Watercolor Tropical Fruit | Daniela Mellen | Skillshare

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Watercolor Tropical Fruit

teacher avatar Daniela Mellen, Artist & Author

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

24 Lessons (1h 12m)
    • 1. Class Intro

      0:57
    • 2. Class Supplies

      0:52
    • 3. Using the Template

      2:03
    • 4. Painting the Mango

      2:39
    • 5. Painting the Mango Skin

      5:05
    • 6. Final Touches

      2:25
    • 7. Painting the Passion Fruit

      4:16
    • 8. Painting the Flesh

      3:44
    • 9. Final Touches

      4:10
    • 10. Painting the Papaya

      5:36
    • 11. Painting the Skin

      2:28
    • 12. Final Touches

      3:28
    • 13. Painting the Guava

      3:08
    • 14. Guava flesh

      3:49
    • 15. Final Touches

      1:43
    • 16. Painting the Dragonfruit

      2:23
    • 17. Painting the Background Image Skin

      3:40
    • 18. Painting the Front Image Skin

      3:27
    • 19. Final Touches

      3:32
    • 20. Painting the Kiwi

      1:46
    • 21. Painting the Flesh

      2:11
    • 22. Painting the Skin

      3:12
    • 23. Final Touches

      2:51
    • 24. Class Wrap Up

      2:22
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About This Class

Tropical fruit is beautifully colored, delicately shaped, and artwork in itself. However, in today’s class, we’ll paint 6 images inspired by these bold and striking fruits.

  • Mango
  • Passionfruit
  • Papaya
  • Guava
  • Dragonfruit
  • Kiwi

We’ll practice watercolor techniques such as creating gradients, making texture, carving shapes, lifting pigments, painting a glaze, and adding spatter. Each image is broken down into 3 or more chapters, with layers drying in between each chapter.

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Daniela Mellen

Artist & Author

Teacher

I'm an artist and author living in coastal Florida and surrounded by plants, animals, marine life, and the warm sun - all things that inspire me.

I am drawn to creating things and love to get lost in projects. Each day is a opportunity to learn something new, build on existing skills, and branch out to new ones. I was formally trained as a educator which is my passion and incorporating art into teaching makes my life complete.

I upload art classes every Friday, here on Skillshare. You'll see handmade books, memory keeping, watercolor, acrylic paint, unique art supplies, and photography composition. Thanks for joining me and I look forward to seeing your work.

Check out my blog for additional info on my website danielamellen.com or my YouTube Channel for additional c... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Class Intro: Hello, I'm Daniela Mellen, an author and artist in today's class, watercolor, tropical fruit. We'll create six paintings of exotic and brilliantly colored produce. Will use basic watercolor supplies to brushes and a pencil sketch to create each painting. The pencil sketch can be traced from a template that you can download alongside a classifier list. We'll mix bright colors that will not only show the fruit's skin, but we'll also paint the inside of each image as if we just sliced it open. The inner flesh is even more radiant than the outside and will capture that in our paintings. So gather your supplies and please join me today. 2. Class Supplies: So here are the supplies that we'll use for our watercolor tropical fruit class. We have two pages of templates that have six images of various outlines of the sketches that we're going to use. And in the next chapter I'll show you how to transfer the sketch to your watercolor paper. I have some watercolor paper here, cut to five by seven inch rectangles that you can use to make each one of these illustrations. You want to combine illustrations, use whatever size paper that you want. I have a pencil and eraser for tracing my sketch, and then I have my watercolor pigments to brushes and a paper towel. I have a one and a number 6 brush. In the next chapter we'll go over using the template. 3. Using the Template: Now to use the template, all I do is I take the template and select which image I'd like to trace onto my watercolor paper. Here I have a light pad, but you can use any light source to do your tracing. You can hold your template up to a window with light shining in behind it. And it's the same premise of how this light pad works. So I turn my light pad on and then I can decide where I want my sketch to go. So here I have the mango and I'll just lightly sketch it with my pencil here. And I want to do a light sketch because I don't want my pencil to shine through when I do my painting. So I complete this sketch, and that's very simple. Sketches are just mere outlines, silhouettes of the shapes. And then I can go in afterwards and tidy it up with an eraser to get the exact image that I want. Now if I wanted to combine images here, I have a couple of options. I can take the image that I sketched. And if I wanted to say, put another piece of the illustration on top of it or in front of it. I would just find that where I wanted to put that illustration and then I can make that sketch right over here. So here I am putting just the passion fruit image in front of the mango. And then I'll erase the lines from the mango behind it. Since all I'm seeing is the passion fruit in front. And I can do that with any of the images, and I can combine that on a larger painting as well. I can also take these images and I can use in the way that they print out. I can also flip them over to get the mirror image as well. And I can do a tracing using that method. So before we do all the paintings, I'm going to trace each painting onto its own five by seven watercolor paper. And then we'll get started painting. In the next chapter, we'll start our first image. 4. Painting the Mango: So here we have the sketch of our Mango. What I'm gonna do is paint the back ground image here. And I wanted to look like a slice to mango, so we'll see the interior flesh. And then on the foreground one, I'm going to paint it like the exterior of the mango. So we'll see the beautiful colored skin will start by painting the flash. Just going to take a wet brush and I'm going to wet the background, leaving some white spots on the paper. And I'm also going to be careful to leave a border between the front image and the back image. And then I'm going to mix my color. Now the mango fleshes a beautiful bright yellow. The exterior is a little lighter then the interior of the flesh. So I'm going to mix some lemon yellow on my palette. And then in a second puddle, I'm going to mix some of this deep yellow. It's a little bit of a warmer yellow, more like a yellow orange. And you can achieve this by mixing yellows with just a hint of orange or red to get that warm color. So I'm going to start with this warm color and I'm just going to dab it and I want this to be a very loose image. And I'm going to just dab it on the inside, leaving the white of the paper. I'll rinse my brush just slightly and pick up some of this lemon yellow. And I'm going to go all the way around right to the, just before the pencil mark. Right now there's only a slight variation between the two yellows and that's exactly what I want. So I'm going to create the shape of that mango, leaving just a slight edge before that pencil mark with my light yellow. And then I'm going to go in there and pick up that darker yellow and continue to dab that. I want to go around and really emphasize the shape of that rounded front image. And then I'm going to just come back in and really make this color super vibrant. I like to have white of the paper showing. I think that's a nice look. But if you like it filled in and more of a gradient, please by all means do that method. Me to come over here with a little more of this. The lemon yellow around the edge. Again, trying to preserve some of the whites of the paper and really emphasizes beautiful shape. And when I have that nice and glowy and a beautiful shape, I'm just going to let that dry. We'll come back and work some more on the back of this image and then start the front of our Mango. 5. Painting the Mango Skin: So now to work on the front of the mango, It's a rounded fruit with some beautiful coloring. There's greens, yellows, reds, and there's variation as well in there. So the first thing I'm gonna do is I'm going to wet my brush and I'm going to just wet like a concentric circle around the shape of the mango leaving the center dry. I'm also leaving a good distance from the edge. This gives me more control for both sections. I'm going to go in there, pick up some lemon yellow in my brush and a little bit of water here. So it really runs. And I'm going to start by creating about two-thirds of the mango here with this lemon yellow, this muted color. And what I really want to do is capture the exotic colors, the bold, beautiful colors here. So once I have that down, I can go in there and deposit just a little more pigment on that wet area that I put down. I'll rinse my brush and then I'm going to mix that color for that pinky red color. I'm going to take some crimson lake on my palette. A little perylene read to mixing with that. And just a little vermilion hue. And you can play around with the color that you get. Then I'm going to take it on my brush here. And I'm going to start by going right up top here. And I'm going to take it right to the edge of that pencil mark. Just pulling that shape. And I'm going to come around carving out the shape of that mango. Pull in some color. Again, I like to leave a little white of the paper exposed and places. And I continue to make that color could have come around. And I'll come around to about the seven o'clock. If this was a clock, maybe a little higher. So I have my basic layer down. I'm going to come back in here with some more of this beautiful bright pigment and deposit it on the areas I already wet. Again, I'm working on carving the shape, creating a slight blend with that yellow that we put down. And just creating some interest here. With this. I'll rinse my brush. I'm gonna take a little of this yellow, green is green, yellow. And I want to just deposit it on some areas here. I'm not touching the pink that we put down by depositing it in some of the areas, we put the yellow, it will eventually run with the pink. But I'm going to let that work that on its own. Now that you have the majority of my mango here, I'm going to come back in, pick up more of that lemon yellow and just deposit that very gently so that it combines the pigments that we have on the areas where I picked up any of this beautiful pink color, I'll come back in, rinse my brush, and then deposit more of that color. I don't want any harsh lines. If there are some lines where it dried, I'll just deposit a little more pink here so it runs a little more naturally. Could take a little more of that crimson lake for some variation, right? Just like that. And then I can play around with how much of this I want to add. I'd like to have areas that have a little more pigment in places and others. So I'll take a little of this green, yellow and just deposit that on one section. When I'm happy with how that looks, I'm going to switch to my smaller brush and pick up a little bit of this pink that we have. We're going to move to my background illustration and just create that outline. Very fine hand. I'll outline that background illustration of the mango. So it looks like the mango skin. Barely touching the brush to the paper. I can come back in, take a glass quick look at my image upfront. And then if there are any spots that I want to just round out the edges a little more. I'll make that correction right now. I can also go back in their deposit a little little puddle of more intense pigment. And when I'm happy with the way that looks, I'll let that dry. When it's dry, we'll come back for our final touches. 6. Final Touches: So work on the final touches to really capture what it looks like for a mango, I want to add some spots to the front of this fruit here, but I don't want to add spots to the back image. So I just took a piece of scrap paper and I traced the back image here, just so that my scrap paper, we'll cover it up and act as a mask and protected. So I have the piece that I cut off here. I'm just going to turn that over here. And I'll grab another piece of paper over here just to protect my paper. There'll be a little area exposed. And if I'm concerned about that, I'll just grab another piece of paper here. So it kinda masked off the background. And with my brush I'm gonna take a little step EA and I don't want a lot of specs. I don't want them too big the drops. So I'm just gonna go in there and just gently hit my brush. And we'll get some specs here right on the mango. Rinse my brush and it'll take away these scrap papers just to complete the image. So I have my specs and my mango going to go with my smaller brush and I'll wet it and pick up a little at sepia just to make the little cap here on the mango. Put that down. I'll put it over here on the background image to leaving a little white of the paper. And lastly, I'll switch my brush, deposits some water here, and I'm going to take a little bit of this Payne's gray. And then I'm going to mix in just a little color for my drawing. So I'll take the smallest amount of this crimson lake in with that gray just to tone it a little bit. And I'll just add a little bit of a shadow here. The step is completely optional. And there we have our Mango image. In the next chapter, we'll come back and paint the passion fruit. 7. Painting the Passion Fruit: For our next painting, we're going to paint this beautiful passion fruit here. And we're gonna make this back one with the skin showing and the skin over here and this beautiful brilliant pinky purple color. So with a wet brush, I'm gonna come in here and I'm just going to haphazardly wet areas of this main image here and a little bit of the skin on that foreground image. Then I'll mix my color. I'll make a little puddle on my palette, and I'll take some of this beautiful crimson lake. It's a berry color here and make a second puddle. Then I'm going to take some of this purple here and mix it in with that second color. I want a nice rich color. I'll mix a little with what's on my brush with that first puddle. Mix in a little more crimson lake on both of them. And then lastly, I'll take a little Prussian blue and I'm mixing it with that second puddle. So now with a very sharp point, I'm going to start to carve out the shape of this background of this passion fruit. I'm just going to come around, going just below that pencil mark, all the way around. And I have just a very rough image of the silhouette. I'll come back in and be a little more careful creating that shape, because that's shape is what we want to capture. In addition to this gorgeous color, get the nice rounded shape, kind of similar to a plum if you're not familiar with the passion fruit. And I want to leave a little gap between the foreground image and our background. While it's still wet, I'll go in there and pick up color from my second petal that we made. And I'll deposit it in areas here particularly close to that image in the foreground. Because I like that contrast. Again, I'm using wet on wet so that the colors blend and bleed and do interesting watercolor things. Rinse my brush, come back in and pick up a little more of that pink and just deposit it. Again. I don't want any straight edges, no straight lines. But I do like that blending. I'm gonna come over here, turn my paper around and work on this skin here. And again, I'm just going to create small little strokes to mimic the silhouette shape that I want. First, switch brushes to a smaller brush so I have a little more control. And I'll go in there with that pink first. I'll bring my pigment right to the edge of that line. Right with the pink leaving a little bit of white showing of the paper. And then I'll pick up that darker color and just deposit it in a few areas. I want it to be primarily pink. But I do like that variation that we see come back in with the pink. Blend out those colors just a little. And I'll just take a quick look over here at this background image. Deposit a few little spots of pink or purple depending on what my mood is. Smooth out that edge. And I'll let this layer dry. I'm going to maintain the pink on my palette and I'm going to mix more eventually, but for now, maintain that pink. We'll let this dry and we'll come back and add our next layer. 8. Painting the Flesh: So now when I come back in and work on the center of this passion fruit with my small brush, dip it in water. And I'm going to pick up a little of this deep yellow and a little more water so it flows, but I still want a nice intense color. And then I'm going to fill in this area just shy of this pencil mark, so I can create that little silhouette first. And it doesn't have to be perfect. It doesn't have to be a perfectly smooth edge. Just don't want to go over that pencil mark. And then I'm going to fill it in very haphazardly, leaving lots of whites of the paper showing. Once I have that done, I'll come back in with more pigment and just deposit it just to get some variation, some areas that are highly pigmented and a lot of contrast. And I'll let that dry. I'm going to switch to my larger brush. And I'm going to take some of this green, yellow and some of this deep green and create a nice, beautiful color here for the leaf. Rinse my brush, and then I'm just going to wet that leaf, that background, avoiding the stem and avoiding the fruit here. And then I'm going to go in with that darker color and I'll create that outline. I'm going to start over here on the left side of the stem, leaving a little gap between the stem. And I'll bring my pigment right up to that pencil mark. That green should cover that pencil mark nicely. And again, I want to leave some areas of the white of the paper, come back in. It's posit a little more pigment. And then I'll continue this in the next section of the leaf. Again, I'm leaving just a little gap around the stem, letting that green pigment run where I've already wet the paper. And I'll do the same thing around the border of this fruit here, leaving just a little white gap. Finished my silhouette. Come back in, rewet some of those areas with this green. Again leaving a nice, generous area of pigment in section. And I'm gonna go in and pick up a little this lemon yellow. I'll mix it on my palette and introduce a little of that green. And now I'm just going to deposit that in areas. Can smooth out any edges. Create nice variation here. Even come in there with just a little pure pigment of that lemon yellow. It's in places. Come back and pick up that green. So I have a nice leaf. And lastly, I want to come in here with some clean water on my brush, right on my palette. I'll take a little of this Payne's gray and mix it in and I want just a slight color, slight pigment, nothing dark. And I'm gonna take this pigment and I'm just going to gently added around this area of the yellow. I'm not coloring in the whole area. I'm just trying to stain the paper ever so slightly to create some variation. I'll let this layer completely dry and then we'll come back in and add some details. 9. Final Touches: So now that this has dried, I want to take my eraser and erase that pencil mark around that center of the passion fruit here and this little yellow center. I mean, another template where I just took the scrap paper and I cut out the images here. Just like this to kind of protect the paper. But then more importantly, have this little area here to protect this section. So I'm masking off the areas except this pink. I want to add some more speckles here to the pink. So I'll take just some scrap paper that I used in the previous illustration. And now I'm going to take my smaller brush because I want the speckles to be nice and small. Dip it in the sepia. Make sure I have enough on my brush. And now I'm just going to speckle very gently all over that skin of the passion fruit. And I'll try and do the same thing over here on this lower piece. It's a subtle effect, but it gives a lot of texture. Once I have that done, I can remove my mask. And then I can start my painting. I'm gonna take my small brush and I'm gonna pick up that sepia. I'm going to wet the brush so that it dilutes it ever so slightly. And then I'm just going to add little sections here, kinda little round hollows. Some might fill in with pigment to make the seeds. Just a few here and there. And I want some to be darker than others. So I'll go back in and re-wet some of the ones that I've done and leave the others just as they are. I'll come in here with more of a septa on my brush. And I'm going to create this little stem here. So the very light hand sketch that outline. And then I'll fill in some sections. And I can make it as thick as I want. I do like to have a little gap between the stem and leaf, at least in sections just to add some interest. And then lastly, to finish our piece, I want to work on this front for foreground image of this passion fruit. Going to pick up some more of that crimson lake on my small brush. And I want to create that outline of that skin. I want to create a little gap between the background image and the foreground image. So I'm going to leave a little white of the paper exposed. I go in there with only enough pigment on my brush to control it. I mean, I create that skin, can go back in and thicken it up in areas. It's a light image and it's not very wet. I'm going to rinse my brush. I'm going to take some of those brilliant pink. It's a very light color. Again on that same small brush. And I'm just going to overlap that image right where we painted the skin. It'll blend a little bit. It'll be a little bit wet. And so there'll be a little bit of bleeding as it dries, but not significant. It really creates just a shadow. Then to finish our image, I'm going to take my larger brush, put some water on my palette and take a little of Payne's Gray. Take a little of the crimson lake with it. Again just to tone it down to match. And I'll just make a little cast shadow here and here. Rinse my brush, dry it off so it's damp. And just pull that around. And there we have our passion fruit painting. In the next chapter, we'll go over the papaya. 10. Painting the Papaya: Now the painter, papaya, we're going to use a lot of oranges, pinks, and yellows. It's a beautiful, beautiful fruit. With my large brush, my number six brush, I'm going to wet it and we'll start with the flesh. Just going to paint water, just to wet this major area of flesh. And then over here as well, just the areas inside these channels. So once I have that water absorbing into my paper, I'll mix my color. I'm going to make a couple of puddles of water. I'm going to take one puddle with this deep yellow and a little water to that. Clean my brush on the next puddle and I'm going to take some brilliant pink and mix that in. Then we take a little perylene red, mix that in with the brilliant pink and create a third puddle here with whatever's on the brush. Rinse with some water, add some vermilion hue. And just a little more of this deep yellow. Now with a very sharp point, get a coming here with my deep with my orangey color. And I'm just going to create some areas in the background. Skipping areas. And just introducing pigment. Rinse my brush off. And I'm going to pick up this beautiful yellow color. And I want to go very close to that area without touching any of that area that we introduced originally. With that orangey peach color. Get a switch to my smaller brush, pick up more of that yellow. And now I want to create the shape. I actually want to run into some of that peachy color that we made. Again, I'm leaving some white of the paper showing just for variation. Going right up to that pencil mark. Coming right over here. Continuing to create that shape of that exposed flesh. Come back in with the orange. And I'm just going to read a posited in the areas I already put down the orange. That'll intensify that color and yet create that blend that we're looking for. Then I'm gonna come in here with some of that. Pink. Can introduce that as well. Let that blend together. And it creates a beautiful result. And now I just play around with the degrees of the color that I want. If I want it to have more of a golden hue, I'll add more yellow. If I want more peachy, I'll add more of that orange. And I can always add some pink just to make it beautiful. But it pick up more of this deep yellow and just deposited and play with it. It's a very beautiful, beautiful blend. Gonna take some of that deep yellow. I'm going to introduce it to these channels. Again, not being afraid to leave a little white of the paper. But I'm going to introduce it to all the channels, very generously avoiding the pencil marks. I want to erase those eventually. Then I'm gonna go back in with my other colors and add it as well. This will tie it into the first, the foreground image. And it creates the shape here. Now on the foreground image we're going to introduce the seeds that we see on a papaya when you slice it open immediately. But on this background image, I want it to look like the siege of in scooped out. So to do that, I'm going to create darker areas inside that center channel. Right now. I'm just going in and adding my pinks and getting that color that I like, creating the shape here. And now I'm going to add just a little vermilion hue to that orange section we have. And to one side of it, I'm going to really heavily add that orange. I'll take a little of that orange and just deposited on the other side. But I really want that brightness to be in the center here. I'm going to pull this out even further. Just changing the shape slightly. And then I'll come back in with my additional colors and deposit that in. Just like that. When I'm happy with this, I'll let this layer dry and we'll come back and add our additional layers. 11. Painting the Skin: So now to work on the skin of this papaya, would it come in there with a wet brush and I just want to add some water to the paper, not worrying about making it complete. And I'll switch to my smaller brush. Could take a little of this deep yellow. And I'm just going to pull it across and I want to kinda work in long strokes here. Again, I'm just going shy of that pencil mark. And I'm leaving a little gap between the top of the skin and the flesh. So once I have that down, I like the way that looks good. Come in here with a little of this yellow ocher. Put that on my palette, a little bit of water. And then I just want to deposit that, letting that run starting at the bottom of this shape. I like the way that looks. It's a little bit lighter up top, closest to the flesh. And then I'm just going to take a little of that pink mixture that we mixed. I just want to add that in a few spots. Now create a nice little blend and coordinated with the inside of that Papaya. Can switch to my other brush to pick up a little of this deep yellow. And then I just want to gently go over that area, kinda creating a glaze on the back of that piece. Just to make all the flesh unite. Once I have that down, I can pick up a little of this orange and just add it in spots. Ever so gently. Coming in, rinse my brush, pick a little more of that yellow up, and just finally pull it through. Gives us a little variation, little difference between what we have here on those flesh pieces. And then lastly, I'm just going to take my brush with that yellow on it and create a glaze right over those areas that we put down first. I don't want to dig up the color or muddy it, just really enhance it. We'll let this dry and we'll come back and add our final touches. 12. Final Touches: So now to finish this piece, I'm going to take some of my orange here that we have mix that we made for the interior here I'm going to mix a little more vermilion hue with that, just to get a slightly darker shade. And with a very pointy brush and a very light hand and just going to create that outline. Just the outline of the flesh here, the skin. And then I'll do the same thing with this piece over here. It just tidies up any of those edges. Do the same thing with the bottom. And that's a nice look for our piece of fruit here. Now, I want to make the seeds. And if you've ever sliced open up papaya or seen the inside of a pipe, There's hundreds of seeds. So put some water in my palette and a little of sepia. And then I'm going to take it and I'm gonna make lots of these little shapes. So I'm just going to make little upside down use just like the letter. And I'll come around and go over them here. And I'm just trying to recreate the rounded edge of these seeds. I don't want it to be a straight line, so I'll stick in a few here and there as well. And then they're taking my brush and just color in some areas here in there. Because a little variation. I don't want to see too much white of the paper in this section. And while that's drying, I'm going to create my cache shadow, put some water in my palette. A little bit of this Payne's gray. And then I'm going to take a little of this yellow ocher again, mix it in there just to tone down that shadow. So it's similar. And then I'm gonna come over here and I'm just going to outline the shape, echoing the roundness. And I'll pull that color rate in. Rinse my brush, but no, clean it off. Just remove some of the water and blend out that edge. Can come back and pick up any of that color. Pole it just over here slightly. And there we have the papaya. 13. Painting the Guava: So the guava is one of those beautiful tropical fruits with a yellowy green skin in this beautiful pale, pale pink flesh. We're going to start by painting the skin. So with a wet brush, I'm just going to dab a few spots, not too much, maybe half of the area with water. I'll just have a little bit over here on this part of the skin as well. And then I'm gonna come in and mix my colors. I want this yellow, green here, green, yellow. And I'm going to mix in a little deep green with that just to make it a little more vibrant. And then in the next petal I'm going to mix my lemon yellow. And I'm just going to take the slightest amount of that green that we mixed in with it just to coordinate it in with my big brush, I'm just going to create the outline here, the perimeter, the shape of that beautiful guava fruit. I'll leave a little gap between the foreground and the background image just to create that silhouette. And I can come in here and the area that was white and just going to tap it, they'll continue to overlap that first layer we put down. And as it dries certain areas, we'll have a little more intensity. And that's the look that I want. I'm creating that shape. I'm going to switch brushes. Now. I'm going to clean that one yet. Pick up that light color. And I want to do the same thing. I want to create the shape on the skin of this foreground image. So I'm going to avoid all the pencil marks, but yet really fill in that area. And that gives me a lot to work with. And then I'm gonna come back in and just read jab the area to create more pigment. And then I'm going to switch back to my large brush, pick up that green. And now I want to just dab not trying to create the whole thing in a solid green. I want it to be modeled with these two colors blending together. Just like this. But to take that green again with a very sharp point and just going to go in here. And my foreground image as well. I'll work on the larger areas first and then continue to just dab a little bit and that background image. And then I'm going to come in there one more time with that green. And just some of that smaller area. I'm going to leave the green and the yellow on my palette to dry. And we'll let this dry on the paper. 14. Guava flesh: So now that our first layer has dried, I went around and erase the pencil marks around the green that we already painted, and I lighten them up around the rest of the piece to go in there with a wet brush. And I'm going to just saturate the paper on that area in the inner circle here. And that's going to be the beautiful pink flesh that we make. We're going to take some of this beautiful, brilliant pink. Just set that on my palette. And then next to it I'll just take whatever's on the brush. I'm going to mix in a little of this perylene red with that second pile. And then I'm gonna come back to this brilliant pink and I'm going to create that shape. I'll start by making the perimeter, bringing it just shy of that pencil line, going all the way around. And then I'm going to fill in a good portion of it, but leaving a lot of white of the paper too. And I'm going to take just the smallest amount of that deeper red that we made. And it just certain spots. I'm going to add just a few little dollops of it here in there. Just to get a little variation. Going to rinse my brush, come back in with that lighter pink and just add a few little dollops of that as well. On the areas that didn't have the pink, the darker of the pink. Just like that. Going to come back in with my smaller brush and take some more of this yellow green and a little more of that deep green. And now I'm going to create that outline for that upper skin. The very gently go around it. Now this color is a little darker than the color we already added. And that's okay because we're going to use this to our advantage. So once I continue to make that outline of that skin just on this front image, I'll outline the bottom as well. Again with these strokes very lightly touching the paper, trying to preserve that beautiful rounded shape of the fruit. And then I'm gonna go in there with a more of that lighter green mix that in. So I get sort of a blend and just dab it. And this will unite the outline as well as brightening that color so that our foreground image is more intense than our background image can come over here and just continue with that. And then I'm gonna take that lighter color, turn my piece upside down because it's easier for me. And I'm just going to outline that image in the back. I'm using that lighter color to really emphasize the distance between these two pieces. And really outline it with that lighter yellow. Then I'm gonna go back in with just a little bit of that green on my brush and just dab it in a few spots just to combine the two images. And I'm sticking with that color since it's a little brighter than the image we run the color we've put down closer to that first piece. Just like that. We'll let that dry and then we'll come back and add some final touches. 15. Final Touches: So now that our pieces dried, I'm looking at it and this is two yellow, this background colors a little too pale for me. So this is a great time to introduce a glaze. Going to take that green that we have on our palette and add just a little water to it. Just a couple of brushstrokes. And then very gently, I'm going to go over that entire background image with that green. Not going to brush too much. I don't want to mess up the color, blend it too much or muddy it. But I do want to introduce a little intensity here to make it a little more green and a little less yellow. And this way it will coordinate with the front piece where it looks like the other half of it. But it doesn't look so strange. I'm going to take my small brush and I'm going to come in here a little sepia on my palette. And I'm going to create that little bottom of the guava here. And I'm a little cap at the top. And then lastly, the last thing I wanna do is a slight cache shadow. Take a little Payne's gray on my palette with a little water. And just the smallest amount of this deep green. And I'll just pull this rate across here, just like this. Switch to a smaller brush and just create that cache shadow. And there we have our guava. 16. Painting the Dragonfruit: Now the paint the dragon fruit. We're going to paint these very interesting little spines. But take my small brush and I'm just going to paint each spine with water, making sure to leave a gap if there's any overlap. The spines come up the top here of each of these little sections. And I just want the top section. I'm not looking to paint the spoon area here. Just over here. And I'll start with this one fruit first before we go to this one in the foreground. So then I'm going to take some lemon yellow on my palette. And I my small brush, just going to deposit that lemon yellow. I'll do these three little spines at the top first. And I'm coloring in the yellow most of the way. The length of the spine. Once it starts to hit the base of the fruit, I'm going to just leave it. So there I have just the tops of those spines are going to come in here and take a little of this yellow green, mix it with little dark green. And now I just want the very tip introduce a little bit of that green will get a little gradient going on. Between the green and the yellow. Then I can come back in with the yellow and work on just the tips of the spine here of the bottom piece as well. And once I have that, I'll go in and introduce just the smallest amount of green to make the tip screen on the bottom piece. And the last thing we'll do before we let this layer dry is just take some clean water on my large brush. And I'm wetting the inside here. Taking a little Payne's gray on my palette, very slight amount. And I'm just going to dab. I just want to barely discover the paper. I also want to leave some white showing of the paper. And I'm bringing this right up to that pencil mark. And then I'll let this layer completely dry. 17. Painting the Background Image Skin: So now that our first layer has dried, I went to work on the brilliant pink color of the skin of the dragon fruit. On my palette. I'll put some water down and I'm going to take this beautiful crimson lake color. And then right next to it I'll make another puddle. Little bit of water. And some of his brilliant pink. And this gives me a nice gradient. Can come back in, introduce a little more crimson lake to that. Just like that. I'm going to pick up this darker color first. And it doesn't really matter where you start going to start one of these sections. And I'm not going to paint over the pencil mark, just going to start at the bottom here. It might be easier if you use a smaller brush. And I'm just going to pull that color up about halfway. I'll rinse my brush and it's the same technique for all of them. I went to come over here and introduce that the diffused pink as well. For that section. I can put a switch to a smaller brush. Take that dark color. Again, start at the bottom, pull it up, introduced that diffused color, creating that shape of each of these little petals. And I'll continue that. And I'm going to work on the back fruit first, create my shape. And then it introduced the dark, the diffuse color, leaving a little gap between where the yellow ends and our pink. I still want to maintain the shape of each of these scales. But I want a little space between the two colors. I'll come here on this very large section. Introduce my darker color at the bottom. Pull that around. Again, leaving some white space and leaving gap between each of the little sections. And then coming in with that lighter color. Because a little variation. And these ones here, there isn't really a lot of space. So I'm just going to barely have a little bit of that red peeking through. Come in here, pull up with my darker pink and then introduce some of that diffused pink. Do one more here, and then we'll let this one dry. And then my diffused pink, I can come back in with some of that deeper pink and really deposited at the bottom of each of these little sections here to seek him a nice little contrast. It gives a pretty shape and it shows the different sections. We'll let this dry and then we'll come back and work on our bottom piece. 18. Painting the Front Image Skin: So now finish this up. We'll work on the foreground here, image. Just with my smaller brush, I'm going to wet each of these little petals. I see, I forgot one here that's in the background, so I'll do that as well while I'm here. And again, same procedure, I deposit my darker color at the base. And then I introduced that lighter color. Going to turn my piece around so I can really introduce more of this darker color on our image up front just to make it a little brighter, make it appear a little closer. Very carefully going around the edges, creating that shape of each of these petals. And then I can go in there with that lighter color, continuing to introduce that shape. And here I think I'll start with that lighter color. And very carefully go in with that darker color. On this side, I'll just work on the pieces. I'm not even going to worry about creating a blend with a lighter and darker. And then I'm gonna take my darker color and with a sharp point, I'm going to go around and create this outline here. Good to go right over those pencil marks upfront. Really build up that shape. Make it nice and bright. I like to do this in multiple layers instead of just going with a lot of paint the first time. And get a nice result. Just like that. Going to come back in and a little darker color here to the base. And really get those shapes going. Amanda, take that lighter color. So I'll rinse my brush, pick up that lighter color. And I'm going to outline that intersection. Goes up against that slightly discolored section that we made of the gray. So I want to create that outline. And once I have that shape down, I'll go in there with a little of that lighter color and just pull those two colors together. There'll be a little bit of bleeding between the darker color and the lighter color. Just like that. Well, let this dry and we'll come back and add our final touches. 19. Final Touches: So now that our layers have dried, I can come in and clearly see what I need to do for the final touches. I'm going to take this white gel pen. And this is kind of a way to try and remedy any mistakes or any paint overrun. And I just want to create a clear boundary between that foreground image and that background image. So I'm just going to go around with the white gel pen just for a moment here and create just a little border between our two pieces, just in a few spots, right up top here, really. And that's just a mistake I made where I didn't leave the paper white. Not a big deal. I'm gonna come in here and I'm going to take a little of this Payne's gray down on my palette, fairly dark. And with a very sharp point, I'm going to make the little spots that are very common to dragon fruit. They're just little spots, almost rounded squares, little rounded rectangles. And I'm just going to recreate that with the tip of my brush. It's kinda spotted like a Dalmatian. And I'm just going to create this all the way around here. It's one of the things that make the dragon fruit so beautiful and so unique. Sometimes the flesh isn't white, but it is the same pink of the skin. So there are variations. Going to take my larger brush, mix some water with that gray that was on my palette. Mixing a little pink with that and just to create that cast shadow right over here. And then the last thing I wanna do is I wanna take some of this lemon yellow, my small brush and really emphasize the tips of these little spikes. This will also helped me build the shape. So I can make it wider at the base. So it almost runs into that red flash. But I'm going to try and leave a little gap. I just like the way that looks. Then I'm going to take my green on my brush and just really carve out that sharp point. I like doing this when the yellow is still wet because then I get a nice little blend between the two. This just really refreshes everything. The last thing I want to do is move my larger brush. I'm going to take some of this beautiful pink that we have. And I just want to create a little bit of a glaze here, really emphasizing the image here we have up front just gonna go over the majority of the areas that we colored pink. And then because I want to maintain that variation, I'll rinse my brush so it's wet. As you can see, it's still has a little pink water on it. And just blend that up to the top of each of these sections. And I'm just doing that on the forefront to foreground shape. And there we have our dragon fruit. 20. Painting the Kiwi: For our last painting, we have the kiwi, which is still tropical fruit, but it's a lot more common than a lot of the others. So a wet brush, I'm just going to wet the background image and the skin here of this kiwi in the front. I'm going to mix a puddle here with a little of this yellow ocher. And the second one here with some sepia. Add a little water to that sepia. Rinse my brush, get a little more yellow ocher. And now I'm just going to dab it just on my skin of the TV in the background here. Just dabbing it just to get a little bit of a light under painting here. And I'm just going to create the edge. I'm not going to make it straight. I want it to be kind of Jaggard. The Kiwis very hairy little thing, little further on it. And I like the way that we try and capture that by making the jagged edges. I'm leaving a little gap of space between the fruit in the background and this one up front. So again, I will tap around and then tap over here the edge. It's supposed to look like it's slice to the top edge should be nice and sharp. But the rest of it should have that little rough edge. Just like that. We would take that color. I'm also going to put it here on the two ends of that Kiwi. And I'm going to let this layer completely dry. 21. Painting the Flesh: So now for my second layer, I want to mix a nice green for this flesh over here. I'm going to paint the larger part of this green. Leave a little gap of white and then have a little bit of blue in the center and also another gap of white. So I'm going to take a little of this deep green and set it down on my palette. Then I'm going to add some of this yellow, green. And I'll do this until I get a color that I like to add the smallest amount of Prussian blue to this. And I'll just cool it off a little bit. I'll rinse my brush. And I'm just going to wet this area, leaving a nice gap between the edge and the center. And then with a very sharp point. I'll take my pigment and I'll try and create that rounded shape. It's a very light color and we'll add more intensity as we go. But right now I want a little gap between the pencil line and the edge. And I just want to create that shape around the edge. That beautiful rounded shape, almost oval, can take a little more of that deep green, mix it in. A little Prussian blue mix that in, and a little more of that yellow, green. And now I'm just going to deposit it just in dabs around the edge with my brush. I'm just going to sweep it in towards the center, kinda making a little bit of a jagged edge there. Just like that. I'll come back in with a little more of that deep green and the point of my brush and just paint it around the edge. Well, let this layer completely dry. 22. Painting the Skin: Now this is dry. I'm gonna go back to work on the back of my Kiwi here. Can take some sepia on my palette. And with my small brush, I'm gonna make a nice sharp point. I'm just going to feed little teeny, little sharp hairs all the way in the back here, leaving a little space between some I don't want it to be perfectly straight. Some areas I'll pull. Now I'll come around here. Do the same. Leave my brush on my palette, wet my brush, and pick up the larger piece. And now I'm just going to dab just like this. My goal is to try and create a blend from that edge, that sharp edge that we made. And the rest of this kiwi here, take my paper towel, fall it up, and just dab it, picking up some of that pigment. And I'm gonna come back in, wet my little brush and create some more of those little shapes all the way around, introducing another layer. So we have a nice underpainting here, a bunch of layers. I'm changing the direction. The only area that smooth here is going to be this edge. Then I'm going to very carefully go in there and just dab, create some space, creates some shape. And then it gives you the same thing with this one in the foreground. Brush full of water. Create little teeny strokes. Just to make a little bit of a rough edge on that key. We now go back in there and just dab it. Overlapping the shapes I already put down. Take my paper towel, debit again, and add the background. I'm going to take my sepia while we're here and just create a little bit of an outline here. And there's little caps. And we'll let this layer completely dry. 23. Final Touches: So now I want to paint the inside here of my Kiwi with a wet brush. I'm going to take some of this Prussian blue, set it on my palette, and a little purple, and I'll combine them until I get a nice color, a cool color, maybe a little more Prussian blue there. And I'm going to take that sharp point on my brush and I'm going to pull a couple of strokes in. And I'm gonna go opposite sides just a couple of strokes and just pull it in just like that. Now, I'm leaving a lot of area blank. I'll rinse my brush and give us a chance to absorb into the paper. In the meantime, I'm going to pick up some of this green and I'll take a little more of the deep green. And with that, I'm just going to sharpen up that edge shape. Go all the way around. Really emphasizing the back of this kiwi here, the slice kiwi. Then I'll rinse my brush and with a damp, I'm going to just blend it slightly out. Not all the way, but just so that there are no sharp edges. Then I'm gonna come back and take a little more purple and mix it in with my pigment here. So it's a lot more purple. And then they take a few more strokes just on top of the existing ones that have kind of dried. And be sure to pull a few more strokes just like that. Give that a moment to absorb into the paper. And in the meantime, I'll take my larger brush, put a little dollop of water on my palette at a little Payne's gray little seperate of that. And I'll create just a little cast shadow here and here. So I have a nice shadow and then I'm just going to create a little bit of a ragged edge. Just to imitate the shape of that kiwi. Gonna come in. Take a little more purple and mix it in with that color, a lot more Prussian blue. So now it's nice and deep and a little Payne's gray with that. So a little bit more there. And now I'm going to come in here and create little seeds. These little edible seeds that are on the key way, just around the edge here and a few in the interior. Make a few little strokes here and there with this darker color. But nothing crazy. I'll let that dry and we're all done. In the next chapter, we'll take a look at our finished work and just a couple of variations. 24. Class Wrap Up: So here we have our completed tropical fruit paintings. We have the mango that we did here where we added the texture of a little spatter. We showed the inside fruit as well as the beautiful shape and the skin color. Then we have the passion fruit with the very rich outer color, the pink in an almost purpley blue outer color. And then that rich inner color layer. We have the papaya, which has its own brilliant color, no longer the pinks, but now we have a little bit of peach and some oranges and yellows, along with all the seeds. We have the guava, the beautiful watermelon colors really with the pink interior and the modeled yellow and green exterior. The ever colorful dragon fruit would the spotted interior, the spines on the exterior and then gorgeous pink color yet again. And then we have the fuzzy kiwi, which is kind of interesting because it has not only the darker exterior with a little furry skin, but the interior as a surprise with the green and the blue. So those are the paintings we did in class today. I wanted to show you some variations that you could do using the same techniques, the same images. So you can combine them like we discussed and using the template where you overlap the shapes. And here I did the full size painting. Originally the same size as these paintings. And then after I completed it, I scanned it into my computer and printed it out on a small postcard size piece. So here I still have the mango and kiwi, the passion fruit, dragon fruit, and the papaya. You can also take it a step further and use this in your art journal. And so here I have another piece, and this is just on a piece of paper. And I did each of the fruits and the night. They're also throw in a little star fruit here as well. That I kind of have just an assortment and inventory of different tropical fruits. I hope you'll try your hand at one of these posted in the project section. Please be sure to follow me here on Skillshare to get notified of future classes and please consider leaving a review. Thank you for joining me today.