Watercolor Florals for Beginners: Autumn Theme | Joly Poa | Skillshare

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Watercolor Florals for Beginners: Autumn Theme

teacher avatar Joly Poa, Watercolor Artist

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

14 Lessons (2h 17m)
    • 1. What is This Class About?

      2:33
    • 2. Class Projects Overview

      2:00
    • 3. Materials That You Need

      6:16
    • 4. Color Mixing

      3:49
    • 5. Autumn Elements

      15:08
    • 6. Autumn Leaf Wreath

      15:03
    • 7. Autumn Dahlia

      13:47
    • 8. Autumn Roses

      13:02
    • 9. Handheld Bouquet

      15:49
    • 10. Orange Fall Bouquet Part 1

      9:10
    • 11. Orange Fall Bouquet Part 2

      9:00
    • 12. Autumn Floral Wreath

      14:03
    • 13. Vintage Fall Florals

      16:15
    • 14. Final Thoughts

      0:59
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28

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About This Class

Learn how to paint watercolor florals and how to give it a fall vibe.

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In this class, we are going to learn how to paint autumn-inspired watercolor florals. This is suitable for both beginners and experienced watercolor artists. Videos will be shown in real-time so that the students can follow along.

Here are the topics included in the class:

  • Materials
  • Color Mixing
  • Autumn Elements
  • 7 Projects
    • Autumn Leaf Wreath
    • Dahlia Bouquet
    • Roses in Autumn Colors
    • Handheld Bouquet
    • Orange Fall Bouquet
    • Autumn Floral Wreath
    • Vintage Fall Florals

By the end of the class, the students will be able to paint a total of seven different projects. The lessons learned in this class can also be applied to different subjects.

 

I hope to see you in the class!

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Joly Poa

Watercolor Artist

Teacher

 

Hi everyone! 

My name is Joly and I am a watercolorist based in the Philippines. I discovered painting with watercolor back in 2013. I started out as newbie and learned to paint better through making mistakes and learning from other amazing artists. I just love how we can express ourselves through painting, creating wonderful watercolor florals using our artistic interpretation. It makes each painting really unique! 

My instagram account (@jolypoa)  serves as my art journal where I post my progress in the form of timelapse videos, real-time videos and photos of my paintings. My goal was also to be able to share what I have learned in watercolor. I hope to be able to do the same here on Skillshare! :)


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Transcripts

1. What is This Class About?: [MUSIC] In previous years, I always found myself traveling to a different country during fall season. Living in a tropical country, we only have rainy and sunny days and so I was happy to see even just a glimpse of this beautiful, warm, and cozy season during my trips. I miss traveling and so I thought, what if I applied the fall color palette to my loose watercolor florals? Hi, my name is Joly and I'm a watercolor artist and a proud mom of a one-year old. I rediscovered watercolor in 2013 and have been painting since then. I specialize in painting loose watercolor florals. People know me more for sharing my work on Instagram. In previous years, I have been invited to do watercolor demos in big art events. I have taught in malls, art stores, and cafes. I'm also an online art educator and have been able to share my craft to thousands of students internationally. I make sure that my approach to teaching is suitable for both beginners and experienced painters alike. [MUSIC] First and foremost we will be discussing the materials that we need. Next, I will teach you how to mix fall-inspired colors that you can apply to your painting. Then we will paint individual autumn elements such as leaves and flowers, using the colors that we have just learned how to mix. After covering those we can now move on to creating seven different projects. [MUSIC] That's it, be ready to fall in love with autumn-inspired florals 2. Class Projects Overview: [MUSIC] Let's briefly talk about the projects that will help you in this class. We are going to start with the ECS and this is a leaf autumn wreath. This is a project where you can definitely experiment with different color combinations using fall-inspired colors. Next, we're going to paint some dahlia. These are multicolored dahlias. This is more of an expressive approach to painting dahlias. You can see that we have a background here. But of course, you also have that option to leave it with a white background. This is a painting that I place on the upper left of this paper so that you can write down something below. You can put your favorite code or make a card out of this painting. Then we have this classic autumn palette. I've just added some layers and roses and some beautiful autumn leaves. Let's head onto the next project. This is a handheld bouquet. In this project, you will learn how to convert your painting into an autumn-inspired painting just by adding the small elements that will change the mood or vibe of your painting. Of course, we are going to paint a floral autumn wreath. Just for some texture, I added some twigs on one side of this wreath. Lastly, this is the vintage fall bouquet. It's one of my favorites. I'm going to teach you how to paint with muted colors. That's it. You can actually finish each project in less than 20 minutes. Now let's head on to the material so that you will know what do we need for this class. [MUSIC] 3. Materials That You Need: [MUSIC] Let's talk about the materials that we need for this class. Let's go to the paper first. This is the Baohong Academy. This is a student grade paper, but it's 100 percent cotton paper. Then the thickness is 300 GSM. This is an affordable watercolor paper that's why I chose this. It comes in a block form, which means that the sides are glued, and there's one space here that isn't glued so that you can take out the sheet from here. The size of this paper is 7 by 10 inches. Let me show you another block. This is also a Baohong Academy, and it's a square block, it's around 10 by 10 inches. The price is also good compared to other papers, even though this is just student grade paper. If you like, it performs a little close to artist grade paper. Right here, I'm showing you how to take out one sheet. I'm using just a small cutter, but you can also use a palette knife, or they also have something called leaf blade. I think if you have an old credit card, you can also use that to take out one sheet. Make sure that your painting is already dry before you take out your painting from this block, so that it stays flat. If you take out your painting while it's still wet, then the paper won't stay flat, it will be a little curved, and that's based on my experience. That's why I always make sure that the painting is already dry. In my opinion, this is one of the best student grade papers, just because it resembles an artist grade paper. It has a nice texture to it, unlike most student grade papers, which are a little smooth, and smooth paper isn't really that nice for loose florals. Always choose a cold press paper if you want to paint loose florals, and choose hot press paper if you want to paint some realistic botanicals. Let me show you another paper, this is Saunders Waterford, which you might have seen in my previous classes. This paper is also in a block form, so all the sides are also glued. The thickness is 300 GSM. It's better to use 300 GSM, so that the paper is quite thick. It won't buckle that much if you put a lot of water. I'm not sure if you can see it, but Baohong Academy on the right, it's a bit yellow or cream in color. The Saunders Waterford is really white. I'm showing the comparison, so that you can manage your expectations. Some people like their paper really white, and I can see the difference when you're painting on a really white background. The painting stands out more in a white paper. For the brushes, I'm going to be using Silver Brush Black Velvet, round in size six, and eight. This is my absolute favorite, round brushes. I prefer using two brushes when painting. One brush I use for the pigment or the paint, and then another brush, I use it to fade away my strokes, so that I just don't have to keep on rinsing if I'm using just one brush. When looking for a brush, try to choose one that can hold a lot of water, but at the same time it can keep its point even when you load it with water. I also love how soft this brush is, and it makes it easy to paint some expressive strokes. Next is a water jar. You can actually use any jar that you have. It doesn't have to be really ceramic. This is a beautiful ceramic cup with a brush holder. Now let's go to the paints. I'm using here, ShinHan PWC, but I have poured into these half pans. This particular brand comes in tubes only that's why I just poured into half pans. Before you start using, you can also spray some water just to prep it. Leave it for a few minutes so that the paint will dissolve, and it's easier to grab some paint using your brush when the paint is moist. Let me show you another type of brush. This is a travel brush. It's also by the same brand, Silver Brush, and it's also a Black Velvet. But you use this when you want to paint outside. The cap will protect the bristles from being deformed. It's a good brush to use if you love painting outside. Using brushes is actually a matter of preference. What works for me might not work for you. Next, we need a mixing palette. This is just the lid of my watercolor palette. I receive a lot of questions about this, it's the brand Watercolor Palette. They sell paints, but the paints inside this palette is ShinHan PWC, so I just changed the brand inside. I love this lid because it has little wells inside, but you can also use a ceramic palette, which I'm going to show you. This is also another type of palette. What's nice about using a ceramic palette is that the paint won't stain your palate, unlike the metal palettes, like the one that I showed you a while ago. You can also use an ordinary ceramic plate. It will also work out for you. As for me, I usually just use whatever is convenient to grab. That's it for the materials. Let's move on to the next video, where I'm going to show you some color mixing. [MUSIC] 4. Color Mixing: In this video, we are going to talk about our fall palette. Before we start, let's just watch the colors that we will be using in this class. The first one is Yellow Orange, Vermilion, Permanent Red, Crimson Lake, Burnt Sienna and we'll be using this color a lot, Raw Umber, Yellow Ochre, Hooker's Green, Sap Green, Greenish Yellow, Burnt Umber, then we have Sepia, for the Blues: Indigo, Prussian Blue, and Cerulean Blue and then we'll also be using Permanent Violet. Right now let's go to color mixing. Let's mix Crimson Lake and Burnt Umber to get that nice Burgundy color. In this video we are going to mix the most used combinations in this class, but of course we will learn even more mixtures in our projects. You can also add a little bit of Permanent Violet to make it look deeper, it's going to be a matter of preference so if you want it to look a bit more Red you add more Crimson, if you want it more Brown than you add more Burnt Umber. Next up is Burnt Sienna and Yellow Orange. We want that Brown color from Burnt Sienna but I want it to be just slightly brighter that's why I added some Yellow Orange. I've also decided to add some Violet into my color palette. We have Permanent Violet and you can add a little bit of Orange. We are adding Orange because we want to mute down the Violet color. You can adjust the ratio, you can add more Violet or more Orange. It depends on the color that you want for your painting. Let's go to our Greens. I'm mixing Sap Green and Sepia. It's one of my favorite combinations. You can get that deep Green color with this mixture. You can also add a little bit of Sepia if you wanted to add just more contrast o your painting. You can also make Sap Green with Burnt Umber and it will yield a different kind of Green. It still has that earthy [inaudible]. You can definitely play around with adding Browns to your Green color. This is another mixture that I did, Permanent Rose and Burnt Sienna. It's nice to add some Brown to your Pinks just to tone it down. Next, we also have this Hooker's Green and Sepia. You'll see that the color looks richer compared to the Sap Green and Sepia mixture. All right. That's a very quick intro to our color mixing. We are going to learn more about it when we dive into our projects. In the next video, we're going to paint autumn elements. 5. Autumn Elements: In this video, we are going to paint some autumn inspired elements. Let's start by painting some simple leaves, therefore green, we are going to use some browns and oranges. Let's mix some crimson lake and burnt umber, you can also use just any red that you have, a pink and then just add brown. Let's start with the thin stem, and then we're going to attach some leaves, just slowly pressing brush onto the paper and then lift towards the end, so that you can get that pointed tip. In this exercise you can try to change the shape of the leaves, and you can make it more expressive, and of course you can use different colors, so right here I just added a little bit more red into my mixture. Now I'm going to add some vermilion, you can use any orange that you have, then you can also use some burnt sienna, it's a beautiful brown color. To make it look more interesting, let's grab some permanent violet and you want to dilute this in water, you can add a little bit of that orange-brown color, so that it's not too bright. You can see that I've muted this violet, and now let's paint and you see it's just a very beautiful color and you'll be using this later on. Moving on to the next leaf, let's grab some yellow ocher and add some raw umber, which is going to mix this up, and you're going to paint some loops just like this, we're doing the edges first then we're going to fill in the center. You also try to rotate your paper so that it's easier to get those angles on the other side. Now let's add two more loops at the bottom, we just feel free to add some more adjustments, if you think the shape looks a little odd. I'm going to add the stem then let's just go back to this leaf later we can add some veins, and you're just going to wait for it to dry. Let's move on to another leaf. Let's grab the raw umber, I'm going to paint from the outside, going into the center of this leaf. You'll see that it's starting to come to life, it looks a little bit like a small bridge leaf, you can use this leaf as a filler in our future paintings. Next we're going to paint a sweet gum leaf, and this is just a mixture of red and burnt umber, or you can use crimson lake and burnt umber. Then right here, I'm just going to rub my pencil, and just draw some lines that will be my guide for painting the strokes. We're going to start with the top stroke and then onto the sides. It doesn't need to look perfect, we can go back in to fix the shape. Then you're going to add a stem as well, and then you're going to let this dry and maybe add some veins and some details. The next one is going to be a filler and we're going to use a really diluted yellow ocher color, and we're going to start with the stem in the center, and just add these quick strokes, you can also raise your brush so that you can get the lighter color. I've been seeing this filler in dried flower bouquets and I thought that it would be nice to add to a flower bouquet. Just for a more contrast, you can drop in some burnt umber, this is diluted burnt umber and just add it in the center. Let's try another easy filler, I have here permanent violet and indigo, and we want really a dark mixture. Let's start by painting a thin stem, and then we are going to stipple the brush, and just paint those small dots, those irregular shapes. You can also try to rinse your brush and then dab it again so that you can get some lighter color. This is a good way to add contrast and to add another color to your bouquet. Now that some of the leaves have dried, I'm just going to grab some raw umber and this is just diluted raw umber, let's just paint some stems. Let's give it some character and just some more detail, we just want to add some veins so that it doesn't look that flat. You can also try to play around and use different colors for the veins. Now let's add some on the sweet gum leaf, this is just a thicker mixture of crimson lake and burnt umber, we can also use just brown or just a more concentrated red. Now let's paint some simple twigs. I have here burnt umber, let's just use the tip of our brush and just wiggle it on the paper, so that you can get those irregular shapes and they're not straight lines, we wanted to look more natural. This is a good filler to add for flower bouquet, then you can rinse our brush so that we can get some lighter colors, you can see that it's just more beautiful if you have different values. Now let's paint some simple five petal flowers. Let's rub some raw umber and I'm just going to paint some expressive petals, you can see that I'm just trying to wiggle my brush, and then creating these organic shapes. You can use the side of your brush, so that you can get a broader stroke, and then for the center you can drop in some sepia, you can add a little bit of orange to your raw umber, so we can get another fall inspired flower. What we're doing here is we're painting our usual flowers, but instead of painting them in pink, we're going to use the fall colors. Try to use what you have in your palette, just use your browns and oranges, and paint this simple five petal flowers. We can just add one more flower. This is made from crimson lake and some burnt umber, so that it's easier to get an idea of some fall colors. You can try to look for reference for those of maybe landscapes and leaves, so that you'll have an idea of which colors to use. Then now let's add a stem to these flowers, I just mix pocus cream and sepia, so that I can get that nice earthy brown color. You can get a natural or green color. You can even paint a wreath just using the small flowers. Now let's move on to painting a rose. I'm going to use permanent rose mixed with burnt sienna. We want pink with a little bit of brown to tone it down and make it look more like a fall inspired flower. I've already taught this in my last class, but it might be your first time to take any of my classes, so I am teaching it again now. We're adding just the center first and then we're going to add some thin C strokes all around it to make sure to leave some white spaces in between your small strokes. Now let's rinse our brush and fade away some of those strokes. We can also try painting some medium-size petals, like what I'm doing now. To make sure to reach the other side of the petal and make sure they're all connected, we can rinse our brush again so that we can get the lighter color in the brush. Then I'm just going to add some more strokes. Some can be just lines. While the flower is still wet, we can also add a darker mixture of permanent rose and burnt sienna into the center and add some C strokes around the sides of the center. Another option is to add some sepia in the center if you want it really, really dark. But later on in the next projects we're also going to learn how to layer these roses. Let's move on to the next flower and now we're going to paint some DC light flower. This is just yellow ocher and just going to paint a round shape. Just dab your brush until you get that desired shape. Now let's wrap a very diluted indigo color and we are going to paint the petals. But I will try not to touch the yellow ocher so that it's not going to blend too much because if it blends together, it becomes a little bit greenish. I'm trying to be careful and just not try to mix it too much. Just use the tip of your brush to create these petals. I'm just trying to add some spaces in between the petals as well because I'm adding a bit more yellow ocher in that area. Then now let's grab some sepia. We want this brush to be pretty dry because we don't want it to spread so much. You want to control that paint, make sure that there's less water in your brush and you can see that the sepia here it doesn't spread so much because you have controlled the paint and water ratio. We can also try to pull away some of the color and mix it into the petal. If you feel like you need to add more contrast, you can just drop in some more sepia just like what they did here. While waiting for this to dry, let's just paint some of my go-to berries, which you might have seen before if you've taken a previous classes. We're just going to use this crimson and burnt umber color. You can also use orange. This is just a practice sheet. Just use any color that you have on your palette. Let's add another layer to this filler. So you can go back in with a translucent yellow ocher or raw umber color. Just paint some more strokes on top of the previous one and you'll see that it instantly looks like it has more depth. Let's go back in to add a second layer. This is diluted indigo, so we want it to be quite translucent. You still want to see the layer underneath. At the same time, you can also add in some more sepia if you want more contrast. You have one more flower to practice, and this is the flower called dahlia. To start, just grab any color that you have and let's just paint some simple petals strokes. You're going to paint some curved strokes and you can see that I'm almost just using the tip of my brush. I'm swaying my brush to create these movements. This is a good exercise before we start painting this flower. To start, we have here permanent rose and burnt sienna. I'm going to use my size eight round brush. I'm going to paint some tiny strokes. This is going to be the center. Then with my other brush, this is a size six round brush. This one has clean water and I'm going to spread those centers strokes that we did. What I'm doing here, I'm trying to pull away that color in the center and then we can also add a little bit of permanent yellow deep. Or we can also add a little bit of orange. You can see that I'm just creating these expressive strokes. I'm doing this in different movements , in different directions. You can grab a more concentrated permanent rose and burnt sienna mixture and just paint on top of the previous strokes just to keep on adding petals. If you feel like you've made some mistake, don't worry, because we're going to add a second layer so we can try to cover that up later. Once this is already gray, this makes our paint for the second layer. This is permanent rose, it's burnt umber. I also added a little bit of violet so that it's just darker. You're going to start with the center again. I'm using my size 8 round brush and I'm going to paint some thin strokes in the center using the tip of the brush. Then we are going to create some more elongated strokes. What we're doing is we're separating the petals. We're doing this because we don't have enough white spaces in between some of the petals in the first layer. If you want to add a bit more color, you can add some permanent yellow deep or yellow orange. That will give you just a small pop of color so that it doesn't look too dark. You can also add a little bit of pink. Whenever I look for reference for those, usually dahlias would have different colors in each petal and we want to mimic that. Now we're done and we can start with our projects. 6. Autumn Leaf Wreath: Let's start with an easy project. This is an autumn leaf wreath and to start, I'm going to draw a circle. Just make sure that you draw lightly with the pencil and then next we're going to grab some burnt umber. We don't want it to be too dark, I'm going to just scribble some lines that will look like twigs or branches. Just paint some thin strokes, it doesn't have to be all connected. It just helps me visualize the entire leaf if I do this but of course this is optional. If you don't want to add this in the beginning, that's okay. What we're going to do is we're going to mix crimson lake and burnt umber. We want this reddish-brown color and we're going to build this wreath per color in the beginning. I'm going to mix up this color and we're going to paint leaves all around this wreath and we're just going to spread apart these colors. It doesn't need to look perfect and you can paint the leaves facing in different directions. Also try to rinse your brush so that you can get a lighter color. Usually when you are painting a wreath, the most difficult would be the starting point because it looks a bit sparse right now. But don't worry, we're going to build up this wreath and I'm just mixing right here some yellow orange and burnt sienna. Let's plot this in our wreath. It's easier to paint a wreath if you have a pattern. You can start with the pattern in the beginning of painting a wreath. You can try to cluster the leaves based on certain colors and then once it looks a little bit full and that's the time that you add leaves based on your instinct. Now I just added some greenish-yellow with a little bit of orange. This is a very customizable wreath and you can use any color that you have in your palette and just mix and match all of these four inspired colors. Now let's paint a different leaf shape, so mixing yellow ocher and raw umber. Let's do something that looks like a birch leaf. Right here, I'm just pressing my brush from the outside and going into the center so you can get those jagged edges. Then on the top right we can probably add another fall leaf, this is an oak leaf. Let's paint some loops until we get the form that we want. Now let's add a sweetgum leaf, this is crimson lake with burnt umber, you can also use red and burnt umber. Let's paint some over here and I'm just going to rotate our paper so that it's easier to get those angles correctly. If you wanted to be a little deeper, you can add some green to this mixture. We don't want it to look too perfect but we can try to fix some of the edges, and then we can go back in later to add some more details. Feel free to add some more sweetgum leaf if you want to add more of that variety. Right now let's introduce a new color, this is just permanent violet and I'm going to add a little bit of that orange so that I can get a muted violet color. We don't want a really bright violet, that's why I'm adding some orange to tone it down a little bit. Now we're going to spread this color on this wreath just so that it's not too orangey. We don't want to introduce a different color, this to balance it. Fall season is a beautiful season, it can look different depending on where you are, some cases can be really red and orange in color, some will have some violet or purple, some are a bit more red so it's really interesting. Now we can add some burnt sienna, let's add some reddish orange brown leaf. What you can also do is to prepare all the colors before you start painting, that will make it easier for you when you're painting a wreath like this. These two leaves have the same color, I'm just going to add some burnt umber on to the other leaf so that they don't look the same. Now let's add some burnt umber and leaves and just try to change the directions of the leaves. You can also vary the shape if you want. There's another space that we can fill in with a sweetgum leaf. This is a mixture of crimson lake and some burnt umber. Let's move on to a different color palette. This is sap green and sepia, so you want an earthy-green color. I'm using a size 6 round brush. We're just going to fill in some of the gaps and in some cases, the first layer of leaves might be dry already. We can try to layer and just paint on top of them, we can also paint some stem sticking out. What you can also do is to grab the colors on your mixing palette and just add it to your green and this also creates harmony in terms of color combination. Let's add some burnt sienna to our vermilion. What I'm doing here is I'm mixing the red-orange, and some brown just to mute it down. I'm just continuously looking for some white gaps that I could fill in. I know that it can be a little tricky to add some leaves but the more you paint, the easier it is to understand where to add these leaves or fillers. Now lets grab some of that violet again and just keep on adding. Let's add some veins on some of the leaves I have here just burnt umber and I have diluted it with water. You're going to start adding some details so we don't want it to be too dark. This is just the same color that we used for the sweet gum leaf, but it's just more concentrated. This leaf is still wet and we're just going to go back in later. Right now I'm going to mix crimson lake with some violet. Then maybe we can add a little bit of burnt sienna. You're going to use this to paint some small fillers that are very concentrated. This gives more contrast to our wreath. Just use the tip of your brush and just tipple it until you create these small strokes that will look like many leaves. Then you can add in a stem and just connect all those dots. You can also use a different color. If you want to use indigo that's also good. You can also use a dark red color and just add it all around the wreath. You can also extend the stem a little bit over the leaves so that it's looks like it's hanging. Now, let's add some twigs and some branches. I'm using my burnt umber. I am just adding these thin and just wispy strokes in the center of this wreath. I'm creating this ring all around this wreath. You can paint some twigs sticking out. Just try to wiggle the tip of your brush. If you want it to be a little darker, just add zip here. Adding these twigs will give it a rustic look. Just try to pause and look at your wreath. If you need to add some more leaves, I'm just adding some greenish-yellow, because I just want a pop of color in some areas. You can also do this. I'm pretty sure you'll be painting your own unique wreath. Just follow your instinct. Now let's add some berries. I'm going to make vermilion and burnt umber. This is a color that you can change depending on the color of your wreath. I wanted just a reddish orange brown color. This is a way to add in more color to your wreath. We're going to add this in areas that look a little light in color to their areas that you want to highlight. This is what you add to that area. If you want something darker, you can also add a dark violet color that will also look good. As you can see, I'm also sometimes just scrubbing any color on my mixing palette. You can also do with that. I'm going to go back into that sweet gum leaf. It's already dry so we can add some veins. Then you can make this look more detailed by adding some veins on some of the leaves. I'm using burnt umber, you can use a different color. I'm not going to add veins on all the leaves. We want it to still look interesting. We want different textures on this wreath. For some of the leaves I am going to use a dark red color as veins. We are almost done. What you can do is to just stop and observe the shape of the wreath. In some areas, you might need to add some leaves to make the shape look better. You can try to extend some leaves and that will do the trick until you fix the shape of the entire wreath. Of course you can paint some stems sticking out. That's a good filler as well. We are done. Congratulations for finishing your first project. 7. Autumn Dahlia: Let's paint some beautiful dahlias. This is the project that we will paint today. I'm going to show you some photos from this book and you will see the title of this book in the project resources section. There are different types of dahlias. Something that I have noticed is that the center has some short and tight petals, but the outer part is loose and the petals are longer. This is just one way to break down the parts of the flowers so that it's easier for you to translate it into a painting. Before we start, we can use a pencil and just plot down those dots. That will be the center of the flower and that will be main guide in painting this dahlia bouquet. It also forms this triangle so that it just looks more pleasing to the eyes. Now let's mix up some of the colors. I'm going to mix permanent rose with some burnt sienna. We want a muted pink color that's getting towards brown already. Then we also have permanent rose and also mixing permanent rose with yellow orange. I'm using my size 8 round brush. Let's grab the permanent rose and burnt sienna mixture. We want a thick mixture and just painting some small strokes that will look like spikes. Now let's grab my size 6 round brush. It only has water in it. I'm just going to grab those colors and just move around this brush. I'm just painting with water and the paint coming from the center. Then we can grab a little bit of pink here and just add that onto the petals. The reference photo that I have has different colors on the dahlia. It has a mixture of pink and just some peachy orange color. Going back to my size 8 round brush. This is just permanent rose and burnt sienna. We can see that it's darker, mixture of pain, it's more pigmented. I'm adding some strokes on top of the previous ones. We can also rinse our brush and fade away some of the petals so that it doesn't look too harsh. You can grab a little bit of yellow, orange so that you have that pop of color. You'll see that I'm also trying to sway my brush so that I can make those petals dance. You can paint some of the petals in an S curve motion. Now let's move on to the second dahlia. We already have here some spikes and with a clean brush, I'm just going to move around the color. I only have just water in my brush. But you can also add a little bit of color. I have here some yellow, orange. We can add a little bit of permanent rose as well. The colors will actually depend on the reference photo that you have to chosen. This flower is a little bit facing on the side. You'll see that I'm adding longer petals towards the bottom part and shorter ones on the top just to give that illusion that it's at an angle. We can drop in some more pigmented color in the center. Moving on to the third dahlia, I'm going to add a little bit of crimson lake to this mixture just to change things up a bit. Then let's paint the center. I'm using just the tip of the brush to create those tiny strokes and then with a size 6 round brush that only has water going to move around this paint. Try to hold the brush towards the end of the handle so that it can get a loser stroke. Don't be afraid to loosen up a bit so that you can create a movement. I'm just adding some pinks and some yellow, orange. You can also try leaving some white spaces in between the strokes. Also try painting the petals in different directions. We can also go back in and fix the shape of the other flowers. You can try to extend the petals so you can change the shape. Try to experiment and paint very quick, just like what I'm doing here, so that you can get some nice wispy strokes. This is already dry and now it's time to start some second layering. I'm going to grab some permanent rose with burnt umber. We want a really pigmented color. Then you're going to paint those tiny petals in the center the type ones. Just going to press my brush onto the paper so I can get that petal like stroke and then we can add some bigger strokes. Try to do it quickly, and then we can rinse our brush and fade away some of the strokes to make it look softer. You can also add a little bit of yellow, orange, or maybe some permanent rose. You want this mixture to be quite translucent. We are done and now let's move on to the second dahlia. I have here the same mixture, but I added a bit more burnt umber. Now let's paint those tiny petals. Just make sure that you are leaving spaces in between your strokes. It's better to start with small strokes so that you can eventually adjust if we need to make it bigger. Now let's add some bigger sized petals. Just add more pressure to your brush strokes so that you can get a bigger petal. Then you can also try to wiggle your brush so that you can add some movement to the petals. I'm going to be adding some yellow, orange again to this flower. I'm just trying to translate what I see on the reference photo into my painting. To give it more contrast, I'm just adding some more pigmented mixture of permanent rose and burnt umber. You can just drop it in the center while it's still wet. For the third dahlia, we're going to do the same. This is a size 8 round brush and just painting those small petals, and then now we can rinse our brush. Just add another layer of petals. Can try to just use the tip of your brush and just wiggle some strokes. Can either lose a bit of yellow, orange. Also try to hold your brush towards the end of the handle. Every stroke that you paint here represents one petal on the flower. This is optional, but if you want to add a little bit of shadow, just get some permanent violet, mix it with a little bit of your orange or brown, and add some petals using that color. Now let's grab some sap green with a little bit of indigo to make it look darker and we're just going to add the stems. Let's start with the first dahlia that we painted and just create that straight line. Then let's move on to the second one. I'm going to make it a bit slanted and onto the third one. Now let's add some more details. I'm going to mix crimson lake, burnt umber, and maybe we can add a little bit of permanent violet to make it look darker. I'm just going to add some more details in the center, just add more contrast. You can also paint some thin lines on the flower just to separate some of the petals. These strokes can also look like they are shadows in between the petals. You'll notice a big difference now that we have added this detail. It just gives this flower more life. Sometimes just adding those tiny strokes, it makes a really big difference. If the lines look too harsh, just fade it away with a clean brush. Then you can also add some more colors on the dahlia, I can add some yellow, orange as well. You can see I'm just dragging the brush. I'm using just the tip of the brush to create those thin lines. At this point we're actually already done. If you want to have a clean background, you can stop right here. But if you want to experiment some more, just keep on watching. Right now I'm just going to get some clean water and I'm going to grab some of the colors from the flower and you can see that it's starting to fade away. You can use a flat brush. I'm just using a regular round brush and I'm just adding water in the background. Now let's add some color. I'm going to be mixing crimson lake and burnt umber. Then we are just going to drop it in the background and just fade it away. I want to use the colors that I've used on the flowers as well. Because we're doing a wet on wet technique, you'll notice that we have a really soft background because the paper is wet. Another way to do this is to add blue background if you want these flowers to pop up or to stand out. It depends on the mood that you want this painting to have. I opted to have that warm autumn feel. That's why I added more reds and oranges. Then right here edges have some permanent violet mixed with a little bit of orange, I'm adding some splatters. For the splatters you can use a darker color. But again, this is all optional. If you don't want this background, you can just start with a plain white background and it will still look really beautiful. That was really fast and now we're done with our project. I hope that you enjoyed painting this dahlia bouquet with me. 8. Autumn Roses: Let's mix some roses in autumn colors. We are going paint to be this corn rose. We can put some coat later on in the lower right. To start, we need to draw circles right here that will be our main flowers. Then we'll add some buds and some leaves. Right now I'm just mixing yellow-orange with some burnt sienna. You want a warm color for the roses. We need the pigmented color I have here, my Size 8 round brush. I'm painting a small coma stroke. Then we are going to just paint some thin C curves all around it. Make sure to just leave white spaces in between your strokes and I'm also trying to vary the shapes of the strokes with another brush that only has water in it. I'm going to fade away the outer strokes, just like what I'm doing here. This rose is facing at an angle and you'll see that I painted a fold right there. Then we're going to sketch the body of this rose. I'm painting like a cup or like a U-shape, just like this. I'm just using a light color first. Then we can fill it in with some color just make sure that you start with a really light mixture first. Then just continue adding some strokes on the top portion, so that we can close that up. You can go back in and fix the shape of the rose. I'm just using a really light mixture in my brush, so that it's just easier to move around. With a more pigmented color we're going to add it in the center just to give it more contrast. Then you can add it in some of the petals and towards the bottom part and you're just going to leave it as is. Let's now move on to the second rose. Let's use yellow ocher, I'm going to start with the center of the rose. Then we're going to add some thin lines all around the center and just use the tip of your brush and just lightly press on the paper. Then you can also grab some sepia but make sure to use a really diluted mixture. Add a lot of water. Adding sepia gives it that rustic or a vintage look. You can also mix sepia and yellow ocher, so that it's not too dark. Again, just make sure that you have spaces in between your strokes. We can add in some more of the diluted sepia and add it on the outer part of this rose. This is an open rose. You can also use the color sepia if you want to paint some white roses, just make sure that you dilute it in a lot of water. Now, let's wait for this to dry and then you're going to add a second layer. In the meantime, let's mix up sap green and sepia and then we can add some stem sticking out. I'm going to add it in between these two main roses. Then let's grab some yellow-orange and we can add some small buds. I'm using two brushes, one for green and one for the yellow-orange colors, so that I don't have to keep on rinsing my brush. Then you can drop in some green at the base of this bud. Now, let's grab some vermilion and you want a thick mixture. Just scribble some lines over here. This will be a loose flower with a clean brush. We are going to fade it away and pull away those colors. We're just going to move it around until we create our desired shape. This looks like a mini rose and you just want to add a contrast in the center. That's why I drop in a really concentrated mixture. With a yellow-orange color in my brush, I'm going to paint some C strokes. Then with a clean brush, we're going to fade it away. We're going to paint the body of this flower. This is really just going to be a loose flower. All you need is a really pigmented center. Then you can add some big petals all around it. That's the secret to painting loose florals without it looking like a blob. Just make sure that you have a high contrast in the center. While the flowers are still wet, I'm just going to add some stems just to connect it to the main flower. Let's mix up some greens. I have here, hooker's green and sepia. Then we have another mixture, hooker's green and burnt umber. We can start the one with sepia and now let's paint some leaves. I'm using my Size 8 round brush and again we add the leaves in between the flowers. That's how we start. Then I think I will add one more leaf near this rose on the left. Adding a really dark leaf beside a light-colored flower will give it more definition. You'll see that we have a very clear edge of the petals and you want to make some jagged edges. Now, we're going to add some stem sticking out. Another trick is to add a color of the rose to your greens. I just added some orange to my green paint. That will make this painting look really pretty. We can also try to rotate your paper, so that it's easier to paint some leaves. Then also try to vary the shapes of the leaves. Try to paint smaller ones and bigger ones. I'm going to rinse my brush to create a lighter green color. Let's add some small orange fillers. I'm using vermillion, you can use any red-orange color that you have. I'm just pressing my brush to create the small petal like strokes that will look like buds. This is a good way to distribute the colors all around this painting. Let's add some more leaves. Again, I'm going to add some orange to my leaves. For the small gaps just put some stem sticking out just hope to fill in that white space. I'm just grabbing some poker's green and adding it to the green paint on my palette. We're just adding more leaves all around the roses, just so we can give it more definition and it will make the roses stand out. The roses are already dry and it's now time to add a second layer. I'm going to grab some sepia and burnt umber. We want a dark center. I'm going to paint over the first layer, paint a coma stroke and just slightly paint some thin C strokes. We don't need to paint a lot because it will look too overwhelming. Now, I'm going to fade away the strokes to make it look softer. Let's add some more layers. But we want a more diluted color. I'm just going to mix up yellow ocher with a little bit of sepia. We want it to still look a little translucent. Just make sure to add a lot of water. I'm just painting it lightly, so that I can get some nice wispy strokes. I'm also making sure that you can still see the first layer. Moving on to the second rose, let's mix crimson lake and burnt umber. Again, you want a more concentrated mixture. I'm just going to paint the center and paint some really thin strokes. Also going to extend this stroke towards the fold of this rose. Then you're going to fade away some strokes to make it look softer again. You can also add a little bit on the outline of this rose. If your strokes are too harsh then just get a clean brush and dab the excess paint. If you've noticed, I've added more color in the center of this rose because that's where the shadow is and you want it to be a bit darker. You can also grab any red, orange color and just put more details in the smaller roses. I'm just slightly dabbing my brush in the center. We can add some veins on some of the leaves. I'm just using just sap green and sepia or just use any dark green color that you have on your palette and add these veins. I usually don't paint it really straight. I tried to paint it in a curved manner, so that it looks softer. Again, we won't be adding veins in all the leaves, so that it won't look that crowded. It's now time to stop and just observe your painting and see if you need to adjust the shape. By adjusting, what you can do is, you can add some small flowers, some leaves, so that they can fix the shape. Then I'm going to add some leaves in between these flowers. I'm just fixing this area. I added too much stems. I'm just trying to fade it away. We're almost done and I'm just adding some stems sticking out and also a couple of leaves. What you can do is you can also change the color of the roses that we just painted. You can try painting with just raw umber or maybe something more red. Again, see something that you can really customize. That's it. I hope that you can use this for creating some autumn cards and that you can put a code below this painting. 9. Handheld Bouquet: We are going to paint a handheld fall bouquet. This one has more of a pink tone to it. But you're adding some fall colors through the small flowers and fillers. We are going to paint the main flowers first. You will see that the two main flowers are not right beside each other. You want some space in between them so that it will look a bit more loose style. I'm going to mix permanent rose, and burnt sienna. Let's paint a comma stroke, and then you're going to paint some thin strokes all around it. Then we see a size eight round brush. You can grab your size six brush to fade away some of the strokes. I'm just going to spread around this color, and I'm also adding some medium-size petals. For this rose, I'm painting some vigorous ice petals compared to their previous projects. It's always nice to try different styles of roses. You can also try to wiggle your brush so that you can create a broader petal. What we did here is the center of the rose is a bit tight, but the outer petals are very loose. Just make sure that you're still leaving some white spaces in between those petals. Now let's grab a more concentrated mixture of permanent rose, and burnt sienna. I'm adding it in the center. While this rose is still a little wet. You can also paint some C strokes. Now let's move on to the second rose. I am using the same color. It's permanent rose, and burnt sienna. You can try to change the ratio of the paints. If you find this too pink, just add more burnt sienna so that they can get a more orangey color. Now I'm just rinsing my brush, and I'm just going to fade away some of those petals. I'm also painting bigger size petals compared to the previous projects. We want a juicy brush so that it's easier to spread those petals, and you can try to adjust the shape easily. This rose is also at an angle. That's why you can see at the bottom part is thicker compared to the top portion. For this rules, we are going to add in a dark center. This is permanent violet and burnt umber. I'm just going to drop it in the center, and this rose is actually a little bit wet, and that's okay. With a clean brush, you can try to fix the center, and spread some of the dark color around. Hereditary, not done with the two main flowers. Let's paint a small flower here. I'm using permanent yellow deep. This looks like a daisy. Now I'm adding the light colored petals. I'm missing radial rooted indigo. I'll try not to touch the yellow part first so that it doesn't mix too much or else it will become too green. You just want to control the way that yellow center moves into the indigo petals. Now if you want to paint white chlorophylls, this is what you can use. Just use a very diluted indigo. You can also use sepia. It's now time to add some stamps and right here I'm just mixing indigo and hookers green. We can also add in some more water so that it's not too dark. For the initial stems we wanted to be a little light in color so that if we need to cover it up, because it looks odd, that it will be easier because the color is just light, and you could just add in some leaves or fillers to cover up some mistakes. To give this bouquet an autumn mood, what you can do is you can add some small branches, just like what I'm doing. I'm just using burnt umber. We are going to attach some small buds later on. When you're painting a handheld bouquet, make sure that you are varying the height of each flower or branch, just to give it more character, and so that it doesn't look too even. In the beginning of this class, we actually practice some small five petaled flowers. That's what we're going to paint right now. I'm using raw umber, and you're just going to paint an irregularly shaped five petaled flower. The petals doesn't need to look all the same. Then for the center, I'm just going to add some dark color. You can use sepia or indigo, and then add a stem. Next, let's add some stems that are facing different directions. I think I want something that's hanging. I'm just going to paint it lightly so that I can try to still fix it if it doesn't look good. Let's add another five petal flower. I'm mixing crimson lake with some yellow ocher. We just want a muted red, orange color. You can also try to rinse your brush so that you can get a lighter color. Just change up the value. Let's add a dark center. It's very important to add a dark center when you are painting some loose florals. This flower is facing at an angle. We are going to paint just three petals. In the color that I'm using is crimson lake and burnt umber. We do want that chocolatey brown color. Now let's add one more flower. I'm just making the permanent yellow deep with an orange color on my palette. This is just really going to be loose. Just try to wiggle your brush on the paper. Then you'll be able to create some petal-like strokes. Then just add a stem with a dark green color we are going to add some leaves, and put a shape on the edges of this flower. Then right here, I just added one long stem and painted some elongated lease by dragging my brush. Now, let's add some small orange buds, and we've seen yellow, orange and then you can add in a bit more red. These buds doesn't have to come in just one color. You can, of course, change the colors of each bud and this is going to give this bouquet an autumn feel. What we are doing here is we're painting our usual home roses, but we're adding a little bit of warmth to this bouquet. We still have our signature painting, but it's just that we added some fall elements to change the mood of the entire painting. If you're going to do a winter bouquet, you can still paint your usual pink roses, perhaps just add some blue-colored leaves, and that will change the mood of the painting. Let's add some leaves so that it doesn't look too empty. You can use Hooker's green with some indigo or maybe add some sepia. Then don't forget to vary the color of the leaves. Some can be a bit darker, some are lighter. I'm adding some burnt sienna to my greens so that I can get an earthy brown color. Now, I just add some stem sticking out over here. I plan to add some fillers. This is going to be cerulean-blue filler. Make sure that you dilute this color, you don't want it to look too bright. Let's just paint some small dots that will look like small flowers. Just using the tip of the brush, try to stipple the brush onto the paper so you can get this texture. You can also add a little bit of indigo to your paint so that you can tone down the color of cerulean blue. You can also add a little bit of green. It's not the usual color that you would use for a fall bouquet, but I feel like it's just going to complement this peachy pink rose. Then now let's just add some mini flowers using Crimson Lake and burnt umber. I usually add fillers using the colors that are already on my palette. Now let's mix up some permanent violet with a little bit of Prussian blue and then you can also add some indigo to tone down the color. I'm going to paint some leaves using this color. If you don't want to use this color, you can use permanent violet and add some orange or brown to it. This looks a little bright, so I'm going to tone it down with some more indigo. I just want the overall look of this bouquet to be autumn, but I also add some accents, that's why I'm adding a little bit of blue violet. Now, let's go to painting the stems just to make it look more expressive. What I'm going to do is, I'm going to paint some stems using water, and then now we're going to add in a dark green color. This is just Hooker's green and sepia. You'll see that it's bleeding into the wet areas. Then you can also add an even darker green color to give it more contrast. Hold your brush towards the end of the handle so that you can get those nice expressive strokes. I would recommend just painting thin stems in the beginning, and then you can just make it thicker later on. Now you can add some twigs sticking out. You can use burnt umber so that you can add in more brown to this bouquet. This area looks a little empty, so we are just going to add some stem sticking out just to fill in those white gaps. I'm going to be sharing a technique with you. I love adding some shadow leaves or stems. What you need to do is just to dilute your green paint. Make sure that it's really light and then just paint those leaves or stems. It's almost like it's just in the background and it's not too obvious, but it also makes a big difference to your bouquet when you look at it. We can try to stop and take a photo of your painting, and then check if you need to add some more fillers. Let's add in some green on the base of these buds just to give it more detail, just more depth. Now, let's grab some sepia and add a ring of dots in this flower, and you'll immediately see how it makes this flower pop up. Let's add a second layer to the petals. I'm using a diluted indigo. Just paint some simple strokes and just dragging my brush. I'm also making sure that you can still see the first layer, and now we can add in some more sepia to just let it bleed into the wet petals. That will give it a dramatic effect. It's also tightly layered this rose, I have here permanent rose and burnt sienna. We do want a really pigmented mixture. Now, let's feed away the other strokes, and then we can go back in to paint some more second layer petals. I always say that each stroke that you make represents one petal on this flower. For the second rose, we are going to concentrate on the outer petals, and just using a very diluted permanent rose and burnt sienna color. If you're not satisfied with how dark the center is, you can of course go back in and just add some more color. We are almost done. I'm just adding some finishing touches. Looking at this from the top view, you'll see how we changed the height of each flower and stem, and that made this bouquet look quite loose and not too overworked and not too tight. I hope this perspective help you in painting your own bouquet. That's it. I hope that you have enjoyed this project as much as I did. 10. Orange Fall Bouquet Part 1: In this project, we are going to paint a beautiful lush bouquet is a combination of roses, some autumn leaves. Let's get started. Before we start, we need to plot down the main flowers. I just drew some circles as a guide. Now let's start with a rose. I'm going to mix yellow ocher with sepia. We're going to start with the comma stroke in the center of the rows and then just paint some thin strokes all around it, making sure that you are leaving white spaces in between. I have an entire class on just painting loose watercolor roses. If you haven't check that out, you can watch that first so that this will be an easier project to make for you. Now I just rinse my brush so that I can get a lighter color. Then we're going to paint a bigger size petals. I'm using the color with a bit more sepia towards the other part of this rose so that I can give the illusion that there is a shadow. For the next rows, I want deep color. It's a mixture of crimson lake, burnt umber in a little bit of Hooker's green, so I can get that nice burgundy color. You want to make sure that the mixture is quite pigmented. Now when the paint the center again and then some thin strokes all around it. Then let's rinse our brush and just paint some broader petals. We want some bigger petals. I'm going to let this touch the first row so that they can blend together. You'll have a beautiful blade. Now let's just fade away the stroke. It looks a little harsh. We are trying to avoid some harsh lines or lines that are too bold. I'm just going to fix the shape and add some more petals and it's nice to add the shape while the rose is still wet. Now the roses are already dry. We can see that it has actually become light but don't worry, we will be adding more color later on. Right now, I just grabbed some raw umber. We're going to paint a dahlia. Let's paint the center spikes, first. I call this the spikes or the very small petals. Then with a clean brush and going to fade away the center. Let's just pull away those colors. You can also go back into paints some more concentrated strokes. I'm using two brushes here, one that has paint in it and one that only has water. What I'll do is I'll paint those dark colored petals and then I will be fading it away with the other brush. Just keep on adding the petals one-by-one so that we're actually working a bit slow so that you can really fix the shape. This is so wet, but we are going to add more colored petals. You'll see that I'm going to paint on top of it. It's just going to blend in quite softly. Let's now move on to the other dahlia. I'm mixing burnt sienna and vermilion. I don't really use these colors that much for flowers. But it's a good experience to be exposed to painting different colored flowers that aren't pink. Let's all start painting the small petals in the center of the dahlia and then with a clean brush I'm just going to fade it away and paint some wispy strokes. Try to hold your brush towards the end of the handle so that you can add movement to your strokes. If you have areas that are not looking good right now, that's okay. Don't worry because we're going to add a second layer. That means we can cover up some mistakes. I'm going to go back in with the brush that has some color in it. It's useful to have two pressures at the same time so that you don't have to keep on rinsing. Then we can feed away some of the petals. That's been another flower. I'm going to mix crimson lake and burnt sienna. You can also use just read if you want. This flower can be just an imaginary flower, or you can also resemble another type of dahlia or maybe a chrysanthemum. To start, I just put a small dot so that I know it's the center. Then I'm going to use just the tip of my brush and just add some nice wispy strokes. We're not going to be strict about the direction of the petals. You can try to vary it. Some of the petals will come from the center going upward, some I'm painting from the outside going inside. This flower is still wet but we can try to add a little bit more color towards the left side. I'm just going to grab a more pigmented mixture. Before we continue, let's just mix some colors. I'm going to make some Hooker's green and sepia over here. Then let's mix up Hooker's green and burnt umber. It's quite useful to mix the colors beforehand. I usually do this when I'm about to paint a lot of leaves. Then we can make some crimson lake and burnt umber. Then we can also grab some burnt sienna. We can use that for some leaves as well. Now we are done and let's start painting some leaves. The first one I'm going to use is Hooker's green and burnt umber. It looks a little light. I'm going to grab some more paint and just add some color to this leaf. Don't be afraid to experiment with the colors. It's a good time to add more colors to your leaves for this autumn inspired bouquet. Now we can put a really dark colored leaf over here near this pale rose. Then let's rinse our brush to paint a lighter green color. Let's paint some leaves in between these two dahlias. Then after that maybe you can add a filler. I'm going to grab some yellow ocher. This is a filler that we have practice in the start of this class to just paint some tiny leaves. You want this to be a light colored filler. Then we can grab a little bit of green from our palette and add it to the yellow ocher. You can add a little bit of brown as well and so I'm going to grab some burnt sienna. What we did here is we actually painted just the same style of filler, but just in different colors. Now let's move on to Part 2 of this project. 11. Orange Fall Bouquet Part 2: [MUSIC] Now, let's paint some leaves. I'm using crimson lake and burnt umber. You can get that nice reddish brown color, and then we can also add some burnt sienna. Adding some red or orange leaves will definitely give that autumn feel to your bouquet. Now, I'm adding some sepia just for more contrast, and you can see that it's bleeding beautifully into this leaf. Let's move on to Hooker's green and sepia. Just paint some leaves all around this bouquet, and also add some stem sticking out. Then we're going to add some brown colored leaves. You can use burnt umber or burnt sienna. Then, let's mix that up with a dark green color. Now, let's look at this from the top and you can see that there's a white space at the bottom. I'm just going to fill that in with some leaves. I'll just try to grab all the colors that you want to use in your palette, right there, I'm just adding some crimson lake and burnt umber mixture. Some raw amber. We can also add some burnt sienna. Just play around and I know it won't look that good right now, but don't worry, we can try to layer it later. With a raw umber color, let's just paint the wispy in expressive failure. Just painting these short strokes that will look like leaves. Let's add one more set on the right. This is just yellow ocher. You can use a different color as well. If I'm not sure what to paint yet, I usually just add some stem sticking out, so that it will help me visualize what to add next. Let's add a burnt sienna color over here at the button. I'm just going to go around this bouquet and add some brown leaves. We can now add some berries and I'm just mixing crimson lake with burnt sienna. You can also use red or orange. I'm just going to add it near the leaves first. We also have some new stems sticking out and you can just attach the berries. If you want a deeper color, just add a little bit of Hooker's green to your mixture. I'm just going to continue adding these small berries, and you can see that it makes a big improvement on our overall bouquet. It's also nice to see that there's now more contrast. We can add some burnt sienna colored berries, just some brown colored ones. You might not be able to see it here because of the lighting but in-person, it looks really nice to see the different colored berries. At this point try stop and observe the overall shape of this bouquet, and see where you need to add some more leaves or fillers. You can try to add some green colored leaves, some brown ones or some yellow ones. [MUSIC] Now, let's put a second layer to these fillers. Make sure that it's already dry before you add a second layer. This will give it more definition and more depth. After painting a lot of autumn inspired bouquets, I realized that adding burnt sienna as a leaf, it just gives that certain warmth to your painting. That's my tip for you guys. If you want a really warm colored bouquet, just add more burnt. Something that you could ask yourself before you start painting is, what is the mood that you want your painting to have when somebody sees it? Now, let's go to adding a second layer to our flowers. I have your yellow ocher with a little bit of sepia. We're going to start with the common stroke and the center and then paint some thin strokes around it, and then just fade it away. It's the same technique that we did in the previous project. Now, let's add the second layer to the dahlia. I'm mixing raw amber and burnt sienna. Now, we are just going to paint the spikes first. Let me zoom it in. You can try to fade away some of the strokes to make it look softer. Let's move on to the other dahlia. This is a mixture of burnt sienna and vermillion. We're going to paint the spikes in the center or the small petals. It will look a little bit tight in the center and then we want some loose petals towards the outer part of this flower. You can try to rinse your brush to soften some of the edges. It looks like we need a little bit more contrast, so I'm mixing burnt sienna and burnt umber. You want a dark center, just going to try to paint on top of it, and you can add a little bit of red as well, just to give it that warmth. I'm going to add it over to the other flower as well. Let's move on to this other rose. This is crimson lake, a burnt umber, and a little bit of Hooker's green. We want a really pigmented color, so that we can have a nice burgundy rose. Now, I am just going to fade away the outer strokes. I don't want it to be too dark on the outer petals, you want it to fade it out a little. Let me fix this area. I'm going to rinse my brush and just absorb that excess paint so that we have a clean break over there. Using the same color, I'm just going to add a second layer over to this flower. I'm just painting some nice elongated strokes, and it will give it more in depth. We're almost done. Right now, I'm just going to add some finishing touches. We can add some stem sticking out, and then you can add some layering just like in this area, so that it has more depth and it will look more lush. Then you can add some more berries, I'm just using a burnt sienna color. Now, I'm adding some yellow ocher berries. What you can do is to grab the color that you use on the flowers and you add that to the fillers or to the leaves. Now we're done. Congratulations for finishing your project. [MUSIC]. 12. Autumn Floral Wreath: Let's paint this autumn floral wreath. We're going to add some roses, some dahlias, even hydrangeas, and this five-petaled flower. To start, draw a circle using a pencil. Make sure that you draw lightly because once you paint on top of that outline, you can't erase it anymore. Then you can look for reference photos. You should look for photos on Pinterest and also try to look for different photos that will inspire you. I usually get at least two reference photos for a painting. Now let's mix some crimson red, burnt umber, and permanent violet. We want a burgundy color for our rose. You've seen in the reference photo that I was looking at the wreath with this color. I usually like to mix and match the florals that I see in different photos. Let's start with a very pigmented center and right here I'm painting quite thick strokes. Then I rinse my brush and create broader strokes. But some of the strokes I'm just going to paint a thin line. Let me dip my brush in the water jar again. Just press your brush onto the paper and just move to the right and make a curved stroke. You'll notice right here how important it is to put the whitespaces and how it just makes the rose look even more beautiful. Now let's grab some yellow, orange and paint another flower. We'll be painting a loose imaginary flower. Let's start with the base of this flower. I'm painting at the 45-degree angle and I'm trying to move in a letter U motion. I just dip my brush in the water jar right now to lighten the color. I am trying to keep the center open. You can see that there's a whitespace. We can keep adding some more petals just to close up this flower. Originally, this was a flower that was meant to be facing on this side but later on, it's going to change. If you want to keep it this way, then that's also okay. I just added a dark center using the crimson red and burnt umber mixture. We're done with two flowers and now let's paint the third one. This is also a rose. I've mixed up a permanent red and burnt umber. You can see here that I'm painting a chunkier rose and it means that my strokes are thicker. Let's continue adding those C curves. I'm just going to close up the top. Then we can rinse our brush and try to fade away the sides of this rose. Let me take you to this rose a little bit closer. Right now I'm just adding some thin lines just to fix the overall shape of this rose. With three flowers on the leaf, we can now add a few leaves. I'm preparing the Hooker's green and CPM mixture. Then we can do a separate one. Let's add some Prussian blue to that mixture. Let's paint some eucalyptus. I just want some oval shapes, and I made it a little irregular. I'm using two brushes right now. One brush is loaded with color, the other one just has water and I'm trying to pull away some of the color to create another leaf. That's why you can see that some leaves here are dark green. Some are a little bit on the lighter side. Let's paint eucalyptus that is on a side angle. We're going to paint thinner ovals and trying to make this look really loose and just quite expressive. That's why the oval shapes are not that perfect looking, so we want it to be irregular in shape. Now let's add some more water in our brush so that we can get the lighter green color. Using the tip of the brush, let's create some quick brush marks and that will make it look more expressive. I'm going to add some more leaves and I'm using raw umber. Then you can also add some burnt sienna. Let's add some more brown leaves. Now I'm grabbing some brown umber, so just play around with the colors. We're not going to be so strict with the color for each leaf. It's now time to add another flower that looks like a dahlia. I'm just mixing up some red and some Hooker's green so that we can create this nice burgundy color. Let's make some brush marking, some elongated brush strokes. It feels like I'm doing some checkmarks. When you're painting a flower like this, make sure that you always go back to your center. You can start adding some more greens. I'm adding more eucalyptus. You can see that I'm holding my brush lightly so that I can create some nice markings. Now let's go to a new flower. We are going to paint a hydrangea. I'm using yellow ocher and greenish-yellow. Right now I'm going to paint four-petaled flowers but in some areas I'm just going to paint only three or maybe two, just to give the illusion that one is in front and another flower is just behind it. You want some of the petals to be hidden. That's why we're not painting four petals in all the clusters. You can also rinse your brush so that you can have a more concentrated flower and then some more be lighter in color. You can stop adding flowers once you have reached a shape that looks like a ball or a dome shape. Then now I'm going to add some center in this flower. Then we're saying sip here. This is going to help us separate the flowers from each other. We're done with the main flowers, and now we're going to add some leaves. I'm using burnt sienna with a yellow orange. You can actually use just burnt sienna if you want. But sometimes I like adding a little bit of yellow orange just to brighten it up. What I did here in some of the orange leaves, I added a little bit of green while it's still wet so that the two colors will mix. Well, it might look a little muddy, so just be careful and try not to add too much green in your orange leaves. When you're painting a wreath it's important to vary the sizes of the flowers. Right here I am going to paint some small flowers, and we're going to start with some stems and I use burnt umber for that. Now let's grab some yellow, orange, and we are just going to press our brush just like this and just create a few markings. Just to give it more depth, I grab sepia and added it at the base of the flowers. You'll see that it just makes it look prettier. Try to look at your painting from a far and you'll see that you might need to add a few more flowers. With a clean brush we're going to paint the twigs or the branches. You can see the brush markings here is just water. I'm doing these technique so that it will look a little bit loose and not too sharp. You can grab some burnt umber and then just paint over those water strokes, and you'll see some areas bleeding into the watermarks. That's what we want. We want it to look a little soft, but at the same time we want some strokes to be quite sharp. Adding another brown is also good, we're adding sepia and it will give it more depth. Just play around and create those crooked strokes. If the shape looks a little odd right now, that's okay. We can always go back in and improve the shape of the wreath. This part right here needs a little bit more contrast. I'm adding some sepia, and try to paint some twigs sticking out and that will look really nice and organic. To fix the shape of the bottom part, I will be adding more eucalyptus. I want it to look like it's hanging. We are going to extend that part. You can see that I'm just pressing my brush to create those small oval strokes. Let's pick up some brown color and just add some leaves over here and then we can stop and take a look at our painting and check for areas where you need to add some fillers. I'm just lightly dabbing my brush so I can create some eucalyptus leaves. Let's fix the shape of this wreath. I'm going to add some twigs sticking out. What we are doing here is we are building this wreath piece by piece. Just take your time when you're painting this wreath. Add the elements one by one so that you can easily adjust if you've made a mistake. Then you can add some contrasts by adding a dark color. This is green and sepia. I'm adding a darker eucalyptus. It's okay to add some layers on the roses, so I'm mixing crimson lake and burnt umber. You can also add in a little bit of violet if you want it darker. Let's zoom in so we can see it better. I'm adding details that will make this flower look like it's at an angle. You'll see the oval shape over here. If it's a top view rose then it's going to be a circle instead. Moving on to the second rose, we're going to add some C curves. But I won't be smudging or fading the strokes. I will leave it as it is. Now I'm mixing vermilion with a little bit of burnt sienna and I'm adding these tiny strokes to separate the petals. Then we are going to fade away some of the strokes and this flower turned out to be different than what I had initially planned. It became a five petal flower. In the center I just added some sepia to give that nice contrast. Then now we're adding some veins, I'm just using this nice reddish brown color. When you're painting just follow the flow just like what happened with this orange flower at the bottom. Sometimes your plans will really change and that's okay. Now we're just adding some more layers on this flower and after which we can move on to painting some berries so that we can add some more color to this wreath. Let's make some crimson and burnt umber color to get that nice broken red. You can also add some orange. We are using these berries to spread out some color in some areas. Instead of painting flowers, we're just painting small berries so that it doesn't look too crowded. Now we are done. Congratulations for finishing this project. 13. Vintage Fall Florals: Let's paint something different. This is vintage fall florals. For this painting, I focused on doing muted colors, but at the same time, it still has that fall theme colors. It's a lot of browns and oranges and you're going to paint three roses. For the first rose, let us mix Permanent Rose, Burnt Umber, and Burnt Sienna. Then you can swatch it here. You'll see that it's a muted pink, but it has more of a brown undertone. I'm using my Size 6 round brush. Let's paint the center. It's a comma stroke and some thin lines around it. Let's zoom in a little so you can see it better. We can paint just a few medium-size petals, then we can rinse our brush. Fade away some of the outer strokes so that you can get some soft petals. You can also grab some more paint and just add some color on this rose. You can see that I'm trying to vary my strokes. Some are thicker and some are just lines. Now I added a little bit of violet to my mixture so that I can get a darker color. It looks like a shadow. You can see that this has that muted violet color. You must wiggle your brush to create some ruffles, and of course, don't forget to leave some white spaces in between your strokes. While this big petal is still wet, we can drop in a little bit of that muted violet onto the edges of the petal. Make sure to add a lot of water into that color so that it's very diluted. You don't want a bright violet color on the petals. You can also use Payne's Grey or indigo if you don't want to use violet. Moving on to the second rose, let's use the color Raw Umber, and then I'm going to start with the comma stroke again and just a few thin lines around it. You want these C strokes to hug the center. Now we can add a shadowy petal. I'm going to grab a little bit of sepia and just dilute it with a lot of water. We can just add that to our existing petals, and we can also add some new petals using that color. You have to be careful when you're adding this color because it might look muddy if it's too concentrated. You really need to add a lot of water to achieve that shadowy look. Then you can also mix your Raw Umber with the sepia so that it has that muted yellow color. This rose is at an angle. You'll see that the bottom part has bigger petals compared to the top portion. We can grab some sepia to add contrast. The base rose is still a little damp, so that is quite good because it will bleed into the rose. All right, now let's move on to the third flower. I'm mixing Burnt Sienna, Burnt Umber, and vermilion. What I'm doing is, I'm adding brown to the color of the flowers so that I can mute down the color and make it look vintage. To better paint this flower, I'm going to rotate my paper so I can get the angle correctly. I'm still using my Size 6 round brush. We're going to go ahead and start with the center again and add some thin strokes, hugging that center. Then we can rinse our brush, tap the excess water, and just fade away that stroke. Then we can create some bigger-sized petals. Let's try to paint in a C curved motion. Let us try to wiggle our brush so that we can get some ruffles on the edges of the petals. We are done with the three roses, and now let's move on to painting some smaller, simple flowers. I'm mixing burnt sienna and permanent violet with some permanent rose. That's aimed to create a muted rose color and you can see that I keep on mixing because it takes practice to get this color right. Let's swatch it. Okay, that looks perfect. Now let's put some small dots in the center, and then we can rinse our brush and just pull away the color from the center going outward. Just make a sweeping motion, just like what I'm doing so that you can create these beautiful petals. You can also use the tip of your brush just to create some small lines beside the petal. Then you can add some contrast in the center. Just drop in some more color in the center. Let's do one more over here and this one is a flower that is on its side. We're going to create just three main petals and one oval shape over here that looks like it is folded. Then let's just drop in some more color in the center. If you want it to be darker, you can add some sepia or maybe Burnt Umber, then we can add a stem that will attach to the main flowers. The mixture of green here is Hooker's Green and sepia. I'm just adding some nice loose leaves. You can put one right here just to give an edge to the roses. That leaf looks a little light, you can drop in some more color just to give it more contrast. Now let's grab some Burnt Sienna and you can actually mix it with some previous colors in your palette. But if you want to mix it from scratch, get some Burnt Umber, Burnt Sienna, and Permanent Rose. But we want to add more brown so you can add more Burnt Sienna. It takes practice again to really mix the muted colors. You can see here that this one has more of a brown color. We're adding some small flowers that will look like a hydrangea. Some flowers will have four petals, some are hiding behind these four-petaled flowers so it will look like just two petals or three petals. You're also trying to vary the colors here, so you can see some are lighter, some are darker. Then with our muted green color, we are going to just attach them to one another. I'm adding stems in between the flowers. I'm mixing some Hooker's Green plus Burnt Umber. We can try to paint some leaves that look like they are hanging. Let's paint a curved line over here, just using the tip of the brush to create a thin line, and then start adding some leaves. We can also rinse our brush to create a lighter green color. You can also add a little bit of brown to the leaves, so you can use Burnt Umber. Just to add more contrast, you can drop in some more color over here and then you can try to wiggle or brush to create a nice expressive leaf. Let's use the side of our brush like this and that way you can create a different shape. For those white gaps we can just add some stem sticking out and then let's just continue to add more leaves on this painting to give it a nice effect. After you've painted the leaves, while its still wet, just try to drop in a darker color. [inaudible] or just indigo is also a good color. I'm going to make hookers green sepia to create a dark green color and then you can add one leaf over here and then just paint some stem sticking out try to wiggle your brush. Now this space right here is still looking a little blank. You can add a filler using greenish yellow with burnt sienna. Let's paint some oval shapes so they can be big berries or maybe it can look like green olives. But whenever I impeding a book I like adding different shapes, just to make it look more interesting. Then we can try to paint a lighter color here. Just try to change the values of the pillars that you're going to add. A lot of people would usually say that it's best to add flowers or fillers in odd numbers. It's a nice guide, but for me, you just need to follow your gut and just added according to how the painting flows. Now I'm adding some more smaller flowers. I'm using the same reddish brown color. So you can use burnt sienna with a little bit of burnt umber. Maybe pop in a little bit of vermilion. Again, what I'm doing is if I want a certain color, I'm going to just add some brown just to mute it down to get that vintage color. It's still needs a little bit of leaves, so we're going to add that where you had a hooker screen NCPI mixture. Then just some stem sticking out. Just try to wiggle your brush to create some nice expressive leaves. Then you can make it pointy over here and we'll add one leaf just to give a shape to the edge of this flower. Now you'll immediately see that the flower just popped up because we added a leaf right beside it. Let me just fix the shape on this side and so I've just decided to paint over the existing leaf. Now let's stop and just observe our painting and observe where we need to add some more leaves. You can also add some leaves in between the main flowers and that will be a beautiful touch. It will help separate the main flower so that it doesn't look like it's overcrowded. Let me add one more leaf right here to give more definition to the edge of this rose. Looking at this from a far, the shape still looks a little old. The overall painting needs just a few more fillers and leaves. Then right here, we can add an orange bard just to give a pop of color in that area. Let me just add some leaves over here just to close off that white gap. You can experiment with the color of the leaves, you can add some orange to your greens. It's now time to layer, I'm just mixing up burnt umber, burnt sienna, and some permanent rose. It's the same mixture that we use for this rose, but we want a darker mixture now a more pigment than one. I'm just going to go over the same strokes as the first layer. Let's just put some thin lines and then let's rinse our brush and just fade it away. Now if there's too much color, just rinse your brush again and try to absorb the excess paint. Really white are very light colored mixture. You can add a little bit more violet to your mixture so that you can get that shadowy effect. You will see that on the outer petals is a bit more violet. I'm going to use the same color for this rose let's just paint the center really dark, then paint some thin lines around it. If you are having a hard time with leery, just paint a few strokes first so that you won't be overwhelmed. Now I'm going to fade away the outer petals and you can see that I'm really pressing my brush onto the paper to create a nice broad stroke. If you want some wispy strokes, you have to do it really fast so that it becomes pointy. For this one is just yellow ocher with a little bit of sepia. We're almost done and I'm just adding the finishing touches. We want a dark green color and let's paint some veins on some of the leaves. Just like before, we're not going to really add veins on all the leaves so that it doesn't look too crowded or just too detailed, we still want that lose effect of the flowers. But at the same time, we are trying to highlight the loose florals through the detailed leaves. I guess it's really just trying to discover the balance for these factors. We are done with our vintage florals. Feel free to add some more details. If you feel like you need more fillers and leaves. I'm pretty sure that you have painted something really good. 14. Final Thoughts: [MUSIC] We have reached the end of the class. Thank you so much for joining, I hope that you learned a lot today. Aside from painting flowers that blossom during the autumn season, you can also paint your usual style or your favorite flowers using fall inspired colors. It's always nice to experiment with a different color palette that we are not used to. Just add some browns and oranges to your usual color palette. If you painted the project, don't forget to upload it in the project resources section of this class. If you uploaded it on Instagram, don't forget to use this hashtag so that I can see your work. That's it, I will see you in my next class. From the bautumn of my heart, thank you again. Sorry, that's another pun [LAUGHTER].