Watercolor Mittens | Daniela Mellen | Skillshare

Playback Speed


  • 0.5x
  • 1x (Normal)
  • 1.25x
  • 1.5x
  • 2x

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

37 Lessons (2h)
    • 1. Class intro

      1:25
    • 2. Class Supplies

      2:39
    • 3. Using the Templates & Modifications

      4:09
    • 4. Mitten #1: Santa Mitten

      5:13
    • 5. Santa Mitten: Part 2

      3:03
    • 6. Mitten #2: Fluffy Mitten

      3:34
    • 7. Fluffy Mitten: Part 2

      2:57
    • 8. Mitten #3: Masking Fluid Technique

      3:52
    • 9. Mitten #3: Part 2

      5:21
    • 10. Mitten #3: Part 3

      2:32
    • 11. Mitten #4: Patterned Mitten

      4:11
    • 12. Patterned Mitten: Part 2

      3:27
    • 13. Mitten #5: Snowflake Mitten

      4:00
    • 14. Snowflake Mitten: Part 2

      3:05
    • 15. Snowflake Mitten: Part 3

      2:33
    • 16. Mitten #6: Ski Mitten

      2:04
    • 17. Ski Mitten: Part 2

      0:58
    • 18. Ski Mitten : Part 3

      3:03
    • 19. Ski Mitten: Part 4

      2:55
    • 20. Ski Mitten: Part 5

      4:26
    • 21. Ski Mitten: Part 6

      2:41
    • 22. Mitten #7: Buffalo Plaid

      5:10
    • 23. Buffalo Plaid: Part 2

      2:37
    • 24. Buffalo Plaid: Part 3

      4:23
    • 25. Mitten #8: Cable Knit Mitten

      1:36
    • 26. Cable Knit Mitten: Part 2

      2:55
    • 27. 26B Cable Knit Part 3

      3:57
    • 28. Mitten #9: Knit Mitten 2

      1:45
    • 29. Knit Mitten 2: Part 2

      3:48
    • 30. Knit Mitten 2: Part 3

      3:33
    • 31. Mitten #10: Knit Mitten 3

      1:36
    • 32. Knit Mitten 3: Part 2

      4:19
    • 33. Knit Mitten 3: Part 3

      1:33
    • 34. Knit Mitten 3: Part 4

      3:16
    • 35. Knit Mitten 3: Part 5

      3:14
    • 36. Class Wrap Up

      3:04
    • 37. Bonus Class! Mitten #11

      5:23
  • --
  • Beginner level
  • Intermediate level
  • Advanced level
  • All levels
  • Beg/Int level
  • Int/Adv level

Community Generated

The level is determined by a majority opinion of students who have reviewed this class. The teacher's recommendation is shown until at least 5 student responses are collected.

48

Students

2

Projects

About This Class

Watercolor Mittens is a fun class demonstrating ten mittens with various techniques, including wet-on-wet technique, wet-on-dry, creating color intensity, making smooth gradients, using masking fluid, and building layers. 

10 illustrations are included in class, with each illustration broken down into a series of lessons, ranging from 2 - 5 chapters long. 

Class includes a downloadable Supply List, a Patterns & Placement Idea Sheet, and Watercolor Mitten Templates (8) to help you draw your sketches. There is also a Bonus Chapter for an 11th illustration.
Class Lessons Include:

  1. Santa Mitten
  2. Fluffy Mitten
  3. Masking Fluid Mitten
  4. Patterned Mitten
  5. Snowflake Mitten
  6. Ski Mitten
  7. Buffalo Plaid Mitten
  8. Cable Knit Mitten
  9. Knit Mitten 2
  10. Knit Mitten 3

Beginners and practiced watercolorists will enjoy the class, as lessons demonstrate easy to follow skills. The classes vary in complexity and progress from beginning level to advanced.

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Daniela Mellen

Artist & Author

Teacher

I'm an artist and author living in coastal Florida and surrounded by plants, animals, marine life, and the warm sun - all things that inspire me.

I am drawn to creating things and love to get lost in projects. Each day is a opportunity to learn something new, build on existing skills, and branch out to new ones. I was formally trained as a educator which is my passion and incorporating art into teaching makes my life complete.

I upload art classes every Friday, here on Skillshare. You'll see handmade books, memory keeping, watercolor, acrylic paint, unique art supplies, and photography composition. Thanks for joining me and I look forward to seeing your work.

Check out my blog for additional info on my website danielamellen.com or my YouTube Channel for additional c... See full profile

Class Ratings

Expectations Met?
  • Exceeded!
    0%
  • Yes
    0%
  • Somewhat
    0%
  • Not really
    0%
Reviews Archive

In October 2018, we updated our review system to improve the way we collect feedback. Below are the reviews written before that update.

Why Join Skillshare?

Take award-winning Skillshare Original Classes

Each class has short lessons, hands-on projects

Your membership supports Skillshare teachers

Learn From Anywhere

Take classes on the go with the Skillshare app. Stream or download to watch on the plane, the subway, or wherever you learn best.

Transcripts

1. Class intro: Hello, I'm Daniella melon and author and artist. In today's class, watercolor mittens. I'll show more than ten whimsical mittens using multiple watercolor techniques. I'll take you through the steps from using the eight templates to modifying them to create unique mittens. And lastly, to painting with great colors and textures. There are mittens from the basic Santa mitten with some variations, to knitted mittens with lots of variations, ski mittens and even a trendy buffalo checkmate in the first few mittens or for beginners. And then the projects get more advanced as we progress, will use wet on wet techniques. And as the illustrations get more involved, will add more layers and more details. This class is for all level artists. And I hope you'll find a mitten in here that's as charming as I do. Select the image you'd like to paint, then created. And once finished, take a photo of your work and post it in the project section. Please be sure to follow me here on skill share to get notified of future classes, please consider leaving your review and now let's get started painting. 2. Class Supplies: For our watercolor mittens class, there are few downloads. There's the classify lists with specific pigments and color shades that I use as well as the tools. Then there are the mitten templates and there's two pages of templates here. There are eight Mittens, but there are lots of variations. So there's over ten mittens that I demonstrate in class today. You can follow along with all or just the ones you like. And you can modify all of them. You can combine and create them all so that they're your own. And I'll show you more about that in the using the template chapter. There is also a another download for pattern ideas as well as placement ideas. And you might find these helpful or they might inspire you to do different things. So you might want to check those out and we'll go over those in class as well. Now for the majority of my mittens, I'm just going to demonstrate on a piece of five by seven watercolor paper and that will fit one mitten very nicely. There'll be a few that we do on where we combine the mittens. And so for that I'm using an eight by ten piece of paper. I have my pencil and my eraser so that I can trace it. And then this is just a light pad. It's optional. All you need is a light source. So by that, a window would work out really well. You can just hold your template up to the window, but your paper on top and trace over that. And we'll go over that in the using the template class as well. I wanted to show you some variations on the mittens. So one thing I'm going to use is this masking fluid, sometimes called liquid brisket. And we'll go over that in the chapter as well. And I just use a tool to apply that. You can use an old paintbrush, a toothpick, a skewer. This happens to be a tool for doing nail work for people that take care of their fingernails. And it is, it's a nice tool to work with with liquid first get just an idea, but it's not necessary. There's also a gel pen to put patterns on your work afterwards. That's one technique and option. You can use colored pencils, acrylic page, or even watercolor to do that. The gel pen gives it a different look and it makes it white as well. So that's something to consider. And then I just have my pigments in any assortment will work. I'm going to explain the ones I use today in class, the exact colors, but any color combination would work well. In the next chapter, we'll go over using the template. 3. Using the Templates & Modifications: Now to use the template, they're all done with the same procedure. I'm just going to show you on the basic template. But obviously some of them are a little more involved than others, but it's the same procedure for using the template. You placed your template down on your light source. And as I said, this is a light pad. It's very thin and it illuminates, which replicates light from a window. Or if you have a picture frame, you can prop it up between two books with a light bulb underneath. Or you can just try and cut out, physically cut out with a pair of scissors, your template and use that to trace around it. I'm just going to place my template down in my light source. And then I add my watercolor paper over it. And I could see faintly underneath where my mitten is. And then I'll just place the mitten how I want it on my paper. And I could also flip this sheet over because they're all reversible. So once I have my placement down, I'll put my paper the way I want it. I have my mitten underneath and they'll all just very lightly sketch with my pencil. I'm trying not to crease the paper or etch into the paper. And I just want to get that mitten shape. And again, you take your time and you do this the way you want with whichever mitten you want to use. And from here you can modify the template. So I have my basic image here. And then I can modify this accordingly. I'll take my eraser and fine tune it to any points that I want. Changing the shape, grounding the corners, and then removing the pencil marks that I don't want and I don't want pencil marks remaining for my painting. That's one of the reasons I'm using a very light hand and not etching my paper. If you wanted to make the mitten fury on the end, just like here, you can just create that shape. And like others here, if you wanted to add your stripes or your checks, now's the time to do that. Now if you want to have placement of multiple mittens at a time, for example, right here from your sheet, you can just choose the mittens that you want to use and then take your larger paper and play around with it the same way. This is just a vague idea. So if I wanted to say this one, I put my template down on my light source. I have my paper down and I'd start my sketch. So I have my first Minton. And then to make that second mittens so that it's flipped the other way. I flipped my sheet around and I place my template down. And because I want that loop though, I'm going to actually drop that second Minton and little lower than the first and maybe put it at a slight angle. And then I just add my simple loop. What I'd like to do is I don't like to use the put the string, the loop that connects them by the thumbs. I put it on the other side. And so what I do is I create my line first. And then I just create a rounded shape and I'll play around with it until I get the shape that I want. I could also turn that shape into our heart or an initial. And so there I have that template done the way I wanted it. I can thicken this and play around with it, and I can do that with my paint as well. Again, if I wanted to overlap the images, I would use the same procedure. And this can be done with any of the templates. And here I modified it so I can do my little checker admittance as well. Feel free to change the shape of a cuff, elongated. The same thing with the mittens. You can add more of a curve, you can make it more whimsical and using the template at this point and modifying it the way you like is your chance to make this super personal. 4. Mitten #1: Santa Mitten: To make the first mitten, which is going to be the most basic, but still a very beautiful mitten. I took my template and I traced it onto a piece of, this is just an old piece of card stock book board that I had and then I just outlined it so I can use this in other areas of my work. It's a little more durable than just paper. I traced it onto my watercolor paper, just like I showed you in the using the template. And now I'm just going to start. Now what I'd like to do is I like to have a cuff on my mittens. Not everybody does, but I just create this shape here. So it's kind of a rounded rectangle. And if I had, if I just sketched a straight line, it wouldn't have that arc that I want. And again, I keep it nice and light. I can even go over it and just erased some of the pencil marks from there. And I can also elongate it and make this coffee than longer. Just to make it a really fun look. And create this arch a little further. Now to make just a simple watercolor, when I just select the colors I wanna use, I'm going to take an, a large watercolour brush, my number six brush, put a little water on my palette. And I'm going to take a little of this parallel in red. This is the traditional color. And then over here I'll take some brilliant pink. It's kind of a softer OP, opaque pink. And I'll mix those two together. Adding a little more powerline red to that. I still want it to be a little more red than pink. And now I want my cuff to be different than my mitten. So this is going to be more than lines of a Santa mitten. So I'm going to wet my entire mitten area, leaving the cuff dry. And I'm leaving a little boundary by the edge. And that's because I want the edge of the mitten to be drier the paper so it will absorb a little more pigment. I'm gonna take a little more parallel lean red. And I'm just going to carve out that shape. Go right around the edge. And as you can see, the area where it's dry created a nice sharp edge. And then the area where it was wet, the pigments started to run. So again, I'm gonna go in there with a little more that powerline red and pull that shape around. And I'll move my paper. Just to get that shape. I like to work just with little parts at a time. When I have that shaped down, I'm very happy with a move on. And I can change the angle of my paper as well. So now I have part of that mitten done. I'll go back, add a little water to my brush and just go over that area that I just put down so that the color can start to blend towards the center. And I want the center of my mitten to be the lightest. I'll continue around here making the thumb. And I can always go back and dropping a little more pigment on the edge. Once I have that thumb all the way down to the base, take my time, create that nice shape. Dip my brush and water and again, let that color bleed out. Pick up more pigment, and then go right to the cuff. Again, dip my brush and water, blend that out. Then I'm gonna pick up more paralleling red and mix whatever I have left on my pigment. And I'm gonna go over one more time, the edge, I want that edge to be a little more intense than the rest of that. Mitten. Colors will bleed. So I will get a little bit of intensity throughout. But I'm getting a nice center that's quite light. And lastly, I'm gonna go in with just a little straight parallel in red just on the edges here. To get some nice intensity. And I can go back in even further if I want it to be super red. And a little shadow over here from the cuff. No, I'm not worrying about creating a fur look or a boundary. I'm just creating a very basic mitten here. And because I'm using such a beautiful color and it's so traditional, it'll be very effective. I'm going to let this layer completely dry and then we'll come back and work on the cuff. 5. Santa Mitten: Part 2: So now our first layer is dried so there's less chance of me blending it out or mistakenly smudging it could still go in with my number six brush. And now I just want to work on the cuff, very simply create the cuff because I wanted to look white. There are a couple of options. We can leave it and just do a light outline. Or we can go in with various colors for the outline instead of just a grey or a light blue. So what I wanna do is just wet my brush, make sure it's clean. And I'm just going to gently go and create a wet outline, giving a little space between the pencil mark and where I just created that outline. And then I want to make two or three colors here, very pale and very light. I'm going to take a little Violet. And again, I want it to be quite light. And then I will take a little Prussian blue. And again, I want that to be quite light. And then lastly, I'm gonna take a little Payne's gray or you can use black. And I just want to create a dark grey here. So I'm going to switch to a thin brush, number one brush. And I'll start with my blue. And I just want to come here and create a line, not a solid line, but I want to create the perimeter in blue and maybe four or five little lines. And then I'll come back in without cleaning my brush on the purple and just add that in certain spots in between. The blue that I connected. Just like that, can turn my paper around. And now again without cleaning my brush, I'm gonna go in there with that light gray. And I'm just going to gently stroke over the pencil marks that we made with this grey. And in some areas it's going to run into that blue and purple that we made. And that's the look we're going for is just that simple blending. I want to create just a slate space with myoblasts stroke between the red of the mitten and this gray of the cuff here. And then I'll just come here and pull color every now and again. I'll rinse my brush and just kinda just blend that in purple and blue lines. I'll come back in and deposit a little purple. Pick up a little blue and deposit a little blue. So I'm kinda staying away from the middle and just creating a thick cuff on the edge. And there I have my basic mitten, kinda traditional Santa Claus mitten. When I played around with this Kf using blues and purples to make it look white. 6. Mitten #2: Fluffy Mitten: For our second mitten, we're going to use a technique very similar to the first one where we're going to have a color for the mitten and a color for the cuff. But it's going to be a little more abstract and a little more textured. So I'm gonna just very lightly pencil my cuff just like this. Just so I have a guide of where I want the edge of the cuff to B. And once again, I'll come in and erase part of it with my pencil. And this is just for my own guide. And then I'm gonna come in here with my number six brush again, and I'll choose two colors. And instead of red this time I think I'm gonna go with the green. So I'm going to take this deep green right on my palette. And I'm going to take a lighter green here. It's a very dusty green. It's called green earth hue. But you can use any combination of greens, but as you can see it so much lighter and it reminds me of P9. So now with a wet brush, I'm just going to wet the entire area of the mitten, leaving a little border, maybe a quarter-inch border around the edge. I'm coming with my dark green and pick that up on my wet brush. And then I'm going to start closest to the mitten this time to the cuff. And I'm just going to create the edge. And as you can see them going back and forth in zigzag motions. I'm not making a straight line around the curve. I'm going back and forth, pulling my color. I'll come back in, takes more that deep green on my palette. Water it down and I'm gonna go back again. Creating a little more intensity. Again. I want to go around. Not trying to create that straight curve. Could continue all the way around, making this thick border. Pick up some more color. And here I want to really exaggerate it by the cuff. Dip my brush in the water, blend out that edge and I'll continue to dip my brush in that water. And as I go it will lighten it up even further. Then I'll come back, pick up that earth green and drop that in. It'll blend nicely and create a nice edge. I'll come back in with that deep green and go around that border one more time. And I'm adding layers. We'll go over everything that I've done before, but I'll go over some of it and as it dries, it'll create a nice depth. If sum is too exaggerated, I can come in there and smooth it out. And if sum is two straight, I can go in there and exaggerated. So this is where you play around with to getting the look that you want and the intensity as well. One more time I'll just go in there with some more of this green earth hue and just deposit that in. And when I'm happy with the shape, I'll let this completely dry. 7. Fluffy Mitten: Part 2: And now that our first layer has dried, now we get to work on the cuff. And I want the cuff to be even more exaggerated than the actual mitten because I wanted to look like it's for. So to do that, I'm going to mix my colors first. I'm going to take a little bit of indigo blue. It's a nice dark blue, very inking looking. You can also use Prussian blue with a little bit of black mixed in if you don't have the indigo or you want to create that color, but don't feel you have to. And then next to it, whatever's on my brush, I'm gonna make another little puddle. Rinse my brush, and I'm going to take just a little bit of that deep green. I'll mix it with some more indigo. Just want a little bit of a different hue and I'll play around until I get the right color that I want. Then I'll rinse my brush completely. And I'm just going to whet the inside section, leaving a nice border of dryness. Good coming with number one, brush and pick up a little of this green and blue mixture that we made. Turn my paper to the side and I'll start from the top corner here. And I'm gonna create a nice sharp edge going back and forth. And again, I'm just pulling that color comeback in, make it nice and sharp. And that's why I'm using my smaller brush. I'm not trying to fill in the entire kf and just trying to make that shape. If I don't have a nice sharp edge, it'll create more of adult shape. And I'll just go back in and correct it. And they'll rinse my brush and wet the area that I already put down. Just like that. Come back in what it again. And then with my blue, I'm going to come back in and deposit it in some of those areas, creating another layer of sharpness to the CAF, just to the exterior. And for this one, I'm not going to bring my pigment on my cough to the center. I liked the way that looks a little variation from the one we first made. Just pulling in some strokes, making them nice and tiny on the exterior. And just pulling them in. Rinse my brush and blend out any areas here. And there. I have my second variation on a very basic mitten. And I really love this texture. 8. Mitten #3: Masking Fluid Technique: Now for my next mitten, I'm gonna do a variation on the plane mitten. And for that I want to create a design using masking fluid. And once again, this technique can be used with any of the mittens in class today. But I'm just going to show a free form technique here. So the masking fluid is a lot like rubber cement and you put it down on your paper and wherever you put it down after it dries, it forms a seal so that when you watercolor over it, you preserve the white of the paper. After the paint is then dry, you rub off the frist skid, the masking fluid, and you are left with the white of the paper in whatever design you created. Now sometimes it's a little difficult to create an exact shape with a liquid first, skip the masking fluid, you just have to practice at it. But it does create a nice result. It's very thick and it dries very quickly. So I like to use it fairly quickly. For this technique, I'm gonna just freehand creating a evergreen tree. So I like to just create my stem. And I just draw that stem. And I'm just eyeballing the size I want to use for this piece. And then from here, I'm going to create the branches. So I'm going to start at the top and pull my masking fluid down. And this is good because it's kind of a rustic, choppy look and that masking Fluid lens. Well to that, again, I'm trying to work fairly quickly because I know it's going to dry. So I'm pulling down my branches. I'm trying to create a nice thick look because it's going to be very rustic. Create a little movements are the branches. And I want them thicker at the base then at the top and longer. So I continue to play around with it until I get the look that I want. You could do dots, you can do stars, stitches, anything you want really just takes a little while. And it's a little tricky to work with. Sometimes the masking fluid will be too thick and it has dried and gone past its expiration date per se. So it's time to throw out the masking fluid and get a new jar. I wanna create a little thicker base. Maybe just a few more branches in here. And then I'm going to take a little unmasking fluid and I'm going to create a little stitch line right here around the cuff. Just gonna pull little stitches. And this will preserve them white. I'm gonna make sure to kept my masking fluid as soon as I'm done. And then whatever's left on the tip, I can remove with a paper towel right now, but I'm just going to let it dry. It will dry. It's very opaque right now. It will dry a little more transparent. And I'll kind of turn this one will turn a little yellow. Some of them turn different colors, pinks, blues, more clear. And I said to let this completely drive, this may take 30 minutes, might take a little less, but I'm going to let it sit and dry and then I'll show you what it looks like when it is dry so that you can in fact tell when you're masking fluid is dry. 9. Mitten #3: Part 2: So now my masking fluid or first good has dried and as you can see, it's a little bit more transparent. This one's dried golden yellow. And here's the tool that I use to apply it. And it's got this coating on it. Because the silicone tip and this fluid, this masking fluid is like a sticky thing I have to do is just rub it off and I, my tool is all clean and good as new. The same thing would happen with the paper, but I don't want to rub it off yet. I want to keep it on. It's protecting the layer underneath. And now I want to paint around it. So I'm going to treat the cuff and the mitten separately, but it's going to be a very simple technique. So with a big wet brush, my number six brush, I'm gonna just choose my colors and I'm going to do this kind of in a yellow. So I have my lemon yellow here. And I'm gonna take some yellow, green as well. The separate puddle. And then I want a third puddle here with a darker green. So I'll take whatever yellow green I had and then some of the darker green and put it down here. And so now I'm going to go around and paint my mitten and I'll do the mitten part with water. I'm just going to brush around the tree, leaving a good space to the edge just so I can control it. And then I'm gonna take my brush, fill it with water, and pick up that yellow. And then I'm just gonna paint over the tree. And the pigment will work its way into any area that isn't covered with the dried masking fluid. So the fluid creates a mask so we can paint right over it without having to worry about getting up close. I'm gonna take some of that medium green that we have. And I'm just gonna go around the edge of that yellow and all the way out here on the thumb. And then lastly, I'll pick up that green and really create my border. And so I just have the deepest color furthest away, just creating a shadow. And this is completely optional technique. I like to do it this way. And here I'm just going around the edge, creating that shape of that mitten. Go back in at a little more pigment. All the way around. A rinse my brush, pick up some of that yellow green again, and create a list, a blend between the yellow and the deep green. Just like this. And then I'm gonna paint over here on the cuff with that lighter color green. And I'll go all the way. And again, I'm going right over that masking fluid that we have in the center here. When that area's nice and wet, I'll come in with a deep green, pick it up and I'll do one more loop around the edge here to create the shadow. Especially while I have the medium green still wet as a buffer between this and the yellow. And I'll come right over that area that I did with the masking fluid to make a little stitches. Then I'm with a sharp point. I'm just gonna go around the outline here as well as my deep green. The pigment is wet so it'll bleed slightly, but I want to really make that blend nicely. So I'll pick up some of that medium green and blend it in. I like to look at my piece and see if there's any area that didn't really blend. And then I just like to help it along. And then lastly, I'll come in here with more of that lightest color we used and deposit that. And I wanted to put that right on the cuff as well as on this tree area. While it's wet, I just wanna do one thing to really take advantage of that tree area. It's not really noticeable now because the fluid is covered with watercolour paint. But I want to take some of that green, that dark green. And I just wanna go right from the center of my tree here. Just going to pull out a little bit of pigment to the side. And I'm going to leave it just like that and let that dry after it drives will come back and rub off the masking fluid from our dried painting. 10. Mitten #3: Part 3: So here my watercolor has dried and I'm left with the liquid FOR skid. Now you can just rub it off with your fingers, just like this. Or you could take an eraser and rub it off. Either way, just make sure your paint is dry and then take a moment to remove it. It comes off like rubber cement. And then I like to go over it with my hand just to make sure I've got everything. And it's a very subtle effect. Now you could stop here and just keep it like this, but I'd like to tidy it up just a bit. So I'll take my smallest brush, my five over 0, and some of those deep green. I have a lot of pigment but I can control at all. And now I'm just gonna go and I'm going to outline on one side these little stitch marks. And this just sharpens them up because it is a little difficult to control the masking fluid when it's wet. It's not impossible, but it is challenging. And then I'll go around the other side as well. You could tidy it up further by going in with a gel pen if you'd like. And then here with my paint brush, I'm just gonna go in, in a few places. I'm just going to pull right from the center of this tree to some shadows. I'll do it on either side. And then lastly, I'm just gonna go with a light hand right around the perimeter of this mitten. You can continue to add dots and anything you'd like. More shape and a background. But that's just one way to use your masking fluid with your mittens. 11. Mitten #4: Patterned Mitten: So new for another variation on our simple mitten here. I'm gonna take it, create a blend of colors on the mitten and the cuff. I'm going to do this all in one color for this one. And then I'm going to draw over it with a pattern. Now because I'm doing it mitten and cafe's one, I wanted to really change the shape of this. So I'm going to pull right from the top of the curve to the bottom of the cuff and then I'll erase it. So I've changed the shape of my mitten considerably. It now looks more like a hot MIT for when you take things out of the oven. And I'll do the same thing here. But I'm just going to pull that mitten shape a little. Instead of going rounded. You can do it however you'd like. It's just a small modification. So knowing that I'm going to go over this with a pattern, I'm keeping that in mind because I want to use a fairly light color blend. My large brush, I'm going to wet my entire mitten, leaving a little bit of space up to the line to so I can control it. And then I'm going to take blue and purple. And I'll start with a little of this Prussian blue right on my palette. And then right next to it I'll take some violet. Take a little more blue. And then when I have a Color blend that I like, I'll start my painting. Could take one more brush full of water for both of my colors. And this way it lightens it up a little. And starting with the blue, I'm going to paint the top here, or what I call the top of this mitten, just like this. And trying to keep my mitten very wet and keep my pigment really runny. Not really worrying about intensity just yet. And I'll go about half of that mitten. Then I'll come back and add more pigment to the exterior. Come back in, I'll do that one more time. Just add more pigment to the perimeter. Then I'll take some of this purple that I've mixed with the blue. So it's kind of a blue violet. And I'll do the same thing, but on the other side of the mitten, I'll bring those colors together. My first go around, I'm just trying to outline that shape of this mitten. It's not very complicated. And where the two colors meet, I'm going to just let them blend. I'll go back to my brush and water and keep that moving. And now you can decide how much of a blend you want. Right here in the center, the thickest part of the Minton. I want it to be very light. So I'm not really worried about pigments showing up there. Then I'll go around the edge and again, deposit more pigment just for intensity. And when I'm happy with this, I'll stop and let this layer dry. And you can add as many colors as you like. You don't have to stop with two. So I'm very happy with the way this looks. And I'll just let this completely dry and then we'll come back and add our pattern. 12. Patterned Mitten: Part 2: So now this nice gradient has dried. We have the blank mitten. So now I'm going to take all of these patterns and I'm gonna paint on it. You can use a colored pencil, a gel pen, our marker if you'd like, but I'm gonna use Paint. So we're gonna take a small brush. This is a very pointing number one brush. And I'm going to mix my darkest color here, which is this Prussian blue, with a little bit of violet in it. So I have a nice rich color. And I'm just going to treat this like a ink pen. So I'm doing wet and dry and wherever I put down my mark, I will see it and it will just absorb. So I can just do stitches or I can do a little pine branch and I think that's what I'm gonna do. So I'm just going to pull my piece around here, my line. And then I'm just going to pull lines from that on either side of that as well. And depending on how far apart I make these little lines, it'll look like a little pine branch. I can go back in and add a few more. Just like that. I'll skip a space to do the same thing again. And then add my little pine needles. And you can use any pattern that you'd like. It's a fun, simple little technique, but it adds a lot of interest to your piece. And I'll continue this the length of my glove here, my length of my mitten, go back in and more pigment. Come back in a little more of these little pine needles. At least that's what they look like to me. You can change colors or you can just add the same color. I just like I think it's a simple effect and I like that look, come back in just like this, and then I'll decide if I want to add a layer in between. I think I will. Could add a little more purple this time, still keeping that blue. And I think I'm just going to add some stitches. I'm gonna follow the shape that I use the first time. Kind of that little worldly wavy shape. And I'll go in between each of the pine needles with my stitches. You could take us as far as you'd like. You could use gel pen in addition. And it's really up to you to see how far you'd like to go with this. And so there I have badminton. 13. Mitten #5: Snowflake Mitten: Forget snowflake mitten. Here's the look I'm hoping to achieve. Now because I have the snowflake here, this is an excellent candidate to gently put masking fluid on the shape of the snowflake. And that way you can preserve it and make a preserve the white where the snowflake would be. So you have a white snowflake. I'm going to color it in, make it a little darker, and I'm just going to have a plain background, just like you see here. So that's look, I'm going for, and you could try it. Anyway. You like any variation? First thing I'm gonna do is mix my color and I like to start with two colors. There's only a subtle difference between the two of them. So I take my brilliant pink. And then over here I'm going to take crimson Lake and mix it with the brilliant pink, but just enough to really darken it slightly like to have enough of my pigment so that I can work. And then I'll come here and I'm going to wet the snowflake. And I want to keep the center of the mitten fairly dry and white. So I just went over it lightly. And then I'm going to keep a little bit of an edge. So I'll go back in with my brilliant pink. And I'm gonna create that edge and I'll start up top here. And I like to leave just a little gap space between the cuff and the mitten part. So I'm going to be very careful and deliberate when I'm add my color. And then I'm just gonna go around my mitten. He could be careful not to go over the pencil mark on the perimeter because I know that it's not going to erase very well. It's going to show up because of this. Pink is such a light color. If you don't mind that outline, you can go right up to it. Now, I don't mind painting over the snowflake in the center because I'm going to go over that with a darker color. So once I have my shape and I'm pretty happy with it, I'll just make sure that it blends right over here so there's no harsh lines. And again, I'm trying to keep the center of the snowflake fairly light. So I'm still working just on the perimeter of the mitten. And I'll continue going around, dip my brush and water. Just like this. Then I'll pick up that color that we mix that's just a shade or to darker and all deposited on the edge, since that's where I want my more intense color to be. But for this mitten, I want a real nice blend between the darkest pink and the lightest pink. So it's just a very gradual transition. And again, I'll come back here and go over that edge. Once I have that edge down, I'll go in there with my light pink and blend it out just so there's no harsh lines. We'll do that all the way around. If there's any areas that I want to create that shape a little better. Now's my chance to go and work it over. And I'll let this layer completely dry. 14. Snowflake Mitten: Part 2: So now that the first layer has dried, I want to work on the cuff. I've made the cuff with lots of little sections and I'm going to treat each section individually. So with my number one brush, I'm just gonna go in there and put in a little bit of water in each section just to saturate the center of each section on the paper. And then I'm gonna take my colors and it looks like I'm going to have to make some more. So I'll take that brilliant pink and I'll start with that one. And I'm gonna go over each one of them, creating the shape with brilliant pink. I want boat center of it to be the lightest, and I don't want that pink to touch the pencil marks. So I'll just go around and creating that, create that shape for each one of these cups. Now I'm going to make, eventually I'm gonna have them striped and the odd ones are going to be with a darker color. So right now I'm just worrying about giving each one of them a nice shape. And that's my goal to create the shape for each one. So take your time and create the shape. And then when it's still a little damp or wet, you can come back in and we'll add our color. So I left a lot of weight on each one of these sections going to coming here with a little crimson lake just to make it a little deeper. And I'm going to start on the end here. And I want this one to be a little darker color. So I'm just going to introduce some of that. And then I'll just skip every other one and add some of the darker color. And I'm just adding it to the edges and it will bleed into the cuff into each section of a cough, kinda doing its own thing. Then I can come back in with a little bit of straight crimson lake. And just adding that right at this bot where it meets the other pieces, the other cuffs. And this creates a little bit of a shadow and it helps create the shape. For each of these little sections here, the ribs sections of the cuff. Then I can go back in with a nice sharp point. I'm really emphasized that shadow. And there we have this layer. I'm going to let this dry. And then we'll come back when it's all dry, erase our pencil marks and create that snowflake. 15. Snowflake Mitten: Part 3: So now with my mitten here, the paint is dry. I'm gonna go in with my eraser and I'm going to erase the pencil marks on the mitten. I'm going to leave the snowflake and money that are trying to remove that. But I am going to remove all the pencil marks on the cough as well as the mitten. Now from here, I want to add my snowflake. So I'm gonna take my very small brush and I'm gonna take some crimson lake. Again. I want intense color, but I want to be able to control it. I don't want it to be a sloppy color. And then with a sharp point went on dry. I'm just going to create all my shapes here that I've already traced. Going right over the pencil. Continue all the way around. And I like to pull these straight lines towards me. And I like how that looks. Good to come in here and mix a little of the brilliant pink with that color we've already mixed. And I just want to create an outline on the cuff. So I'm just going to go along the edge connecting all these sections, just making the outline. And then I'll connect it right to this mitten. And there we have our snowflake mitten. 16. Mitten #6: Ski Mitten: For our next mitten, I call it the schema. And here I have two of them. It's this one here with the stripes. And from the second page, it's this one with the stripes. So it's the same procedure with a slight modification and I'm just going to show one here, this one with a furry edge, although you can do it however you'd like. I consider it a schema and because it reminds me of a big puffy mitten from when I was a young child, my brothers and sisters skiing. It was a big down mitten and it had a nylon outer coating, so that wasn't any knit texture. You didn't see thread, it was supposed to keep you warm and it was usually a jumbo mitten. So we're going to work on this one right here. First thing I'm gonna do this time is work on the cuff. So I'm just going to wet the entire KF And then I'll mix my color. I'm gonna take a little bit of this violet right down on my palette, little Prussian blue. And I'll mix it until I get a little bit of a grayish color. I have my blue down. I'll add a little bit of this Payne's gray to it. And when it's kinda starting to turn gray, that's the color. I want a mixin some more water. And I'm just gonna go over my edge with a very light color, making a very rough furry edge. I'm gonna go over this just with one brush full. And I have a nice shape that I want. I'll come back in, rinse my brush and deposit water. And I want this color to dry fairly lightly. Before you let it dry, just make sure you have your shape. And we'll let this layer dry. 17. Ski Mitten: Part 2: So now while my cough is still drying and went to work on the main part of the mitten here. Again, I'm gonna take my nice big brush and just some of that color that we already mixed. And I'm going to lighten it up considerably. I have my water, rinse my brush, and now I'm just gonna go over the mitten very loosely. And I'll take that color and I'm really working on the stripes. Just wanna make sure I get the stripes are not so much worried about the area in between the stripes, but I just wanna go over the stripes with my brush and then I'll just wet my brush, blend out the edges, being careful not to touch the cuff. I don't wanna make the cuff run, but I'm just trying to deposit a little bit of color on those stripes. And I'll let this layer completely dry. 18. Ski Mitten : Part 3: So now our first layers are dry. I wanna spend some time working on the KF. So I'm going to take a brush that I can control fairly well. And I liked this one because it has a sharp point even though it's a number six. And now I want to make my texture. So I'm gonna take a little Payne's gray and put it down on my palette. I don't want the color to be super saturated, but I also don't want it to be too loose that I can't control it. So I'll put it down. And I want to be able to push my brush point and make a little shape just like that. And then I'm going to come in here and around the edge of my pigment, around, around the edge. I'm just going to start with my darker color. And I'll go back and pick up some of the brush, some of the pigment. And so that when I make my brushstroke kinda haphazardly, just around the edge. I have a little bit of a texture. I can even come in a little on a few just because I don't want it to look like I'm making a set ring of color. I just want there to be an abundance of dark color on the edge. And then I'm gonna come over here with my violet and I'm gonna do the same thing. I wanted to be loose but controllable and still somewhat light. And so now I'm gonna come in here and just make some brush strokes of the violet. But I'm going to move in a little further. It's okay if the colors touch and they blend together a little bit. There'll be areas that have a little more pigment than others. And I can turn my piece around if all my brushstrokes are going in the same direction. And then lastly, I'm going to come in here with some Prussian blue. And again, I'm trying to achieve that right blend on so that I can get a brushstroke and still control it. And I'm gonna come around here and just add a little of that to my piece. Now I know that my colors are gonna dry a little later than they are showing up right now, because that's the nature of the watercolor. And I can just play around with it. I have all three colors at the ready. And if I feel like it's too blue, I can add more purple. And if I feel like it's too wide, I can add a little bit more of the Payne's gray. And if I feel like it's not blending, I'll just rinse my brush, clean. Brush off the water. And I can just add a few little brushstrokes of just the brushstroke with no pigment. And when I have the way that the way I like, I'm going to let back completely dry. 19. Ski Mitten: Part 4: So now that my layers dry, I'm gonna go in there and start adding pigment to my mitten. Whenever six brush, I'm gonna come in here and I'm gonna take this Prussian blue. I'm gonna set it down and I'm gonna add just a little bit of violet, not too much. I still want my piece to look blue. So I'll go back in and incorporate a little more blue. And then I'm going to start with one stripe here, since I'm doing two stripes. And I'm going to start at the top here and move my painting. So they do have the top. And I'll create just a little area where I'm really careful to get my shape. And then with a very light hand and a sharp point and just going to drag that down the length of that stripe. And I'll do that on both sides. And then we're gonna pick a pigment and fill in the bottom right at the edge of the mitten. You could start with either stripe. It doesn't matter. I'll rinse my brush, wet the center of the stripe, and then come to the edge and activate that watercolor. So now I have two dark edges and the center, and I can tilt my paper and let it run and let the color blend. I can also come back in here and deposit more color, which will ultimately make more of a blend. You want more of or less of a highlight, more pigment. You just go in there and add more pigment. And then I sharpen that up. And then I'm gonna do the same thing with the smaller stripe, gonna mix a little more color. I'll start at one side here right at the top. Carve out my shape top to bottom. And with a very sharp point, I'll drag that stripe down. And this is how I get my shape of my stripe. Rinse my brush what the center, and then introduce the pigment. And then I can tilt my glove back and forth and add more pigment on the edges until I'm happy with the result. And once I am, I'm going to let this completely dry. 20. Ski Mitten: Part 5: So now I'll take my number six brush and we'll work on the remainder of the mitten. Once again, I want the exterior, the perimeter to be the deepest color. So I'll use the same technique but on a bigger scale. And I also have a line here that I'm using as like a seam line is sewing line. And I'll go over that at the end when it's dry. So I'm not really I'm treating these as separate sections, but I'm also trying to unite them somewhat. So that's an intentional line. I'll put some water on my palette and I'm going to add some violet to that. And then I'll add Prussian blue to tone that color down and unite it with the blue. But I still wanted to look more violet than blue. I'm going to come in here and I'll start with the thumb. And I'm gonna go around the edge and I'm gonna leave just a little gap between the stripe and the thumb. The smallest of gaps. Once I have my shape of my thumb and I'll take it right up to that line. And then I'll come back in, wet my brush and help that color move. Starting from that area that we just put down, I'm gonna pull with a wet brush right to the center of this section. Again, I'm leaving just the slightest space between that stripe and the area we're coloring in. And then I'm gonna go and get my brush and the pigment and create the shape down here with more pigment. So now because my section is all wet, it'll run together. And I can come back in and deposit more pigment over here on the thumb. And then I'll treat each section the same way. I'll move here to this one. I want to leave just a little bit of space between each section. Add my pigment, dip my brush and water. Continue to move that pigment all the way right to the base of that section. And then pick up more pigment over here. Because this is watercolor, you can leave some sections of the paper exposed, like this little section here if you'd like. And then I'll do up top as well. Pick up my pigment. Really go emphasize that perimeter. Lastly, that I flipped my piece over here and I want to work on this bottom section. Because it's the bottom section and I want there to be a shadow between the cough and that little section. I'm going to really emphasize that still keeping a little white border, but putting in a lot of pigment closest to that cuff. And then once I have my shape created, I'll go in, rinse my brush and with a point, I'll blend that color out. Again. I'll come back in adding a little more purple and just emphasize that area closest to that cuff. And I'll let this layer completely dry and then we'll come back and add our final touches. 21. Ski Mitten: Part 6: So now that this layer is completely dry, I'm gonna go in there and add some detail work. You can even use a colored pencil or even a gel pen to do this as well. I am however, going to use my watercolors. And so I just want to erase any pencil marks that might remain. And once I'm happy that they're gone, I'll come in with a very tiny brush. This is a five over 0. And so what I do is I take my pigment and I make it super saturated. And here I'm just using that purple one, adding a little more violet to that. Whatever's left on my palette, or I could just mix some new and I want it to be super intense. And so there were the sharp point. I'm just going to create stitch Marks and I'm gonna do it on either side of the stripe right up in that little area that we made. Were there'll be white still showing. But right on that line. And so here I'm just creating those stitch marks. And you can do any marks you want. I'm just trying to create the illusion of this being stitched piece. So I'll follow this. And then down the center one here. I'm going to fill that in. Just a single line. I might go over it twice just to really make it nice and intense. And then I'll continue with stitch marks on either side of that as well. Picking it more pigment as needed. And with a very light hand just making simple marks. And I'll do the same thing over here for the final stripe. Then if you decide you're finished here, you can stop here. But what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna go back to my large brush. And I'm going to water down this color. And I'm just going to take a little bit of this purple and just make a few little marks on the exterior of the CAF, just around the perimeter. And this will further enhance the shadow. And there we have this little scheme it in. 22. Mitten #7: Buffalo Plaid: So for our next MIT and we're gonna make a buffalo check, print mitten. And I think that's kinda fun. It's particularly festive and trendy this year. So I've created the outline and I used a formation like this so that I have the two mittens together. You can use any formation or you can just do the single mitten if you'd like. And then we work with making the buffalo check. And for that you have to choose your colors and basically you're choosing to major colors and then we'll do some variations with that. So typically buffalo check is red and black. You can also have white and black or any colors, two colors, usually with a black. So I'm gonna do the red and black again. And the way I'd like to do this is I like to have the cuff and the thumbs be black. And then I also work The Black into my check. If you want, you can just do a checkerboard pattern, but that's not quite the same. So too, do the buffalo check, going to wet my brush and I'm going to mix my color. So I'm gonna take this Payne's gray right on my palette. And I'm going to mix a little bit, a little bit of indigo blue with that. Then I'll rinse my brush. And I'm going to wet the cuff. And I'm leaving the center dry. And the same thing with this thumb leaving the center dry. Then I'll go in with my paintbrush, with my pigment on the brush, and I'll create that outline. Right here on the cuff. I'm making its smooth, but if you wanted to make it furry, You could do that as well. And I'm taking that colour, we mix two, it's kind of a mild color. And I'm going over and carving out that shape. Come back in at a little more intensity to the perimeter. And then I'm going to take just some Payne's gray on my brush and go over the perimeter just to make it nice and intense. Dropped the color, come back in a little bit more and drop that color all the way around. Give turn my paper around and I'm gonna do the same thing here too. The thumb, whoever's on my brush, I'll carve out that shape. Then I'll dip my brush in the color we mixed and just spread it out. Leaving the center the lightest. I'll rinse my brush so it's wet. Mental make it damp. And I'll just move that pigment around. And then I'll come back in with a lot of intensity, a lot of color, and again, go for there. So they're on one mitten. I have the cuff and the thumb. Now, I want to do two more sections on this, and I'm going to skip one square due the next square, and I'm going to skip another square and do the other square. So I did my brush in water and I'm going to create that shape. Bringing my color right to the end of that square. The pencil marks create that perimeter. Rinse my brush. And then this blend out that color. Then I'll come back in with a lot of pigment on my brush and just go around the perimeter, letting the color bleed and blend. And the center of the square will remain white, or at least light. And then I'm gonna do the same thing over here to this square. I come in with a light color, create my shape. Blend out the center, pull that pigment around, and then pick up some intense pigment and just go around the perimeter. I'm going to do the same thing on this mitten. And Lynn let these layers dry. 23. Buffalo Plaid: Part 2: So now that our layer of our dark color, which is supposed to resemble black, has dried and want to go in there with my powerline red. So on my palette I'm going to mix up a good amount of parallely in red and just a teeny bit of dark green. And now I'm going to paint my squares here. Read, but first I'm gonna paint the rest of the mitten here with just clear water. All the remaining squares. And then I'm going to come in with my red on my brush. And I'm gonna paint them all just like this when a carve out the shape. And again, I want the perimeter to be the darkest. So I go in there and create my shape. Wet my brush as I get to the center of my mitten so that there's more water on my pigment in the center. And then I'll just continue this all the way around here. I'll come back in with my pigment really deposited on the perimeter. And then I'll make sure I have a nice even line around these black squares. When I'm happy with how that looks, I'll just let that dry. And I will do the same thing on its partner here. And we'll come back when it's dry. 24. Buffalo Plaid: Part 3: And now to finish our buffalo check, we're gonna take a very small brush. I'm using my five over 0 and we're going to go over these boxes here. So the box between here and here, and here and here. And then to the left and the right of each of these ones with the darks. When you go over the red pigment that we've already painted, it will reactivate. So just keep that in mind. So I'm gonna take my Payne's gray and mix it with whatever remained here on my palette. And they'll mix just a little Prussian blue With that. I want this nice and thick. Take one brush full of water. And then I'm gonna start over here by the closest to the cuff. And I'm going to make a series of hatch marks, hatching here. I'm just going to go from filling in that square. I'm just going to make my straight lines and be very careful. And they're going to end right at the line for the box or start at the box. And I'm just making them all going in one direction. And I'll do this on all the squares. So I'll do this on the first to show you what I mean. And they stop and start nicely creating that square. And then I'm going to tilt my paper to the side and I'm gonna go back and make the cross hatch. And again, I keep the same thing. I want to keep that box and hold its shape very nicely. And then I'm gonna come over here and do the same thing. And once again, we're using wet on dry for details. Now, I want to come over here and do this box and this box just to the right of our black box with the same hash marks. And I'm just eyeballing the spacing my keys to use that box as a guide. And I use a very light hand. Then I have two more boxes to go. And then I'll go right here. I'll make sure all the lines end up in the same spot to make that nice shape. And then I'll do my hash marks. When this dries, it'll dry a little lighter, but it'll still be a pattern right on those boxes. Now I still have to do the same thing to this min and I will, but I want to do are courting here. So I'm going to take a number one brush and I'm gonna go in here with this color. And I'm just going to pull strokes, just like stitches. The length of the chord. And this gives it a little texture and makes it a little thick. You could do it one continuous motion if you'd like. But I wanted to look like little twisted chord. So I'll finish up the hash marks on this side. And that's our buffalo check mitten. 25. Mitten #8: Cable Knit Mitten: For our cable knit mitten, we're going to create the mitten and then add lots of texture with our brushstrokes. So I'm going to choose a color and I'm gonna choose like a light orange. So I'm going to mix vermilion hue on my palette with some of this deep yellow. Then I'm gonna mix a couple of brushstrokes of water because I want the background to be very, very faint. Then I'll rinse my brush and I'm gonna go over everything with some clear water, wedding, the mitten and the Kf. Then I'm just going to pick up one brush full of this color that we mixed. And I'm just gonna go over the entire mitten, create a nice light code. You don't have to be precise, you don't have to get everything perfectly done. And then I'm gonna take one more brush, stroke, a brush full of pigment. And I'm just going to deposit little pockets, little blobs of color right around the perimeter. And I want to let this layer completely dry. 26. Cable Knit Mitten: Part 2: So now that that layer has dried, I'm gonna go in and just on the perimeter, I'm going to erase the pencil marks from both the mitten and the cuff. I'm also going to take my eraser and just lightly erase whatever I can of this cable in the centre, leaving some of it because I need a guide. I just want to get the majority of the pencil marks are moved. Now that I've done that, I want to work on creating some shadows. So the first thing I'm gonna do is create shadows. Going to take my number six brush and I have that color that's on my palette. I'm going to add a little more deep yellow. And I want to have just enough to control. So if I have to add water, if it's dried, I'll do that. But I want to be able to just make little brush strokes. And so from here, I'm just going to create brushstrokes around the cable, all going in the same direction, up and down. And I'll create a few more, make it nice and thick closest to the cable, and just have a few coming out from the cable. And I'll do this on both sides. And again, I want trying to maintain the same size brushstrokes If I can. Then I want to take my brush and work on the cafe little. And I'm going to try and create straight lines up and down, but not perfectly straight. I want them to bow out a little, so I'll skip going from the center or imagined that there was a center line. And then I'm just going to create small little Boeing on either side of it. Just equally spacing it out. So three or four on each side. Going to take a brushstroke of water and mix it in, maybe even to brush strokes if I have a lot of color on my palette. And with that same brush, I'm just gonna create more brushstrokes. Again, going up and down, but further away from that cable. And because we watered it down, it will dry even lighter and even lighter than the first strokes that we made. And while we're here, I'm going to take that at one, we're brushstroke of water to that. And I want to pull just some color down from the bottom of each of these cables like this. So it's almost like an ice cream cone. Rinse my brush. And with the damp brush, I just want to blend out that line that we made here on each of those cables. And I'm going to let this layer completely dry. 27. 26B Cable Knit Part 3: So now that layer has dried and I'm gonna go in there with my smallest brush, my five over 0. I'm going to re-wet what's on my palette. And just take a little bit of vermilion hue, just trying to deepen the color a little bit. And so now with that on my brush, I'm going to create these lines for these cables. And I'm gonna go and I'm going to create little space in between. So it looks like almost stitching. And I'm going to follow one all the way to where it meets the other, the next one. So I'll start and go all the way down the length. Adding more on my brush as needed. I like to do this with a small brush so that I can be very particular with where I put my pigment. Then with that small brush while I have it, I just want to create the outline of the entire mitten and cough. I'll go over the pencil mark that remains here for this cuff. And then I'll just go around the outline. This one because it's knit. The outline is a little wobbly. I want to make sure I get all the little sections here of that cable. I'm going to switch brushes to my number one with a pointy brush. And now I want to start in the center of each of the cables. And I want to create that jag and switched stitched line. And then I'm going to go to either side of it as well with more stitches. And the distance and the length that you make the stitch is totally up to you. And I'm just going to do three for each cable. This is causing direction and drawing the eye down the length of this cable, which is what we want. And then on this little one on the top, I'm only doing one and I'm only doing two on this little bottom piece that's sticking out. I'm going to make a little puddle here and take some more of this deep yellow and mix a little lemon yellow in with that as well. And then with this color that's just slightly off of that color, I'm going to go in and create stitch marks down the length cable in-between the original stitches we put on. And on the larger ones, I'll create more lines than on the smaller ones. And again, this just emphasizes that it's a knit fabric. It creates a little motion and it draws our eye. Once we have that, I'm going to go down the cuff and do the same thing. And right in the center here, instead of having one straight mark, I'm just going to have two lines going down. I'm going to take that color for the last part and just make a few stitches going down here, filling in the spots away from the center of my mitten. And there we have our cable knit mitten. 28. Mitten #9: Knit Mitten 2: For our second knit mitten, we're gonna do a similar technique we did with the first. So with a large brush, I'm going to wet the entire mitten very loosely just to saturate it. And then I'm going to mix my color. I'm gonna mix a very subtle version of the color I want to use. So I'm gonna take the Cyrillic and Blue and mix it on my palette. And I'm gonna make just a little bit of Deep Green with that. So I'm happy I have like a very subtle turquoise. And when I have that color, mixing a little water since it's a little brighter than I wanted. And now I'm just going to create my first layer of turquoise all over my mitten. It's a very light layer. And if it's darker in spots than I want, I'll just go in there with more water on my brush and lighten it up. I'll come in here, the little surly and blue all by itself on my palette. And just mix in a few spots of that. And that gives me just a little variation. I have a little bit of white, a little bit of the turquoise we mixed, and a little bit of this pure blue, the civilian blue. And now I'll let this completely dry, leaving the colors on my palette. And we'll mix more as we go. 29. Knit Mitten 2: Part 2: After your first layer is dry, now's the time to go in there with a second layer. So we're gonna take a little more of the Cerulean Blue and mix it onto our palate. So we're just trying to create a slightly more intense version of that first color that we made. So now with a pointy brush, I'm gonna create little brushstrokes mimicking the shape of the cable, the exterior, the cable. So I'm going around just like this, all the way down, fairly even spaced from that cable. And I'll do that on both sides. I want to change the angle of my brush, and this is a larger brushstroke. Use whichever size brush that you're comfortable with. And then I want to take that same brush and in-between the cable stitches here on the cuff, I want to bring them fairly close together with this color. I'm gonna take that same brush and on the other side of the cable, i'm gonna make smaller dabs all the way down. And the same thing on the thumb to either side. Rinse my brush, switch to a smaller brush. And this is also a number six, but this point is a little sharper. So now I want to take a little more green and mix it in here. So I have just a slightly off-color. And I'm gonna come over here. And I'm gonna just make dabs on the other side. And some of the dabs will run into the first and others won't. And that's okay. I just want to create a lot of texture. And I'll go do this a row or to just keeping those lines all the way down the mitten part. Once I have that done, I'll take a little bit of this and just add a few little dabs. Over here on the cuff. I'll rinse my brush, switched my number one brush, and we'll just some silly in blue. I'm going to create those strokes on these cables. It's going to dry lighter. And I just want to create a little bit of a shadow. And I'll do the outline as well up top and around the sides. Then I'm gonna take that seems to really in blue, mix it with enough water to make it light. And I just want to go around the, each of these little stitches here, these little cables on the remainder of this mitten. It's a subtle color and it'll dry lighter, but it'll create a little bit of a shadow. And that's what we want. Once you have that done, you can let that layer dry. It's kind of messy work. It's not precise work, but it is creating a little shadow and it's a subtle color difference. And that's what we're going for. And then I'll let this layer completely dry. 30. Knit Mitten 2: Part 3: So now that are layers are dried, I can go in there with my eraser and erase the exterior of the smitten. I'm gonna go in with the number one brush for the very pointy tip, feel free to use a smaller brush. And I'm gonna mix some civilian blue with that deep green civilian blue mixture that was on our palette. Again, I'm looking for a turquoise color here. Little more on the bluer side than the green. But if you'd like to go more green, feel free. And now with a very light hand and a sharp point, I'm going to outline the perimeter of the glove here. I'm really emphasizing the stitches, the rounded shape of the stitches. This will just make a little more of a cohesive unit. And that's the look we want. I also want to outline right here by the thumb. Follow it around. And then I'm gonna come in here. And I'm going to work on outlining all the cables of a light hand. I like to do all my downward strokes. First. I mean, I over here I need to outline the curves of the cuff. Comeback, finished my strokes. And then the last part of this, this is a little more time consuming as I want to outline the knitted part here as well. Sometimes it's easier to do all the curves first and then go back and do the inverse. Because of the shade we chose. It'll dry like a shadow. And the interior of each of these stitches will really stand out with a highlight. So I'll finish this up and I'll show you the end result. And there I have my second knit mitten. 31. Mitten #10: Knit Mitten 3: For our last mitten, we're gonna do another knit version, but it's going to be a little more complicated and a little more variegated. So we'll start by creating that background layer. So I'm going to wet the entire mitten. Going very light on the top layer here of this cable down the front. It's almost like a braid. So I'm not really putting too much water there. And then I'm going to mix a little bit of this lemon yellow and some yellow ochre. So I get a nice warm color. I'll add a little more lemon yellow, so it's a little more yellowy. Been dark Golden. And now I'm just going to carve out my shape. It'll be a light color. And that's just the look we're going for. I'm going to avoid going down to the center cable here. Just want to create the shape. And then I'll come back in and just deposit a little more color around the edge. A wet my brush. So it's still a little bit yellow, but not nearly as much as on the edges. And paint down that center cable. And I'll let this layer completely dry. 32. Knit Mitten 3: Part 2: So now this layer somewhat dry. I'm gonna go in there with a thin brush at the point. This is a number six, but it has a nice thin point. And I'm going to work on adding a little bit of variation. So I'll make another puddle here with more just the lemon yellow. And I want to just lightly trace around this cable. And so what I'm doing is creating the shadow of where that cable forms. And once I have that place down, going to create another shadow here over the cuff. And one for the foam as well. I'll rinse my brush and just very lightly drag that across just to make slightly more of a blend. I'll take that yellow again and this time with a very sharp point. And I'm gonna go and the base just beneath each one of these little sections here on this cable breed. And then I'll just go over here in between. Switched my pointing number one brush and take some vermilion hue on my palette. I'll mix it with that yellow. And then with a very sharp point, I'm going to trace over all of the lines here for each of these little stitches that were needed. And I'll be sure to go right down the line as well. And I'll do this for all of them. Come over to the side, a little water on my palate and mix a little more lemon yellow. And continue on with tough. Then I'll come back here, makes a little more vermilion hue and work on this side. This part takes a little bit of time, but it's the basis for the next step. I want to very carefully mix my color and just outline very lightly with my brush the entire length of the. And then I'll let this layer dry. 33. Knit Mitten 3: Part 3: So now our layers dry with my large number six brush and but it coming here and take some of this yellow, orange, this deep yellow. And I'm gonna mix it with whatever's left on my palette. Could add to brush fulls of water. And then I'm going to take a nice wet brush, nice thirsty brush here. And I'm gonna go over everything creating a glaze. I like to go around my cable first. And I'm trying not to really work the painting, just going over it and brushing it. I don't want to reactivate the colors that are there. There will be some smearing, some blending, but I don't want to overdo it. So I'm gonna go around the cable first, building up on those colors we've already put down. And then I'm going to put more water on my brush, a little more of this deep yellow. And now I'm gonna go over the entire cable again. Angle at this layer dry. And then we'll come back and add some details. 34. Knit Mitten 3: Part 4: So now that our mitten is dry, We're going to come back and work on this big braid here, this big cable. And I want to treat each section individually, so it is a little bit of time consuming. Gonna go in there with some vermilion hue and mix it on my palette. And I'll mix it with whatever remains. And I'll start here at the bottom at one of these large ones. And I'm with a very light hand, I'm just going to outline this shape. And I'll fill in with this color, this little diamond shape in between. Then I'll dip my brush and water and blend out that shape. I'll rinse my brush and then just blend out the center of it. And I'm going to treat that. I'm gonna do each section that way. I can even come back in and deposit a little more pigment on the outside. I want a really nice highlight in the center. So I go around my section, fill in my little diamond, dip my brush and water to blend that out. And then clean my brush for the center just to make sure that it blends. And I'll continue this in all my pieces here. And I'll speed this process up. When I get to the top of one side, I'm gonna go in there with a little more vermilion hue. And I'll come back to the pieces here and just drop in a little more pigment when the water has absorbed a little more on each of these sections. And then continue on the other side. And then I'll come back around and really emphasize that shadow going down one side or the far side of this cable here. I could do that as many times as I like to really get that intensity. And then I'll do it on this side as well. I want to make sure to go over that center diamond. And then I'm going to let this dry and we'll come back and do one more layer of detail work. 35. Knit Mitten 3: Part 5: Now just add some details to this to really make it pop. I'm gonna go in here with the number six brush to mix my color. And I'm going to take some of this deep yellow and mix it in here. So it's still darker than the color in the background, but not as dark orange as what we used on that cable. Could take my pointy number one brush, pick up some pigment, and it's got a very carefully outline rate on the pencil mark. All of these braids Here. Each section. It'll just unite them and make them a little, tie them in and make them a little special individually because of the color not being dark. And then I'm gonna go in here to these little diamonds and we're going to make those deeper in a moment. But for now I want to just create that outline with this medium tone color. Go right on that pencil, mark the very edge. Then I'm going to make sure those diamonds are filled in. And then I'm gonna go right on the outline here of the entire mitten. And here's where I could change any shape. If I want to just pull that color right to the side. It'll dry a little bit lighter than it is going down on this mitten. But yes, it, it will unite the peace and create a nice strong boundary. Now what the cough, you have some options here. I'm going to line the actual border of the cuff. And then I'm going to go in and just outline around this braid. Again, it's going to dry lighter and it'll be just barely noticeable. But I just want a little bit of a, a halo around this braid. After I have that, I'm going to pick up some of this vermilion hue again. And I'm just going to drop it here in these little diamonds. Just like that. 36. Class Wrap Up: So now to wrap up class, I just wanted to show you each of the end results of mittens we made, as well as just a couple of variations on some of them. So we started out with our templates and we started out with the basic mitten and I made the template here. And then we just did some variations. So here we have your typical Santa mitten. Then we did a little bit of an abstract version where we made more of a furry edge and a little ruffled edge here. We took another one and we made it using masking fluid so that we could carve out a shape and preserve the whites of the background. And then using the same template, we made a slight modification to the shape and we put a pattern on top. So these are your four basic mittens from your basic shape, just the silhouette of a mitten, and it's very easy to come up with variations. So for our next mitten, we made a snowflake right from this pattern here. And instead of using masking fluid to preserve the white of the snowflake, which you surely can-do. We went over it with an additional layer of watercolor that coordinated with our mitten. You could also use marker or colored pencil or gel pen to get the same effect. For our next mitten, we did one of these which I consider to be the schema admins. And so using the same technique for both, we created our mitten and then here we added a pattern on top, the little stitches. And we added some texture here for the cuff. And here's a similar one, stripes changing the color but keeping it all uniform like a nylon puffy mitten. Next we did the buffalo check and we start out with a checkerboard pattern and created that interesting plaid shape. And I wanted to show you a variation. So here's your classic red and black buffalo check, but you can also modify it and do and other colors. Here I did a blue on because I'm just partial to blue and I love the way that looks after this. We started our cable mittens. And so here we have the basic cable, would just the cable going through and we kind of gave it a knit look where you can almost see the stitches. Here we have another one with a cable going through and then some more stitches to little more complex. And the final mitten that we worked on in our knitting series is this very ultra complex multi-layered effect. Or there are lots of shadows, lots of highlights, and a lot of warmth. You can play around for any of these mittens, changing the colors using your own colors or even adding multiple color combinations to create your very own mitten. Thank you for joining me today. Please be sure to follow me here on skill share to get notified of future classes. And please consider leaving a review. 37. Bonus Class! Mitten #11: For a bonus class, I wanted to show you how you can take your simple mitten and just add texture that look makes it look simply knitted. So you could just choose your color and for your background, you just gonna do a very subtle version of that color. So I'm just going to wet it very lightly. And then I'll just mix one color for my background here. And I'm going to take a little bit of this violet. And I'll just go over the entire mitten just to make that background color. I don't want it to be very dark and I don't want it to be very wet either. Just want a nice blending everywhere, no lines. Once you've accomplish this, you'll just let it dry. And now once this layer is dry, here's where the interesting part starts. And what you really wanna do is make a slight variation on your color even if you're going with a somewhat solid color. So on my palette, I'm gonna mix more of this violet. And I'll make two little puddles of the violet. And with one I want to add some of this indigo. So I just have a slight variation on this color. Doesn't matter which color you choose, but I'm gonna take one color. And I'm gonna create a line from the top to the bottom, but it's not going to be a straight line. It's going to be the same stroke making aligned. So right now I want to work on just eyeballing the same stroke over and over again from the top to the bottom. Fairly equally spaced and the equal length. And I'm going at an angle here, a media 45-degree angle from the top to the bottom of that line. So now you want to take another color and you want to create the opposite of that. So I had my line going this angle. And now for this one, I'm going to match up those lines, but I'm taking it in the other direction. Not touching or I'm trying not to occasionally I might, but I'm just keeping that color, size, angle and distance, the same kind of making mirror images. Then I'm gonna go back and it doesn't matter which color you choose. And you're going to do the same thing again, make the mirror image. Again, you wanna keep more or less the same size, shape, and distance. And this will come across as almost knit look when you're done. And you want to continue this all the way across both sides of this mitten? I'll speed this along. Why? Right? Well.