Useful & Common English Phrasal Verbs | Group 3 | Able Lingo ASL | Skillshare

Useful & Common English Phrasal Verbs | Group 3

Able Lingo ASL, American Sign Language (ASL)

Useful & Common English Phrasal Verbs | Group 3

Able Lingo ASL, American Sign Language (ASL)

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6 Lessons (22m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:00
    • 2. "bump off"

      3:10
    • 3. "cut down on"

      3:51
    • 4. "go over"

      4:45
    • 5. "pull through"

      3:52
    • 6. "stock up"

      5:41
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About This Class

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EXPLORE AND MASTER essential English phrasal verbs with a native English teacher.

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IN THIS CLASS:

  • We explore useful and common English phrasal verbs frequently used by native speakers
  • We examine the definition of each phrasal verb and use images to guarantee understanding
  • We see each phrasal verb used in the past, present, and future verb tenses
  • We do pronunciation practice using each example sentence
  • We explore each example situation to better understand why and how the phrasal verb was used
  • We master essential English phrasal verbs

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THE TARGET PHRASAL VERBS ARE:

  • "bump off"
  • "cut down on"
  • "go over"
  • "pull through"
  • "stock up"

THE TARGET ENGLISH SKILLS ARE:

  • English phrasal verbs
  • English vocabulary
  • English verb tenses
  • English pronunciation
  • Active English grammar

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AFTER TAKING THIS CLASS:

  • Students will be able to use important English phrasal verbs immediately
  • Students will have mastered useful English phrasal verbs frequently used by native speakers in common life situations
  • Students will be more confident with their English proficiency and vocabulary skills
  • Students will be more fluent in English

REQUIREMENTS:

  • A desire to improve, have fun, and be more confident using English
  • A computer, tablet, or smartphone to access the study material

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THIS CLASS WILL:

  • Improve your communication fluency as you master common and useful English phrasal verbs
  • Boost your proficiency with important English vocabulary and phrases
  • Increase your overall vocabulary by learning alternative ways to say essential phrasal verbs
  • Increase your confidence and ability to communicate using the English language

LET'S HAVE SOME FUN as you expand your vocabulary and become more fluent in English.

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Well, hello. What? That's right. You guessed it. We're going to talk about Fraser verbs. Which ones? Well, let's take a look. We're going to talk about bump off, cut down on, go over both through and stock up. OK, so we're not just gonna do a little bit. We're going to do a lot. We're going to talk about each one in depth. For example. Once we get to bump off, we're going to do the meaning. We're going to do the past present future examples with different tenses. Berg tenses. We also kind of have pictures with the situation that we can talk about. It's great, and we're going to do this for each phrase over. So this should be a great opportunity for you to really soak up and understand how to use the's Fraser verbs. OK, let's do it. Let's get started 2. "bump off": Let's talk about the phrase. Oh, verb. Bump off to bump off. Okay, So to bump off means to murder, kill or assassinate someone. All right, so we have the picture of this lady's like, Ah, right. And the lady in the guys like, So he's probably going to bump off the woman. Uh huh. So he's going to kill her. All right, lovely. Let's take a look at this, uh, brazel verb in the past, present and future. Here we go. Let's take a look at the past. It's an opportunity for pronunciation. Repeat out loud after me. Here we go. Last week, George bumped off Tom because Tom didn't like his cooking. Okay, An unfortunate situation for Tom because Thomas now dead. Okay, So George is very sensitive about his cooking, and he killed Tom because Tom didn't like his cooking. So another way to say the sentence would be last week. George killed Tom because Tom didn't like his cooking. Okay, let's do the president. Repeat out loud. Here we go. Maria is bumping off her ex boyfriend. She's also recording it for YouTube. All right, so I'll give you another way to say this sentence. We could say Maria is assassinating her ex boyfriend. Maria is murdering her ex boyfriend, and she's also recording it for YouTube. Why? I imagine Maria is crazy. But either way, that is an example of the present tense Using bump off. Right, Let's do future tense. Repeat out loud after me. If he takes the contract, Gabriel will bump off Henry within three days. Okay, so this would be in the dark criminal world of assassinations. And you pay people to kill someone else there called an assassin or ah ah, murder for hire type of thing where they take a contract and then they kill someone. All right, so we could also say in the sentence if he takes the contract, Gabriel will assassinate Henry within three days. All right. Assassinate works here because it's usually a specific killing and is very common, I guess for someone to be paid to do it, you could say kill. You could say murder assassinate probably would fit very well here. Okay, So nice. Lovely situation. We just talked about the phrase of herb bump off to bump off. Remember, it means to murder, kill or assassinate someone 3. "cut down on": Let's talk about the phrase Oh, verb. Cut down on to cut down on. All right. So it means to reduce or lower the intake of something. So there's ah, flow of something in this case is going to be food. So there's a flow of food, and then, oh, we have to lower the amount of food that we're eating. All right? So if you cut down on something, it's very common to say I need to cut down on chocolate. I need to cut down on sweets. I need to cut down on unhealthy, greasy, fatty food. All right, so this lady over here, she kind of has a look like, you know, you need to eat less. Mm. Then we have a plate with this, like tiny burger. Maybe the burger was like this big before, But the lady, she's like, No, I think you could have a burger, but it needs to be like this big. So you need to cut down on the unhealthy ingredients in the burger. Something like that. All right. So let's take a look at this phrase over been the past, present and future. I'm going to read each sentence out loud and then pause so you can repeat after me and improve your pronunciation. Okay, here we go. Let's start with the past. Fred. Cut down on fried chicken after his bathroom scale broke. Okay? So, in other words, Fred, eight less or cut back is another way. He lessened. Reduced the amount of fried chicken that he ate after his bathroom scale broke. Right. A bathroom scale is a little thing that you stand on in the bathroom, and it tells you how much you what you weigh. Right. So Fred must have been getting very heavy, very fat. And he stood on the scale and crack. The scale broke. So now he's like, um, I have to cut down on fried chicken. All right, let's take a look in the presence. Repeat out loud after me, we're cutting down on high fructose corn syrup because it's unhealthy. All right, so this is the present. We're doing it now. We might have started a while ago, and we're going to continue into the future. But right now we're cutting down. We're reducing. Our intake were lower in the level of this kind of food that were eating. So we're cutting down. We're reducing our level of high proof toast. Corn syrup? Because it's unhealthy. All right. All right, let's do the future. Repeat out loud after me after this trip, will cut back on donuts, ice cream cake and potato chips. Okay, so it looks like, uh, whatever they're doing right now, they're going crazy eating on eating doughnuts, ice cream cake, potato chips and junk food. Right, So they're like, they're thinking into the future, right? So we're on a trip. Oh, it's just, you know, go crazy. That's eat whatever we want. And later, later, we can cut back on this junk food later, we can reduce the amount of eating this kind of food. Uh, okay, so we talked about the phrase oh, verb cut down on to cut down on. And it means to reduce or lower or lesson or decrease the intake of something. And intake just means that something is coming in. And in this these situations, it was food, right? So we're gonna lower the amount of food that were eating of this kind of food. All right, OK, Looks good. 4. "go over": Let's talk about the phrase a verb. Go over to go over all right. It means to review something carefully and thoroughly, right? So if we say thoroughly, it means you really get in there like this guy here in the picture. He's looking at all the details of small words. You really know what you're doing, so if you learn something thoroughly, you don't just learn part of it. You learn the whole thing and you learn it at a very high level. Very in depth level. All right, so to go over to review something go over something to look at, something to practice, remembering something. You keep trying to learn something even more, all right to review something carefully and thoroughly, right? So the lady she's studying on her phone, which is great. Our phones can come with us everywhere. So she's reviewing. Maybe she's reviewing for a speech. Maybe she's studying for a class. Or maybe she's just learning something that would be useful for her life. Right? So she's reviewing the information, right? This guy over here he is in his book. The book is huge, and he is down in it, focused, looking at what's happening. All right, so let's take a look at the this praise over been the past, present and future and do some pronunciation. Repeat after me and I will pause so that you have time to say it as well. Here we go. Let's do the past. Mark went over the notes for his geography presentation 50 times. All right. So if Mark went over the notes because went is the past tense of goal, right? So Mark went over. He studied his notes. He looked at. He reviewed his notes for the geography presentation 50 times, right. If we're talking about geography, it's like places, locations, countries, states, cities where things are in the world. All right, So, Mark, if he studied it 50 times, Hey went over it reviewed it 50 times. This presentation must be very important. Or maybe Mark lack self confidence, and he This is the first time he's given a speech and he's like, I need to practice. I need to practice. I need to practice. But imagine after 50 times he probably doesn't even need to look at his notes, right? He's good to go. All right, let's do the present repeat out loud after me. Here we go. We're going over the tests and we'll let everyone know the results soon. All right, so this sounds like a situation. Maybe there was a final exam or something in people. The students, they want to know their results. They need to know the results so they can move forward and know if they could move forward or if they need to redo something. Right. So when this says we're I imagine it would be the administrators, maybe the professors or the teachers. They're going over the tests. That could be that they're gonna be grading the tests to decide what score. Or maybe there's an allegation that someone cheated. When we say allegation, someone may be brought up. They are accusing someone that someone cheated on the exam, but they're not sure which one. Or maybe there was a problem with the exam so they could be going over the tests for different reasons. Right? And we'll let everyone know the results soon, right? This is not really what the students want to hear. They want to know the results now. But maybe the administration is giving the students an update on their progress. Okay, let's do the future. Repeat out loud. Don't worry. We'll go over what's required after we eat lunch. Okay, so this is quite broad. It could be at work. Could be it could be at school. I don't know. They need to talk about some information which is important for studying or for the presentation of the project or whatever, but they're going to take a break, right? So they're gonna eat lunch first, and then they're going to go over there, review what's required later in the day after the lunch. Okay, that was pretty straightforward. All right, so we talked about the phrase a verb go over to go over, which means to review something carefully in thoroughly to really look at and learn something well, or you're checking something to see if there was a mistake. An error, something like that. Okay. All right. Wonderful. 5. "pull through": Let's talk about the phrase Oh, verb. Pull through to pull through. OK, so it means to survive, continue living and not die. So if someone says he didn't pull through or you don't pull through, that means you're dead. Right? But here it is. It's positive to pull through. OK, so let's take a look. The ladies like, Yes, because she's happy, the person she loves and cares about. They pulled through. They didn't die. They survived. Maybe they had heart surgery, right? Something was wrong with their hearts of the doctors had to operate, and there were there were nervous something was happening and a person pulled through. They survived. All right, so let's take a look at this phrase a verb. In the past, present and future. I'm gonna read each sentence and then pause so you can repeat out loud. Okay, let's do it. Here we go. Somehow Henry pulled through after the crocodile swallowed him whole. Okay, So, in other words, Henry survived. Somehow Henry didn't die after the crocodile swallowed him whole. And when we say swallowed him whole, you could swallow something like, I don't know, swallow an apple hole, which would be like, hopefully a small apple. But if you swallow something whole, it's the complete peace. You don't chew it and then swallow. It's just one piece, maybe like a grape. A raisin a nut would be is much easier to swallow whole cause you just go. No chewing. It just goes down. So in this situation, Henry pulled through. He survived after the crocodile come swallowed him whole. All right, let's do the president. Repeat out loud. Her medical condition is serious, but Jenny is pulling through the worst of it. Okay, so in other words, her medical condition is serious, but Jenny is surviving the worst of it, right? So we don't know what her medical condition is. Maybe cancer, maybe. I don't know. Maybe she, uh, got bitten by the crocodile when she was trying to save, uh, Henry? I don't know, but her medical condition is serious. She's You know what? She might die. She might not survive, but she is pulling through the worst of it. So that means she's in a situation where she's probably surviving and improving. So she's not going to die. Okay, let's do the future. Repeat out loud after me. Don't worry. Fred is the toughest guy I know. I'm sure he'll pull through. Okay, so it's in the future. Even though it's in the future, we know that something is happening right now. That is very serious. All right, so maybe, uh, maybe whoever saying this is talking to friends. Family member, right? And the person is like, Oh, my goodness, he's going to die. And the other person says, Fred, so tough. He's gonna survive. He's going to pull through. He'll pull through. He won't die. He'll survive. And yes, things will be fine. That it are. Okay, So we talked about the phrase a verb pull through to pull through. It means to survive, continue living and not die. Okay, so is good. 6. "stock up": Let's talk about the phrase a verb stock up to stock up. It's very common to say to stock up on right to stock up on something batteries, food, clothing, whatever. And it means to buy a lot of something by a lot. A large supply of a specific product. Okay, so the lady she's pointing over there, she's like, check it out. So here we go. We're looking at a fuel gauge. Might call it. Ah, gas gauge, maybe. And it just measures the amount of petrol, fuel, gasoline, diesel, whatever that you have in your fuel tank. So we have e for empty an F for full. And right now, the the marker is on F for full. So we could say we stocked up on fuel. If you leave it down close to empty or 1/4 tank or half tank, then you're not really stocking up because you're going to run out soon. But if you put it on full, and maybe if you buy a whole extra tanks, extra gallon jugs to put extra gas, you could say your stocking up. Maybe you think the price is gonna go up. Maybe you have a long journey in the wilderness in Africa are somewhere where there no roads and stuff. It is difficult to get to a gas station or petrol station. So you stock up you by a large supply. All right, so let's see this phrase over been the past, present and future. I'm going to read each sentence and then pause so you can repeat after me and boost your pronunciation. Here we go. Let's start with the past. We stocked up on food and water because a huge storm was coming. Okay, So in other words, we bought ah lot of food and water because a huge storm was coming. Now this is common in the U. S. And I imagine around the world when there's a bad storm coming, whether it's a hurricane or tornado, something is coming and it's going to be an emergency. And usually the news and the government lets the people know about it. It was really bad. They say you need to leave. It's not so bad. They just say, you know, get some supplies, uh, protect your house and stay inside something like that. But before the storm comes, people go out like crazy and they buy food, water, batteries. I don't know. Tools, whatever they think they'll need to prepare them for this storm. And what what's what's happening after the storm. But sometimes a storm is short, but it destroys things. It is difficult to get supplies. You can't get to the store or you can't move or something, so you need supplies at home. So you stock up. You buy a lot of something in this situation. Probably food, maybe batteries. A tools, clothing. I don't know, right. Let's do the present Repeat out loud after me. Thomas stocking up on sardines because the store said there's no more. All right, so in this situation, I wouldn't call it an emergency. Well, Tom might think it's an emergency, but it's not the same kind of emergency, like a huge storm or something like that. So he's stocking up. He's buying a large supply of sardines because the store said there's no more. In other words, maybe they're not going to produce or sell the product that he likes, and he's like what? So maybe he has enough right now, but he's like if they're not gonna produce anymore, I'm gonna go by as much as I can, so I will have a supply for much longer into the future. All right, so this is good. We can use stock up not only for emergencies, but also if a product is no longer going to be sold and we want to have as much as we can for as long as we can. All right, let's do the future. Repeat out loud after me. Laura will stock up on cereal as soon as the price decreases a bit. Okay, so we don't quite have an emergency. We just have Laura, who is trying to save her money. Or maybe be a responsible consumer responsible buyer. And the product is cereal. It's good, it's delicious. But it's not like something you need right now, so she's thinking, Well, the price is a little bit high, so I'm gonna wait till maybe there's a discount. Me. There's a coupon, something that I can use to lower the price. And when the price decreases, I will buy a whole bunch. I will stock up, right? So if she really wants it bad right now at regular price, she might, you know, maybe buy one box of cereal or two boxes of cereal. However, if there's a coupon or a discount in the price goes down, she might buy like 10 boxes or 15 boxes. 20 boxes. Who knows? She will stock up because she wants to save money over the longer term instead of pain. Regular price Once in a while, she wants to pay a larger amount, but a lower price per box right now. Okay, so we talked about the phrase of herbs stock up to stock up, and it means to buy a lot of something to buy a large quantity of something because you want your supply toe last. All right. Looks good to me.