Video Editing with Final Cut Pro X - From Beginner to YouTuber | Ali Abdaal | Skillshare

Video Editing with Final Cut Pro X - From Beginner to YouTuber

Ali Abdaal, Doctor + YouTuber

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33 Lessons (3h 15m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:27
    • 2. Class Project & Resources

      3:08
    • 3. The Anatomy of Final Cut

      6:32
    • 4. Libraries, Events & Organisation

      5:41
    • 5. Sync External Audio with Video

      3:38
    • 6. Create a New Project

      2:08
    • 7. A-Cut: An Introduction

      1:41
    • 8. In and Out Points

      6:51
    • 9. Speeding Up Playback

      2:10
    • 10. Keyboard Shortcuts - In, Out, Append

      6:27
    • 11. The Philosophy of Pauses

      2:08
    • 12. Assembling the A-Cut

      11:34
    • 13. Tightening up our Edit with Trim Deletes

      11:11
    • 14. Keyboard Shortcuts - Q and W

      2:06
    • 15. Save Time with Markers

      2:59
    • 16. Full-Screen Transition Titles

      15:07
    • 17. Basic Titles

      3:57
    • 18. Lower Thirds

      2:55
    • 19. Adding Images

      7:02
    • 20. The Ken Burns Effect

      4:11
    • 21. iPhone Screen Recording

      8:08
    • 22. Desktop Screen Recording

      10:36
    • 23. Second Camera B Roll

      8:55
    • 24. Timestamps

      9:36
    • 25. Animated Handwriting with iPad

      22:26
    • 26. Background Music

      5:46
    • 27. Extending our Music with Audition

      5:02
    • 28. Sound Effects

      2:31
    • 29. Timing the Music

      2:34
    • 30. Limiter and EQ

      5:40
    • 31. Colour Grading

      7:03
    • 32. Exporting

      1:05
    • 33. Conclusion

      3:08
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About This Class

Video Editing with Final Cut Pro X - From Beginner to YouTuber

In this class, you'll learn everything you need to get started with Final Cut Pro, and how to take your editing to the next level. We'll work together to create a YouTube-style video following a 3-part workflow.

  1. A-Cut Assembly - We'll create our project, import our footage, and get to assembling the A-cut. We'll learn how use In and Out points effectively, how to append footage to our timeline and how to cut out all the inevitable mistakes and pauses to form a sharp, snappy edit. And we'll learn a tonne of keyboard shortcuts on the way to make the process as efficient as possible. 
  2. B-Roll Shenanigans - With our A-cut sorted, we'll make our edit more interesting by adding B-roll - second camera clips, titles, transitions, lower thirds, images, screen recordings and even handwritten animations. 
  3. Coats of Polish - We'll add background music to sound more pro, sound effects to our titles and transitions, vocal effects to our audio track (compression and EQ) and colour grading to give our edit the look and feel we crave. 

If you're a complete beginner to Final Cut Pro, we'll ease you in with the basic fundamentals before getting fancy with transitions and animations. And if you're an intermediate or an advanced user, hopefully you'll find something here that's useful (the iPad handwritten animation trick is pretty neat). 

Who am I?

My name is Ali - I'm a doctor working in the UK, and on the side I make YouTube videos about medicine, tech and productivity. I taught myself how to film and edit two years ago, and in that time my channel has grown to over 350,000 subscribers and generates more revenue than my full-time job as a doctor does. 

I often get questions on my videos asking for editing tips, or how I get certain effects like timestamps and animated handwriting, so I thought I'd put this course together to show the start-to-finish workflow of how I make my videos, and to hopefully help anyone interested in becoming a content creator. 

Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hey everyone. My name is Ali. I'm a doctor working in Cambridge, and on the side, I make YouTube videos about medicine, tech, and productivity. I've been making videos using Final Cut for the last two years. When I was first learning how to edit, I taught myself using a combination of trial and error and a ton of YouTube tutorials. Learning editing in this way was pretty inefficient, but it was also quite frustrating because at the time, I was preparing for my final year medical exams at Cambridge University while trying to churn out YouTube videos every week. This is the class that I wish I would have had when starting out, and that would have really speeded up the process of learning how to edit. If you enroll in the class, I'll be taking you through my three-part workflow in Final Cut. Firstly, we learn how to assemble an acre, where we cut out all the mistakes and pauses to lay a shop snappy foundation for our edit, and I'll teach you various keyboard shortcuts and other techniques to make this process as efficient as possible. Secondly, once we've got a basic timeline together, we'll start to get a little fancy by adding B-roll, titles, transitions, lower thirds, images, screen recordings, and iPad animations to make things a little bit more interesting. Finally, we'll end by adding background music, sound effects, compression, EQ, and color grading to give our edit that final layer of polish. I'll explain all of this stuff while showing you how I would edit a monthly favorites video, and you'll have access to the raw footage from that video so you can follow along the edit if you feel like it, or even better, you can take part in the class project which involves making your own monthly favorites video and I'll be able to answer any questions you've got and give you feedback throughout the process. Thanks for watching, and I'll hopefully see you on the other side. 2. Class Project & Resources: Hello, thank you so much for enrolling in the class, it's lovely to see you here. Before we get started in how to edit in Final Cut Pro, I just want to tell you a little bit about the project and resources section. So let's start with a class project. The class project is going to be that we're going to be making our own monthly favorites video. Now, if you haven't seen monthly favorites videos before, I link some of mine in the project and resources section down below. But essentially what that involves is talking to a camera and talking about some of the things that you've enjoyed this month. So for example, this month I talked about a book, a blog post, a podcast, and physical board game that I'd enjoyed. So the idea is that we just talk to the camera, we assemble a sharp and snappy foundation for our edit and then we add images and text and stuff on top to make the edit a little bit more interesting. Now, if you look at the project and resources section, you'll find a link to the raw footage that I used when filming this month's monthly favorites video. So what you could do is if you're just getting started in Final Cut and you don't have your own footage, you could just download all of that and use that to follow along with the edit. But actually what I'd recommend instead is that you do the class project, which again, more details down in the project and resources section. But essentially, the class project is that we're going to be making our own monthly favorites video. So what I want you to do is use whatever camera you've got, use your iPhone, use whatever and just film yourself talking about some of the things that you've enjoyed this month. So it might be a food that you like tasting for the first time, or a book that you've read or a blog that you read or a podcast you listen to or even just take any of your favorite things. This is the John Varvatos perfume that I bought this month, that I enjoyed. This is a desk plant on my desk that I've had for the last three years, but I'm going to talk about it this month in this month's monthly favorites video. Basically, the objective is that we just want to talk about three or four things that we're interested in that we enjoy. That'll be really good raw footage for us to have when we're starting to learn how to edit. So rather than editing me, kind of making loads of mistakes and stuff which might be kind of entertaining but isn't objectively that useful, I think it'll be better if you film your own monthly favorites video just using your phone or whatever and then we can edit that as we go along. Once you're done with it or even as you're going along, just upload it to the class project section on skill share. That means that we'll all be able to see each other's work, will be able to give each other feedback on our edit. This is a safe space, is a learning environment, no one is going to make fun of you. It's not the same thing as putting your video on Facebook for all your friends to see or on YouTube for the world to see, it's literally just the people on this skill show course who can see your class project. So yeah, I really hope you take part in that. Film your own monthly favorite videos, more details in the project and resources section. Also in that section we've got loads of links to various plugins and templates and stuff. So as you go through this course, I'll be mentioning a link in the video description. What I mean by video description when I say that, is the project and resources section. So that'll have links to all the various video hive plug-ins, all the transitions, sound effects, and stuff that I've been using in my videos for the last two years. So that's all the housekeeping done. I really hope that you'll take part in the class project. I think it'll really make your experience of learning how to edit a lot better if you work along with the class project and especially if you're thinking of starting your own YouTube channel and putting yourself out there in some capacity. I know it can be really daunting, but this is a baby step forward that will get your feet wet in the world of video editing. So thanks for watching and I'll see you in the next video where we talk about the anatomy of Final Cut Pro. 3. The Anatomy of Final Cut: we're going to start with a quick overview of what Final Cut Pro actually looks like and what the different bits of it are. This will hopefully be useful if you're a complete beginner. If you're not feel free to skip over this video. In the next video, I'll talk about how I organize my footage. But this is essentially the timeline and actually what I've got here is a video that I've just edited and uploaded. So let's get rid of that. I'll show you what a blank screen looks like. This is a blank slate on Final Cut Pro. It actually doesn't look too complicated if you have tried opening something like After Effects that looks super, super mega complicated when you open it initially, whereas blank screen on Final Cut Pro, nothing loaded, nothing interesting going on. Essentially over here where my mouse is pointing, we've got the timeline. This is where our video is going to show. This is our inspector and this is where our files are going to go. Basically files, video, inspector and timeline, very straightforward. I'm going to open a random library. Like this life advice one and show you what a full screen looks like once you've got everything set up. Here on this side, we've got this little panel which contains your libraries and your events, and we'll talk more about what those mean in a later video. Then we've got all of the files that we're using in this video here. This bit is called the browser, and this is where we can browse through all of all of our files. We have different ways that we can browse the files in our browser. If we click on this button, it toggles between this view, which I find to be quite helpful because then you can see exactly what's going on. So I've got all my various bits of footage. I can scroll down, I can find my video feed. You'll notice that as I click on something in the browser, that thing is then going to appear in the viewer area. Pretty reasonable. I've got all different types of media in there, so I've got iPhone screen recordings, which again show up over here. I've got the project itself. Again, we'll talk more about what projects actually mean in a later video. But essentially your project is your video. We've got bits of music. Obviously, if it's music, there's not going to be any video available for it. We've got images, random images here and there. These are bits of B-roll that I'm putting into my timeline. Again, I'll explain the process behind that and what that actually means in a later video. This is just to give you an idea of what a timeline looks like. Sidebar over here that contains a library and our events. Browser over here, that contains all of our files. Viewer over here, and this inspector bit will become relevant in just a second. But let's now talk about the timeline. The timeline is the fundamental feature of any video editor. It is from start to finish what your video actually looks like. This is what the timeline looks like. We've got our main story-line, which is this big thing over here. What's the most valuable thing? Hey, itable, I'm his brother. I studied Maths University, I graduated a couple years ago. This is our main story-line. Then above it we have got our various other bits and bobs. For example, this thing, if I press V, I can toggle and untoggle it. V, I think stands for visibility so you can make it visible or invisible. So you'll see that this is the. Cambridge and today I'm joined by my. That's animation is called a lower third, and that'll be coming a lot more later in this class where I'll teach you how to set these up and how to use them. But the lower thirds go above our main timeline. Underneath or main story-line, we've got our music and music is color-coded green. Brother, I'm going to introduce you something. This is soaking up the sun, a track that I got from epidemic sound, which is where I get all the music from. That's essentially the anatomy of the timeline. We've got the story-line as the main thing. We've got the music below it and we've got other things that we want to go above it. Then finally we are talking about the inspector. If I click on anything in the timeline, it then lets me do stuff to it in the inspector. In the inspector is where you can change settings like how big it is, its positioning, its volumes, stuff like that. If I take just a standard shot from the main story-line and we look into the inspector, we'll see there's a video bit. Show the video Inspector which has Blend Mode, opacity, positions, scale,so if I wanted to, I could scale this and that would zoom into my nose and my face, which I don't really want. Then I can hit this button to reset. That just resets it to a 100 percent, which is absolutely fine. We can crop. If I wanted to, I could crop left, right, up, down, whatever. Then we can distort. If I wanted to, you could distort like this. I don't really use this very often, but I'll show you later on a use case where actually do find that distort toward to be quite helpful. That's the video Inspector. Then we go along and then we have the color inspector. In the color inspector, we can do our changes to color grading and color correction, again more on that later. But if you just have a play around, you'll see it changes stuff. Once I've made a change, I'm just using Command Z to undo them. Various things that you can do, the color inspector, more on that later. We have the audio inspector. The audio inspector is where we can edit our volume settings, we can add equalization, we can add audio effects, again, more on that later. Then we've got this eye panel that I literally never use. I think this is more for if you're in a big, big film production, you want to label your cameras, stuff like that. Then we've got this, which is again the meta stuff. Again, I never ever use that. The only things I use are video, color, and audio, and that basically all you need to use if you're being a YouTuber. A book standard YouTuber. This is the anatomy of Final Cut Pro. A few more things. Over here on the sidebar, you'll see we've got this show or hide the library sidebar. At the moment, we can click on that to toggle the library sidebar. We've also got the photos and audio sidebar. Over here, we can add sound effects or we can add photos from a library or sounds from iTunes. I don't really use this very often except the add sound effects. Again, more on this later. Then we've got the titles and generator sidebar. This is very important because over here, we can add all these fancy elements like title scenes. We can add lower thirds. For example, this is a lower third, this is a lower third. We can get all these lower thirds of the Internet and then we can access them from this title and generate a sidebar. Then if you want a lower third, we just take it and drag and drop it into a timeline, and then it appears, for example. That would actually be quite nice one. Follow us. Anyway, let's get rid of that. So yeah, I think that's everything we need to know. In terms of anatomy of what Final Cut Pro actually looks like, let's now a reset. Go to a complete blank slate and I'll talk about how we import our footage, we'll talk about libraries and events, and we'll get started with editing this project. See you in the next video. 4. Libraries, Events & Organisation: In the previous video, we talked about the anatomy of a Final Cut Pro timeline, but of course, when you're getting started with a project or with Final Cut in general, you won't see any of that intimidating looking stuff. What you're going to see is a blank screen, and then we can import our footage into that blank screen. I'll just wait for it to load up, it might actually open up with, "Which library would you like to open?" I don't want to open a library, I'm going to click New. Basically, you want to be making a new library for every new video, that's just like a simple way of doing it. There are all sorts of fancy organizational things that you can get in Final Cut Pro, but let's just keep it simple. What me and most of the YouTubers do, just one library per video. I'm going to store that library in my external hard drive because I don't have enough space on my MacBook storage. I'm going to do it within my August 2019 Favourites video, so that's the folder that I've made that has all the footage inside it that I've already filmed. I'm going to call it Aug 2019 Favourites Library, just to make things easy, going to hit Enter, and now we've loaded our library. You'll see in the library sidebar, we've got August Favourites Library, we've got Smart Collections which we can safely ignore, and we've got the date which is 7-09-2019. Now this here, is an event, 7-09-2019 is a new event. Basically, an event, it's kind of hard to describe, I'll link down below to the final cut website where they explain this. But again, the way I think about it is, one library per video and within that video, one event, so all you need is one library and one event. Circumstances in which you might want to have additional events, for example, this weekend I was at the power video conference in Belfast. I filmed lots of vlog footage for that event, so in my library, I had my day one event, and a day two event because that just let me split up the footage. Because I was making a review of the British Airways business class flight, I made that into a third event. Events are projects within your library, but actually they're not project because there's another thing called Project. Basically, let's just keep it simple, one library, one event, that's what we need to know for now. Then if you're getting more advanced, you can have a look online for all the various reasons why you might want to have multiple events. At this point, if we click on the Library or if we click on the Event, we get this option to Import media, so that's what we're going to do. But before we do that, I'm just going to open up Finder and I'm going to show you how I've organized my footage. This is quite a simple video that we're making, it's basically just one single camera. Its external audio, that's externally recorded, that's completely optional. You don't have to do that, but if you can record audio externally, I think it does increase your production value because it means you can get slightly better sound. One camera, one audio, and then a few extra bits and bobs. It's not like I'm working with multiple camera angles or anything like that. I've just got a little folder called August 2019 Favourites and within that folder, you'll see one, two, three, four MP4 files. You've got these XML files that my Sony a7 III just generates, not really sure what they do, I just completely ignore them all the time. We've got these MP4 files and then we've got this WAV file, that's 145 megabytes, which is my audio. I just shoved that all from the SD card import into Finder, into my external hard drive. That's what all the footage looks like on Finder. Let's now click Import Media and we'll see how to import it. You'll see this is just a standard file import dialog. Let's go to my two-terabyte hard drive. Let's find the folder August 2019 Favourites, and let's select these bits. I don't even have to select them, I could just select the folder and it would just know to import all of those bits, but I'm just showing you for clarity that you can multiple select by holding Command. I've got everything selected now. On the side it says, add to existing event. Now at this point, we could create a new event, we could call it video, but one library, one event. I always just do add to existing event, so it's going to be added to the event labeled 7-09-2019. Files, we're going to leave the files in place. I don't want to copy the files over to the library because then, I'll be using another 50 gigabytes of storage, because it'll be trying to copy the files over. Leave files in place if you want to edit them directly where they are. Because they're on this little Samsung T5 solid-state drive, which is very fast, I'm completely okay with leaving them as they are. Keywords ignore, Assign Role ignore, optimized media and proxy media, again, we can safely ignore that for now. The main point of optimized and proxy media is that let's say you're doing a multi-camera edit and you've got three cameras shooting in 4K. Creating proxy media just lets Final Cut know that you want to first turn all of those really enormous 4K video files into tiny low-quality 720p files, for example, because then you can work with those tiny files, but then when it's exporting, it will relink it backup to your full size files. It means that if you have a computer that's not very powerful, or even if you have a computer that's very powerful, you can just get better performance if you're working with smaller file sizes rather than huge files. Anyway, we're going to leave those blank because this particular MacBook is absolutely fine in terms of dealing with 4K video files. We're going to ignore all the Analyze and Fix stuff, that's more advanced stuff that I never really use. Import Selected, and we will see that everything has now been imported into our library. If we click on library, we see all the stuff within the library. If we click on this event, we see all the stuff within the event because it's all part of one event. We'll see, we've got our video file number one, video file number two, video file number three, video file number four, and we've got this audio waveform thing. You'll notice that as I'm just hovering my mouse through this little browser thing, then it's updating on the fly. This is quite a nice feature for Final Cut Pro, you can just skim through the video and you can see exactly what's coming up. This is the organization, the importing, basically one library, one event importing the files into our event browser. Now in the next video, we'll talk about how to actually get started with our arrow. Thanks for watching and I'll see you in next video. 5. Sync External Audio with Video: In this video, I'm going to show you how to do audio and video synchronization. This only applies if you're recording audio and video separately. I would probably recommend recording audio and video separately because the microphones that you get built into a camera are just not very good. It's better to have some external microphone. If you're sitting any distance away from your microphone, even if you're having an external microphone plugged into the camera, it's still going to be less good quality than if you have a microphone that is directly above your head. Actually I'm going to switch my iPhone for now. I'm going to show you what this looks like. This is the setup that I've got at the moment. I've got this huge light up here to try and get some decent video. I've got the Rode MDG4. This is where my mouth is. I hope you can see that and that is this distance between me and the microphone's. This hopefully create some good quality audio. This is recorded externally and it actually goes into the Zoom H4 the Zoom H5, which is an external audio recorded that records to an SD card and this helps me get better audio. I do have the Rode VideoMic Pro Plus plugged into my camera which is recording this angle. But I think the audio from that is going to be less good than the audio from this. Even if it's the same aquifer, even if we stopped them around actually, the audio from the microphone that's closest to you is always going to be the best. That's the reason for recording external audio and video. If you've done that, and I recommending that because it's a very easy way to add some good production value to your setup. If you've done that, then this will be relevant for audio and video syncing. If you haven't done that, and that's okay, you can graduate to using external audio and video later and obviously, if you're doing vlogs are running on film making, it's absolutely fine to use the microphone attach to the camera anyway. If you want to do audio and video sync, there's a few different ways of doing it. The way I normally do it is using an app called Pluralize. If I just open that up, what I can do in pluralize is I can add media, I can add my footage. I can hit the synchronized button and it will just do it automatically and then it'll let me export the timeline straight to Final Cut Pro. But Pluralize costs a few $100. Final Cut Pro lets you do the exactly the same thing just within itself. Essentially what we want to be doing is over here, where in our browser, we want to just select all the files. Go away. We want to select all of our files and I'm holding command and clicking, select all the files. Then we right-click and it will say Synchronize Clips. Perfect. Now, we want to use audio for synchronization and actually let's name it A roll synchronized. Starting Timecode zero, ignore that. Use audio for synchronization. What this means is that Final Cut Pro is going to try and figure out how to line up the audio. We've got the audio from the external microphone and we've got the audio from the camera and it's going to automatically lined that up. That's what we want and disable audio components and AB clips. We want that as well because we want to get rid of the audio from our camera and replace it with the audio from our external microphone and then video and audio is all fine as it is. Hit okay. Great, we have now an, A roll synchronized clip. If I click randomly anywhere and hit the Spacebar button, or press the play button here. But, spaces are very easy keyboard shortcut. We follow the story of his going to wait on his quest to find the Easter egg. You'll notice hopefully that the audio of that sounds a little bit better than it did from the microphone itself. In the camera, the microphone and the camera had a little echo, whereas this was much closer to my mouth and therefore recorded decent audio. But anyway, that's how you do a audio video sync. If you haven't done external audio then I don't know why you watch this particular bit of the video, you probably should have skipped ahead. But that's the basic thing that we need. Let's now talk about how to import this footage into a timeline and then we'll do the basic A roll cut. 6. Create a New Project: Okay, friends. Now, that we have synchronized our audio and video or not, we now need to create a new project. A new project, like a project, is basically the file that you're going to be exporting. We hit New Project over here, and it's going to ask us for a few options. Project Name - untitled project. It's not very helpful. Let's call it Aug 2019 Favorites. The project is within the event, and because we just go in one library, one event, one project, it doesn't really matter. But for example, if you're doing multiple types of videos, one thing that I sometimes do is, I'll have a single project in a single event, in a single library for a video, but then, once I've done that video, I'll create a second project which will have the dimensions for an Instagram square video. I will do an Instagram video edit, just copying and pasting stuff from my primary project into my Instagram square project. Equally, if I was making a 4x5 video for Instagram, or a sort of 1080x1920 video for Instagram stories. That's a fully vertical video. I could create new projects out of that, but that's kind of complicated when we're just starting out. It's one library, one event, one project. Starting Timecode- we can leave that blank. Video- 4K. Resolution- whatever that is. Most people who are just getting started will be doing 1080, which is absolutely fine. I'm going to do this one in 4K just because, why not? Rendering- Apple ProS 422. We can just leave that blank. There's all sorts of different renderers and codecs and all this stuff, which I don't really know what it means. But the great thing is that you don't really need to know what it means. All we have to do as video editors, as YouTubers, is understand vaguely what's going on. We don't need to dive down deep into the details. Audio stereo 48 kilohertz. I know that when I record audio onto my external audio recorder that it records in 48 kilohertz. So you could pick 44.1. Usually, I would just go with whatever the default is. So, I'm going to hit Okay. We've now created a new project. You'll notice this timeline has now gone blank. We have this main story line that's a little bit more black than the rest of it and we can now put whatever we want into our project. The project is where absolutely everything happens, and you'll see that it's just rocked up over there. Yeah. That was how to create a new project. Let's now go on to the A cut of the video. Finally, when we talk about the basic editing move, that all of editing is basically based around. 7. A-Cut: An Introduction: In these next few videos we're going to be talking about how to edit the A- cut of the video. The A-cut refers to this me talking to the camera segments. For example, this is the A-roll. I'm going to snap my fingers. This is the B-roll. You are now seeing the screen recording, I'm going to snap my fingers again, back to the A-roll. The A-roll is just this bit of me talking to the camera. Ideally, we want this to be smooth without any mistakes. For example, if I were to stumble, I would, while filming the video, I'll clap my hands because then I know when I'm editing that I've made a little stumble and then I will just cut out all that stuff. Hopefully, in the edit it would look as if I've just kind of gone on talking without any pauses. The A-cut is basically about cutting out all the mistakes. But this thing about cutting out all the mistakes is such a fundamental part of editing. It's like a piano player and playing their scales, just knowing what the keys on the keyboard or knowing how to read basic music. It's like the single most basic thing. Whether you're getting started with video editing or if you're a seasoned pro, if you can make your workflow for cutting A-roll more efficient, just sitting in and out points, doing all these things that we're going to talk about, you'll become a much more efficient and effective video editor. We're going to spend quite a lot of time on this A-cut series because it is really important. If you're already seasoned pro, feel free to skip along to whatever section interests you the most. But if you're a complete beginner, this is the video that I wish I would have had when getting started because when I was learning how to edit, I was combining various YouTube videos from various sources and trying to figure it out by myself, which works, but it's not very efficient, so I'm hopefully going to give you the formula for doing an A-cut. That was a very roundly introduction to what an A-cut actually is. Let's now go to the next video where we start getting our hands dirty and actually assembling some footage on the timeline. 8. In and Out Points: Let's finally start getting our hands dirty, and actually assembling and editing. I'm just going to start by showing you uncut what the first 10 seconds of this video actually look and you'll see just how many mistakes there are and therefore that'll give us some ideas to what we have to cut out in our record. "We can do this. Now that bloody remote is gone. Well, it's the remote for anything anyway. Let's just unplug that, hit the Record button." You see for the first 20 seconds of it, the screen was completely blank and it was just me trying to find out where the remote was so I could press the record button. Obviously, we don't want that stuff to be included in the footage, but yeah, I'll stop interrupting, let's just play it all the way through. "Hey guys. Welcome back to the channel and to another. Hey guys. Welcome back to another episode. Hey guys. Welcome back to another episode of the monthly favorite series. Today, we're going to be talking about the book and blog. Hey guys. Welcome back to another installment of the monthly favorite series. Today we're going to be talking about a book, a blog, a podcast, and a board game so yeah, let's just jump into it." It was only that last bit that was actually coherent. As you obviously noticed, I was doing a lot of, "Hey guys. Welcome back to the channel, today will be talking about," oh shit, I did that wrong. The thing that I do is that whenever I make a mistake, I have this just as a reflex. I clap my hands or snap my fingers or hit my jeans. Anything that is going to cause a spike in the waveform, because you'll see our waveforms here. If we zoom into that a bit more, you'll see where the spikes are. By the way, if you can't see the waveforms, you click on this little button over here, and you can toggle the waveforms on an off. I always like to see them because of this thing where I clap when I make a mistake. Usually when I'm making a YouTube video, it's going to be the final take, that's going to be the most coherent. It's just useful to watch all the way through and figure out where that final take is. Now this is where it starts to get interesting. What I'm going to do is I'm going to play, up until the point where I've just started that perfect final tick. "Hey guys. Welcome back to another episode. Hey guys. Welcome back to another episode of the monthly favorite series. Today, we're going to be talking about a book, a blog. No. Hey guys. Welcome back to. Hey guys. Welcome back to another installment. Hey guys. Welcome back to another installment of the monthly favorite series. Today we're going to be talking about a book, a blog, or a podcast, and a board game so yeah, let's just jump into it." That was the most relevant one that I want to isolate and I want to put it onto my timeline. How do I do that? Well, firstly, it's not too helpful to see things in this particular browser format. I prefer seeing it like this, because now it's zoomed everything so much more and so I can see exactly where if we zoom right in, you'll see that there's a little spike over there, so I suspect that's where I clap my hands. Yeah, you'll see that's where I hit my jeans so I've noticed a spike. Immediately after the spike, I'm thinking, is this the right take is starting? "Hey guys. Welcome back to another installment of the monthly favorite series. Today we're going to be talking about." Yeah, so I can tell that that's going to be the perfect one. Now, the objective is to select the in and the out points of that particular clip. How do we do that? We could just use our mouse to drag along until we find the right bit, so I see the spike there and I'm going to click over there and I know it's round about there. But that's not a very precise way of doing it and instead, what we want to be doing is we want to be going much more granular, much more specific in where in and out points are. There's a few keyboard shortcuts I'm going to use for that, because you can't do this with just using the mouse. That is the left and right arrow key, and the shift button. Left and right arrow key, move it along by a single frame, whereas shift, moves it along by think 10 frames. If I'm at this point, "We are going to be talking about", and I know that this particular bit is the right one that I want. I'm going to shift back, play by hitting Spacebar. "Hey" As soon as I stop talking, at that point, I'm going to pause again and I'm going to find the specific frame where I stop talking, because the only in and out points I want are the ones where I'm actually talking, I don't want there to be unnecessary pauses. That's the point where it says, "Hey", and actually if you want to figure out that further, you can hit this button, show how the audio meters. You'll notice nothing particularly on the audio and then I say, "Hey", and then the audio meter. What I want to do is I want to go one frame before that point and I on my keyboard, this sets an end marker that tells Final Cut that this is the endpoint of this clip and then I want to get to the end of the clip. "Hey guys. Welcome back to another installment of the monthly favorite series. Today we're going to be talking about a book, a blog, a podcast, and a board game so yeah, let's just jump into it." At the point where I stopped talking and I then want to hit O on my keyboard. You'll notice that this then begets yellow selected and that tells Final Cut that, "Okay, the next thing I want to do is going to be to this particular segment of the video." Now we basically want to copy and paste that onto a timeline. What I could do is I could take it, I can drag it, and I can just drag and drop it. That would be very reasonable and now if I hit Spacebar to play, "Hey guys. Welcome back to another installment of the monthly favorite series. Today we are going to be talking about a book, a blog, a podcast, and a board game so, yeah, let's jump into it." Now we're playing with the timelines. You'll notice that when I hit Play, "We are going to be talking about a book", we've got this red line going across the timeline. Whereas over there, "Today we are going to be talking about", over there we were browsing the raw footage, but then when we select this area for good and then in the same browser window, we'll get a timeline instead. This is a pretty reasonable start, we've taken the bit of the footage that we want. We've set our endpoint or outpoint and we've dragged and dropped it onto the timeline. But as you have noticed, this is quite a cumbersome process. I don't want to have to watch myself over and over again. In the next few videos, I'm going to be talking about how we can speed up with this basic editing move. This really is a basic editing move, it's like pretty much any YouTube channel is just a case of filming the footage and then when you're editing it, it's about selecting endpoints, outpoints, and dragging it onto the timeline. You could practically edit an entire feature film, excluding all the special effects which you can't really do an editing software, you need extra software for that. You can just edit an entire feature film just by using the in button, the out button and dragging and dropping it onto the timeline. Everything else is just accessory on top of that. The more efficient we can make this process of just in, out, drag onto timeline, the more efficient or video editing is going to be and that's what we're going to be talking about in the next few videos. I'd have cheeky kept that pause and just so you see that, even while filling an online class, I'm still doing this thing where I'm just clapping because at this point is just reflex. Anyway, let's move on to the next video. 9. Speeding Up Playback: We've done our first clip. Let's now do the next few clips of a cutting, putting them onto the timeline and as we're going along, I'll show you how we can make this process more efficient. That's the end of our in and out points. At that point, if we scrub through the footage, we can hit in and out, in and out. You'll see that at any given point we can only select one in and out point. At this point we've let the most important lesson of video editing, which is that you should watch your footage before you start editing it because immediately after I got this suppose that amazing a role cut. Hey guys. Welcome. I started doing it again because I wanted to plug the skill share thing, so really important, watch the footage before you do it. The problem with watching footage is that if you've recorded an hours worth of footage for a 10 minute video, which is very common, you don't want to spend an hour watching it again. The absolute superpower is to speed up the video as you are watching through it. Yeah, let's jump into it. Let's jump into it. Now, I'm going to hit Spacebar and because I know I'm going to be watching the rest of the footage, I'm going to use L keyboard shortcut, which speeds things up. [inaudible] That speeds it up twice. If I hit l twice, it will speed it up four times. Let's try that, so Spacebar normal [inaudible] L once, just speeding up twice. [inaudible] and that is a four time speeded up thing. I talk quite fast anyway, so even I can't figure out what I'm saying for time speeds. Usually double speed is when I'm watching things. But, sometimes I will watch it at four times just to get a gist of what's going on. L once to speed things up, double L twice to speed things up four times. This makes it so much easier to scrub through the footage, to watch it, to see what's actually going on. 10. Keyboard Shortcuts - In, Out, Append: In the last video we talked about just the basic idea of in points out points, dragging, and dropping onto the timeline. I'm going to show you how I would actually edit this and I'll explain things as I go along. So I'm going to get rid of this bit first. I'm going to just click here and hit "backspace" because I know that I actually don't want that. I know that it was actually roughly here where I wanted my thing. I'm just going to start off to the clap. If we look deep down and actually I'm going to scroll a little bit further in using my trackpad, or I'm not. I'm going to click on this button. This lets me zoom more in 10-second intervals. Let's zoom in, zoom that foreign. Over here. Hey guys, welcome back to the channel. Hey, guys, welcome back to the channel. I know that this is the proper one that I actually want. But before we launch into. Therefore, I'm just going to put my play head next to the clap. Because I know from the audio waveform that's where the clap is. By the way, if you can see that they had, these are huge, very useful setting. "Turn video and audio skimming on and off" with S. If I turn that off, you'll suddenly notice that I can no longer skim through the footage. It's really, really, really useful to have that turned on with the keyboard shortcut S. Because now you can skim through the footage. Over here, we've got turn audio skimming on an offset shift S. [inaudible].An audio skimming just gets them [inaudible] , to happen as you're going along. I think it's quite useful. A lot of people have that turned off. That's personal preference. [inaudible] Sure. I'm going to have it turned off because then it doesn't screw up with this audio while I'm doing it, but normally I would have that turned on. It is a little bit annoying. Then we've got the headphone button, which you don't care about right now. We've got a snapping. Snapping is good. I'll talk more about snapping later and change the appearance of clips in the timeline. Don't care. Basically the most important thing is that you have videos skimming turned on. Now, we can skim through the video. I'm going to click on a point, hit ''Spacebar'''. I'm going to try and find my in point. You'll notice I'm using shift back and forward just to speed this up a little bit. This takes ages to do initially, but it becomes second nature as you get more experienced with editing. Channel. That's my in point where I've just taught talking. [inaudible]. I've seen that [inaudible] , [inaudible] , bubblegum game of them, bubblegum that I enjoy this month. Then there's really long posts. Obviously I want to cut out the pause. [inaudible] this month. My output is going to be set just as soon as I finished talking. Hit my ''Outpoint''. Now, I'm going to use the keyboard shortcut E and E just adds your current selection to the end of the timeline. That's where E stands for end to end of the timeline. But because my timeline is empty, is just adding it as we're going along. So as I'm finding in and out points, I'm just going to press ''I, O, E''. In, out at the end of timeline. That's going to be a very quick way to assemble our timeline without having to use the mouse to drag and drop. Now, ideally when editing and when doing anything on a computer, we actually want to be just avoiding using the mouse just in general. So now, I'm going to skip ahead to this point. [inaudible]. Now, because it washes through. I know that I don't think that's the right takes. I'm just going to skip ahead. Before we launch into. I basically repeated that phrase again. I'm just going to completely ignore the previous take. Just go for this one. So I'm starting as soon as they [inaudible].But before we launch into all of that, [inaudible] this video is being used as an example in a new online course that was made about how to edit videos. [inaudible] sure it's pretty good. You learn lots of stuff on it. You learn there's lots of stuff on it. That's what I'm posing and that I can see what my waveforms, that there is a huge pores coming up there for I know. I should set an out point. So I'm going to find the bit where I stop talking. Lots of stuff on. Outpoint, E to go to the end of the timeline. It just appears. None of this flapping around, dragging, and dropping with the mouse. Hit ''Spacebar''. I see my play head over there somewhere. As soon as tossing, so I'm putting an endpoint. In this online class, I'm going to teach you [inaudible] edit videos for beginners. Outpoint because I can see that there is a huge amount of pausing coming up. But then, why have we got so many claps? That'll be a waveform that I'll be able to see. Perfect. Not just edit videos for beginners. Outpoint and edit the timeline. But that's enough for me. Because [inaudible].That's [inaudible] I [inaudible] speaking. But that's enough with me. Plugging in that class. Let's get on with the video. In, out, end. This becomes a very, very quick process as you get more and more experienced with video editing. What am I saying now? Now at this point we're going to have [inaudible]. There's going to be new sections. I'm going to do a [inaudible]. That'll be a waveform that I'll be able to figure out where to actually cut in the video. You'll notice that I'm clapping anytime you make a mistake. Because again, that shows me the waveform in my editing program final cut. That lets me see where I made a mistake. I'll know exactly, like I'll have an idea of how many attempts I've taken to get something right. Anyway, let's talk about the first thing. The first thing of the book, here's the book. I'm going to bring it onto the screen. Hopefully if I do this and stuff, what. First thing I want to talk about a book that I read this month. All of that rumble was purely for the purposes of this class. I wouldn't normally be talking to myself. But the point is, when you've video editing, you've got so much freedom to cut out all the bits that you don't want. Actually now, that I want to start with is here. First thing, I want to talk about a book that I read this month and that is, Ready Player One. That's going to be my next cut stuff. I will end this video for now. Then in the next video I'll just assemble the entire [inaudible] and occasional share some keyboard shortcut tips. But as I said right at the beginning, you can assemble the entire film just by using I, O, and E. In, out at the end of timeline. Things just become very, very easy. Very, very straightforward. Thanks for watching. I'll see you in the next video. 11. The Philosophy of Pauses: Before continuing, I want to flag up the importance of getting rid of pauses and this was a tip I picked up from Hank Green from the channel Vlogbrothers who just like really iterated this point. Because when we're watching videos on the Internet, we used to not seeing pauses and if we see a pause it looks a bit weird. I'm going to extend one of these colors just to show you what it looks like normally and what it looks like with the pauses left in. To the channel and to another installment of the monthly favorite series today would game that I've enjoyed this month. But before we launch into all of that, I just want to flag up that this video is being used as an example. Okay, so that's what it looks like currently. But if I just extend that, if my in and out points weren't that precise, this is one might look like. In that I've enjoyed this month. But before we launch into all of that, I just want to flag. That is really weird, doesn't it? Having, let's zoom in a bit, having a gap at the start of a new clip is very weird. If you do want to have a gap, have a pause, let the viewer to take the breath, whatever you should put it at the end of the previous clip rather than at the start of the new one. Let's make this really tight and I'm just going to drag this bit over to hear. That's quite nice. But before we launch into all of that. I'll show you that if you want to add a pause, then we should add it to the end of this one so you'll see the subtle change in cursors shape. This bit, that cursor means that it's extending the end of the previous clip whereas that one means you can drag and drop the new clip. This is the thing that you did just become intimately familiar with the more editing you do. But let's drag this out a bit. A board game that I've enjoyed this month. But before we launch into all of that, I just want to. See that wasn't too unnatural. It's not too bad when the pauses at the end of the board game I enjoy this month but in this video I want to talk about, blah, blah, blah. Whereas if it was like as far as board game I enjoy this month, but I want to talk about, it's just a bit more weird. Ideally, we don't want to have any pauses at all between a role clips because it just makes for a tighter, nicer edit that's more of a pleasure to watch. But if we have to have pauses, we should have them at the end of a stanza, at the end of the clip rather than at the beginning of the next one. Just a quick little point before we move on. 12. Assembling the A-Cut: Now, we're going to just assemble the rest of the A cut using in, out and the keyboard shortcut E to append to the end of the timeline and I'll be using the speed feature with L. By the way, if you want to go backwards, you can use J but I don't find going backwards particularly helpful because here's what it sounds like," [inaudible] " Yeah, not too helpful. L is the one I may use most of all and I'll be using shift forward, shift back, and trying to get the frame perfect so that I can cut exactly on where I'm talking rather than having unnecessary pauses in the video. Let's just continue with that and see how well it's going to. "How to edit videos for beginners but that's enough of me plugging that plus let's get on with the video." Now at this point, I know that I want to have one of those title slides that go whoosh and give me a new section. What I'm going to do is I'm just going to add a little gap just so that I can remind myself that's where that goes. The way I'm doing that is with Alt and W. I want to make sure I'm at the end of the timeline before I do that. You have Alt and W and Alt and W adds this blank piece of clip to your timeline, which means that when you're zooming out, you can see exactly where that is. By the way, another keyboard shortcut, I'm using is Shift and Z, which zooms in appropriately to fit the entire timeline on your screen. This is just quite handy in general. But yeah, and then I'm using the trackpad to zoom out. Let's just continue with the arrow. "First thing I want to talk about, a book I read this month and that is Ready Player One and it's a book by Ernest Cline. If you hasn't seen the movie I first watched the movie and actually loved the movie. But then I thought I actually read the book, because I heard the book is really good. I actually love the book it took about two nights to finish this and I stayed up until 4 AM both night to watch it and I think I said in my last month previous video I think they've had like this that rating system for books. Are they good, really good. [inaudible] "Here I've gone quite far ahead because I can see I've made loads of mistakes and me from the past trying to figure out where the actual mistake was and where actually want to go so, "Here I talk about this [inaudible] Then I'll try and say this thing about in my previous video and that's where I make all the mistake. I'm actually going to isolate this point before that. That's mistake free. [inaudible] Watch it out point E to put it in the end and then I'm going to find the next one where I've actually explained this properly. " I think I mentioned last month favorite video. I've got this this rating system for books they can either good or really, good. And they are really really if the keep me up until 4 o'clock in the morning and this definitely kept me up until 4 o'clock in the morning those two nights. And it's absolutely incredible. Let me talk about what the book is all about. Essentially [inaudible] it's like set in the future and this future the earth is a bit screwed pollution is everywhere people are living in slums in cities. But there's this guy called James Halliday who invented this amazing virtual reality, realistic gaming experience. And the whole population pretty much spend their entire life in this game which is far much better than in real life so that's the backdrop that we find ourselves in and we follow the story of this 18 year old guy at the time of the, maybe he is 15 or 16, he is a teenage anyway. And we follow his story as he grows up through the book and that really cool thing." Actually that was quite a reasonable segment of love like prose where I didn't really make a mistake. When I was first getting started with videoing and stuff, I wouldn't have been able to do go that long without making mistake. Normally, I'd be making a mistake every ten seconds and so the edit will be a lot harder. But this makes life easy for me because it's just continuous prose and so what I can do is that, "It goes up through book." Through the book. I know that at that point looking on the wave forms there's like various pauses so I can hit and how point there. " [inaudible] " through the book, finding the end of that, hitting O, hinting E, that's on the timeline. Let's move on. Space bar L, " I think that's really cool is thing when James Halliday dies, the guy who invented this virtual reality world called the oasis. When he dies, he releases a message out to the world. He says that within the game the oasis he has hidden a special Easter egg. The Easter egg is kind of some bonus thing you see in the video game and he set u this challenge of everyone in world that." Another mistake so I'm going to go back. You've seen some video game I OI. "He set out this challenge for everyone in the world that if you can be the first person to find the Easter egg with the oasis then you will inherits his whole fortune and all like multi-hundred billion company and you will control the Oasis so everyone, in the World pretty much goes on a mission to pretty much find this Easter egg. It's start out with this clue and it becomes it trying to interpret the clues and trying figure out where this lead you to eventually find the Easter egg. And find the story of this guy what his name I can't remember what his name is." I know there's a mistake there and was trying to figure out where where I want to set my point. "As follow of this guy called Wade who is like." We follow the story of this guy called Wade. That is the bit that I know I need to chop out because that's the bit where I'm resuming the video. "We follow the story of this guy." That's where I can get rid of it. "Figure out where they lead so you eventually find this Easter egg". Eventually find the Easter egg. I know I can set my point there, E I'm going to scroll forward where I know it's legit. Actually, let's look at that. That's a way for that to clap. Along the journey over there I said and a long journey so that tells me that prior to that point, I've done a good take of and we're following the story of this guy called Wade." As a we follow this guy called Wade on his quest to find this Easter egg. Wade who like big with video games and who obsessed with and so we follow this guy called Wade on his quest to find this Easter egg. Along the journey he meets this loads of other people." and along the journey, so this guy called Wade his a quest to find this Easter egg." The next base and along the way. "Along the journey he meets loads of other people who also want to find and there a chic a bit of romance in the and then there is this big bad guy. He's like a big evil corporation that employs thousands people because they want to get their hand on Easter egg first. Because then they can control the amazing commercial property which is the Oasis and they literary advertise and a lot of stuff. It's a really nice coming of age story a little bit of romance always good adventure, action, mystery, suspense. Following the story of this guys who meet each other online through this video game and how they work to fight the biggest corporation. This is absolutely sick, so read Ready Player One and you should absolutely read the book and you can actually watch the movie first there might be a few surprises there. I'd probably read the book first and the watch the movie afterward. [inaudible] in the description below, check it up. I forgot to mentioned that someone needs to win this. I've mentioned every month I do this thing where when I review a books like I did with the Third door last month. I said you need to comment on down below or your Instagram user name I'll run. The winner of the Third door is let me just pick a random comment on YouTube. The winner is, his Instagram is Sofia so Sofia I'm going to be messaging you on Instagram and you will a copy of I'll mail you a a copy of this with a little message inside from so reply to my Instagram DM, please, thank you. I'll do the same for this month so if you want a copy. Obviously I've got a copy on Kindle because I read everything on Kindle. I this copy just so I can give it away so if you want this just comment below anything you like plus your Instagram user name. Then I'll pick someone next month and will mail you a copy of this particular book. I've just restarted the recording because I can't actually see myself on on camera and so I always like every 10 minutes, 15 minutes or so, I just stop the recording and restart the recording just in case because I don't want to have recorded for half an hour and then suddenly realized that something's gone wrong in the footage is missing and I have to reshoot so yeah, occasionally I'll just do that. Then the three claps that start with so that we could sink nicely with the audio because the audio is continuously recording. Anyway. Next thing to talk about is the podcasts. Now at this point, I can see that I've got a huge long gap where I'm just trying to figure out what to talk about so I'm not even going to bother watching that. I'm just going to get my play head, stick it to the start of the next bit. In fact, yes, you could have started the next day and just browsing through it. I can see that that is where the content really starts." Yeah, we've done the first bit of the first bit of the video. I'm not going to speed things up along just so you don't have to see me edit the code because this is, this is like the most long and most annoying part of video editing, but it's the most basic part. It is like the bread and butter of video editing. We have to get good at this. We have to get quick. I think I'm pretty quick at it at this point, but it still takes a long time to get an a cut together. We'll speed up the rest of the video. I'll show you how I do it and you'll see that basically I'm just using I, O and E and append to enter timeline and I'm using shift forward and back and using L to speed things up. Basically just using those six buttons, I'm able to assemble the entire a cut so that's what it looks like and you must also use alter W to add a little gap just because I know a new section in my videos coming up and I know that later on I'm going to want one of those who are generated title things to come up. You'll notice that actually what I'm doing now is that I'm cutting out the bits where I'm saying um because I say um a lot when I'm talking and it's because that's not what I'm making things up on the fly. I'm not like reading from a script and so I don't really like having ums and videos unless, only in very rare circumstances so I'm just cutting out the ums where relevant. That's the end of this next bit, ALT and W create little gap, shift and Z to zoom out a little bit on our timeline. That's fine the next bit. Now the final bit, Alt W, just to add some more. I see my triple thing, so I'm going to start there, I'm going to hit I. Then I think about I and O as well is that let's say I hit I and then I actually realize the actual I point at one was later on, I just press I again and it updates to my new I point. If I wanted to clear my selection for whatever reason, I think it's Alt X, yeah Alt and X just gets rid of all your in and out points so yeah, let's go back to my tripled thing. That's a final bit of the A cut. I think I'm now going to say some Goodbye bits so let's add another Alt and W little gap and you can see as I browse through my timeline, I can see exactly where the gaps are and so that's exactly where later on my title screens are going to go. My God, that's the A cut down ever literally have no idea how long that take, I'll find out. Overall, this video is 14 minutes and 42 seconds and as you've seen avoiding doing the A cut, I did a lot of skimming through the video. I can understand myself when it's going at double speed. I'm sure if you're editing videos, you'll be able to understand yourself when you're talking at double speed and so it just makes the whole process of doing A cuts a little bit easier. Now we're bit I'm going to grab a cup of coffee and then I'll talk a little bit more about other things that you can do within a cut just to make things a little bit more efficient like adding markers and then we'll talk a little bit about how to adjust the A cut depending on how well you've succeeded at doing the first pass of it so, yeah, let's end this long video for now. I'll see you in the next one. 13. Tightening up our Edit with Trim Deletes: Welcome back. I got my coffee. At this point, most of the grunt work is done, and now we can start to get interesting by adding stuff on top of it. But, before we move on to the BCAT, which is the second pass, we want to take another pass through our ACAT, and I want to share some tips about how we can make this a little bit more efficient. While doing the ACAT, we want to pay really close attention to where our clips are starting and stopping. Because as we saw in one of the previous videos, it's very weird if there is a bit too much of a pause between clips. I'll show you what that might look like. For example, if there was a bit too much of a pause if while doing my in and out, I did it fairly roughly. Nice to watch it. I think I mentioned a lot that we'd have that in the video which obviously we can't have. In this video, I want to tell you how we can refine our ACAT, using trim to end of clip type things on final cut. There's an article that I linked below this video that contains a list of keyboard shortcuts and their description of how this works. But I'm just going to explain it, through video, so that you'll see what this means. Let us take this for example. I stayed up until 4:00 AM both nights to watch it. I think I mentioned in last month's favorites video as well. What I wanted to do here, is I want to get rid of the pause bit from this video. How do we do that efficiently? Well, there's a few ways of doing it. What I could do is I can go to the start or infinite where I'm starting to talk. If I've got snapping turned off on, this was snapping. Snapping is where the cursor snaps to natural points where it should do. Let's turn it on. You'll see, as I'm moving the mouse, boom, it snaps to where the play-head is. Equally, as I'm moving the mouse, it's going to snap to the end to where this clip is here. Bang, snaps. You'll see it goes yellow when it snaps. Red when it's just free flowing, yellow when it snaps. All we can do with snapping turned on is we can just zoom really close into this. We can make sure the cursor is this one, which means we're selecting this particular clip, and we can take it and we can drag, so that we get rid of all that stuff. Let's hear what that sounds like. It's nice to watch it. I think that mentioned in last month. That's much better. That's one way of doing it. Let's undo that and see how we can do another way. Again, I'm going to find my point where I want to get rid of stuff. 4:00 AM both nights to watch it. I think I mention [inaudible]. That's the point where I want it because I know that I can see from my wave form that this is exactly, where I start talking. If I go one across, I can see from my audio inspector exactly, that I'm talking, so that's where I want it. But now there's an incredible keyboard shortcut that basically lets you accomplish that mouse movement without needing a mouse movement. That keyboard shortcut is Alt and the left bracket. If you look at what a left bracket icon looks like, that looks like the left bit of a clip, like the start of a clip. The right black bracket, the square bracket, looks like the end of the clip. I hope you can appreciate that. What we do is, if for example we hit Alt and press that left bracket. Alt and left bracket, look at what happens to the screen now. Let's undo that. Look [inaudible] to the screen. Alt and left bracket basically cuts the clip. Undo. It cuts the clip, so that it gets rid of everything from the start of the clip up until your current play-head. This is enormously helpful. If I only left bracket. I have essentially done, what I was doing with that mouse movement, dragging here and here. But now, instead of finding the clip, turning on, snapping, and dragging, all I have to do is find the point. Alt, left bracket. Boom, done. This is a huge superpower that you can get, when trying to edit videos. Because there are so many instances where you just want to get a little bit of the end of a video, and you don't want to have to use your mouse. Because again, as we have been retracing throughout this whole course, using a mouse is going to be inefficient. Let's talk about a few other ways we can refine this process. It's essentially, once I've got my ACAT, what I'm doing is I'm re-watching it, but I'm not really watching it from scratch, I'm just focusing on the points in-between clips because I know that's where the mistakes are most likely to happen. So let's just watch those points. This month. Before we launch into all of that I. Let's listen to that again. Enjoyed this month. But before we launch into all of that. I don't know if you noticed, but right in the start of the but bit, that was a bit of thing. But before we launch. So I don't really like how that sounds and I know it's because I've probably cut it a little bit too close. Actually, I just want to go one frame on this clip. I want to start this clip one frame before where I've actually started it. What I want to do is I want to take this and I want to drag just one frame. That sounds more natural in my opinion. But again, using the mouse is inefficient. So what I can do is I can select just the end of the clip. This is I think the whole clip, or I can just click on the end of that there. Now, when this yellow thing is selected, what I can do is I can press the Comma button or the Fulls-top button to extend this by a frame forward or frame backwards. Again, the comma button, it's to the left to this extent that left comma, comma, comma, comma, comma extending left and then full stop, full stop, full stop, full stop, full stop, extending right. In fact, we can hold Shift and do it 10 frames to the left and to the right. This is also another really good tactic that you'll just find yourself needing quite a lot. But before launch into. I think that's fine because that is required extension by one frame. But also on the previous clip, let's have a look. Board game that I've enjoyed this month. But before we launch into. I think there's too much of a pause there between Month and But. I want to get rid of some of that pause. What I could do is I could find where I wanted to end. Enjoy this month. At that point I can use Alt and right bracket, which we just get rid of that, that's one way of doing it. Another way of doing it is I can just select that bit of the clip. Again, I can use the comma button to move it left. That I've enjoy this month. Bout before we launch into. That's not very reasonable. So I've reduced the length of that clip by four frames by using comma, or I've just taken my play head and then use the Alt and left bracket or the Alt and right bracket trick to shorten the length of that clip. This is very important. It sounds so basic, but this is what makes an edit sharp and tight and engaging, just getting rid of all the pauses and all the mistakes. I learned lots of stuff on it. That bit is actually fine. Edit videos for beginners, but yeah that's not. A bit weird. What I want. So I'm zooming in, I'm going frame by frame to figure out where that's going weird. I think I want to get rid of these two frames, 1, 2, I want to get rid of those. So I'm going to go Alt, left bracket. Edit video for beginners but yeah that's. That's a bit better. Then I'm pressing down. The interesting thing about the down key is that it takes you to the end of your next clip or to your next cut point, which means again, I don't have to use my mouse. I can use down, Shift, Back, Shift Back, Shift Back. Takes me about 30 frames or 15 frames of something behind. Press Bar. [inaudible] to watch it. I think I mentioned in last month's. That's fine. I'm happy with that particular cut. Let's move on to the next one. Hitting down Shift Back, Shift Back, Shift Back. Really cool thing. That's fine. Video games and he set some of challenge. That's fine. So we follow the. That's fine. Along the journey he needs. [inaudible]. That's fine. The one you should absolutely read book and you can watch. That's fine. Check it out. I forgot to mention. That's fine. The winner is Broken Chalk. That's fine. Please. Thank you. Yeah, we're going to do [inaudible]. That's fine. [inaudible] last few months..That's fine. In the first minute. There was an episode with the [inaudible] thing and and how they struggled to pay [inaudible] thing. There's a bit too much of a pause there. I think you noticed. That was a thing and how they struggled. That was a thing and how they struggled. I think there's too much of a pause. So I'm just going to get rid of two frames. Like the Internet was a things and how they struggled. That's fine. I don't think I repeated too much. It's a minor point. Looks like for a bit and how they struggled to pay posting [inaudible]. That's fine. Yeah, it's just all very interesting stuff. [inaudible] repeated something. How they struggled to pay for like posting space because at the time [inaudible] As a duplicate something, let's get rid of that. Good. [inaudible] , or it was [inaudible] Good. Get rid of that. That's fine. That's all right. Next. A little bit stumbling on that bit. I'm going like [Sound effect] really interestingly. So let's get rid of a few frames there. So I'm just going to click on that. So I want to get rid of those. I'm going to go Alt and Left bracket. Videos on my website. That's fine. That's okay. Because it's like a board game actions. Some stuttering a bit there, but I think that's natural. [inaudible] blaming someone else for being a were wolf. Now it's [inaudible]. Let's give it up. That's where I think I start saying, You have to weave. So I'm going to alter and left bracket up.That's fine. That's going through my ACAT again, and just tightening up the edits using the trim feature. I think on Premiere Pro this is called ripple delete. But yeah, that's hugely valuable as a keyboard shortcut because it just makes the process of going through the ACAT easier and it's really important to make our editing as tight as possible with our ACAT. Then when we're adding stuff and fancy stuff on top of it, we are starting with a good foundation. As we're going to the next video, I'll talk about one more thing in the ACAT and then we can move on with our lives to BCAT. 14. Keyboard Shortcuts - Q and W: All right team. Nearly done with this whole echo nonsense. Let's talk about some more very useful keyboard shortcuts. So you know how we said that INO which is in and out points and then you could press E to add something to the end of a timeline. What if you want to add something to the middle of your timeline at your current play head? There's a very good shortcut for that as well. I'm just going to pick two random in and out points; there and there. Ideally, what I want to be doing, if I drag and drop, I can just drag and drop it. Because Final Cut Pro is great in that it has a magnetic timeline, it means that as I put stuff in there, the rest of the timeline moves to accommodate it. This isn't the case in Premiere Pro where you have to have loads of different layers of stuff. It's just a different way of editing, but this is quite a natural way of editing. It's what you'd expect if you're dragging something into footage. But obviously, we don't like keyboard shortcuts. So we've got our in and out points,we just press W, and W insert your clip at your current play head point. So that's a very nice thing to do if, for example, you want to add something in that you've forgotten to add afterwards, when you're looking through your end cut to see how it's going, you can use in, out and W to add mid thing. Actually you can see exactly what those things do over here. So E was the one that we were looking at, append the selected clip to the primary story line or the selected story line. So that's E that puts it on the end of it. W puts it in the middle of it, and Q connects it to the primary story line by putting it above. So I've got my in and out points selected. If I press Q now, then this actually comes up above the main story line. So [inaudible] , it's obviously that that is really weird because there's audio on this. I can get rid of the audio by just scrolling down on this thing and getting rid of it. This is what it sounds like now. People wake up and do certain actions. So then when the night is over and it's daytime, then it becomes a case of trying to. So as you can see, I've got this video feed on top of my main story line, so it's just screwing everything up, but that'll become a lot more relevant when we talk about adding B-roll at a later segment of this online course. But for now, it's really useful to know that W put stuff at your current play head, Q puts stuff above your main story line. So that's quite handy. Let's now move on to talk about the marker technique for saving time. 15. Save Time with Markers: This video is about the marker technique for saving time while editing. Essentially, while doing our A-cut we want to be thinking about the sorts of B-roll, ie, the footage over the top of the video, or the text flying in, or images of books coming onto the screen. We want to be thinking about how we might be doing that as we're doing our A-cut. Actually, we want to be thinking about it even before, well, planning the video, even before shooting it, so that we can formulate our filming formulae or edit based on what we know is going to be happening on screen. There were a few instances in this video where I have recorded B-roll alongside which I'll show you a little bit later on in the course. The marker technique basically involves while we are setting up our A-cuts [inaudible]. Here I've mentioned this is this like BoardGameGeek.com forum for medic for board games as well. While I'm watching this in my A-cut, I'm thinking, at this point it would be useful to just add a screenshot of BoardGameGeek.com or whatever that thing is or a text with link on it just to add a bit of masala, a bit of spice to the video. Otherwise, it's just me talking to a camera all the time which is fine. That's fine if that's what you want to do and YouTube. But I just think it just makes for a more interesting video if you can add B-roll segments in and out of the video. Someone like Philip DeFranco does this really well. His whole videos, he does a daily news show every single day. That's what daily means, and he's talking to the camera for the whole thing. But you actually get lots and lots of B-roll elements. You get stuff and images and photos of people flying on and off the screen, which just makes it a much more engaging experience to watch. The idea behind the marker technique is that as we're watching our A-roll and as we're sitting in and out points for example, and people were like this is the best thing ever and this is like BoardGameGeek.com forum for board games as well. At that point, while I'm watching that before something like an A-cut, I'm thinking, it would be nice to have a link to that. I'm just gonna hit the m key and the m creates a marker on that particular bit of the clip. That tells me, and actually if I just gone a bit really hit the out point. I'm just going to add it as a queue to a random point in this video here above the story line because we don't actually need it. You'll see that the marker stays in the video while it's on the main timeline. The idea is that over time, as I'm creating my A-cuts, I'm marking points where roughly I want to be adding stuff to it. That means when I'm then looking through my video again, I will have various points. For example, where I can just see what I'm doing my B-roll, I don't have to watch the whole video and figure out what's going to go where, I can just go roughly to that point and think, okay, 'I've put a marker there. I must have put it there for a reason. Let me rewind back a few frames to see what B-roll I was thinking of putting in there. Usually what I do is, as I go along do my A-roll, I'm also marking points where I want to be adding B-roll. I didn't do it for this because it would've complicated it but I'm doing it. I'm showing you now because it's another way of saving time and it's all about saving time. It's all about efficiently doing the editing because this is the not very fun part about being a YouTuber. That was the marker technique. Let's now move on to figuring out how to add B-roll. This is so exciting. 16. Full-Screen Transition Titles: At this point we've gone over all of the annoying grunt work to get our eight cut together. We've gotten rid of all of our mistakes. We have internally cursed ourselves, maybe even externally. Internally cursed ourselves about how many mistakes we made while recording it and lamented the fact that we spent like literally an hour filming a video that is only lasting 14 minutes and 31 seconds. But that's absolutely fine. At this point, we've got a fantastic foundation and let's just delete all these markers. I'm right-clicking them, delete, delete. But now, at this point of the video, we are going to be talking about how to add all of the various bureaus. Usually when people tell me that, "Oh, your editing is really good." What they really mean is the fact that I've got transitions and title screens and images coming across and timestamps, or I've got stuff going on and screen recordings and all these other bits that just add a bit of spice to the video. I'm going to be breaking up the process of adding every single one of these in turn. Let's start with the title screens. Essentially, this is a plugin from VideoHive that does this. VideoHive by the way is a fantastic resource for anything video related. It's run by the Envato networks, which is like GraphicRiver and Themeforest and Audio Den, VideoHive. All these various sources of getting plug-ins and transitions and stock footage and all this stuff. I think since about 2008 when I first started designing websites, I've been fully getting all of my images, all of my themes from the Envato network. I'll put a link in the video description. I think there's a video description on this thing. I'll put a link in the video description to the particular plugin that I'm using but essentially the idea is that you buy a plug-in from VideoHive, you install it, and then it appears in this titles and generators sidebar. Now, what's the title and what's a generator? The way I think about it is that a generator is like a full-screen thing, whereas a title is just something you add over the top of your existing footage. The plugin that I'm using for these titles is easy edit YouTube Essential Library version 3.1 and this is the one that I'm using. I'll show you what this looks like if we describe through it. That is what that looks like. In order to add one of these titles, what I'm going to do is just to drag and drop. Then I can put it anywhere I want on my footage. Let's zoom in and figure out where the best place to put this is. This is a full-screen title. I'm [inaudible] and how to edit videos for beginners but, that's not for me plugging that class. Let's get on the video. First thing, I want to talk about a book that I read this month. You've seen what's happened there. This becomes a title almost that gets put over the top of this and so I can add it wherever I want. I could add it there if I wanted to. Animations. If you're into the whole video editing thing then you should definitely check out my new online class. That's not particularly helpful because I want this to be like a segment divided between the different sections of the video. Actually what I'm going to do is I'm going to put it at the end of this, but I want it to overlap a little bit. I'm going to use shift and comma. Comma while you've got a whole clip selected, moves things one frame to the left and full stop move things one frame to the right. Shift and comma and shift and full stop move things five frames to the left or to the right. I think it's five, 1, 2,3, 4, 5. Five or ten frames, mostly like that. But either way, I'm going to select that point and I'm going to move it to the point just where I feel comfortable having this overlapping what I'm saying because I like my edits to be typed. Let's see what this sounds like. First, let's get on the video. First thing I want to talk about a book that I've. That's fine but that was a bit too much of a long pause. Normally what I do is I just really shrink this down. This what it looks like now. First, let's get on with the video. First thing I want to talk about a book that I've read this month and that is Ready Player One. I think that's a bit better, but now I can actually adjust the length of this transition thing and here's how that works. Let's get on the video. First thing I want to talk about a book that I've read this month and that is Ready Player. I think that's actually fine. Obviously, I don't want it to say [inaudible] , I wanted it to say Ready Player One. What I can do is, I can select the thing, go in the inspector and this is where I can change all of the various settings that I want to form a particular plug-in. If I change the text, I can make it to source text, say "Book Ready Player One" then hit Enter and who's it by? Ready Player One author, it's by Ernest Cline. That is very reasonable and so if I play that. Get on the video. First thing I want to talk about a book that I've read this month and that. That's not too bad. That gives me the text, usually the font that I like to use Avenir. I'm going to click on the text settings and change it to Avenir. I can just type that in. I want to change it to heavy and usually what I like to do is I first select the text itself. I like the bottom bit to be a little bit more light. Ready Player One, Ernest Cline and I'm not a fan of this tracking. It's a bit too much. I'm just going to change that to zero and that makes the text a bit more compressed. Whenever you get a plug-in from any other resource, you can and should be editing it to make it your own rather than just doing a default plug-in. But you can use a default thing if you want. I just think that this Ready Player One, Ernest Cline fits more with my style. It just looks a little bit nicer than the text spaced out apart. We're nearly there. Now we can adjust the colors and I want to make this my own colors. Fill Color, click on that. I've saved this color blue as the one that I use for all my stuff, but here's a pink, here's a blue. If you want a new color, you just select it and then you can drag and drop it over here. Now you've got the saved for any project that you want. It's generally useful to have a consistent style, so Ready Player One by Ernest Cline. Now this bit is a drop zone where you can add anything that you want. Normally what I do here is I add an icon from flat icon. I'm going to go on flaticon.com and I'm going to find the icon of video game. I'm just giving away all my secrets here guys. This is amazing. I quite like that one, so I'll click on it, close this ad. I want it as a PNG and a free download. Okay. Now I've got this open as a PNG. What I want to do is I want to actually import this into my project. One way of doing that is by doing Command By which lets you import anything and I can navigate to my downloads folder or desktop. Desktop, downloads. I think that's the PNG. No, that's not it. Content created joystick.png. It's all black right now, but I can import that in. Now I should find it in my browser. Here it is, joystick. The problem is this is an entirely black image, so I want to turn this white. Now in order to turn this white, what I could do is I could put into Photoshop and make it white but actually, I think there's a slightly better way of doing that. This is a bit more advanced, but hey, while we're here, I might as well show you exactly how I do it. I'm going to drag and drop this somewhere onto my timeline. Now. Let's watch the movie and I absolutely love. Obviously that looks absolutely terrible, but we need to have it on our timeline if you want to make changes to it. What I want to do is I'm going to click on it, go on the color tool and using the exposure tab, I'm going to take the shadows and make them go all the way up. What that does is it takes all the black parts of the image and makes him very white. Boom, all of a sudden the black bit of the image becomes completely white. and you would never ever do this for an actual video clip. Like if I did that for the for a video clip, it would look ridiculous. Yeah. It would just get rid of absolutely everything because we're massively overexposing. If you do it for the black image, it becomes white. Now this is still not very useful. You might have seen the movie, I first watched the movie and I absolutely loved. That's still not very useful, but now, here's the magic of this plugin. We click on this, and within the clip settings it says drop zone 'no source. We can click on that, and then it also asks us to select, choose a clip that has the drop zone you want to use. The clip I'm choosing is this one. If I click on it, boom. Look at that. This plugin has now taken the clip that I've just added, which is just this image, and has put it within this circle. But obviously that's to looks bit bad. But thankfully there is an option here and it says ''scale zone'', and that means we can just change the size of this. Look at that, and roughly 21 percent. It's sounds reasonable. You just do it by eye. Now what I can do is, I can hit ''apply clip''. I can even delete this because it's done what it needs too, and now look at what this looks like. Class, let's get into the video. First thing I want to talk about is the book that I read this month and that is written. That is how you add a simple full-screen title thing. Again, I'll link the plugin in when doing the video description. Definitely check it out and browse VideoHive, there are a whole host of really nicely designed plugins that if you can modify them and make them your own. You can make your own personal branding style when making your YouTube videos, and this is something that I have been doing for all of my videos. Before we're ending, I'm just going to do that across all of them. Let's zoom out with shifts z. Let's find the next point. That's this one, I'm going to paste that in, so just copy and past the same thing. Now I'm moving this over a few frames so that, how about that. To read a copy of this particular book. I know that I want this to stop roughly there, It doesn't really matter. This particular book. Right, secondly, I want to talk about a podcast [inaudible]. This is a podcast, and so what I want to change this text to is my first million podcast. It's not that. Particular book. Slightly knowingly this has now going bold again, but so let us select that, change it to light my first million podcast. Yeah, that's reasonable. I will figure out the icon later. I just want to get the copy and paste stuff done for now. Let's copy that again. Scroll, copy, move along to the next bit of the video, paste, move it across a little bit so that it overlaps a few frames. It doesn't really matter, adjust all this. Thirdly, I want to talk about a blog that I discovered and that's from. At this point, this is not a license blog. Blog Nat Eliason and let me just double check. What's his blog, Nat Eliason with a single l. Let's just make this light, here we go. Thirdly I want to talk about a blog that I discovered and that's from this guy. That's fine and let's do for the final bit. I think there's two more bits to do, copy. I got this going next blog. You should check out this going next blog. My next blog. Yeah. Then I'm talking about the board game, so I'm just going to select that, changed the text. One Night Ultimate Werewolf enter Board Game. Go on my thing, double-click to select the text, double-click to try and highlight that bit, having here light, press escape. Is going next blog, yeah. Finally, I want to talk about a board game and that is one Night Ultimate Werewolf. I think that looks all right. Now, for the icons, obviously I don't want all these things to have a video game icon, so I'm going to change the icon for each one. We've got a podcast, we've got a blog, and we've got a board game. I'm just actually going to flat icon and find relevant things. The first one was podcasts and I just search for podcast. This looks all right, actually I didn't like how non-centered that is. If it got a little king by it, that means it's premium thing which is slightly annoying as you have to pay for it. I don't like paying for stuff. Actually, I don't mind paying for stuff, but I'm going to download that one, good, ignore it. For now, let's do another one for the blog. See if there's anything blog. Yeah, let's go for this one. Don't really matter, it's just adding a bit of flare. Finally, let's go for the board game. Is that a wolf icon? That would be nice. Oh, that's quite nice. Let's go for this one. I think there's looks cute free download. Now I've got my three extra images. What I'm actually going to do is I'm going to open them up in my downloads folder, and I know there here, here and here. Now what I can do is, instead of having to import them into final cut, I can just drag and drop them straight onto the timeline or into my library bits. I'm just going to put them straight onto the timeline because I don't really care. Because I know I'm going to be making edits to them. Now I'm going to take this one, going to go into color correction settings, work of the exposure to make the icon white. This is just so that we don't have to do in Photoshop. Now what I can do, and we are getting quite advanced here, but what else. I can copy it with ''control C'', and I can paste the settings that I've applied to these other clips. I can select both of these with ''shift and select''. Then I can use command ''Shift+ v'', which pastes attributes and lets me choose watching attributes I want to put into this. You just command c to copy, and then command shift V to paste attributes. I think if you wanted to use a mouse, you can go edits, paste attributes that would go. But obviously why would you use the mouse when you can use a keyboard shortcut. I want to apply the effect of the cardboard, so I'll select that one. Now these icons become white as well, which is all very high-tech. Let's change them now. This one is the blog icon, so I'm going to go on this. I'm going to select the drop zone, it says choose a clip that has the drop zone, I want this blog. Perfect, that looks good, apply clip. Let's find the next one, what was the next one? This was the podcast, so My First Million, select the drop zone, select the podcast icon that looks all right. Then where's the werewolf thing. There it is, One Night Ultimately Werewolf, select that, select the icon of the wolf, looks all right, apply clip. Now we can delete these. Thirdly, I want to talk about a blog that I discovered, and that's from a guy called Nat Eliason. Yeah that's how we add like full-screen title stuff. Again, as I said just pick any plug you want from VideoHive and install it. There's going to be like a read me installation instructions. Each of these have slightly different instructions. Involves opening up a specific folder on your Mac and then dragging and dropping. It's very easy to install these things, just follow the instructions and then you can add stuff to them. One final thing is that it would be nice to add a sound effect to this. [inaudible] really good podcast to listen to. It would be nice to have like a [inaudible] sound effect as this new thing happens. But we'll talk about sound on our C cut we've done our A cut. Our B cut is adding the visual effect and then our C cut is going to be to add sound effects. This is how you add a full-screen tittle type thing. Let's now talk a little bit more simply about how to add text and how to add images, which is going to be in the next video. 17. Basic Titles: At this point, we've got the right cut, we've got audio transitioning things, which took a long time to add, but as you do this more and more, it just becomes second nature and you do get these things done quite quickly. Now, let's talk about how we add text to the video. I think text is quite useful. Let's say I mention a technical term like appendectomy or if I mention a blog like Tim Ferriss or Tim.blog or Derek Sivers.com or anything like that, I'd quite like to have just a little bit of text pop up, to just reiterate what I'm saying, and just to add a little bit of spice to the video. So let's find a point that I can add text and I'll show you a few different ways about how we might do that. First thing I want to talk about a book that I read this month and that is Ready Player One, and it's a book by Ernest Cline. You might have seen the movie. I've first watched the movie, and I actually loved the movie, but then I though I'll read the book [inaudible] good. First thing I want to talk about is a book that I read this month and that is Ready. So this is just an example. I probably wouldn't put text in here. I think the more text you can have flying into a video the better because we've already said Ready Player One by Ernest Cline in the title. But let's just add a bit more text just to show how we might do that. So first thing I want to talk about is a book that I read this month and that is Ready. Ready Player One. So now I'm getting the point where I want the text to come in. If we want to add text, that's known technically in the video world as a Title, because it's like you're adding a title, but subtitles are the things underneath the videos and titles are the things on the video. So what we can do is we can hit "Edit", "Connect Title", "Basic Title". You'll see that creates this purply thing which is above our story line. Ready Player One. Which is just a bit of text that just appears. You can do stuff to that text. You can drag and drop it. I like to have it down here. So I might say Ready Player One. Of course, you can change the text and you can change the font. So let's change it to Avenir heavy. Let's increase the size a little bit, boom. So that's what this looks like. That is Ready Player One. It's a book by Ernest Cline. Now let's say I want to add some text. I want to remove this text when I say Ernest Cline and I want to add the text for Ernest Cline. I could just copy and paste, which would actually be very reasonable. So "Command C", "Command V", change the text on that to say Ernest Cline. Now here's what that looks like. That is Ready Player One. It's a book by Ernest Cline. You might have seen the movie. I first watched the movie and I actually loved the movie. Adds a bit of spice. Usually what I like to do and I'll skip forward ahead is add a sound effect. So I'm going to go on the Sound Effects panel. The particular sound effect that I personally like is called Cartoon Accents 17. It's just built into Final Cut. If you're going to add sound effect, probably don't copy me, find your own. There's loads like Audio Jungle and stuff and epidemic sound. I'm just going to drag and drop this effect at the start of each of these clips. Here's what that looks like now. So first thing I want to talk about a book that I read this month and that is Ready Player One. It's a book by Ernest Cline and you. That's a little bit obnoxious. So I'm going to select those two clips and going in the Volume Settings, I'm going to reduce the volume. So usually I just know that I like minus 15 dB. So 0 is maximum volume and minus 15, you have to have to go negative to reduce it. Here's what that sounds like. Let's talk about a book that I read this month and that is Ready Player One. It's book by Ernest Cline and you might have seen the movie. I first watched the movie. I think that's quite reasonable. That adds a little bit more masala and keyboard shortcut because we love keyboard shortcuts, I never pick Edit, Connect Title, Basic Title, instead, I use Control and T, and that just adds your basic title there and then for you, and then you can do whatever bits you want to it. Then for the first one in the video, I'll actually edited by changing the font and the size of the style. Then for the rest, I'll just copy and paste, so that I don't have to worry about. Keep me up until Four O'clock in the morning. I don't have to worry about being consistent with these settings anymore. So that is the simple way to add a title. If I was going for something a little bit more fancy, I might use a specific lower third, which I will talk about in the next video. 18. Lower Thirds: In the previous video we talked about how to do simple titles. It's Ready Player One and it's a book by Ernest Cline. You might have seen the movie. I first watched the movie- I think it's quite nice, it's quite classy. But let's say we want to go a little bit more fancy and we've gone on VideoHive and we've got some lower thirds plug-in. Okay, so let's use this infographics builder plug-in again from VideoHive. This has a few titles, so not a fan of that one over classy. Oh, that's quite nice. The text is coming up from the bottom, that would look cool. This is where the text is coming in from the side, not really. It's a bit much. That's a bit much. Not a fan. I should quite like the simplicity of this one. Let's find another point where it could insert some text. Movie [inaudible] At this point, I wish I had been inserting markers in my a cup. Like I said in the previous video about how to add markers to save time, because then I would know exactly where I have to go. But I have to watch this again and figure out where the points are and then I'm going to add my markers. I'm just going to do that behind the scenes and add the markers just to make things a little bit easier. Okay, so after introducing this My First Million, but I'm just going to show you how I might use one of these titles rather. Secondly, I want to talk about a podcast that I listen recently. I really enjoyed it. That is called My First Million. [inaudible] I'm going to take title O2 to drag it down. This is what that looks like. That is called My First Million and it's a podcast that is run by the guys behind The Hustle. Okay, so now I want to move this down. So obviously it's kind of at the bottom of the screen, brought them across my face. So the way I'm going to do there is I'm going to take this. I'm going to go video inspector, and I can change the x and y positions of this thing. So I wanted to stay centered because that's how it appears by default. I'm going to preselect to zero and I'm going to click and drag. I can just click and drag and move it down round about here. Yeah, that seems reasonable. I want to change the text. Subtitle, I want to say My First Million and if there's tagline of it, let's just copy with subtitle a bit who is written by description, the Hustle and Shaan Puri. So here's what that looks like. That is called My First Million and it's a podcast that's run by the guys behind The Hustle, which is really good like tech news, daily e-mail newsletter that I've been subscribed just the last few months. Okay. That is called My First Million. It's a podcast that's run by the guys behind the Hustle, which is really good like tech news, daily e-mail newsletter that I've been subscribed just the last few months and the only way to get the grip of- Yeah. So you've seen that's like a slightly fancier way of adding a plug-in again from VideoHive, this infographics builder that I actually use a quite a few things. So I'll link that in the video description as well. It's just a little bit more spice to the video if you don't want just a simple title plopping onto the screen. Let's move on now when we talk about how to add images and make images fly across the screen, which is very exciting. 19. Adding Images: Let's talk about images and how to add them in an effective way or rather in my opinion, in an effective way. In this bit where I'm talking about this guy, Natalie Eisen's blog, I'm referencing the 4-Hour Work Week, which is a book by Tim Ferriss. Usually in these videos when I'm referencing a book, I like that book to, swish, fly onto the screen to add a bit of spice and to give a bit of context. Here's where I mention it. He also started off by reading the 4-Hour Work Week by Tim Ferriss and it's a very interesting blog post where he talks about how he first. By reading the 4-Hour Work Week and as soon as I start saying it, I want that image to appear on screen. Let's delete this marker so it doesn't confuse me. I'm going to save that point and I'm going to find 4-Hour Work Week on Google images, of course. Images. That's quite a big one and that's a bigish one. "Right Click" Save Image to Downloads. Now, because I've got a Mac and I've got this downloads thing. I can open my downloads folder and drag straight onto my thing and I've just got my image and it automatically imports it into the project, but it references it in the downloads folder. If I were to delete the file from my downloads folder, this wouldn't work. Let's say I delete this file. Suddenly, this is going to say, "Missing File" so I don't want that. I want to make sure that I'm actually keeping files where I think they are. If I was doing this properly, I should actually just copy this file away from my downloads folder and add it into a separate B role folder within my August favorites folder. Then I know it's safe. I know if I clear my downloads, I won't just lose this randomly. Anyway, obviously this looks bad. Started off by reading the 4-Hour Work Week by Tim Ferriss and it's a very interesting blog post where he talks about how he first got turned on to this idea- Okay, obviously that looks absolutely terrible. Let's make it look a bit nicer. Firstly, let's reduce its scale to make it about there. I'm going to click on this little button, which is the "Transform Tool" and that lets me take the middle bit and then drag it wherever I want. Usually when I make books fly and I like to have them run about there, I can resize and whatever. That looks reasonable. Here's what that looks like now. He also started off by reading the 4-Hour Work Week by Tim Ferriss. It 's a very interesting blog post where he talks about how he first got turned on to this idea of that, "Oh my God, you can make- Okay. That's just- He also started off by reading the 4-Hour Work Week. That's fine, but we can make this a little bit more fancy. Two things we can do to make it fancy. Firstly, we can add a movement transition. Now this where Final Cut Pro is very helpful to us. If we go on "Window," "Show in workspace transitions." Or we can use "Control, Command and 5." Control, Command - 5. We've got these transitions that appear here. I've got probably more than you will if you're starting out because again, you can buy transitions and stuff off of Video Hive enough of other resources so you can expand your library of transitions over time. Within Final Cut Pro, we've got a built-in transition under the Movements Tab, and that is Slide. In order to add a transition to a clip, you just click it and then you drag and drop it onto the clip. Now we've added this slide transition onto a clip. This is what that looks like. Just by default. Started off by reading the 4-Hour Work Week by Tim Ferriss and it's a very interesting blog post where he talks about how he first got turned on this idea that, "Oh my God, you can make money." But that looks a bit weird. That's sort of the effect we want, like this bit is fine. Started off by reading the 4-Hour Work Week by- But this bit is definitely weird. You can make money. That's not what I want at all. What we can do is, we can customize this transition. If we scroll down a bit, we click on the transition itself. Now we'll see we've got a few options. Type slide in or slide out, and direction right or left. This is sliding into the right but I actually want this to slide into the left so that it looks like this. By reading the 4-Hour Work- It comes in from that side of the screen, which is what I want. This one, this is still a slide in. This transition thinks that I want my whole clip to slide in again. I actually don't. I want it to slide out. You can make money. Perfect. It's sliding out to the right, which is exactly what I want. You can make money by reading the 4-Hour Work Week." That just looks a lot more classy. Now when we're sliding in something like that, we want to do the fill up the [inaudible] thing of having a little bit of a swish sound effect. Again, kind of skipping forward a little bit, but, oh well. That is Swish two, I think, is built into Final Cut and is the one that I usually use. Here's what it sounds like. Yeah, that's not too bad. I'm going to drag and drop it as soon as the transition begins. I'm going to copy and paste that as the transition ends. Here's what that sounds like. Also started off by reading the 4-Hour Work Week by Tim Ferriss. A little bit loud, little bit obnoxious as usual when it comes to sound effects, I like to put them at minus 15. Here's what that sounds like. He also started off by reading the 4-Hour Work Week by Tim Ferriss and it's a very interesting blog post where he talks about how he first got turned on to this idea that, "Oh my God, you can make money, like what- That's fine. Actually, I think even that's a little bit obnoxious. Let's put it to minus 20. I don't like how high pitched it is, so what I can do is I can add a cheeky bit of equalization and treble reduces the high end a little bit. This is really nit-picky stuff but whatever. Here's what that sounds like. He also started off by reading the 4-Hour Work Week by- That's fine. That's a little bit more subtle. This is how I get stuff to slide on an off-screen and the sound effect that makes it look kind of cool. We're done for our work week. He also started off by reading the 4-Hour Work Week. By Tim. I'm mentioning Tim Ferriss and I'm going to get a picture of Tim Ferriss and do exactly the same thing with it. Images, let's find a reasonably sized one. That one looks good. Good looking image of Tim Ferriss, saved to downloads. Got my player head of where I want it. I opened my downloads folder, drag and drop into my timeline. By Tim Ferriss. That sounds terrible. Let's transform so that it's more in line with this thing. That looks reasonable. Just generally eyeballing it. Good. Now, this can slide in as well. What I can do, is I can actually just copy this transition and paste it there, and then look at that. By Tim Ferriss and it's a very interesting blog post where he talks about how he first got turned on to this idea. Okay, but again, that looks terrible. Let's change that to slide out to the right. Got turned on with this idea of- Fantastic. Let's add our sound effect there and let's just drag this all the way so that they both go at the same time. Here's what it looks like overall. Income and he also started off by reading the 4-Hour Work Week by Tim Ferriss and it's a very interesting blog post where he talks about how he first got turned onto this idea of like, "Oh my God, you can make money while you sleep and then- That's a relatively easy way of just adding a little bit of spice and I like to do that anytime I mention a book, an author, and just anything that I think, "Oh a little image on the side, sliding in, would just be a little bit nice here. That is how you add images in Final Cut Pro X. 20. The Ken Burns Effect: If you've seen any Philip DeFranco videos or any Thomas Frank videos or lots of other YouTubers do this thing. They like to have, occasionally, full screen images and you've got a slight zooming in effect, I think the CrashCourse YouTube channel does that very well as well. A slow zoom in effect just so it looks a little bit more dynamic. As I was watching this back, I noticed that when I'm talking about the scenery in Ready Player One, I could probably find some fan art, off the Internet. Let's look at what I'm saying. The really cool thing that the whole premise of the book is based on is the fact that, it's in the cities. It's just absolutely incredible. Let me talk about what the book is actually about. Essentially, it's post-apocalyptic, not really post-apocalyptic, it's set in the future. In this future, the earth is a bit screwed, pollution is everywhere, people are living in slums in the cities. The earth is a bit screwed, people are overcrowded, people are living in slums in the cities. I'm going to see if I can find any concept out of fan art from the Internet. Ready Player One concept art. There we go. These are perfect. This shows this exactly what I want in this post-apocalyptic thing. So I'm just going to "Find" this image, there we go that will do. You share "Save" to Downloads, and as we've previously established, we can "Drag" and "Drop" from Downloads onto our timeline. Good, we got our image. But there was this guy called James [inaudible] Essentially its like post-apocalyptic. Not really post-apocalyptic. It's [inaudible] set in the future, in this future, the earth is a bit screwed. Okay, and I've done the "Alt" and "Right bracket" just to edit the length of that image. So this is sort of what it looks like right now. In the future, in this future the earth is a bit screwed, pollution is everywhere. That doesn't look great, We just got this image. But now what I can do is apply the Ken Burns effect to it. So what I'm going do is I'm going to hit Crop over here, and I'm going to choose Ken Burns. Now what this lets me do it lets me "Select" what window I want the image to be in and then what the end point of that movement is going to be. So just by default, you'll see it's, the start is what appears in green and then the end is what appears in red. So we're gonna start at that bit of the image and we're going to end at that bit of the image. So let's just hit "Play" and see what happens. Not really post-apocalyptic. It's set in the future, in this future like the earth is a bit screwed, pollution is everywhere. People are living. Yeah, that's more interesting then. That's one image and let's just find another one. Just for good measure. Come into our Ready Player One, pollution is everywhere. I want a fairly large image. Let's go for this one. So "Save" image to Downloads. Do a little bit of that. That's fine. Pollution is everywhere. Let's "Add" The Ken Burns Effect to this as well. What it's done by default now is that it's starting and then zooming in a little bit. I quite like this. So here's what this looks like overall. It's like post-apocalyptic, not really post-apocalyptic, it's set in the future, in this future the earth is a bit screwed, pollution is everywhere. People are living in slums in the cities. But there was this guy who James Halliday, who's invented this. So I have just adjusted the length of that let's have a look. In the future, in this future like the earth is a bit screwed, pollution is everywhere. People are living in slums in the cities. But there was this guy who James. Great. So I mean that's just a little bit of how you can add a bit of full screen banter to your videos. I think that's quite nice just because I don't want to be describing futuristic and stuff. I might as well just get them off the internet. This take lot of time. If we thought the A-roll was annoying, the B-roll is even more time consuming to get across. But I think having decent amounts of B-roll does makes such a difference to videos that we actually should be putting in the time and effort to make our videos a little bit more. Have a bit more B-roll and then just for a bit of spice. So thanks for watching and we'll see in the next video in the series. 21. iPhone Screen Recording: Now let's talk about adding screen recordings to our videos. Now, this is something that I do a lot, and you'll notice that anytime there's a tech YouTuber and they do a sort of what's on my iPhone, what's on my iPad, you'll see that they have got the footage, the screen recorded footage from their iPhone or their iPad on the screen. That is one way of doing it. What I like to do as well as if, for example, if I'm referencing a website or a podcast, I'll include a screen recording of me browsing that website or browsing through that podcast page on my phone or whatever. First things first, we actually need to record the screen, and in anticipation of myself doing this online class, I actually prepared a little something. Let's go back to this video, and here is what I was saying. At this point I'm going to turn on the built-in screen recording feature of my phone and record audio alongside so I can synchronize what I'm about to show the iPhone clip of me scrolling through the description for the Hustle podcast, and I'll show you how that works. I'm using the app Go Record, which lets me record audio as well, and now the screen is recording. You'll see that little red thing over there that says 19:06, that means a screen is recording and hopefully it's recording audio as well. I should very easily be able to synchronize this camera audio with that microphone audio with this phone audio, and then everything will be synchronized straight in Final Cut Pro 10, or I can use something like pluralize to do that for me. Here's how you record your screen with Go Record. We've got our iPhone over here, and we've installed the app Go Record, which you can just find in the app store, Go Record, oops. Once you follow the tutorial of its setup, what you'll be able to do is you'll be able to scroll down from the top into control center and you'll be able to click on the screen recording feature, and then you can choose to record your screen with whichever app you want. We hit Go Record, we choose Microphone On, because that ensures that we record audio as well, and then we hit Start Broadcast, and then it's going to go three, two, one and that way the screen will be recording, and we know it'll be doing that because we can see that little red thing up there. Now if I want to stop the screen recording, I'm going to do my stuff on the page, what's on my iPhone, whatever, stop the screen recording, hit stop. We'll then get this notification, tap to view screen recording. So we're going to tap, and that screen recording will now appear in Go Record. You'll see this is all of the screen recordings that I've done. The most recent one is here, and we'll be able to scrub through it, and if we hit play you should hear my voice as well. We can see that little red thing up there. That's how you record the screen. Then once we've done the screen recording we just want to add, drop it straight across to our Mac Book, and then it will appear in our downloads folder and then we can put it into Final Cut. Let's now resume Final Cut. That has now appeared in my downloads, and what I want to do is, I want to drag and drop it onto my thing. Actually, I'm going to do this properly. I'm going to open the file up in my finder. I'm going to copy it across to the hard drive where I've got my stuff stored. I'll paste it in there. Then, I can reference it directly from the hard drive, which means if I empty my downloads folder and nothing gets screwed up on the way. Let me find a bit where I'm talking about this podcast. Here we go, [inaudible]. Stick that over here. Now, you'll notice that there's audio that's overlapping. Okay, now get gritty details. I'm going to select this and get rid of the visibility just so I can figure out how to get this audio to line up. Podcast I discovered recently and that. All right. Secondly I want to talk about the new podcast I discovered recently and that is called, My First Million, which is a podcast that having observed it kinds of open what rate went down, if they would stop. It's a podcast that's run by the guy behind- What I want is I want this screen recording to come in as I'm starting talking about it. The audience get the gritty details on how Silicon Valley's most prolific founders. The audience get the gritty details. So I'm looking for that on my screen recording. If I was doing this actually properly I'd have synced everything in pluralize and that would have just synchronized it for me but let's assume we don't have this $200 piece of software. [inaudible] I found the point where I'm saying, "Get the gritty details", and that's how sort of short staccato sounds. What I can do is I can put a marker over there by hitting m. The audience get the gritty details on how Silicon Valley, get the gritty details. I'm going to find exactly the same point on my proper clip. So I'm going to hide the visibility using v and I want to put a marker there and you only get, get, get. That's it, so I'm going to put a marker there and now what I can do is I can line up these markers, those are very exciting. Okay, fantastic. I've officially lined up the markers. That means I can now get rid of all of this footage before I can hit v again, and I can take the audio of this Go Record clip and reduce it to zero. I can either do that by hovering over this thing and reducing it down, undo, or I can go the audio panel and just drag it all the way to negative infinity, which means we don't have any audio from the screen recording that's affecting anything. The main point of the audio was just to synchronize. It's only really the front bit where I actually curve or that I actually care about. Let's get rid of that by using ALT and right bracket. Now I've got this, but obviously that looks absolutely terrible, so we want to take that and you guessed it, we want to move it across to the side a little bit. I'm just going to exchange that and I think putting it over there looks reasonable, just roughly. Okay, here's what it looks like now. [inaudible] and the audience get the gritty details on how Silicon Valley's most prolific founders make that first million. Okay, that's fine. I quite like the fact that we've got this footage coming across. Okay. I'm quite happy with having this just there for the whole video. The only thing I'm certainly not happy with is this jump cut. It's not too bad but usually I like to have some kind of transition. In order to add a transition, what am doing again is just skipping forward a bit. I should not risk skipping forward anyway, whatever. In order to do it out of transition, I'm going on this little, selecting this bit of the clip, and I'm finding my transition from the transitions panel, which just to recap, you can buy find by going control command five. That shows an heist transitions panel or you can, if you're feeling slow, you can go window workspace it showing workspace transitions. Window showing workspace transitions, anyway. The transition I want is from a glitch pack that again, I've got a Video Hive because I like buying stuff off Video Hive. Where is it? Glitch pack and I want Glitch Shuffle Two, cool. This is what Glitch Shuffle Two looks like. Yeah, you know, just a little bit of a glitch transition, nothing too fancy, nothing as obnoxious as like a star wipe transition or anything really weird like that. Just a simple, [inaudible] and the audience, just a simple glitch transition that just makes this a more interesting clip because while I'm talking about all this stuff, there is stuff relevant to the podcast that is coming up on the side of the screen. Cool. That is how you add screen recordings for an iPhone. In the next video, I'm going to show you how you add Mac screen recordings and how we can use the distort feature to make them look a little bit more interesting. That'll be in the next video. 22. Desktop Screen Recording: So in the previous video, we talked about how to add this iOS screen recording which is relatively straightforward. You just record the screen using an app like [inaudible] record, and then you just drag and drop it and adjust the positioning of it. It really is that simple.The only extra bit is maybe syncing up the audio in the video. But let's say you want to do screen recording from a website and I did quite a lot. So on this bit where I'm talking about nateliason.com, "If anyone." That's a little loud. 'We're going to talk about a blog that I discovered, and that is what I call Nat Eliason. You can find it in nateliason.com. [inaudible] founder of Growth Machine. [inaudible] So I've got this reference to his blog. Instead of having iPhone footage. I mean, I could have had iPhone footage, but I thought I'd just add a bit more variety by having a Mac screenshots. What I'm going to do is I'm going to go on his website, nateliason.com. What I want to do is I want to screen record my Mac as I'm browsing through that website. So let's minimize final cut. Let's maximize this. I've seen that, this website is very, very thin. So actually what I could do is just record this screen size, and that would be very reasonable. So now I'm going to go in QuickTime Player, because QuickTime Player has built-in screen recording into it. I'm going to hit file new screen recording. Then over here I can choose what microphone, whatever I'm recording from. Hit the "Record" button, click "Record discourse" to full-screen directory called part of the screen. I might as well only record from here down to here. I think that seems reasonable. Stop recording. So now I want to start off in his homepage. So actually nateliason.com. Hi, I'm Nat, I'm the founder of Growth Machine, blah, blah, blah. I want to be on this page for a while because I know that I'm talking about it a little bit. Then I'm going to go on his articles page, and I'm going to just do a quick scroll through all of his articles. I think this would be a quite a nice thing. In fact, I'm going to start again because I actually want the smooth scrolling from my trackpad rather than the click-scrolling from my mouse. So I know that this is going to happen. I'm just actually going to just start again. There's no need to start the screen recording again. I can just, in editing, I know exactly where I want to start. Here's the point where I want to start, "Hi, I'm Nat," and I want to stay on this page for a while, I'm going to his articles page. Then I want to use my trackpad, just scroll through and just giving people a general idea of what sort of article this guy is writing. This is pretty good stuff. I need to read a lot more of these. Let's go all the way to the top. That's fine, and now in one bit in the video. I talk about how he takes notes in all the books he's ever read. Summaries, notes and reviews from books I've read. So I'm just going to scroll through these as well and just to give people an idea. When I'm making these monthly favorite videos, I'm really trying to do a good job of showcasing these work of these other people. This is great. This is so good. I mean, I really wish I had a section on my website where I had so many notes from all these books. This is incredible, genuinely. Anyway, let's scroll back up to the top, and that's it. I'm going to end the screen recording by hitting this button over here, somewhere. Where is it? That one? Now we've got this document that appeared in QuickTime. I'm going to save that straight to my hard drive, "August, 2019, favorites, "B Roll" and then I'm going to go nateliason. I think that's how you pronounce his name. Cool, and close that, close that, minimize Safari, open Final Cut again. Now I want to include this onto the website. So what I'm going to do is find it in Finder, Nat Eliason.mov, drag it all the way in. Now, because we made a mistake at the start, I actually want to find the point where I rig on this. Here we go. So I'm just going to do a ripple to neat thing there. I'll trim, delete whatever it's called, alt and left bracket. "An app by this guy called Nat Eliason, and you can find him in nateliason.com." So that's where I want to start it. "Nateliason.com [inaudible]." Then I'm scrolling through all the articles. So this what I want, let's change the positioning of this. Again, I'm going to go transform. Actually let's just change the x and y positions. Because the problem with transform is that it moves it around a bit, whereas all I want do is just change the expedition. So let's put it over there and let's reduce the scale a little bit. I'll show you what I like to do with this sort of stuff. I like to add a distortion that makes it look like it's more of a screen cast. I don't know, like this doesn't look that classy right now but what you can do, and I've got the streak of Jonathan Morrison as we can use the distort feature. It's this corner and that corner, so the bottom right and the top right that I want to distort. So bottom right, that's distort y by 100. That pushes the bottom right corner up a little bit. Then top right, let's do minus a 100, which pushes it down a little bit. This still looks a little bit weird. But now what we can do is we can scale x to reduce the x scale of it. Now this looks fairly normal, change the expedition a little bit more. Now here is the screenshot that we've got of this guy's website, Under Growth Ma, chine, [inaudible] , I need to listen to that. Co founder of Cup & Leaf tea, this site [inaudible] self educational. Actually I'm on reflection, I think this 100 is a bit much. Let's do 50 instead. That's another thing that I want to do with my website that I found quite inspirational." But now I think I'm a bit, I'm not too much of a fun of the symmetry of this because my face is too close to what's going on screen. What I'm going to do is, I'm going to move myself a little bit across to the right-hand side. I'm going to find the point where this happens and I'm going to use Command in B to create the cut. Now that means that I can do stuff to this clip without affecting the previous one. So what I want to do to this clip is I want to change the x coordinate so that I'm moving a little bit this way, there we go, "Leaf tea, this site [inaudible] , psychology, self-education." That's fine. But now you'll notice if we're over here, if we're nitpicking a little bit, there's this little sharp demarcation between where the clip ends, because it's just black space next to it. There's a little trick we can use for that, and that is the graduated mask tool. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to go on the effects panel, which is just Command 5. Because Command, Control 5 was transitions, just Command 5 is effects, and I'm going to go to Masks. I'm going to use graduated Masks and just drag and drop it. This is what a graduated Mask does, it sort of creates a gradient beyond which the clip disappears. If we go on video settings, click on the "Graduated Mask," we can then edit the options for it. This is the center point of the Mask. That is sort of how far along is going. Just kind of have a play around with this and you'll see you can do this stuff. So what I actually want to do with this, I want to fade out the clip, so that there isn't that sharp demarcation line between the clip and then not the clip.So if I go this far out about there, maybe. That looks very reasonable. I can't see any demarcation line. If I went too far this way, my face will start to get dark. That just looks bit that, so I'm trying to go as far as I can so that this looks like the most natural blend into black. Now if we look at how this looks, "Growth Machine, co hosted the [inaudible] , I need to listen to that, and a co founder of Cup & Leaf tea." That's fine, so I think this looks pretty reasonable, but now again, I don't like the fact that there is a jump cut there, I want a transition. So the transition I want is, as usual Glitch. Let's use Glitch shuffle 4 and this what that looks like now. "That's by this guy called Nat Eliason, and you can find it at nateliason.com, it says he's the founder of Growth Machine." There we go. That's exactly what this looks like. But now because I've only applied the effects to this particular clip when we go back over here, all the effects disappear. If you can remember back to many videos ago, we can copy and paste the attributes or the effect or the settings for one clip to another. I'm going to select this one, hit Command C to "Copy". Then I'm going to select these next two clips, or at least this one, Command Shift V to "Paste" attributes. I want the Mask, I want the positioning, there we go. Now all of a sudden this clip has the exact same effects. Let's stop it over there. Let's have a look, we find the end of that clip, "Income and he also started out." At that point I want to add a blade. So I'm going to use Command V to cut it, at that point. I'm going to paste the attributes onto the previous clip. So we have all the attributes here. Then when we stop this screen recording, that's when the clip reverts back to normal. Again, we want to apply a Glitch transition there. Let's use Glitch shuffle 3 just because, why not? Now, here's what the start of it looks like. I think that's quite classy, and let's look at what the end looks like, "Passive income and he also started off by reading." Maybe you didn't quite see that. So on Final Cut, you'll see these little dots over here, that means that it's still rendering. That's where you get what's called a dropped frames. Because the computer is struggling to playback everything very, very smoothly, especially if you're adding a transition or an effect or speeding something up, then it takes Final Cut while to figure out what to do with that information. So if you see these little white dots, it means that you might drop some frames, so things might not look as legit as you want them to, but you can rest assure that if you give it enough time to render, eventually, everything will work out and it will be absolutely fine. So we'll just give it a bit of time to render and then you can see exactly what that looks like. You'll notice as we're waiting, these white dots are disappearing. It's rendering stuff in order as we are going along. There's a setting within Final Cuthat if you keep it idle for like two or three seconds and you can change what this number is, it then starts to background render stuff, which just makes it faster overall. Let's say I want to make myself a cup of tea. It would be rendering stuff in the background so that now if we watch this transition, it should be very reasonable, "Is that I'm bringing in passive income." There we go, we've got the transition. It's been rendered out by Final CutPro. That is how I would add a distortion effect so that I can add screencasts or whatever from Mac OS or from iPad rather than just from the iPhone. I Hope you found that useful and see you in the next video. 23. Second Camera B Roll: Okay. We've talked about how to add all sorts of B-roll like images and texts, and lower thirds, and titles and screen recordings from iOS, and screen recordings from your Mac, but we haven't yet talked about how to actually add the actual definition of B-roll, which is camera clips from a different angle or camera clips of stuff that are overlaid onto the top. This is something that Tech Youtubers do a lot. In some of my iPad videos, for example, you'll hear the A-roll of me talking, and then over the top, we've got some B-roll of me typing on an iPad, or a nice slide movement shot that shows the iPad up close. It's things like that that are B-rolled that people traditionally think of as A-roll is your main talking head and B-roll is the stuff on top of that. I didn't actually film any B-roll for this video, so we're going to do that right now. I feel like that when I'm talking about this board game, One Night Ultimate Werewolf, in the video, I'm just showing it up like this, but actually it will be very easy to set up a second camera, get some B-roll shots of me, just opening it out and showing what the cards are like. I'm going to do that right now with my second camera and I will show you the process of how I'm doing that. Here we go. This is the Sony A6500 with my Sigma 30-millimeter lens attached to it, and yeah, actually, very reasonable. I need to find a tripod to put this on because I've got one tripod already in use. This is my vlogging tripod at the moment, so what I'm going do is just set this up and get some B-roll. Let's get rid of this keyboard, trackpad and mouse, and what I want to do is stick the camera on here. Now, I just need to figure out a way of filming this in a nice way. Okay. That will do for the B-roll of the board game and actually I'm going to do some B-roll. I'm going to physically record my iPhone showing the app as well, because I also talked about the board game app. Okay. Now we're going to grab that footage from this extra camera, import it into my hard drive, into my project, into my B-roll folder. Let's put all these stuff away. Let's go find the file, find that "M4ROOT," "Clip," latest ones, this one, and that one, chttps://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1029860-REG/sony_ilce6000l_b_alpha_a6000_mirrorless_digital.htmlopy across to "August 2019", "B-roll," "A6500." Just a quick pointer on organization, this is how Peter McKinnon organizes his footage, so I'm stealing the idea, just organizing folders based on what the camera is. For example, if I'm on holiday somewhere, I'd have a folder for Mavic Pro for the drone, for A73 for the main camera, for A6500 for the B-camera. If I'm filming a multi-camera, I might have A6000 or iPhone for the CMD cameras, all this sort of stuff. It just lets me keep track of what footage is coming from where. Anyway, now that this is almost finished importing, it becomes quite a straightforward process to add the B-roll on top of our stuff. Let's just add them both to a library, so I'm just going to drag and drop straight into the event. Now, what I can do is I can set in and out points for the B-roll itself. Normally, for the way it comes to B-roll segments, what I like to do is I like to set in and out points and then add them to my Favorites, so I'll show you how that workflow works. It's still based on INO, except when I'm going to press F to add things to our Favorites, and then we'll add the Favorites on to our timeline later on. Let's take 0493, which is this piece, this one, and this is just me setting it up, la, la, la, la. Okay. I like this shot of me opening it up, so I'm going to hit "In" or rather in from here, yeah, good, and I'm opening it up. Okay. I don't like all of this because I'm fumbling with it a bit too much. I like the opening bit of that shot. Where is it? I think up to there looks cool, so I'm going to hit the out point. I'm going to hit "F", and F adds it to my Favorites. If I change the views of that, this is more obvious, you'll see that a little green line appears above it, and that means that that segment of the clip has been added to my Favorites. How do we access our Favorites? I'll show you in just a sec, but let's add some more clips, some more bits to our Favorites. I like it when I take the thing off, there we go. That's nice. Let's add that to the Favorites. This shot of me taking stuff out, I think that looks cool, let's add that to Favorites. Placing those down, let's add that to Favorites, in, out, F. This thing. When I start dealing these cards, I like the look of that doppelganger Mason, and I turned it around. That's not quite as cool, so let's do the shot of me adding the doppelganger, that's fine, let's add that to the Favorites. I'm playing with a few more, that one, that one, that one, let's add those to Favorites, and these final few, I think that looks quite cool. We've added a few shots on there to our Favorites. What else do we have? Oh, there's the shot of me flicking through the booklet, I think they're quite cool. Let's start here, One Night contents, and now I turn the page, and that looks cool. That's a nice shot. Let's look at me browsing the app now. When I turn the brightness up, and let's take the whole clip and add to Favorites, just it shows what the app is like. Now that I've added to stuff to my Favorites, I can then click on this thing up here, and go Favorites. That just only shows me the bits that I've already added to Favorites. This is fantastic. It creates a different mini clips out of each one. At this point, I want to start adding some of this. Actually, what I can do is just drag-and-drop. Put extra clip in that point because I want to take the whole clip. I don't want to set in and out points within my clip, so I can just click the whole thing and then press "Q", which adds over the top. You can select more then just do "Q". Now, I've got all of these clips already over the top. I don't want to sound from them, so I'm going to take the sound down in all of them. Now here's what this looks like. "I'm reading about this and yeah, it's really, really good. So if you're familiar with Werewolf Mafia, you'll be vaguely familiar with the concept of this. The idea is, and I think I will talk about the board game Avalon." Okay. Now I can just re-do the B-roll where I feel like it would work best. "So if you're familiar with Werewolf Mafia, you'll be vaguely familiar with the concept of this. The idea is, and." Okay. What I want to do now is, I want to actually get rid of all this. I'm going to command X so I can cut it so it's on my clipboard now, because I actually want you to see my face when I'm talking about this idea of Avalon. "The idea is, and I think I will talk about the board game Avalon at one point as well in one of these." Let's add a marker. "It's sort of similar, I don't know if you have watch one of those old videos, I don't know how many people worked to get there but, anyway. There are some people and some bad guys, and the bad guys [inaudible] me the rock, because the rock has the [inaudible] " Okay. Now I'm talking about the character, so let's get rid of these. "And the bad guys open their eyes, and then no one really knows anything else." And there are the different characters. These are the different characters that I'm talking about. "Anything else. There are some special characters that have more information. One Night Ultimate Werewolf is interesting because it's in fact a board game, but you have an app. Because it's like a board game, but". Okay. "game, but" That's like a board game, but you have an app. While I'm talking about the app at that point, it makes perfect sense to show the B-roll about the app. I'm just going to drag that onto my timeline. "You have an app on your phone in the middle and the app does the narration. The app will say, you hit the play button, you tell it how many people you've got. The app say things like, 'Now everyone close your eyes.'" Okay. I'm quite happy with the B-roll that I've added to that. As you can see, the B-roll hopefully enhanced the video. Otherwise, it was this bit of the board game is literally just me talking to the camera, which is fine, but, I'm trying to be more intentional about the B-roll that I add to my own videos. It was so easy to setting that shot up and just having some footage of me just playing through the board game and it really adds some production value to the video. So that is the simple way of adding proper B-roll from separate cameras or even same camera onto your video in post-production. I hope that was useful and I'll see you in the next video. 24. Timestamps: Another thing I like to do in my videos is, I like to add timestamps at the start of the video that reference the various sections of the video, and I often get messages from people being like, "Oh, how did you create those timestamps? Can you do a tutorial?" Those timestamps are basically created as with every single thing on my YouTube channel using a plug-in from VideoHive. Let's add timestamps to this video, and I'll show you how it works. [inaudible] A book, a podcast, a book or a little ball games like I like, I want to have the timestamps come in at each of those points. What I'm going to do first of all is create markers for each of those points using the M keyboard shortcut, "Favorite series. Today, we're going to be talking about a book." Book. Blog, Blog post, and a boat game, blog post like more like a block. This is where I want the timestamps to appear. Now, the plug-in that I use in taking up for timestamps is infographics builder and it's actually there, bullet points plug-in. Where is it? Here we go. Bullet description. If you've seen any of my videos, this should look familiar. This is basically I'm just going to drag and drop this and talking about a book, a podcast, a blog post, and a board game that I've enjoyed this month. But before we launch into all of that, that's actually quite nice. I think I should use this more as like extra explain a text for stuff. But anyway, I like using this for, I like using this timestamp. Let's find the first timestamp where it talks about the book. The book is at 109. I'm going to click on this for the text. I'm going to go 0109, Ready Player One. But that obviously looks really craft. But as you guess, we can customize all the various settings of this plug-in so that we can get it to be right. Background width, we want it to be about big, text position Y. We wanted to come down texts position X, we want it to be more that way. By ground length can now come down. This is looking like a very reasonable timestamp. I think it's a little bit too round, so I wanted to be a little bit less round. Let's call it, I don't have 40 arbitrarily. I'm more or less happy with how this looks. Width a little bit up. I'll do a length a little bit down. I think that'll do. I don't like this red color, so I'm going to change it to my special blue. Here we go. We now have a timestamp. We're going to be talking about a book, a podcast, a blog post, and a board game that I. Now, let's just copy and paste these. First of all, actually want to position this. That looks right. Let's put it over here somewhere, just randomly. I've had all based the positioning of all the others off of that. Podcast, a blog post. A book, a podcast, a blog post, and a thing? Book, a podcast, a blog post, and a board game that I've enjoyed. But obviously we don't want them to all be in the same place where we all be on to say different things. Let's reposition. I'm just going to take this and use the Y positioning to change it, a podcast, a blog. I think round about there looks reasonable. Now, just call it minus 190. I think that's a good spacing between the top one and the second one. Talking about a book, a podcast, a blog post, and a board game. That means that this one, I want it to be minus 190 and then another minus 190, minus 380, minus 380.2. That will do. The next 138 minus 19, 38 plus 19 is 57 minus 570, minus 570. Minus 570. Perfect. I've positioned these practically identically and here's what that looks like. Series today, we are going to be talking about a book, a podcast, a blog post, and a board game that I've enjoyed this month. That's fine. But obviously now we just need change text. Let's look at when the next thing is. A book, the podcast is at 428. Let's say 0428, my first million. But that doesn't quite look right. Actually, I want to change the text position so that it's right aligned. Then I'll reduce the background length. It's like that. Perfect. What's the next one? Next one is Nat Eliason, so let's find where I talk about him. That's at 632. I'm going to 0632, Nat Eliason. Again, text position first, somewhere over there? Then background lengths somewhere over there. Doesn't matter too much as long as they beg you to consistent. Then the final one is One Night Ultimate Werewolf, which is at 1,056. Let's go 1,056. One Night Ultimate Werewolf text position, name. Then obviously you need to increase this significantly. That looks good. Let's see what this looks like. Today, we're going to be talking about a book, a podcast, a blog post, and a board game that I've enjoyed this month. That's all it took. It took about maybe three or four minutes or work to just generate these bullet points pretty much from scratch using these infographics builder plug-in. This is the thing that I hope people see on my channel and think, "Wow, this is good production value." But even though it's comparatively very easy to put in, it's just that all of these various things combined together take a fair bit of time. But I'm not a fan of the overall positioning. What I can do is I can select all of them and then use this and move them all down a little bit. I think about their looks good policy. That's what it looks like. My favorite series today, we're going to be talking about a book, a podcast, a blog post, and a board game that I've enjoyed this. Fantastic. If you've seen my videos, you'll know I like to add a little subtle sound effect to all of the stuff. Actually, I can just copy my cotton x and 17. That's what I want. That's this plop sound effect, about a book, podcast. Good. We'll just copy and paste that and each of these starting points. Now, here is overall what this timestamps look like. The monthly favorite series. Today, we're going to be talking about a book, a podcast, a blog post, and a board game that I've enjoyed this month. But before we launch into all of that, I just want to flag up that this video is being used as an example in a new online class that I've just made about how to edit videos. Also find out of how these are ending. I usually like them to be a lot more quicker. What I'm going to do is, I'm going to line these up and then I'm just going to say one, two, three, four, five. I'm going to press full stop to extend the length of the clip. One, two, three, four, five and the last one. Previous one plus one, two, three, four, five. Here's what that looks like. That's what closing up. As an example in a new online class that I've just made. Now, I think that looks a lot closer than the just lots of gaps between those two things. Overall, this is what we have. Today, we're going to be talking about a book, a podcast, a blog posts, and a board game that I've enjoyed this month. But before we launch into all of that, I just want to flag out that this video is being used as an example in a new online class that I've just made about how to edit videos. Actually, what I've done is that I don't do this process every time because that would just be time-consuming. What I have is I've created a new library called assets. Within that, I've just copied and pasted these exact settings. Here is what it looks like. If anytime I make a new video, I'll just select all this stuff. I will copy it across to my own thing. If you care about how to edit videos and you want to learn the workflow. That's it. I don't actually go through the effort of generating the plug-in and editing it every time I just copy and paste. What I'd recommend is that you create your own assets project that has all of the stuff that you want in it. I've got my Instagram handle, I've got this title. I've got this my camera back thing so that I don't have to change the settings. I've got this stuff that actually I'm going to use here. I'm just going to copy this, put it across over here. Hey guys welcome back to the channel and do another installment of the monthly favorites. But there's a monthly favorites, not Tech Tuesdays. All I have to do is edit the text. Monthly favorite, August, 2019, let me get the doorbell. It got some takeaways because I spent the last six hours, seven hours filming online class anyway. Where are we? Monthly favorite, August, 2019. I'll figure out what episode number it is. Series today, we're going to be talking about a book. I want this title to go away before the timestamps come in. I think that'll do. Let's see what that looks like. Hey guys, welcome back to the channel and to another installment of the monthly favorite series. Today, we're going to be talking about a book, a podcast, a blog post, and a board game that I've enjoyed this month but before we launch into all of that, I just want to. Perfect. That is how you add timestamps to your video and also bonus how to add little title thing. This is again from that easy edit YouTuber pack something like that. I just edited it one time and now I've copied and pasted it into my assets thing. You absolutely should have an asset's thing to make the process of making these videos infinitely easier. Thanks for watching. I'll see you in the next video. 25. Animated Handwriting with iPad: The video editing question I get above and beyond absolutely anything else is, how do you do those handwritten iPad animations that you use in some of your videos. In this lesson I'm going to reveal all, and show you how easy it is to do these fancy iPad animations. Step one, you need an iPad that has Apple Pencil support. Step two is you need an app in which you can write on a black screen, so the app that I use for everything is Notability. I'm going to open up Notability, open up my whiteboard thing, and create a new file. But this is a white screen at the moment, so actually I want to go settings, paper, completely black. Now I'm writing on a completely black screen, and thirdly, I want to use an app like Go Record, so that I can record my iPad screen. The idea is that we are going to be recording ourselves writing on a black background. It's really that simple. For example, let's do this title, pick that color. That can be one of the things that we'll be doing. Let's scroll a little bit, I'll just do some animations right at the start of the video. For example, I might do something like this. Let's say hypothetically, if I were to just draw a diagram of the heart. I don't know. We can do anything we want on the iPad really. Let's stop this recording, and I will show you how we actually get this to look Pro on the video. We've stopped the recording, it's been saved to Camera Roll. Let's open it up, and air drop it across to the iPhone, or rather, air drop it across to my MacBook. Air drop. Air drop to MacBook Pro, and then we're going to import it into our final cut file. Now this is where the exciting stuff happens. I can now put the iPad away, because I don't need it anymore. Now I've got the screen recording onto my Mac, and I'm going to get it from my Downloads folder and import it into my project. It just lands over here. This is all the iPad screen recording these stuff recording onto a black background in Notability, and being screened recorded using Go Record. The objective now, is that I want to create in and out points for the bits that I care about. There's a lot of crap within the screen recording that I don't actually want shown. I just want to create in and out points, and favorite to all the bits that I actually want to put into my video. I'm looking for the bit where just where I start writing this iPad animation bit. That's where I make the first line, and I'm just going to rewind. There we go. That's the instant I stopped writing. I, for the endpoint over there. Now that is where I stop writing. I'm going to hit an out point, and favorite that. That will be in my favorites bank for later. Let's do the same thing with these other bits that I made. Over here, as soon as I start drawing the arrow. There we go, there's the point. I've just found it by going forward and back. I, for in, as soon as I finished writing, find that point, hit the out for out, and F for favorite. Let's get the next one. I've favorite that, and then I've got this weird drawing of the heart that I just randomly did. This is a little bit more complicated, because I want to create in and out points and favorite all of the bits where animation is happening, where I'm actually drawing. I don't want to include anything where I'm changing the pen color or the pen shape, because that would look really weird. Unfortunately, this takes a little bit more work. Okay, so that's fine. When do I stop drawing this heart? There we go. I'm going to favorite that point, and then I'm going to ignore the bit where I'm selecting a new pen. Here we go. I've now got the yellow pen opened. That's the point where I stop writing the aorta. I'm going to go in there. Favorite that. Now I'm labeling the atria and the ventricles. I'm going to create an endpoint there. Right atrium, right ventricle, left ventricle, left atrium. That's where I stop writing in blue. In, out, favorite. This is where I switch to this random pink color and go. Septum there. Lets put a little septum there. In, out, favorite. [inaudible] That is the extent of wanting for the iPad screen recording. Let's find my favorites by clicking over here. We'll see all of our favorites without any of the crap. This is just pure hand-drawn animations. How do we get these to look pro on the video. Let's just find a point where I want to include these. Actually in this video, I'm talking about how I do iPad hand-drawn animation. That's the bit of the video where I want these animations to go. Let's just do that. We'll take the first one. How to do a hand-drawn iPad handwriting animations, and we're just going to take the whole thing, and use Q to drop it above the storyline. We're going to get rid of the sound on the clip, because we don't need the sound on the clip. Now we've got this thing. Obviously this looks really crap. But there's a few things that make this look good. The first one is that we want to take the final point, and we want to crop out all the irrelevant stuff, so we're just left with a black background. I'm going to use these crop features. Top, going to get rid of that, bottom, right, and left. At this point, this is just a black background. Now if you have any experience with graphic designer video editing software, you'll know where the magic comes next, and that is blend mode. This is the only thing I ever used blend mode for. The great thing about blend mode screen is that it automatically gets rid of any black from your image. We now have an iPad hand-drawn animation without the black background, so it looks like I've just written it onto the screen itself. Isn't that wonderful? But obviously it's just a case of re-timing it now. We want to make this much faster, so that while I'm saying the stuff about the iPad animations, we've got one coming in there, one coming in there, and a few things coming in random places. What I can do is I can click this button, which helped me re-time it. It's a little cog icon. I've selected the clip. I'm going to hit the re-time button, and I'm going to go fast, and let's call it eight times. I can adjust the length of this to whatever I want. I'm just going to hide this for a moment. I want all of my iPad handwritten animations to come between these two marker points. Let's put this one over there, and now I will make it visible. This is what it's going to look like. It's going to be speeded up, so it's going to look like I've written really fast across the screen. In terms of actually moving this around, I probably want us to be in a more legit place. Actually let's stick it over here. I'm going to make it go down. Let's wait for that to render, and I'll show you what that looks like provisionally. This is what that looks like. All this stuff and how I do iPad hand drawn animation. Great. You saw that go. The problem is now it just disappeared immediately. What we want to do is we want to create a freeze frame that holds it in place. The way to do that is you go in the final frame that you want, select it and go Alt and F, and that generates a freeze-frame, which is basically everything in that frame just as a still image. But obviously, it's black and so we want to do a blending mode screen. I'm happy with that layer. Probably as soon as that finishes, I want to have my... This is so cool. OMG, this is awesome. Bits coming in. We've got this one for a start. Hand drawn effects. Let's cue that and put it in there. Let's get rid of the volume. Let's crop, everything else out. Get rid of the top. Awesome. That will do. Now it just makes it much easy to position. Let's say hand-drawn effect over here and I won't add any settings to that just now. I just want to position these things in the right place. Then we've got this one. OMG, This is so cool, good. Let's say we have that one there. Get rid of sound from it and again, we'll do all we had to copy stuff so that we only get the bits that we want. Get rid of all that. Get rid of all the stuff from the bottom. Get rid of all the stuff from the right and get rid of a little bit from the left. That's fine. I can now take the transform tool and put it here, I guess. That will look all right. Once I go blending mode screen, I'll get rid of black backgrounds, but I am just keeping the black backgrounds for now so that it's actually legible on screen. Then finally we've got these other bits. What I usually do, if it's an extended animation that's made up of different colors, is that I like to group these into a compound clip. I'm going to select them all by holding command and selecting or by clicking the single one and then shift clicking the final one. I've selected these four. I'm not going to group these together into a compound clip. I could right-click them and do new compound clip or I could do Alt and G, which does exactly the same thing. I'm going to call it Hearts animation and that is all going to be part of one clip now rather than multiple trips put together. Now, I can just import that as well. Let's put that over here. Again, we're going to go to the end and then crop out all the stuff that we don't care about it. So left, right, top, bottom, that'll do. Because I've got animations on this side I'll just stick that over on this side. Now this is still looking pretty crap, but we've seen a proof of concept from our original handwriting animation text thing. All we have to do now is change the blending mode to screen for all of these. Good. Now we just have to re-time them so that they fit. We also have to figure out how to make them legible against this fairly light background. The way I do that is similar to how we did it previously with the Mac OS screenshots. If you watch that particular video in this really long and hopefully in-depth class. That's by using a graduated mask or a mask of some sort. Let's see, let's do it for the Heart animation for a start. I'm going to re-time this by pressing Shift and B and Shift and B is like, let's undo. So Shift and B puts a timed gap in your video. So what I could do here if I wanted to do is I could shorten a particular bit and then the rest of it would be normal, that will be a conversation for another time. But if you press Shift and B and then just undo, that gives you this dialogue or you could just go over here and go fast eight times, whatever. I want to edit this so that it's about roughly in line with this marker, which is where I want to end my animating. I'll put a freeze frame for the final bit. So I'm going to go Alt and F. Good. Then I can change that to screen as well. Now I've got my Heart animation roughly in place. But at the moment it's not really very visible. What I want to do is I want to create a graduated mask as soon as this starts. The point where my Heart animation is starting, I'm going to go Command B and that will create a cut and then I can add a graduated mask from that cut onwards. What I'm going to do is going to go Command 5, masks, graduated mask, drag and drop it across and because I wanted to make the Heart a bit legible, I am just going to change this around so that it's just a little bit more contrast. I think that's fine. Now we've got this gap that actually allows our iPad animation to be shown because we've got a little bit of darkness in the background while doing it. Let's do the same for the others. I want us to be quite quick. So let's re-time this. We're going to drag it across, that'll do. Then of course want to freeze frame to final frame. Nope, I'm going to select that and then freeze frame the final frame. Change that to blending mode screen and that last until like then. That looks all right, but you can't really see much. Again, I want to re-time this second clip so that it ends about there. Then I want to freeze frame that so that extends. Actually, you'll see that there's a problem here because this clip is so short and I've made it so fast that the clip before the end. If I freeze frame that it actually says this is so cue because it's been read timed such that it hasn't actually had time to do the whole writing bit. What I'm doing now is I'm going back to the normal speed version of it. I'll create a freeze frame then based on that and now I will re-time this clip so that it's easy to get a full freeze frame out of it. Then we're going to change blending mode to screen on that particular clip. Now we pretty much have everything that we need. We just need to add some graduated masks to our main story line so that all this stuff is actually visible. So the first one we're going to do is this one where we're writing this iPad handwritten animation thing. So over there I want to create graduated mask. We're going to be adding quite a few graduated masks here. This is like super advanced stuff and let's stop there. I can always zoom out a little bit, if I want. I can go to 12.5 and that lets me adjust this a bit more legibly. I think that will do. That is just about legible. That's fine. It's just a matter of doing it by eye. If we fit this again, that zooms in. Here's what this looks like now. This stuff and how I do it in iPad. You'll see my laptop is stuttering a bit because all this stuff needs to render, especially when we've got the iPad animations and we're trying to speed it all up. It takes a few seconds for it to render. This is quite a decent, spec'd out laptop, so that's fine. But it might take a little bit of time for things to render out. We've created a graduated mask for this bottom bit, that's iPad animation section. We've created a graduated mask for the hot diagram, we just need one more graduated mask for these, "OMG, this is so cool section." Let's create a new cut with "Command B" at the point where we stopped that. I'll just had a new graduated mask. Let's see what happens. What I'm doing here, I'm actually setting the playhead so that I'm at the point where most of the text is already on screen because if I put the playhead here, I could still edit the clip. I could still add stuff to it, but I'm seeing what's happening at this particular timestamp and at this particular timestamp, we haven't yet started writing, so I can't position my graduated mask in an effective way. If I instead put the playhead here by just clicking on the side and now select the clip. Now we've got a lot more text as you can see over here and when I add a graduated mask by double-clicking or by dragging and dropping it, I now can see exactly where I'm going with it. It's up there, down here and I'm just playing around to find a way to make this look all right without being over the top. I think that looks all right. Let's see what that looks like once it's rendered. From the top, this is what we've got. All this stuff and how I do iPad handwritten animation. If you're into the whole video editing thing, then you should definitely check out my new online class on Skillshare. We've added a lot of graduated mask to this particular layer and then we added a second one over here. Actually what I need to do is just make sure these effects sync up across the clips. Just eyeballing it, the bottom one, we currently have on clip number one and clip number two, but not on clip number three. Clip number three, let's say we want to end it over here. I'm going to create a new cut and I don't want any graduated masks here. I can click that and get rid of it with backspace. This is where we're going to be completely fresh and we're going to get rid of all our animations by this time. By the time we make this cut, at this point, all the animations will have gone, so we no longer need graduated masks. This is clip number one, number two and number three. I'm just going to sync up the graduated mask. How will I do that? On clip number one, we've only got this bottom graduated mask. I'm going to copy that, I see it's already on clip number two. It's not on clip number three yet. So I'm going to "Command Shift V" and paste that graduated mask onto clip number three. It has now appeared on clip number three. In addition to the hot diagram graduated mask, we've got two of them. Unfortunately, we can't rename them because that would be really convenient. But we just need to keep track of we've got two of them. Now over here on clip number two. We have our graduated mask for, "This is so cool" and for the bottom one, but we don't have it for the hot diagram because we don't need it yet. Actually that's fine, but what I'm going to do is I'm going to figure out which graduated mask is that. It's the bottom one. The bottom graduated mask is the one that is applied to this hand-drawn section. You can see if I just click it off, you can obviously tell that that is the graduated mask applied specifically to the, "This is so cool" section. I'm going to copy that and I'm going to paste by "Command Shift V" onto clip number three and I know it's the bottom one. I'm going to paste to the bottom one. Now on clip number three, I have all three graduated masks, as we can see from the corner over here. On clip number two, I've got to graduated masks and on clip number one, I've got one graduated mask. We're building up the graduated masks as we're adding more and more hand-drawn elements to this particular video. But there's one last problem and that's a problem of the jump cut. We don't like jump cuts, do we? Like all this stuff. That looks really weird. Look at that again. Like all this stuff. You just saw it just popped on with that graduated mask. But the nice thing about graduated masks are that it's very easy to fade them in and it's very natural and we can use a dissolve transition or a cross fade transition. To do that, we could click on the little bit. We could open up our transitions panel with "Command Control 5", we could find basic or dissolves and we could go cross dissolve. Double-click that. Here's what that looks like. Like all this stuff. That fades this graduated mask onto it. That's one way of doing it. The better way of doing it is just "Command" and "T" and that creates a cross dissolve for you just with the keyboard shortcut because it's such a common transition that we use. I'm going to use the cross dissolve transition to cross dissolve into our graduated masks and then I want a final cross dissolve that gets rid of everything just with a nice fade. We don't need glitch transitions for it because I think graduated masks lend themselves very nicely to simple cross fades. Now that we've done everything, let's see how that looks. [inaudible] to the video and you'll learn how we do timestamps, all this stuff and how I do iPad handwritten animation. If you're into the whole video editing thing, then you should definitely check out my new online class on Skillshare and how to edit videos for beginners. That is very reasonable. Actually just watching this back, I probably want these animations just to stay on screen for a bit longer. What I'm going to do is let's get rid of this transition. That's a drag these out a bit more. These are all the freeze frame, so I can just drag them out to my hearts content. Let's create a new cut at this point with Command B and I just want to make sure that this clip that has this cut in it has exactly the same graduated masks as clip number three. I'm just going to copy from their "Command Shift V" paste all three graduated masks and if we play that through. Then you should definitely check out my new online class on Skillshare on how to edit video. Then we'll add a final clusters off with "Command T" and overall, this is what it looks like now. Like for this stuff and how I do iPad handwritten animation. If you're into the whole video editing thing, then you should definitely check out my new online class on Skillshare on how to edit videos for beginners. Yeah [inaudible]. I want to just apply a cross dissolve to all of these so that they can now fade out nicely. There we go, because that was a bit too jumpy when they were leaving. To recap, step number one, get a black background or notability or any other app on your iPad. Step number two, record the screen. Then make whatever animations you want. Then do your in and out and favorite points, then re-time the clips, crop them appropriately, and then put it on blending mode screen and then add graduated masks or whatever you want to make the text seem more legible depending on what color your background is. I think my voice is really gone from doing this whole thing, but that is by far the commonest question I ever get asked on my YouTube videos. That's how I do the iPad handwritten animations. There's nothing fancy about it. It just takes a little bit of work. But I think that I quite a lot to the video, if I do say so myself. Thank you for watching and I'll see you in the next video. 26. Background Music: Welcome back. We have done our first A cut, our first pass where we've got all the arrow footage and cut it up and got rid of all the mistakes and hopefully made it flow. We've done our B cut, our bureau segments where we've got text and images and timestamps and transition title screens and clicks, transitions and iPad animations and all this cool stuff. Now it's for the third pass, which is the final touches to the video. The two main things for this are the music and the color grading, so we're going to be doing those in turn. Let's start with music. Now where do I get my music? I got it from Epidemic Sound. I'm going to go on player.epidemicsound.com and that is where you can find all sorts of music. Music is really important. I think all the YouTube videos, even ones where you're just sitting and talk to the camera, can be elevated in terms of production value, but just having a very light music track underneath them. Because no one really wants to listen to someone talk, without any music in the background. I think that's a little bit weird. Maybe that's what we're doing on this course, because online classes are different. You're actually sitting there to actively learn something and actually actively being engaged, and you can put your own instrumental music in the background. Anyway, it's really important to have music in the background and you'll notice different creators use different styles of music. [inaudible] famously has smooth jazz piano, in the background. Peter Mckinnon has more beats in the background, but they're very settled to the point where, you don't really notice it's there, until he cuts it out when he's making a joke or something like that. Well, I like to do is I quite to have piano instrumentals or acoustic guitar instrumentals, but I'm experimenting with different sorts of music. The easy way of adding music to a video, and that's what we'll be going over in this one, is just taking a track and then just extending it so that it last the length of the whole video. You're not doing anything particularly fancy with music. You're not really changing up the music. You're just picking a track and going with it. I don't know, let's pick a random instrumental track from Epidemic sound. By the way, you can get a free 30-day trial Epidemic Sound by clicking on the link in the video description. If you want to see what I do here, let's pick, Lounge Instrumental. Let's see what that sounds like. One thing that I do is I like to put a volume very down and then I just play my edit to see what it sounds like with the music on top of it. Hey guys. Welcome back to the channel and to another installment of the monthly favorite series. Today, we're going to be talking about a book, a podcast, a blog post, and a board game that I've been doing this month. But before we launch into all of that I just want to point out that, this video is being used as an example in your online concept is made about how to edit videos. It's not really the thing I want to go for. Let's go Soft House Laid Back. I usually just click to a random point in the track just so I have a feel of what the track sounds like. Come on load. Well, that's absolutely not what I want, and not the vibe we're going for. Let's do the search. Let's go piano and see what piano tracks we've got. Piano_soothing, soothing piano. That's what I like, I like soothing piano. Let's go for, let's pick Nightingale, solo piano romantic. I've used this in some video already. It's a bit too sad for my liking, and you so a tell that BPM/ beat per minute, that's zero, and energy is low. I want something a little bit more medium. Let's try Nocturnal Waltz. Hey guys. Welcome back to the channel and to another installment of the monthly favorite series. Today, we're going to be talking about a book, a podcast, a blog post, and the board game that I've enjoyed this month. But before we launch into all of that I just want to point out that, this video is being used. I quite like no tonal wards by Johannes born Love. Okay, so there's a download that now would form x. Now I'll be downloaded as an MPG file or as WAV file. I think mp3 You can choose. Unfortunately, automatically opens an iTunes, which is really incredibly annoying. But now what we can do is we can grab it from downloads and just drag and drop it immediately underneath our story line. We can add it to the start. Now one thing I like to do is I'd like to right-click and assign audio roles, music. That just color codes as a green. These more teal looking ones, these are effects. So assign audio roles, effects. Then the main one is dialogue. So that makes sense. It just lets you see on the timeline. Here's what it sounds like if we just do it as it is at the moment. Hey guys. Welcome back to the channel and to another installment. Clearly too loud. I think a good general volume is about minus 25 to minus 35. So let's do minus 25 see what that sounds like. Hey guys, welcome back to the channel and to another installment of the monthly favorite series. Today, we're going to be talking about a book, a podcast, a blog post and a board game that I've enjoyed this month. I think that's a bit too loud as well. So let's put it at minus 35. Editing videos. So if you care about how I edit videos and you want to learn the workflow for video editing skills you're on like. Maybe if its soft ,lets try minus 30. Now I'm happy with minus 35. So this is just like a piano underscore volts thing that covers some of the video. Now what I could do is if I was feeling lazy, I could just take that track and just copy and paste it. Copy, paste, it, and then just cut it off at the end. Then I'm done. So that would be a very easy way of getting an instrumental track and making it and extending it so that it last a whole range of your project. That is a very simple way of doing this. In the next video, I'll talk about how we actually use Adobe Audition to make this process a lot smoother. Then we'll talk a little bit more about more advanced music editing techniques on it, music editing, but how to use music and videos a little bit later on. So thanks for watching and I'll see you in the next video. 27. Extending our Music with Audition: At this point, we've got our single track that's been copied and pasted across everything. But this is not particularly ideal. It's not particularly ideal because all these music tracks, they've got very specific ending bits. Let's put the volume up so we can actually hear what the sound is like. Let's put it back up to zero. [inaudible] invented this amazing virtual reality like realistically gaming experience and the whole population pretty much spends their entire life in this game because it's far much better than the real life. It's clear from that background music that the song is over, and then we just start the song again. That is one way of doing it, but I think there is a better way. The better way is by using Audition. I'm going to open up Audition CC 2018. If you don't have Audition, you don't have to do it this way, but this is just an easy way of doing if you happen to have the Creative Cloud subscription. What I'm going to do is, I'm going to file a new multitrack session and I'm going to call it whatever that track is called. So this track is called, Nocturnal Waltz. I'm going to call it, Nocturnal Waltz. Save it to my music folder. This is now empty, I'm going to drag and drop my nocturnal waltz file onto it. I don't know how to use Audition at all. I just know how to use it for this feature. "Click" on it. Over here in this place, we've got Properties. Under Properties we have remix and we can "Click" Enable Remix. That will start analyzing the track. We can figure out how long is our video. It's 14 minutes and 11 seconds. At what point does the music go out? So this whole track is about two minutes and eight seconds and the final note of the music is at two minutes and three seconds. There's about a five-second bit of silence at the end of the track. So if I want this track to end on the 14 minute and 11 seconds mark, all I need to do is get this track to be 14 minutes and 16 seconds. Because if it's 14 minutes and 16 seconds, then the final notes will hopefully end where I'm saying, goodbye. What I really like is when I say, "Thanks for watching. Have a great day and I'll see in the next video. Bye-bye." At that, 'bye-bye,' then the song goes 'bum' and the final perfect cadence of the song is at that point, which just rounds of the video nicely and it means that I can fade too, like [inaudible] or something else if I want it. So what I've done here, I've set target duration 14 minutes and 16 seconds and it has remixed it to 14 minutes and 17 seconds, which is probably fine. We can tweak it a little bit later on. Now, you will see this track is 14 minutes and 17 seconds long. What Audition does very cleverly is that it creates cut points. You can see them here, these jagged lines. It does that halfway through the song. So it's like extending the song in the middle bit rather than at the end bit. It's because you want your start to be constant, you want your end to be constant. It's just the middle bits where you can just extend it. So Audition does that for you nicely. I'm going to go to File, Export, Multitrack Mixdown, Entire Session. I'm going to export it as a wav file whatever. Now I can get hold of that wav file, waltz_mixdown.wav, open that up, drag and drop it. We'll see that this is now, if I assign audio roles music, this is now a massive long audio file. Which means that I can get rid of my totally pointless little bits here and here. We've now got an entire track that is, Jonathan Nocturnal Waltz. Let's do minus 35 for the whole thing. Let's see where we are for the ending. That's not too bad actually. Thanks for watching. I'll see you in the next video. Bye-bye. I really would like the final bye-bye to be on the final of the audio. So what I'm going to do is, I'm going to create a marker there. That is the marker at which I want my goodbye to be. So now I just need to cut down the music track very, very slightly. The way I'm going to do that is I'm actually going to mask the music with a sound effect. Do we have any sound effects here yet? No, we don't. So in the next video, we're going to learn how to add sound effects to our full-screen transitions. These bits. That sound effect is going to mask the slight cut that I'm going to add to the music. So in this video, we've seen how to extend a music track using Adobe Audition. In the next video, we're going to talk about how to make the ending match exactly perfectly, which is what I do with every video. Thanks for watching and see you in the next one. 28. Sound Effects: We probably should have had these in a slightly different order, but let's just add some quick sound effects to our full-screen transitions. Let's put the music back down to negative 35, and this is what our transitions look like at the moment. Like I said it would be really nice to have a woo thing coming in for that. We're going to click on sound effects in the sound effect browser thingymagigy. The one that I like to use, I think is Whoosh 9. Yeah. This is genre Ali sound effects because I downloaded this Whoosh pack. I think it was another YouTuber who was selling a Whoosh pack online and so I downloaded the Whoosh sound effect. So if you Google Whoosh sound effects, you'll find various ones. Whoosh 9 is one that I like. If we just drag and drop that onto our transition. [inaudible] That's a bit obnoxious. Obviously, sound effects, we want to be subtle so let's do minus 15. [inaudible] That's actually very reasonable so I'm going to just keep that as minus 15 and apply that to all of our transitions so where's the next one, My First Million, just copy and paste. Where's the next one? Nat Eliason, copy and paste and the final one is One Night Ultimate Werewolf, and then we have this final wrapping up bits where I'm just going to literally add a glitch transition, because why not? Let's go with glitch pack. Glitch pack, glitch shuffle. Boom. [inaudible] Yeah, I think that I'll do. Now, we have got these. We've got all the sound effects we want at this point because we've added the plops and the swooshes to our sliding and things. [inaudible] We've got the swish sound effect for that. We've got the plop sound effect for stuff like this. No, not for that, for the Ready Player one bit. Now we've got the whoosh sound effect for our transitions. This is fantastic. Okay, so in the next video we're going to talk about how to time the end of the music to the end of the video because I think this is quite important. It just makes it very satisfying. If for the 5 to 10 to 20 percent of people who will ever watch to the end of your YouTube videos, it's just really nice if you can give them a nice experience at the end that would think, "damn, this is good editing." So we'll do that in the next video. 29. Timing the Music: The conundrum we had was that we wanted the end of our video to time the end of the music perfectly. I should put the volume up. [inaudible] can see you in the next video. Actually, this is more of a problem because we actually got rid of our little transitioning thing. Now, the track is even shorter. Now, this is actually more important to get the end bit perfectly timed. The way we're going do that is we're going to create an artificial cut in the music. That we're going to do it at the point where we've got the sound effects coming in. What I'm going to do is I'm going to bleed the music at this point. This second bit that we've got, I'm going to drag so that it's just underneath where the marker is. Now, is this what I want? Let's have a listen. Yes. That's exactly what I want. On the final note of the track, we cut to black. That looks classy af. But now, we have this bit of overlap, which is a little bit ropy when you just hold that up. We're going to cut this down over here, and just as this whoosh is coming in, we're going to just do a little bit of shenanigans. If we zoom in, we can fade this track out by dragging on this thing. We can fade this one and let's see what that sounds like. Can we notice that there is an artificial cut there? I didn't notice that there was a cut there. I think this is absolutely perfect. Now, we have effectively cut our music, masked the cut with a whoosh, which we probably don't need to do anyway because it just worked out nicely. Now, we're ending on a nice, slow cadence. Yeah. That is how we return the music. A few things left to do, and that is firstly, modulating the volume of the music appropriately depending on which part of the video we're in, and secondly, it's on sorting out our vocal tracks so that the volume is a little bit boosted and I'll show you how I do that in subsequent videos. Thanks for watching and see you in a sec. 30. Limiter and EQ: We're on the final stretch of finishing touches. Now one thing that we want to do is we want to use the Limiter feature to just boost the volume of our vocal track so that we're doing it at the right volume. They say that the ideal volume you want is you want your audio levels to be around about the minus 4.5 to minus six decibel mark. Let's see whether we're hitting that right now. Let's disable the music track with V. Taking [inaudible] I put a link below to my skill share on. If you look on this audio a bit, you'll see that the levels are hovering between minus 20 and minus 12. You can watch it for free if you have a subscription your premium subscription or if you don't. What I could do is I could grab the clip and I could just raise the volume up until the point where it sounds reasonable. But there's a better way of doing it using a Compressor or Limiter plugin. Let's use the Limiter plugin. We're going to go on Effects with command 5. We're going to go Levels and we're going to go Limiter, and I'm just going to apply it to the very first clip. Double click Limiter that applies it. Now what Limiter does is it sort of acts as a compressor. The way compressors work is that it's like a variable volume knob so that the quieter bits of your video will be boosted up more than the loud bits. What a Limiter does is that it acts on top of the compressor to make sure you never exceed a certain decibel threshold. Essentially, the settings that I use. I think I got these from another YouTube video. Gain, we'll talk about it in a sec. But Release, I always have a 280, I'm not sure why. Output level, minus 4.5. If I have a music track I'll look ahead I'll leave it too. A gain is how much extra volume you want. Usually I start with 10 and then I see what that sounds like or what that looks like. Hey guys, welcome back to the channel and to another installment of the monthly favorite series. If we pay attention to what's happening here, we've got Input, and output, and we've got reduction. Hey guys, welcome back to the channel and to another installment of the monthly favorites. If you compare input and output, you can see that the input is slightly less than the output is because we're applying gain to it. Hey guys, welcome back to the channel and to another installment of the monthly favorite. What if we made this plus 20, how would that sound? Hey guys, welcome back to the channel and to another installment of the monthly favorite series. Today. Okay. Now you can see that essentially what it's doing is it's boosting the gain of the input. Hey guys, welcome back to the channel and to another installment. But it's going above the zero point, and we never ever want our audio levels to go above zero because that causes distortion and hiss and is just not very nice. What this Limiter plugin is doing is that it's boosting our input by adding gain to it, and then it's flattening it so that it stays below 4.5 decibels. The reduction bit is where you can see the Limiter dynamically applying the compression, the reduction in levels. Hey guys, welcome back to the channel and to another installment of the monthly favorite series. Today. They say that you ideally want your reduction to be around about the 10 decibels mark. It's around about the 10 decibels mark. So I'm quite happy that these are the settings I want with a gain of 20 decibels. I'm just going to copy that setting, and I'm going to paste it across every single clip by doing command + shift + v, applying the Limiter, hitting Paste, and now we will see the volume of everything gets boosted. Let's see what that looks like now. Well, what that sounds like rather. Hey guys, welcome back to the channel and to another installment of the monthly favorite series. Today, we're going be talking about a book, a podcast. Now this is the setting that I want to export us. I don't really know why, but I just saw on some YouTube tutorials. I don't know a lot about sound, but this seems to be a good, easy way of getting sound to be loud enough. There's one final effect that I do apply to sound, and that is a little bit of EQ, equalization. I'm going to double click Channel EQ, and again we'll just do it on the first track, Channel EQ. The way that EQ works is that it lets you adjust how much gain you want applied to different bits of your audio track depending on what frequency the speeches are. I saw from some YouTube tutorial that the Male Dialogue is kind of a roundabout here. These were particular settings that were particularly nice to have. I just copied the settings and now I've got this preset for Channel EQ called Male Dialogue. Let's hear what it sounds like with the preset. Hey guys, welcome back to the channel and to another installment of the monthly favorite series. Today. Without the preset it sounds like this. Hey guys, welcome back to the channel and to another installment of the monthly favorite series. Today, we're going to be talking about a book, a podcast, a blog post, and a board game that I've enjoyed this month. I don't know. I think it sounds good regardless, but I'd just like to have this Channel EQ just so it makes the audio sound, I think, I hope a little bit more polished. Now that I'm happy with that effect, I'm just going to again copy and paste it across all of these different clips and we know how to do that now. Just the Channel EQ because I've already applied a Limiter to them and I don't want to double that Limiter because that would double the Gain, that will be bad. Now they all have this applied to them and therefore they're all a little bit quieter. Reject is life priority even. I actually figured out what actually makes them happy now that he is broken free of this rat race or part of it where he's interviewing that super story, little bit of romance always good. I'm actually not too much of fan of the slight echo there is this sound. I need to soundproof this room a little bit better, and probably I should have had the mic a little bit close to my face during the recording, but all well, it is what it is. I still think this is a reasonably high-quality video. Those are the two settings that I applied to the vocal track; firstly limiting and secondly the EQ using these settings that I will link in the video description. Thanks for watching and I'll see you in the next video. 31. Colour Grading: All right, team. We have a lot of videos into this. It's has been really, really long. The final piece of the puzzle is the color grading and color correction. Now, color correction is the idea of just correcting the colors to make the image more in line with what it actually look like in real life. Then color grading applies more to the style of colors that you want. What I do in terms of color grading is that again, I just use something that I got off the Internet. I will link the LUT pack down before. LUT stands for look-up table and it's basically a set. It's like Instagram filters. People publish their own filters or LUTs, and you can just apply them to your videos. You can just make them look a bit better. Here's how I would color grading color correct. The first thing is that I would use this plug-in, this effect that's called mLUT or rather custom LUT. Yeah, so custom LUT, and I would drag and drop that onto my particular clip and I'm just picking a random clip in the middle. With custom LUT, I can select one of my LUTs. I've bought Peter McKinnon ones. I don't use those for my videos. I think I actually I use Ryan Nangles LUTs. I'll link to those and you can buy them. By now it's zero pounds off, you're getting for free. I'll just cycle through some of these, so steel teal is one of them. Oh, hello, that's a bit much teal and cream. I quite like teal and pink. I quite like that teal and orange though. I think that's one of Peter McKinnon ones. But obviously these are way too much, so what you can do with this is that you can dial them down so that it looks a bit more natural. I usually dial it down to about 30-40 percent. Now, this is before and after. This is with a LUT without, with and without. This is steel teal. Steel and cream looks like this. Teal and pink looks like this. You can sign up for a free two month trial using the link below. Then what you might want to do is having decided what sort of LUTs you want in terms of personal preference, you can then go on the color correction inspector a bit, and you can start adding and changing things. One thing that I like to do is in terms of color curves, I like to do what's called an S curve when it comes to the LUMA, which is like the White bear. What the S curve does is that it makes it look a bit more movie like because if you lift up the shadows here, you crush the blacks. If you look at what's happening as I raise this, the blacks of the sofa become a bit more, become more gray, and this is like excessive, but that is sort of what it looks like. I like to crush the blacks a small amount. I'd like to crush the highlights a little bit as well, and that sort of only you can go up and down and you can just play around with this and try and get a look that matches what you want. I'm not going to do this manually. I've actually got my own assets thing, as I alluded to earlier. I've got an adjustment layer where I've got the color grade that I want. I'm going to copy this adjustment layer. An adjustment area is just a layer that you can add on top of your truck that we discussed in the anatomy of Final Cut Pro. You can just add it on top of your truck and it will apply all the effects that you apply to the adjustment layer will be applied to the videos below your adjustment layer. So the way you add an adjustment layer manually is you go and just generate its bit adjustment layer. You can just drag and drop it. That's fine. But because I've copied this to clipboard, I'm going to get rid of these color effects I've done here, delete and delete, and I'm just going to paste my adjustment layer, there we go. You need a subscription or if you don't. I pretty much just copy and paste this layer for all of my YouTube videos. You can see I'm using teal and pink, I've got it at 25 percent. Now, I've made a few of the changes, so within color curves, you see this thing that I was talking about with the crushing the blacks. I've crushed the blacks a little bit on the LUMA side, just a small amount. I've also made the oranges less a rigid on the highlights aspects. That's usually when I'm filming in a different scenario where I've got actually got orange lights in the background or I don't want it to be too high, but you can see I'm changing skin tone as I move this up and down. Let's just play around with this a bit so it looks natural, I think that looks all right. Then on the blues, I like to add blues to the shadow so at least the shadows are a bit more blue. As I raise this up, you can see what's happening. Everything is becoming blue or the blacks are becoming more blue. But that's a bit much so I think about there looks good. So now without the color curves, it's a very subtle change, but I don't know. I think this looks a little bit nicer. It's already post personal preference, so what I would suggest above anything else is a, you get some presets of the Internet, some lattes, and you just play around with what looks good and adjust the fading appropriately. But otherwise you just figure out what sort of look you like the look of and then you can play around with that. Let's put this as 0.5, and the other effect I've got is bored. I think I changed the colors a little bit. Add a little bit of blue to the shadows, so this is only a 3 percent, so if I increase that by going up, you'll how stupid that looks. Color grading is already about being self-aware and just picking a look that you like. Let's just reset it to what it was, and then within the highlights, I've go a little bit of orange. This is the sort of teal and orange field where you have a bit of orange in the highlights and a bit of teal in the shadows, and that is supposedly quite pleasing to the eye because orange your skin tone and a teal is the complementary color to orange. If you notice a lot of travel vloggers and travel video makers like Sam Kolder, they love to use teal and orange color grades. I've done a little bit of teal and orange, but not too much because then it would just look a bit too much. I'll include links to all of the LUTs that I routinely use down below. But yeah, really, it's all about just experimenting and finding your own style and then just copying and pasting that style across all your videos. With this adjustment layers, I can start over here. I can just drag it out so that it basically goes over the entire video. Now I've got this adjustment layer that's just above my video layer. But it doesn't affect my screen recordings because the screen recordings are above the layer. Stuff that's above the layer is not going to be affected by the layer. Now, let's see what this looks like. Hello guys welcome back to the channel and to another installment of the monthly favorite series, today, we're going to be talking about a book. You can see if we got before and after. This is what it looks like with the color grade and this is without, so you can see there's a bit more green like this. My skin tone looks a little bit green. Partly that's because of the Sony A7R III, just like Sony color science makes skin tones look slightly green. But I think it just looks a little bit nicer, a little bit more maybe cinematic with that adjustment layer with the LUT applied. That is the only thing I did with color. I pretty much decided one day I played around with the settings, copied and pasted them onto an adjustment layer. I've been using exactly the same LUT for all of my videos for the last six months all there about. That was a very quick guide to color grading. Links in the video description to more links of like LUTs and all that kind of stuff. Thanks for watching and I'll see you in the next video. 32. Exporting: Finally, once we have everything together on our video, we're just going to export it and exporting and final cut is really easy. You can press command and E. Or if you want to be old-school about it, you can click this share icon in the top corner. Master file is what I export to. You got your title, you got to do your description under settings. I got video and audio, H.264, which is a compression codec. I just open with QuickTime player. I don't actually change anything about these settings. Hit next, export, and you're done. I'm not going to export this cause I have a few file changes to make. But I mean, in Premier Pro and stuff, there's all these weird settings for exporting, but I just go for the book standard master file export, export the full 4K file or the __init__.py file, depending on what I'm working with. Then I will upload to YouTube manually. I don't like uploading directly to YouTube from final cut because I'd like to have that physical file there, which means that I can then put that on my external hard drive and I always have a reference to the full 4K resolution file of my videos rather than the downscale version that it's going to go up onto YouTube. That's it for exporting. Very straightforward. I'll see you in the next video. 33. Conclusion: We are finally there. We have pretty much got everything. I don't think we actually need to add any more things to this video. I might add a few more final touches where I've got these markers. When he dies, he releases a message out. Yeah, I might add a few more final touches, where I just add a little bit more text. But this is essentially my entire video workflow from start to finish. We've talked about how to import the footage, how to put into libraries, how to create projects, the basic stuff, we've spent absolutely ages focusing on the A cut, the basic skill of video editing, setting in and out points and appending them to the end of the timeline, and then making sure that we have gotten rid of all the pauses and all the mistakes such that our A-Roll cut is really, really, really nice and tight. Then we talked a lot about B-roll and how to add various effect over the top. Things like text layers, things like timestamps, full-screen transition, iPad animations, images, full-screen images, full-screen video, all of these other stuff. We talked a little bit about transitions and about how you can add sound effects like the plop or like the whoo or like the phew, all these various things that you can add to just add a little bit more finesse to the videos. Then we ended by talking about how to add music. We've gone with the single music track, of course the whole thing. We've extended it into Adobe Audition, although you can't just copy and paste if you want to. We talked about how to modulate the music so that in my opinion, it's a bit better if you have it a bit louder at the start and a bit louder at the end. Then finally we talked about the color grade and I showed you my workflow for how I color grade videos from start to finish. Overall, these are the editing skills that I've picked up over the last two years since I started doing YouTube in 2017. I don't know when you're watching this, but I'm filming in September 2019. It's been about two and a bit years. Over time I've developed a very efficient workflow, I think, at Final Cut Pro. I'm still always looking for ways to make it a bit more efficient. I'm still watching YouTube tutorials fairly regularly from other more advanced editors to see if I can pick up any tips that might improve my own workflow. Because I know that shaving even a few seconds off each individual task will make such a huge difference in the long run, especially because I work as a YouTuber while also working full time as a doctor and also trying to have some semblance of a social life. Essentially, the more efficient we can be with our editing, the more we can create content, the more we can help people, the more we can also spend time doing things other than sitting in front of a computer and editing videos. I really hope this series of classes or whatever has been helpful. Initially, I only intended for this to be about 10 or 15 videos, but it spiraled out of control to the point where I've just basically taken you through absolutely everything. If you get to get started on YouTube, then by all means go for it, it's fantastic. Hopefully you've learned some techniques in this. If you are already a seasoned pro, then I hope you've picked and chosen the videos that you want to watch. Maybe you just wanted to see how to do the iPad [inaudible] animation or the timestamps, whatever the case, that's absolutely fine. Thank you so much for watching. It's been a real pleasure to have you on board. If you have any questions about any aspect of video editing, leave them down in the comment section of this video wherever you find it. I'm not sure whether you can actually have comments. I'm sure you can. Do please send links to videos that you've edited using some of these techniques. If you have any techniques of your own that you've picked up over the years of video editing, then please do let me know. Again, leave a comment down below and I'll do my best to respond to everything. Thank you so much for watching. All the best with your journey as a video editor. I will see you on my YouTube channel or in another video or somewhere. Thanks for watching. Bye bye.