Using Greenscreen with Your Animations: FCPX, Rough Animator, ProAnimation 2 | Patrick Davidson | Skillshare

Using Greenscreen with Your Animations: FCPX, Rough Animator, ProAnimation 2

Patrick Davidson, Expat Animator

Using Greenscreen with Your Animations: FCPX, Rough Animator, ProAnimation 2

Patrick Davidson, Expat Animator

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6 Lessons (18m)
    • 1. Class Trailer

      2:07
    • 2. Animate a Cycle in Rough Animator

      5:14
    • 3. Using Greenscreen with Animation

      2:03
    • 4. Using Greenscreen in FCPX

      2:35
    • 5. Using FCPX Plugin ProAnimation 2

      4:43
    • 6. Recap

      1:12
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About This Class

Have you ever thought about using greenscreen techniques in your animation project? This class will show you both why you should and how to do it. 

This class will teach you how to add a greenscreen to your hand-drawn animations. I'll also show you why that's important for compositing your animation with other video clips.

The class requirements are a computer or tablet with Rough Animator. A drawing tablet or stylus is recommended but not necessary. You will also need Final Cut Pro X or another video editor. You may also want the Plugin ProAnimation 2 from Pixel Film Studio, but it is not necessary for the greenscreen portion of the class.

This class is for Intermediate Level. You should have a basic knowledge of video editing with Final Cut Pro X or a similar editing software. If you are familiar with Rough Animator that will help with this class. If not, you might want to take my class "Hand-Drawn Animation for Beginners (Rough Animator)".

Meet Your Teacher

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Patrick Davidson

Expat Animator

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Transcripts

1. Class Trailer: Have you ever thought about using green screen techniques in your animation project? This class will show you both why you should and how to do it. This class will teach you how to add a green screen to your hand drawn animations. I'll also show you why that's important for compositing your animation with other video clips for our class project, we will be animating a ghost. Then we will composite that goes over our shoulder using green screen techniques. Finally, we will make the ghost float using a plug in called pro animation, too. The class requirements are a computer or tablet with the program Rough Animator. A drawing tablet or stylist is recommended but not necessary. You will also need final cut Pro 10 or another video editor. You may also want the plug in pro animation to from pixel film studios, but it is not necessary for the green screen portion of the class. This class is for intermediate level. You should have a basic knowledge of video editing with final cut pro 10 for a similar editing software. If you are familiar with rough animator, that will help with this class. If not, you might want to take my class. Hand drawn animation for beginners using Rough Animator If you're not familiar with Rough animator, don't worry. It's only $5 it's really easy to learn. Hi there. My name is Patrick Davidson, and I'm also known as the Expat Animator, Demographics freelancer and part time animator. I've been animating for over 20 years now, and I've worked on projects from TV commercials to feature films. I worked mainly in two D for hand drawn animation. My favorite animated projects are the Web comedy series Traveling Gringos and My Action, Siri's Trip. I'm also an expat California living in my new adopted country of Costa Rica. But enough about me. Let's get into this class. 2. Animate a Cycle in Rough Animator: for today's class, we're gonna be animating a ghost, So let's go ahead and get started. So let's go ahead and launch Rough Animator Create a new project and 10. 80 p at 30 frames is good and there's our canvas. Let's go and import an image that we're going to be drawing. And I found this ghost on the Internet, So I'm going to just basically trace this guy. Let's go and add three frames. We're gonna have this animation cycle, so let's add an empty layer above it. Dominica's call this animation and what I want to do is I'm gonna add a couple of drawings so that we get our three drawings and pull the capacity down on our ghost. And let's just start, go ahead and trace this guy. So I'm gonna grab black hair and I brush tool, and I'm just going to start tracing and it doesn't have to be perfect. So if you've seen any of my other animation classes were basically just doing the make cycle technique here within Rough Animator, and we're going to do that with these through three drawings, so I'm just gonna do these three drawings real quick here and then we're going to move on to the next section. Okay, so let's go ahead and start to fill in our character. And the reason we want to do that is I'm just gonna go ahead and throw a color, any random color on the background here and fill our background so we can see what we need to fill in for the color. So I'm going to pick White and I'm going to check my feel expand here in my tool options feels behind and let's that should work would see what we get here, the room on the wrong layer. So let's go ahead. And that looks pretty good. Let's just go ahead and feeling our ghost on all three drawings here and now. I want to go back and fill in the mouth here and the eyes. And let's just do that on all three drawings. And then let's grab a ah red here and just color in the tongue. Okay, so now got our ghost ready to go. Let's go ahead and animate him. So I'm gonna add a drawing after our last drawing here, and I'm going to hit make cycle. And now we've got our cycle here. And if I add to this, you can see we're starting our cycles. But I want it Go back to these original three drawings and add two frames teach drawing here, and that's just gonna help with our timing a little bit. And I wanna hold this for about 10 seconds. So let's go ahead and grab the green cycle here, and I'm just going to pipe. Type in 291 frames minus these initial nine gives us 300 frames, which is 10 seconds of animation. So let's go ahead. Let me grab my preferences here, and I'm gonna pull back on timeline, Horizontal zoom and you can see here. We've got 10 seconds of animation now, so it's go ahead. Just play that and there's our ghost. So now we want to get this ghost into a video so it could be floating next to my shoulder here, and that's basically what we're gonna end up editing in our editor, which would be final cut pro for this class. Now there's two ways to do this and the first way you would go here and you would export file and you can export a PNG sequence now. The reason I don't like to do this is because Final Cut Pro doesn't treat the P and G sequence as its own movie. It treats it as individual frames, and there's a process that is kind of cumbersome to turn that into a movie. So to avoid that process, that's kind of a pain I prefer to export as quick time video. But there's a trick, and the trick is that you need the background to be transparent so we could turn the background off here. And if I export this as a quick time video, we're gonna have that background. It's not gonna be transparent. It's going to be white. So my trick that I came up with is I'm gonna make the background of the ghost a green screen. So let's go ahead to the next section and I'll show you how I do that 3. Using Greenscreen with Animation: So let's talk about green screens. If you go on the Internet, you'll find different RGB values for different green screens. So you just have to pick one that works for you, and I'll show you what I have been using. So I've got my green screen already open here in my photo editor, and you can see the RGB values of my green. Here I've got are zero G as 1 77 and be as 63 and this color of green works very well for me within final Cut pro. So you could just export this as a 10 80 p sized image. And I'll go ahead and have that this exact same green screen background that I use as a J pig for you to use in your own projects. So if we go back to our animation, what I want to do is fill this background with that green screen. So let's do file import image. I'm gonna grab that green screen J peg and paste it there on the background and by clicking one time it's placing it on the canvas. So now when I hit play, I've got my ghost animating on top of the green screen. Now, this trick won't work If, say, your ghost has some green in his outfit or your character has some green That's not gonna work for this trick. But for something like our ghost here, this is gonna work. Fine. So let's go ahead now and export as a quick time video and I'll just call this ghost animation and save that out. So now I want to go ahead and bring that exported quick time video into my video editor, which is final Cut pro 10. So let's do that in the next section. 4. Using Greenscreen in FCPX: So let's go ahead and open a new project in final Cut pro, And I'm going to create a new project and I'm going to call this ghost animation and go ahead and create a new project. I'm gonna call this green screen test and make sure that I'm at 10. 80 p 30 frames per second, which is the same frame rate I used on my export of the ghost animation. Okay, so let's go ahead and bring in are ghost animation movie that we made. And I'm going to go ahead and place that into the timeline here and now I need to bring in a video clip and we're going to show how we green screen this. So I'm gonna go ahead and bring in a clip video clip here, and I'm just going to grab a little section of this like and drop that on my timeline here . And I want to make sure that that's below the green screen and let me just clean this up real quick here. Okay? So now the trick here is we're gonna select the green screen clip. We're gonna go over to our effects in final cut pro and we want to go too keen. Now there is here and there's loom a cure. And if you just put your mouse over, it will actually show you that. Here's what you want. It knocks out the green blue McTeer doesn't do that, so we can just take here and drop it right onto our clip. And there it's knocked out the green background so I can get rid of my effects here. Now, all I really need to do is make sure I select the clip and I can go ahead and scale my goes down and positioning wherever I want him to be floating. Okay. And then it done. And now when I go ahead and play this, you can see I've got an animated ghost over my shoulder composited into my video clip. And that's all there is to it, really. But we're gonna take this one step ahead in the next section. We're going to make our ghost float, so I'll see you there 5. Using FCPX Plugin ProAnimation 2: so to make our ghost float. There's a plug in that I like to use in final cut pro called Pro Animation to, and I'm gonna go Ahead and show You that right now. So over here in final cut pro, we've got the titles and generators sidebar. If we click that, you can see here that there's something called pixel film studios Pro Animation, too. Now this is a paid plug and set that I got off the Internet and I'm gonna show you how I did that. But once we've got it installed, this is where it shows up. So let's go ahead and I'll show you how to get that installed into your final cut pro cause It's not going to be there by default. So if we go to pixel film studios dot com, you'll notice that they've got a search feature over here. We click that then, and we search for the word animation. You'll see some results pop up, and the 1st 1 here is pro animation to, and it's currently 29 95 marked down from 49 95. So if I were to click this, you can watch a video and it shows you all of the presets that it comes with. We're really just looking for one for today's class. So I would add this to the cart and go ahead and pay for this. And they've got really good tutorials on how to install it within your final cut pro. So once you've got your plug in installed, we can go back in the final cut pro and again it will be here under the titles and generators sidebar. And what we want to do is we want to select that so pixel film studios pro animation, too. Now you can see that these air broken into three categories we've got animate in And then we've got animate out and then we've got through. So in this through section underneath this little line right here we're gonna look for levitate And then what we do is just click and drag that and drop it on top of our ghost here. And then I want to drag that all the way to the end of the clip. Now you'll notice it's levitating my video as well. We don't want that. So here's the trick with this. You want to select that plug in and the video that you want it tied to, and then we can right click and hit new compound clip, and I'm just going to call this floating ghost. You can call it whatever you want, and then they merge into their own clip. And now that that's done, you can see that the only thing floating is the ghost and not the background video. And that's what we're going for now. If you want to go ahead and tweet that, because maybe he's floating too much or not fast enough, you can go and double click that we can go into the levitate and then over here. If we click on the T here, you can see these. There's parameters for this animation effect and you've got animation strength. You've got position sliders. So you've got a whole bunch of stuff here that you can use to change the animation effect of that ghost so we can get out of our floating ghost compound of clip here and now we're back at the timeline, and we can just play this from the beginning, and there we have it. So at this point, we can export are composited video and we'd be done. So let's just go ahead and export that 10. 80 p in my case, give it a name and save it to the desktop. So let's go ahead and go look at our final output ID clip here on our desktop. And again, there's no sound on this, but let's go ahead and hit play. And there you have it, how to use green screen with your animations with Rough Animator Final Cut Pro and the bonus of adding on the floating clip from the pro animation to plug in from pixel film studios. Stick with me for the next section, where we recap what we've just learned. 6. Recap: congratulations on completing this skill share class, but we're not done quite yet. Let's recap what we've just learned today we learned how to animate a cycle in Rough Animator. We discussed why using the green screen behind your animation might be the best and easiest option for compositing with video clips. We went over good RGB color values to using your green screen background. We saw how to remove the green screen within final cut pro 10. Using the Keir Effect, we went over how to buy and install a plug in for final cut Pro 10 at Pixel Film Studios website. And finally we used that plug in tow. Add a floating effect to our animated ghost. Remember to post your work to the your project section of this class, I will do my best to check all of the projects that come through and give feedback. Please follow My profile here on skill share is I have plans to create a lot more animation classes and thank you for taking my class today. I hope you're able to learn something valuable. This has been Patrick Davidson, the expat animator. See you next time