Watercolor Biscuits & Cookies | Delicious Food Illustrations | Jekaterina Kotelnikova | Skillshare

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Watercolor Biscuits & Cookies | Delicious Food Illustrations

teacher avatar Jekaterina Kotelnikova, Artist & Language Tutor

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

23 Lessons (1h 11m)
    • 1. Intro to Watercolor Food Illustration

      0:33
    • 2. Art Supplies: Watercolors, Brushes, Paper and More

      3:24
    • 3. McVities Rich Tea Biscuits [Reference]

      2:08
    • 4. Drawing McVities Rich Tea Biscuits Part 1

      6:16
    • 5. Drawing McVities Rich Tea Biscuits Part 2

      6:02
    • 6. Jammy Dodger [Reference]

      1:11
    • 7. Jammy Dodger Illustration

      4:34
    • 8. Choco Leibniz Chocolte Biscuits [Demo]

      3:44
    • 9. Drawing Choco Leibniz Chocolate Biscuits Part 1

      2:59
    • 10. Drawing Choco Leibniz Chocolate Biscuits Part 2

      4:12
    • 11. Bourbon Biscuits [Reference]

      1:01
    • 12. Drawing Bourbon Biscuits Part 1

      3:29
    • 13. Drawing Bourbon Biscuits Part 2

      3:45
    • 14. Custard Creams [Reference]

      0:35
    • 15. Custard Cream Illustration

      5:20
    • 16. Oreo Cookies [Reference]

      1:19
    • 17. Drawing an Oreo Cookie Part 1 Sketch and Inking

      3:47
    • 18. Drawing an Oreo Cookie 1 Adding Watercolor

      3:03
    • 19. Drawing an Oreo Cookie 2 Part 1 Sketch and Inking

      3:31
    • 20. Drawing an Oreo Cookie 2 Part 2 Adding Watercolor

      3:00
    • 21. Drawing a Pink Macaroon

      3:21
    • 22. Drawing and Painting a Blue Macaroon

      3:24
    • 23. Your Project

      0:47
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About This Class

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Hi! My name is Kate, I am an artist and an illustrator and I am in love with watercolor.

In this class, you will learn to draw and paint beautiful biscuit and cookie illustrations with watercolor and ink.

We will start off with rich tea biscuits, then take on something more complicated like custard creams and jammy dodgers, and pass onto chocolate cookies like Oreos and Bourbons, to finish everything off with vibrant macaroons.

Do not worry if you are just starting out with watercolor, this class is for beginners and advanced watercolorists alike!

I will guide you through every step of the way and explain everything I do, so you will be amazed at what you are able to achieve!

If you are a seasoned watercolor expert I hope to share my knowledge with you and maybe you will learn some new tips&tricks along the way!

If you love food illustration as much as I do then do check out these great classes:

Mariya Popandopulo (sweets, coffee, chocolate and more)

Yasmina Creates (sweets and treats)

So what are you waiting for? Get your watercolors and brushes ready and let’s paint!

Another thing before you start, you can download all the reference materials and art supply list in your project area!

See you in class! :)

Art supplies I use in this class:

Pentel Graphgear 1000 Mechanical Drafting Pencil 0.3mm (with a 2H lead, bought separately)

UniPin 0.5 black fineliner

Pentel 1.0mm Tip Hybrid Gel Grip Dx Ultra Smooth Pigment Ink Pen

Koh-I-Noor Kneadable Eraser

Pentel Aquash Water Brush Pens, Assorted Tips - Pack of 3 (Fine, Medium and Broad)

Sennelier Watercolour Metal Tin of 24 Half pans Classic Set

Sennelier Test Pack half pans

St. Petersburg White Nights

Daler Rowney Aquafine Watercolour Paper Pad A4 12 Sheets | NOT 300gsm

***GIVEAWAY***

Hi there! I decided to do a small giveaway for my wonderful students! There is already 21 of you! Thank you for your support and I hope you are enjoying the class.

I will be giving away one set of Winsor & Newton Cotman watercolos to one of my lucky students. All you have to do is to watch all the class videos, post your project and if you have an Instagram account post it with hashtag #kateamedeo_skillshare and don't forget to tag me @kate.amedeo :)

To participate, enter your project until 1st of MAY, 2018.

Good luck! And happy painting!

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Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Jekaterina Kotelnikova

Artist & Language Tutor

Teacher

Hi there! I'm Kate and I am an artist and an illustrator (and a mom of a wonderful 5-year-old). I live and work in Jelgava, Latvia. 

When I was very young I went to art school but did not finish it as I got really tired of everyone telling me what 'the right way' to do things is. I believe that in art there is no right or wrong :)

I returned to drawing and then painting after I started having problems with my health. Right after I gave birth to my daughter I was in pain 24/7 for over a year and a half when I was finally diagnozed with fibromyalgia (for those of you who are lucky enough not to know what that is, it's an illness that makes your nerves transmit paint which is not there). 

I run my YouTube art channel, Patreon, my little online art school... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Intro to Watercolor Food Illustration: Hi, my name is Kate, I am an artist and I am in love with watercolor. In this class, I will show you step by step tutorials on how to ink and paint delicious biscuits. We will start off with rich tea biscuits then take on something more complicated like custard creams and jammy Dodgers, and pass on to chocolate cookies like Oreos and blue beans to finish everything off with vibrant macaroons. So what are you waiting for? Get your paint brushes ready and let's paint. 2. Art Supplies: Watercolors, Brushes, Paper and More: Before we start painting, I want to say thank you for choosing this class. Now I would like to show you the art supplies I will be using. For the initial sketch, I will be using my Pentel mechanical pencil. It's an 0.3 2H pencil. You can use mean graphite pencil. It doesn't have to be a mechanical pencil either. Any graphite pencil will do. Just make sure it's a hard leg. H were harder, by the way, H stands for hardness of the pencil and B for blackness, as well as for its softness. If you choose a pencil that is soft, it will leave darker marks and it will be more difficult to erase, meaning that the lines might show through the watercolor paint. Next, is the eraser, I will be using a particular eraser by Koh-I-Noor kneaded, you can use any eraser you have handy. The advantage of the particular eraser is that it doesn't beat the rubbery when it's erasing and most importantly, it doesn't damage the tooth in the paper. We will talk about the paper shortly. Next is the Uni pin fineliner. I'll be using a unique one within UniPin 0.5 black fineliner in this class. You can use any fineliner or as long as it's waterproof. This is very important as we will be inking our sketches before applying watercolor. So a fineliner that is not waterproof will bleed. A white gel pen. I will be using 1.0 hybrid pen by Pentel, but any white gel pen will do. For my brushes I'll be using two water brush pens by Pentel. I got them as a set of three, all different sizes. I will be using the largest one and the smallest one. There is no need for the water brush pens. You can do this class with simply nylon brushes. Just make sure that you get a small size about two or four, and a larger size about five or six. Then of course, watercolor paint. I used artists great paints by Sennelier, I would strongly suggest you get a set of artists, Choco Leibniz, as the results will be more satisfying with them than if you use cheap students paint. The main difference is that artists great paint have a higher pigment final ratio and will look different to the students paint. A good alternative would be investing in children's or Newton clock set or if you could [inaudible] buying a starter set. Now, I would go for a base pair left by Sennelier or White Nights as both of these brands, I would recommend and they would cost you just under 15 pounds. Of course, watercolor paper. I love cold press paper. It has a texture to it, and it gives that painterly charm to watercolors. You often use Daler Rowney Aquafine paper, but you can use any paper meant for watercolors, as long as it's at least 300 grams per square meter. One other thing before we start, you can download all the reference photos for this class in your project section, as well as the list of all the materials I just mentioned, and a list of colors for each basket. For art materials, I also added some links where you can see how much they cost and where you can actually get them. One more thing before we start. Don't be afraid to make mistakes. Every mistake is another milestone in your learning journey. Most importantly, have fun painting. Are you ready? Let's paint. 3. McVities Rich Tea Biscuits [Reference]: Let's start with something as simple as McVities rich tea biscuits deepest gets. Before you start drawing, always carefully look at the reference material be it a photo or life crop. You can grab a pack of McVities videos and take on biscuits is studied in the maybe have it with a cup of tea. But for the demonstration and show you the flow of my creative thoughts, and we'll be using a photo in this first reference, the first thing I noticed is that the biscuit is round. It might seem obvious, but there are many details that slip away without careful observation. As I observe it To be round I do see that it is not flat and it has a thickness to it. Thus, I see there's a lighter line just under the shadow in the bottom light. So two other things came up from this. First is that the light is coming from the top left and the second is that there is a thin line of the reflected light right under the shadow. I also noticed that because the biscuit has rounded edges, it's benches are darker than the flat surface let's look at the patterns and biscuit itself. I break everything into simple shapes and see that the logo looks like a boomerang with one long side and that the shapes on top look like kernels of grain.I also see that the text is etched into the basket and that there is a pattern of dots. I see that the text McVities is right in the center and that rich deep occupies approximately the same amount of space as the logo. We will not care that much about the precise position of the dots, but we'll use them to fill in empty space to make the biscuit look more interesting and complex. I also noticed that the logo, the little holes, and the texts are all darker compared to the biscuit surface color.Let's also take a look then at a photo of the same biscuit, and this time we will see it from a different perspective. I immediately noticed that there is a shadow at the bottom edge, but as the biscuit hasn't thickness to it, there is a lighter area right under the shadow. Now that we have broken the biscuit into simple shapes and know the direction of the light and the position of the shadow. We can begin to sketch. 4. Drawing McVities Rich Tea Biscuits Part 1: I sketch in a circle with my pencil. Don't worry if it's not perfect, that's the charm of hand-drawn illustrations. You can practice drawing circles before hand or you can use a cup to trace the circle around. I add the logo. Because I've observed the biscuit before hand, I know that the logo looks like a boomerang of grain kernels. I start to write the text from the center. To do that, I choose the letters that is closest to the center and write from it to the right and to the left. That way my text will stay centered and I do not have to worry about positioning it so that it fits the biscuit. I add the little holes in our biscuit. There is no need to follow the pattern. I simply add them to places of the biscuit that seem too empty. Simple patterns like this are a great way to fill an empty space. With my fine liner, I ink in the outline. I love how the fine liner looks on the textured paper. Make sure you do not press too hard on the fine liner and let your lines be light. I often let my lines interrupt as that brings a softer touch to the illustration. I outline text. In all my illustration, the text is the only part of my inking when I do not let the line interrupt. I end the logo, again, interrupting the line. I outlined the holes and fill them in only partially. This will give them more dimension and it will also give a lighter look to the biscuit. Now that I am happy with my sketch, I erase the pencil lines. Make sure you're fine liner is completely dry before passing over with your eraser as you might smudge the outline and there will be no way of fixing it. For my base color, I will mix a naples yellow deep and yellow ocher. It will give it a nice yellowish color of a biscuit, just right. I layer watery wash not worrying that I may leave some parts white. I will allow this first wash to dry before applying the next one. This is called glazing, but I will tell you more about it when we will apply the second layer of paint. Before it dries, I add some more color to the edges as this will make the transition a lot smoother than if I were to add them on the dry bit. While the first one is drying, let's outline the second biscuit. This time it's lying flat on the table. I draw an oval and sketch out the logo and the text. Text and logo sound a bit too low so I erased it and sketched them higher up. I add the dots filling the empty space. With my fine liner, I outline the biscuit. I do not worry if it's not the perfect oval. As I've said, imperfections are the charm of hand-drawn illustrations. I ink in the letters and the logo. I do the same thing with the dots leaving them half empty. I erase the pencil lines and it's time to paint. I layer light wash and drop in some paint at the bottom edge, leaving the very bottom later. While it dries, let's return to the first biscuit. I add more paint around the edges and notice that there is a thin lighter line just under the shadow at the bottom, so I leave a thin lighter line on the illustration as well. I soften the edges and add random strokes all over the biscuit to make it look less black, making sure I did not cover all of the surface. Returning back to the second biscuit, I add color to the side and where the shadow is at the bottom. I add random strokes like I did in the first biscuit. This is called glazing. Applying a wet wash on the previously dry wash. 5. Drawing McVities Rich Tea Biscuits Part 2: Before it dries, I add some more color to the edges as this will make the transition a lot smoother than if I were to add them on the dry paint. While the first one is drying, let's outline the second biscuit. This time is lying flat on the table. I draw an oval and sketch out the logo and the text. My texts and logo seem a bit too low, so I erased it and sketched them higher up. I add the dots filling the empty space. By my fine liner, I outlined that this again. I do not worry if it's not a perfect oval. As I have said, imperfections are the charm of hand-drawn illustrations. I inking the letters and the logo. I do the same thing with the dots, leaving them half-empty. I erase the pencil lines and it's time to paint. I layer a light wash and drop in some paint at bottom edge leaving the very bottom lighter. While it dries, let's return to the first biscuit. I add more paint around the edges and noticed that there is a thin lighter line just under the shadow at the bottom. So I leave a thin, lighter line on my illustration as well. I soften the edges and I add random strokes all over the biscuit to make it look less flat, making sure I do not cover all of the surface. Returning back to the second biscuit, I add color to the side and where the shadow is at the bottom, and I add random strokes like I did with the first biscuit. This is called glazing, applying a wet wash on the previously dry wash. While the biscuits dry, let's sketch two more biscuits, but this time together. I sketched two circles overlapping. I pay attention to the angle of the logo and to the text. Some letters are covered by the biscuit that is on top. I repeat the same sketching process as with the two previous biscuits. I outline the biscuits interrupting the lines and places and inking the text and the logos. I make sure that I leave the dots half-empty, and use my pencil sketch just as a rough reference moving or changing the position of the dots if necessary. I erase the pencil lines and layer in the first wash. I add more color to the edges and drop in some random spokes as well. Now, I mix in some warm sepia to the base color to make it darker. I add a darker edge to the first biscuit making sure I leave that line at the bottom lighter. 6. Jammy Dodger [Reference]: Next, we will draw a Jammy Dodger. Looking at this reference, the first thing I see is that the biscuit is round and it has a wavy edge. It also has a heart in the very center of it. Now, I see that the light is coming from the top left so the shadow will be at the bottom right. The splash that is slightly raised also has its own shadow making all the edges towards the left light. I see the shadow on the right bottom edges of the splash. As the splash curves in where it meets the heart, it gets slightly darker there as well. I also noticed that there is a shadow around the gravy edge as there is a small depth. The logo with the letters is also raised with the letters like in the previous lessons we did with McVities, darker as they are pressed into the biscuit end [inaudible]. Now, let's look closer at the heart. It has two highlights and the darkest part is the edge all around. With watered color, the most important thing is to notice your highlights upfront or you also can use white gouache, wet acrylic, or a gel pen. You should do that [inaudible]. I think we've had a good look at it. Let's paint. 7. Jammy Dodger Illustration: First, I sketch out the shape of the biscuit and add another smaller circle to help me sketch out the heart. Then, I add the correct lines around the larger circle to indicate the wavy pattern of the edge. I look at my reference then sketch in the splash and the circular JD logo. When I am happy with my sketch, I outline it with a fine liner. I press very lightly and make sure that my lines interrupt so as to give it a lighter appearance. My circle, once again, is not perfect. But that is what gives the charm to hand-drawn illustrations. I think I'm repeating this the third time, but I can not stress it enough. Just relax and have fun. I erase the lines and start applying the first light wash. It's a mix of naples yellow, deep, and yellow walker as we did previously. As the light is coming from the top-left, I add more color to the bottom-right of the biscuits to start giving it a sense of shape. I also add color around the edge as I see it in the reference. Now that is dry, I can apply the second wash. I use the same mix and pass over the shadow and the edge. Then I add the shadow to the splash. As it is raised, it will draw the shadow and as the light is coming from the top-left, the shadow will fall to the bottom-right. I can also see that the top of the splash is darker than its left edge. I also trace out the letters to give them depth. Now, when the second wash is dry, I add in some orange sepia into the mix and pass over its shadows where they are closest to the light to create more contrast. For the heart, I mix oprah rose with carmine. I paint in the heart, making sure I leave the highlights white. Now that is dry. I add in the second wash, but leave some parts untouched. I notice how it starts around the edges and adding the next gouache to my red mix. There we have it. Our Jammy Dodger with a bright red heart, ready to eat. 8. Choco Leibniz Chocolte Biscuits [Demo]: As we did two light biscuits already, let's try something with chocolate now. Before we start painting the two Choco Leibniz biscuits, I wanted to show you how to deal with a more complex edge. I already sketched out the Choco Leibniz biscuit and outlined it, as well as added the first wash, using the same base mix of Naples Yellow Deep, and Yellow Ochre. I add the shadows to the right and bottom edges as I want the light to come from the top left. I also pass lightly over the biscuit to make it more interesting, otherwise it would look too flat. When the paint is dry, I mix my chocolate color using Warm Sepia. With my small brush, I carefully cover the chocolate area. Then, I add a bit of Warm Sepia to the base mix to outline the letters and add some depth to the holes. I deepened the shadows by deepening the lines on the right side of the biscuit, and add paint to every tip of the rounded edge. On the bottom edge, I outlined the lines between the rounded shapes and add some paint to the bottom right side of each small shape. This will give the biscuit a 3D look. I add a little wash to each line on the left side of the biscuit as well. As the corner also has its shape, I add shadows to the right side of it, and then to the right side of each rounded shape on the top edge. Now that the paint is dry, I add more chocolate color by the edge of the biscuit itself on all sides except for the left one. I do it because the biscuit is raised on a bed of chocolate and it will give it a more dimensional look. Then, I add a bit more color around the edges of the Chocolate as well. The demo biscuit is done, let's try to paint some together. 9. Drawing Choco Leibniz Chocolate Biscuits Part 1: I'm sketching the rectangles first. I'M sketching the biscuit part of the one underneath with a simple rectangle a bit smaller than the first one. For the second biscuit, I'm sketching the shape I see with the text and write out the letters to fit it. I do not worry about giving the letters the thickness that they have in the reference photo at this stage. I also add the cursive of text at the bottom. Now I start to draw the edge of the biscuit and then add the text and the dots. I start outlining the chocolate biscuits lightly interrupting the line and do the same with the other biscuit, but make the line around the biscuit itself more pronounced just to separate it from the chocolate. On the biscuit, I simply writing in the text but on chocolate part, I outline my penciled in letters a bit thicker and write the cursive texts as well. I also have the edge of the chocolate by simply drawing narrow tall triangles. Adding the dots on the biscuit. Now, I can erase my pencil lines and start adding the first layer or color. 10. Drawing Choco Leibniz Chocolate Biscuits Part 2: On the biscuit, I simply write in the text, but on the chocolate part, I outline my pencil in letters a bit thicker, and write the cursive texts as well. I also have the edge of the chocolate by simply drawing narrow felt triangles. Adding the dots on the biscuit. Now I can erase my pencil lines and start adding the first layer [inaudible]. I use the same mix of yellow ocher and naples yellow deep. For the chocolate, I use warm sepia. I add more color to the bottom as that will be in the shadow. When the first layer is dry, I pass over the biscuit with the base mix leaving some parts untouched. I add more bright red to the chocolate mix and add the darker shadow at the bottom and in the triangle pattern on the edge. In the rough ends I see that the internal part of the chocolate is lighter, the one with the letters on it. I pass all around it to make the outside darker. I pass right around the second biscuit, but leave some parts untouched to get it more variety. I outline the letters and dots with the yellowish mix and add some more sepia to it for the shadows. As I've demonstrated before, I outline the lines of the edges. I add more chocolate color and at the bottom edge to create more contrast, and a bit on the left. I pass over the triangle pattern of the top biscuit and add more shadow to the lower edge. I pass over some parts over the letters. 11. Bourbon Biscuits [Reference]: Here are two references for Bourbons. These biscuits are a bit more complex as they consist of two parts, but let's take it a biscuit at a time. The first biscuit is quite simple as we do not see its depth. It's a rectangle with rounded edges, four little holes on top and at the bottom, text in the middle with a slight indication of a line just above it. As the light is coming from the top, the lower parts are in the shadow, and the edges are slightly darker because they are curved. Now, let's look at the two biscuits together. Again, the light is coming from the top side, and the lower edges have a shadow. But here I can see that the biscuit actually consists of three parts. Think of it like as a sandwich: the top, the cream, and the bottom biscuit. I also noticed that each part of the biscuit has a thickness and where it changes prints, there is a shadow, although not as dark as the one on the bottom part of each biscuit. 12. Drawing Bourbon Biscuits Part 1: I sketch in the rectangle and then another one in its center. It will help me sketch in the text. I add four dots at the top and at the bottom and start inking the biscuit. I try to make my lines light and even allow them to interact. But when I ink the text, I make sure that it's quite pronounced. I remove the pencil sketch and mix my base color. It's a warm sepia and bright red mix. This will give it the chocolatey look. When I am happy with my mix, I apply the first wash and drop a bit of color at the bottom edge and randomly around the biscuit. While the first biscuit dries, let's do two more. This time let's sketch them one on top of each other as we've seen in the reference. Pay attention that now we can see that the Bourbon is made of two rectangles with the cream in between. When I sketch the top rectangle, I add depth to it just as I see it in the reference. Now, I add the bottom rectangle. I add the lines to center my text and add dots. Let's draw the second Bourbon. Again, I add the depth to the top rectangle and add the text and the dots. When I am happy with my sketch, I start inking. I interrupt my line wall between the two surfaces of the top rectangle, the top, and the depth. I ink in the text and the dots. I do the same thing to the second biscuit. Let's return to the first bourbon and add some more depth. I start by adding the same color mix to the dots and randomly around the biscuit and its edges. Remember, to glaze, we need to make sure that the layer of the paint that we applied previously is dry. 13. Drawing Bourbon Biscuits Part 2: Now I add the bottom rectangle, I add the lines to center my text and abducts. Let's draw the second bourbon. Again, I add the depth to the top rectangle, and add the text, and the dots. When I am happy with my sketch, I start thinking. I interrupt my line war between the two surfaces of the top rectangle, the top, and the depth. I ink in the text and the dots, I do the same thing to the second biscuit. Let's return to the first bourbon and add some more depth. I start by adding the same color mix to the dots, and randomly around the biscuit, and its edges. Remember to glaze, we need to make sure that the layer of the paint that we applied previously is dry. While it's drying, I remove the pencil sketch from the two biscuits and add the base layer. I drop in a bit more color randomly to make it look less flat. While I was drying the paint with my blow dryer, I accidentally made the color spill into the white area. It is very easy to correct such mishaps. Just add clean water with a brush, scrub a bit, and soak it up with a clean tissue. Back to the first biscuit. I add some more color to the edges and outline the text. I soften the hard edge I accidentally created and move on to the two bourbons while it dries. I add shadow with the same mix to the bottom rectangle of my bourbons. Then, I add some depth to the dots and a line over the letters. I add some random strokes all around and by the edge. I see that the red edges are darker than the surface and add some more color there. 14. Custard Creams [Reference]: Let's take a quick look at this custard cream. What you noticed first, is that it's a rectangle with rounded edges, and that it has two diamonds in the center and custard cream written inside. All the ornamental elements and the texts are raised and we'll drop a shadow. Since the light is coming from the top, the shadow will fall to the bottom. There are three little holes in the diamonds as well. Now the ornaments in each corner, I can see that most of them are simple lines with curved ends or split curved ends. But I will show you how to tackle those in the next lesson. Let's go. 15. Custard Cream Illustration: First, I sketch out the rectangle with the diamond inside. I made the diamond too narrow, so I fixed that with the help of my eraser. I add two lines at the sides and one more diamond in the center of the first one. I start writing the text as usual from the central letter to the sides and add the three dots. Now, I ink the initial sketch not to get confused later on in my pencil drawing. I outline the pencil lines. This way I add some thickness to them without having to trace out the thickness of the line in pencil before hand. I just use my pencil lines as guidelines in this case. I also add a line at the top and at the bottom of diamond. I outline the basket and the dots and then present to outline the text. Again, I trace around the pencil lines, this way giving the letters some thickness. As we've seen in the reference, the main ornamental feature is aligned with the curve at the end or two. I will not follow the pattern as it is on the basket because that would be over complicating it, but I will use this ornamental feature instead and I will fill in one of the corners with lines and curves at the end of them. Again, no need to give them thickness when sketching out with a pencil, I outlined the pencil lines with my Fineliner instead. Pay attention, I do not close off the lines that connect to each other. I fill in all the corners this way, paying attention that the lines in the top two corners go upwards from the center and the ones on the bottom go downwards. Now I can erase my pencil lines and start layering the first wash. I use the same base mix, yellow ocher and naples yellow deep. Now that it's dry, I add a second wash, but I don't cover all of the basket. It's just random strokes. I add warm set yet to the mix and add a shadow at the bottom of the basket. I let it dry and with the same darker mix, I add shadows to all decorative elements. The shadow will fall to the bottom and more to the right as I see it in my reference, because the light source is on the top and slightly to the left. That's it, the custard cream is out then. In the next lesson, I will show you a demo of a pink maker in. Let's go. 16. Oreo Cookies [Reference]: Let's try and draw something a bit more complicated. This time, it will not be only a sandwich type of biscuit, but it will have a complicated at a first glance pattern on the surface. Again, the first thing I notice is that the biscuit is round and that the central bit, the oval with the text in it, is a very characteristic feature of Oreos. I see that all the ornaments are raised and dropped a shadow. On the inside of the oval, I also noticed the two half circles, and above, a double cross with one horizontal line shorter than the other. Now, let's look at the ornament. It might look complicated in the beginning, but let's break it into simple shapes. On the outer edge, there is a simple rounded line similar to that of Choco Leibniz, but narrower, and there is an interrupted circle after it. Now, the pattern occupies the rest of the space. I can see that the pattern is grouped into squares and each square in turn is made up of four triangles with a dot in the center. Easy. The rest of the details do not make any difference. If we get all of the above right, it will most definitely look like an Oreo, even if you've painted with bright green. I say it's time to paint. Let's go to the next lesson and give it a go. 17. Drawing an Oreo Cookie Part 1 Sketch and Inking: I start with the shape and add another circle on the inside to indicate where my ornament that goes all around the biscuit is going to end. Not to get overwhelmed, I start with the largest and most important part of the biscuit, the central ornament with Oreo written it. This is what will make the biscuit recognizable even if we get all the rest of it wrong. I add the oval, the text, and the two crosses at the top. I'm happy with the sketch so far, so I ink it in. If I continue drawing with my pencil, I might get confused with all the lines being the same. But this way I make sure that I take it one step at a time and get everything just right. I outlined the outer edge and add that interrupted circle all around. Time for the central belt. I see that it has some thickness to it, so I outline my pencil line. Pay attention how I do not close the circle off at the top, but rather continue it into the crosses. I do the same with the text and the two half circles. Now, it's time to tackle the ornament that covers the rest of the biscuit. Let's break it into simple shapes as we did in the previous video. I can see that each section consists of four triangles, and these four triangles make up a square. There is also a small dot in the center of each square. I start by sketching in the position of each layer of my biscuit. No need to make it exactly the same as the reference. We can use this ornamental element to cover the empty space. This will serve two purposes. It will remove the unnecessary empty space, and we'll make our biscuit more recognizable. With my fine line art, I draw four triangles into each square, easy. I fill in the space between the squares with more triangles. I erase the pencil lines and it's time to add color. 18. Drawing an Oreo Cookie 1 Adding Watercolor: I do the same with the text and the two half circles. Now, it's time to tackle the ornament that covers the rest of the biscuit. Let's break it into simple shapes as we did in the previous video. I can see that each section consists of four triangles, and these four triangles make up a square. There is also a small dot in the center of each square. I start by sketching in the position of each layer of my biscuit. No need to make it exactly the same as the reference. We can use this ornamental element to cover the empty space. This will serve two purposes: it will remove the unnecessary empty space and it'll make our biscuit more recognizable. With my fine liner, I draw four triangles into each square, easy. I fill in the space between the squares with more triangles. I erase the pencil lines, and it's time to add color. I mix one sepia with delo blue instead of the red we used for bourbons, because Oreos have this bluish brown to them. I add the first wash all over the biscuit and let it dry. Now that the previous wash is dry, I start adding the drop shadow for the ornament. This is what will make my biscuit more realistic and less flat. I use my small brush and add paint to the inner side of the oval, and then to all the squares and triangles in them. As the light falls from the top left, the shadow will fall to the bottom right. So my little ornamental bits will drop a shadow to the bottom right. 19. Drawing an Oreo Cookie 2 Part 1 Sketch and Inking: If the first seemed easy to you, let's make it a bit more complicated. In this lesson, we will be drawing an Oreo in perspective. Do check out the reference materials in your project section. First, I sketch an oval and then draw vertical lines coming down from it, connected by a curved line creating a cylinder. As the Oreo consists of three parts, two biscuits and cream, I split the height of the cylinder into three. First line will be to show the thickness of the first biscuit. Then will be the line showing the cream, I draw it a bit closer to the center as the cream is kind of hidden inside the biscuit and then I draw another line to serve as the bottom biscuit. When I have my construction in place, I have the inner oval for the decoration on the outer edge, and the oval with the letters in the center, not forgetting about the crosses. I start to ink from the bottom edge of the first biscuit and then at the decorative edge. Notice how the lines curve over the edge of the biscuit when changing planes at the front. In the back, I simply add the lines with curved ends similar to that of choco alignments. On the right side, the lines once again curve over the edge. Just treat the line of the oval as the edge they have to fold over. I add interrupted line decoration on the inside, outlining each section to give it thickness. Now we have the upper biscuit outline, let's outline the cream and lower biscuit. Here's the cream, I interrupt my line a lot to give it a lighter look, then I outline the upper edge of the bottom biscuit and I add curvy lines to its bottom edge. Now, it's time for the decorations on the inside. Again, I outline the pencil sketch to give it some thickness. Before we start to draw the ornamental bits on the inside of the circle, let's have the little dots in between the lines. 20. Drawing an Oreo Cookie 2 Part 2 Adding Watercolor: In the back, I simply add the lines with curved ends, similar to that of choco alignments. On the right side, the lines once again curve over the edge. Just treat the line of the approval as the edge they have to fold over. I add interrupted line decoration on the inside, outlining each section to give it thickness. So now we have the upper biscuit outline. Let's outline the cream and lower the biscuit. Here's the cream, I interrupt my line a lot to give it the later look. Then I outlined the upper edge of the bottom is good. I add curvy lines to his bottom edge. Now, it's time for the decorations on the inside. Again, I outlined a pencil sketch to give it some thickness. Before we start to draw the ornamental that's on the inside of the circle. Let's have the little dots in between the lines. Now, I sketched squares that serve as the base for our ornament with a top. Eyeing the triangles for each square. I also had some random triangles to cover all the empty space and the dots inside the real square. Now I erase the pencil lines and it's time to layer the first wash. As further first Oreo, I am using a mix of one sepia and [inaudible] blue. I cover the upper basket and then the bottom one. I dropped pink randomly and let it dry. When it's dry, I use my small brush and add the shadow to the bottom of the [inaudible] , but only to the upper part and to the very bottom, leaving a light dark area in between them. 21. Drawing a Pink Macaroon: I start by sketching a short cylinder. Then I outline the upper biscuit and the bottom one. I'm marking the spot where the edge will curve on the top biscuit. Then I add the lower edge of the top biscuit. It is slightly jaggedy and I do the same for the bottom biscuit. I sketch in where the cream will be. I engage in making the parts closer to the cream appear lighter by making my line really jaggedy interrupted. Let's choose where the light source is going to be. I like the top-left, as you might have already noticed. I make my opera rose into a very diluted wash and pass over the upper biscuit. I leave the highlight white though. I pass over the bottom biscuit of the same wash. Now I can take cobalt violet light hue and pass over the cream leaving some parts white. After the first wash is dry, I add more depth to the biscuit with opera rose the but leave the very top untouched as well as the highlight. I do the same with the bottom biscuit, adding more shadow to the right bottom corner. Now that it's dry, I mix some dioxazine purple into my pink opera rose and add it to the shadow on the bottom biscuit and a bit at the top. I outline the lower edge between the two parts of the biscuit and add some random strokes. I do the same to the bottom biscuit, intensifying the shadow. Just a bit more to the shadow on top. I add a darker edge to the very bottom of the upper biscuit and to the edge between the two parts of the biscuit. While I am drying it, I put some color closer to the highlight and there we go. Pink, purple [inaudible]. Now let's do another one. 22. Drawing and Painting a Blue Macaroon: I will start out with a sketch of a rectangle with rounded edges of my macaroon. Now, I sketch out the top and the bottom parts and add the parts that are touching the cream. It will consist of five parts in total. I inked in making sure that my line is interrupting and passing through the parts that are closer to the cream. I erase the lines and start layering the first wash. I use a light [inaudible] as blue and leave the highlights in the clean white for now. You can use any color you prefer as macaroons come in all colors you can imagine. After it's dry, I add the second layer over the dark parts, remembering that the top and the bottom of the macaroon are flat with rounded edges. I use darker shade of blue to intensify the shadows and add a bit more contrast. I also add some blue to the darker part of the cream. With ultramarine, my darkest blue, I layer the next wash and after it's dry, I soften the edges. There, my macaroon is all ready. 23. Your Project: You've completed this class. Congratulations. Now, it's your turn to draw. For your class project, you will have to draw an illustration biscuit. Look for inspiration online, on Pinterest or just search for images on Google, from cookbooks, or from cupboard in your kitchen. Maybe you are a cook and make your own special muskets. Take out your paint and start painting. I really hope you enjoyed this class and if you did, I would appreciate you leaving a review or just the thumbs up. I am looking forward to see your illustrations. If you post them on Instagram, add the hashtags SeeThisKate and tag me. Thank you for watching this class. Bye bye.