doesn't get wet and activated, but I do like to take my time inactivated. So for the first layer, I'm just gonna go around the bear and the ears with this light brown, golden brown color. I'm going to avoid the eyes and would go right up to the shape of the eye and the shape of the muscle. And then I'll come in with a little water on my brush and do the areas in the center of the face in between the eyes. I want a nice loose color. I can color it in the entire area with my pigment or I can leave some white spots because I like that traditional look. It's your preference, whatever you like. But I do want to get a lot of pigment here. Turn this around. And then I work on the scallop area here by the brim of the hat. Again, carving out that shape. I had a nice wet brush and just go over my initial strokes repeatedly just to get a nice blend. Then I work my way around the muzzle and then dip my brush and water to keep it flowing. If any of the area has dried like around the edge here, I'll go back over with initially more pigment and then just some water on my brush. Again, I'm just trying to create that nice base color. And then while I have my brush wet with that same color, I'm gonna do the ears going to leave a little gap between the top of the ear and the hat. And then just go around the entire ir. And I'll do this for both ears. And the same thing over here. Come back and pick up my pigment, create those shapes and that little gap. Now I wanted to take my time. It's not as crucial as in the other hats to have more pigment on the edge. But that is where I want my pigment ideally to be. So I'll just move it around with a wet brush and it's also very good practice for other techniques. And I'll let this layer completely dry. 25. Bear Hat: Layer 2: So now work on the brand. Great user wet brush. And I'm gonna what the brim very loosely, not worrying about getting to the edges. And the second part here, the part underneath. And then I'm going to come on my palette and I'm gonna mix a little bit of this black. You can use Payne's gray as well. And I'm gonna use a little Prussian blue. I just want a hint of a color here. And then I'm gonna take my brush and I'm just going to create the shape very loosely at first, going around the hat. And then after I have a good amount of pigment down and it's a very light pigment. I'm going to switch to my smaller brush, my number one brush. And I'll pick it up. And I'm going to bring it to the shape of the brim here, my little scallops, but I'm going to leave a little gap between the hat and the brim. And I'm just trying to paint with this pigment really in a very primitive way. Just to create the overall silhouette here. I'll leave some areas uncolored. And that will give a nice little variation. And right now I'm just looking to create a base color and we know what's going to dry lighter. And that's the look I'm going for. Now for the underside here, could do the same technique. I'm gonna just add a little more pigment, so I'll add a little more blue and just a little more black. And I'll put a big blotch down in the center here. And then I'll switch to my smaller brush, which I can control more. And I'm going to bring it right up to the top here, leaving a little gap, creating those scallops shapes. Then I'll go to the bottom here and I'll bring it right to the bottom. That wet pigment and that causes that edge to bleed a little. And I really liked that look because I use Brown from my watercolor pencil. It ties in with the top of a hat. But you can use any watercolor pencil color. If you want to use a neutral like a light gray, or if you know, you're gonna do you're say you're doing your Hatton blue, that would be an ideal time to use that color. So now that I have my shape down, I'm gonna spend just a little more time on the brim here, going to pick up a little more black. So I have a little deeper gray and just a little bit of blue. And so now with the same small brush, I'm just gonna debit in points here underneath. And this will create that shadow that I want. Once I had my first stabs, I'll go back in in between just combining the dabs to create more of a shadow. And if I missed any spots on those scallops to make them really sharp, I can repair that as well. I also like to go in on the edges and I'm introducing just a little bit more pigment. And I'll do this a couple of times. A lot of this depends on how much water is on this area. If there's too much water, it'll just blend and the entire section. But I just want enough so that it creates a little bit of a shadow. So I like the way that looks on the bottom here. It dry very quickly at the very edge. So I'll just take a wet brush with water and just blend those edges together just to get a softer blend. And I like the way that looks. I'm going to let that completely dry for now. 26. Bear Hat: Layer 3: So now let's dry. I'm gonna add my base layer for my muzzle. And I'm gonna do just a very pale color. So I'm gonna take a little step IA, and put it down on my palette. And then I'm gonna take a little powerline read just a little bit, wipe it off with my brush. I just want a little bit on my brush and I'll blend that in with the sepia. Take a little more sepia since I don't want it to look to pink. I just wanted to look like a very light cherry color. Rinse my brush. And not I'm not going to use too much water, the small area. But I'm gonna paint all the way around the nose. I'm going to use the mouth Marx as a guide so I can get those wet. And I realize they're going to fade quite a bit. Once I have that area wet except for the nose and go in there with that color that I mixed and deposit it, it's going to dry lighter. It is. And I like that look, I'm going to leave a little border around the edge at first so it doesn't have to be perfect. And then I'm going to take most of it off my brush, the pigment, and just continue right to the edge with that for, of the face is. So there I have a very, very light color on the muzzle. I can go back in with a little bit of pigment on the brush and go right around the perimeter. And that will drive a slightly more intense, give a little more dimension to the muzzle. And it's kind of a cute look. While I'm here. I want to work on the eyes. I want my eyes to be black. You can use any color you like, but I like the contrast. So I'm gonna take some black on my palette. I'm using my small pointy brush. And here's where I make the eyes have a little bit of character. I don't fill them in completely. I take a very sharp, controlled pointy brush, twirling it on my palette to make it nice and sharp. And then I'm gonna do the outline and I want to first work on creating that circle shape. And I'll compensate if I have any wide marks or any straight marks. The shapes, making a perfect circle is actually a lot more difficult than it looks. And once I have that circle, I'll come in here and I'll fill in, leaving a little white showing for highlights. And I liked the way that looks good to let that dry just for a moment while I work on the other eye. And because I wanted to look nice and black really crisp, I'll go in there and deposit a little more pigment after it absorbs into the paper. But first I'll do the same technique. I'll create my circle trying to match the size and the shape of the first die. And then I'll come in here and deposit some pigment. I'll take a little more pigment on my brush and just deposit it all the way around to really make those eyes pop. Keep that rounded shape. And then over here we'll have to compensate. And so I made them left. I just a little bit bigger. And then I'm going to let this dry and we'll come back and add our detail work both to our brim into r hat. 27. Bear Hat: Layer 4: Now to start on detail work, we'll start here with the brim. I cleaned my palette just because I like to have a lot of area to work with. But whatever colors you have remaining on your palette where you mix, you can certainly use those again. Going to take a little bit of water on my palette and a little bit of black. I want to create a grey. Then we would take a little Prussian blue. So I'm echoing the colors we used on the first layer for our brim. This time I want it to be just slightly more intense, maybe just one shade deeper at this point. So I'm gonna take my brush, and this is my number six pointy brush. And I'm gonna come here on the edges and I want to make this center part look closer to me. So therefore, the parts on the edges are further away and I'm gonna create a little shadow on them. Just taking my brush, putting a little bit of deep color right on the edges here. Just like this. And going right to the edge with my brush. And then you just dabbing it in, going to rinse my brush. And so now I have it wet and put. I'm gonna kinda remove most of the water. The brush will still be wet, just a little bit more than damp. And then I'm just going to pull in just like this. Some of this paint we just put down. I also want to contribute here to making those rounded shapes. I can pick up some more of that pigment to make sure I get those rounded shapes. I'll dad my brush and water. And then I'm just going to pull it in even further. And then I'll just make a little bit of haphazard marks with whatever's on the brush, it'll be very faint. I want to take that same color and I want to go over the bottom here. And I'm right now, I'm just dabbing it with little dots for the shadow on the second part of the hat here, the underneath. And then I'll just continue on the side here again, creating more of a shadow. And I'll continue my dabs. Just like this. When I turn my piece like this, I have more of a shadow. And so now I'll rinse my brush, remove my water, so my brushes wet but not soaking. And I'm just going to create dabs here to blend out that shadow. Can take a little more Prussian Blue and mix it with whatever's on my palate. Move, even mixing a little more water and a little more black. But I just wanted to have slightly more of a blue hue. And I'm gonna do my dabs on the side here of the top of the brim. Just like this. I'll add one more brushstroke of water, so I get it just a little fainter. And then I'm just gonna pull water and pigment right on the edge. I'll do a little on the bottom here. And I'm going to switch to my tiny brush. I'm gonna mix a little more blue and a little more black in with whatever remains here. So now I'm about three shades, three or four shades darker than the first shade we used here. And I just want to create the outline. I have an a sharp point and I'm gonna go to the top here. And just with a very light hand paint that shape to really emphasize that scallop right on that watercolor pencil mark. I'll do this over here on the bottom and on the sides. It will reactivate any part of the watercolor pencil. Create a little shadow and really emphasize that shape. And then I'll just go around here and on this side as well. Lastly, I'm just going to outline the base of the brim. You can go back in, create even more of a shadow right up top, underneath that first section. And in that way I do about half rinse my brush and just blend that out slightly and then come back in for the other side. And this is just the process of creating lots of layers to get the intensity that you're looking for. Now, I liked the top here, but I fear that I've made it a little too straight. So I'm just going to play around with the edge just to make it nice and curved. And I'll let this layer dry. We'll come back and add texture to the top of our hat. 28. Bear Hat: Layer 5: So now work on texture here for the teddy bear part. That's my favorite part. But it takes some water on my palette and pick up some sepia and put it down. And that's a pretty dark color. So Ella brushstroke of water. And then just to tie it in the rest of the piece, I'm going to add just a little Prussian blue to that. And that just adds a layer, a little bit of color here that will tie it in. And then I'm going to add one brushstroke of this yellow ochre. Mental warm it up and just change the color ever so slightly. So I think I'll add one more brushstroke of water because it is fairly dark. And then with my numbers six brush on my dry hat top here, I'm going to really take a brushstroke and I'm just going to debit and I'd like to start in one area. It doesn't have to be too close to the brim. And I'm just making little brushstrokes here and there. So some of them are facing in and then I'll come back in and crosshatch it. And so I want some of the background color to peek through and some areas where it doesn't. I can use my brush to push it around. And I'm right now I'm just working kind of maybe an inch deep into the hat. Will turn this around, make my dabs, and continue all the way around, not going deeper than the eyes, staying a little bit away. And I'm not doing the ears. I'm trying to create just a little bit of texture. Then when I want to do the area closest to the brim, I'm going to sharpen that point up a little bit. And I'm just going to pull strokes from the inside of the scallops here. And then we'll come back and do dabs. Again about an inch in to the hat. I still want to see some of that background peeking through. But I just keep doing dabs. So now that I have everything done in that perimeter that I like and go take one brushstroke of water and mix it in. And this will just lighten up some of this pigment that we mixed as well. And I'm gonna put a little bit of that pigment on the top of my brush. And I'm gonna do smaller brushstrokes as we get closer to the center. So now I have not only the lighter color, but the smaller brushstrokes. I can control the smaller brush strokes because it's a smaller area. And I'm just going to create dabs. And I'm also going to have a little overlap with the dabs we already did. So I go around the eyes, around the muzzle, just like that. And this creates a lot of texture. I don't want to reactivate the black of the eyes. Go switch to a smaller brush, my number one brush. And I just want to outline that muzzle. There's a little area I was very careful not to create dabs in it. So I just want to go around it with a controlled brush here. Now I'm can take a look at this. I can come back in with my deeper color and add just a few areas of intensity right along the edge. Just like this, not too many, just a few. And then I'm gonna mix just a little very quickly of this yellow ochre. And I'm not even too much of that. That's just the pure yellow ochre. And I'm just gonna dab a few spots of that here in there, basically around the edge. And then a few spots in the center. And I like the way that looks. So now I want to take my number one brush. I'm gonna go back to that darker color and I want to outline the ears. So I'm going around here since I have my color all wet, I'll do one year at a time. I have a kind of a nice thick outline. I'll draw my brush, then pick up a little more pigment and just create some dabs right on the edge of the ear. And this helps to make that perfectly straight line that I added right at first. To be a little more haphazard on the inside. Kinda looks like the ears rolling over. And I'll do the same thing to the other ear. So I'll go around and I can come back in and thicken that line up just a little bit. And then I'll come back in and create an irregular border on the inside of just a bunch of dabs. I'll take a little more of my yellow ochre to set a few. Again, little dabs. And that just coordinates the entire bit of for. I'm going to let this dry. And then we'll come back and add some final details. 29. Bear Hat: Layer 6: To add some final details, I'm going to add a little more definition to the side of a hat. And I want to work on that nose. So to work on it knows I want the nose and the mouth to be black, so I'll whet my black, Put a little on my palate. It's nice, rich color. And I want a little highlight. And the highlight is going to match this rounded shape of the top of the nose. So the first thing I'll do is control these, this paint and create the outline. And I traced it nicely and I liked that shape. So I'm just gonna use that as a guide. So there I have that shape. And now we'll work on the mouth, going to pull right straight down from that knows. And then just make curved edges here for the mouth. Can come in and thicken that up just a little bit. And then when I go back in and fill that knows I'm going to just pick match the shape and that arc going down of the nose. So I skip a spot and create that shape. And I fill that in. Then to add a little more water to my existing black on the palate and fill that in a little further. And then I'm just going to work my way in. So I'll go to the sides. And then up top here I'm just gonna gently add a little bit more, filling it in from the top, but still leaving a highlight. And when I have the shape and the amount that I like, I'll stop right there. While I have the black here, I want to go over the eyes just a little bit more to create a nice intense color. And I'll do that on both sides. And the last thing I wanna do is I want to add a little darkness to the edge of my hat here, so I'm gonna be careful not to smear my wet pain if I have any concerns, I'll let this layer dry, but I think I can handle it right now. What my number six brush pick up a little sepia and mix it with whatever was on my palate. If I have nothing left on my palette, I'll just mix it with water until I get a nice loose color. I'll add maybe one more brushstroke of water because you can always add additional layers. It's harder to remove them. And the more water you add, the lighter it will dry. So now I have my brush loaded with my wet pigment. And I'm just going to very carefully create dabs right around the edge here. I'm not gonna do the ears just working on creating dabs and a nice border, maybe one-inch deep. I'll go back in and constantly rewetting my brush, creating those scallops shapes to maintain that rounded edge. Once I have the edge and I thicken it all, I can come in here and work on the scalloped edge on the bottom. And again, I like to just put little dabs on the scalloped part. And that kind of brings it easier for me to maintain that shape. And then I'll fill in here with dabs. Again, I want the background still exposed in some areas. And now I'll continue to just dab. I'll make my dabs a little thicker. Whereas on the outside I did very controlled pointed dabs, like just like that. But on the inside here I can really push that brush down. I cover more area and it creates a lighter color in the center, which I like. Gonna be careful around the muzzle on the eyes. Again, I don't want to activate them or smear my work. But I am trying to create essentially a glaze that isn't a solid color, a solid piece. It's a glaze of dabs. And I'll just continue to come back in and do this. The reason I do this as it adds texture, but it changes the color from being very yellow and Golden from that yellow ochre to more of the sepia without being dark. And then with whatever's on my brush, I'll make a very sharp point. And I'm just gonna go around the ears a little bit, just the edge. It'll tie them in. And it'll help create that unity. Between the dark colors and the irregular shapes with a solid edge. Over here I can see at the top part of the scallops, I didn't want to overrun them. So they're a little bear. I'll just go in there and make that correction. And that's what you do is you take a look at what you've done and see where it might need a little more help. So I'm very happy with the way that looks. I'm going to let this dry. And then we'll come back and do a class wrap up. And they have a couple of bonus images as well. 30. Class Wrap Up: So here we have our finished results. We have our Santa hat from our template, and then we have our snowman hat. And the colors are traditional, Christmas and February wintery. At a glance, you get those feelings of the holiday season. Had more just Winter hats that you'd see from anytime the weather's cold and some people even where these type of hats off-season. So we have the hat with the palm palms and the lovely knit texture. We have the beanie with a lines of the knit fabric. We have the cute little cat hat that you'd only see little kids wearing a durably, or some younger women tend to wear these cutesy type things as well. And then you have the teddy bear hat. I just think this is so cute. My sister as a child adored teddy bears and I could see her wearing this when she was little, not so much today though. I also have a bonus for you. When you do your download for your templates, you'll get page four of templates which include two more winter hats, a Barea and a snowboarders hat. And here I've completed them. As you can see here, I made a Barea, something you might see a character wearing on a golf course. But this technique can be used for any colors or you don't have to use the pattern. And then there's the snowboarders had, which is something you'd see on the slopes and it's kind of a fun hat with the braids going down, a little tuft of fleece up top and the longer back than the front. If you'd like to view the techniques to create any of these bonus images, just check out my YouTube channel and you'll see these two techniques where you can watch along as I do them in, in fast motion. So it gives you some ideas, some variations. You can try them on your own. I hope you try your hand at making one of these winter hats, making your own variations and colors. Please snap a picture and upload it to the project section. Please be sure to follow me here on skill share to be notified of future classes and please consider leaving a review.