Useful & Common English Phrasal Verbs | Group 2 | Able Lingo ASL | Skillshare

Useful & Common English Phrasal Verbs | Group 2

Able Lingo ASL, American Sign Language (ASL)

Useful & Common English Phrasal Verbs | Group 2

Able Lingo ASL, American Sign Language (ASL)

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6 Lessons (23m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:18
    • 2. "carry out"

      2:47
    • 3. "fog up"

      6:11
    • 4. "get away"

      4:13
    • 5. "let up"

      4:49
    • 6. "try on"

      4:04
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About This Class

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EXPLORE AND MASTER essential English phrasal verbs with a native English teacher.

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IN THIS CLASS:

  • We explore useful and common English phrasal verbs frequently used by native speakers
  • We examine the definition of each phrasal verb and use images to guarantee understanding
  • We see each phrasal verb used in the past, present, and future verb tenses
  • We do pronunciation practice using each example sentence
  • We explore each example situation to better understand why and how the phrasal verb was used
  • We master essential English phrasal verbs

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THE TARGET PHRASAL VERBS ARE:

  • "carry out"
  • "fog up"
  • "get away"
  • "let up"
  • "try on"

THE TARGET ENGLISH SKILLS ARE:

  • English phrasal verbs
  • English vocabulary
  • English verb tenses
  • English pronunciation
  • Active English grammar

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AFTER TAKING THIS COURSE:

  • Students will be able to use important English phrasal verbs immediately
  • Students will have mastered useful English phrasal verbs frequently used by native speakers in common life situations
  • Students will be more confident with their English proficiency and vocabulary skills
  • Students will be more fluent in English

REQUIREMENTS:

  • A desire to improve, have fun, and be more confident using English
  • A computer, tablet, or smartphone to access the study material

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THIS COURSE WILL:

  • Improve your communication fluency as you master common and useful English phrasal verbs
  • Boost your proficiency with important English vocabulary and phrases
  • Increase your overall vocabulary by learning alternative ways to say essential phrasal verbs
  • Increase your confidence and ability to communicate using the English language

LET'S HAVE SOME FUN as you expand your vocabulary and become more fluent in English.

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hey and low. We're going to study phrase. Oh, verbs. And we're going to study these phrase of herbs. Harry, out, Bog up, Get away, Let up and try on That's right. Or each phrase over Bob will give you the definition will talk about the meaning. And we'll also see the phrase of herb used in the past, present and future tense is I like it. And of course, we're going to do pronunciation of all the example sentences. This is a great chance to improve your pronunciation ability, but you can repeat out loud after me, we'll do it together. Then we'll explore the example. Situations will look at the vocabulary. See other ways to say the phrase a verb and learn something new. Okay, well, we're going to master essential raisel verbs. It sounds wonderful. What do you think? Yes. Okay, well, let's do it 2. "carry out": Let's talk about the phrase. Oh, verb. Carry out. Okay, So carry out means to perform work, to do a job. You take action to do something, right? So the lady here, she's giving us the thumbs up because, uh, maybe the workers finally doing his job, and she's like, Yes, he's taking action. He's carrying out his duties. All right, so let's take a look at this phrase over been the past, present and future. I'm going to say, read each sentence and then pause so you can repeat out loud after me. Okay, so let's start with the past. Repeat after me. Here we go. The work was carried out by a local contractor who knew the area. Well, okay, so a local contractor is just like a local business person who does this kind of work, right? So they, uh, except a contract. They agreed to something to, you know, do whatever the work is. The work was carried out, carried out by local contractor who knew the area Well, right. If you hire a local contractor, they probably live in the area. They know a lot of information about it. They know who to talk to and it can save time. Okay, So repeat after me. Let's do the present. Tom carries out his work tasks every day with efficiency and a smile. Okay, so Tom does his work every day, you know, in an effective way. So if it's with efficiency, it means he doesn't waste time. And even better, he smiles. He may be a manager's dream. Okay, let's do the future. Repeat out loud after me. Hopefully, George will carry out his experiments while wearing a helmet. Okay, So if we hope that George is going to do his experience, his experiments, or carry out his experiments wearing a helmet, there must be something reckless or dangerous or potentially hazardous with Georges experiments. But either way, we hope he wears a helmet. Okay, so we just talked about the phrase a verb carry out 3. "fog up": Let's talk about the phrase a verb fog up to fog up. All right, we're going to be talking about windows or glasses, right? Glasses like these, not glasses that you drink from. Well, I suppose it's possible. But here it's more like glass is something that you need to see through right windows and glasses. We see through them all the time. Okay, so to fog up means to become covered with small drops of water and then you can't see through or it's difficult to see through. Or you could Onley kind of see shapes. You can't see things clearly, so the pictures show it better than I can explain it so we can say these window's fogged up . This one kind of looks like it's the window on like a passenger car of a train and someone sitting there and the windows are fogged up. It's very common when there's air conditioning in one inside the room or the car or the train or whatever, and outside it's really hot. Sometimes the windows will fog up when there's a temperature difference, then condensation, which is like the little droplets of water form on the window, and then it fogs up, it becomes covered, and it's difficult to see through it. Okay, so let's take a look at this phrase, a verb fog up in the past, present and future. I'm going to start with the past and read each sentence out loud that I will pause to give you time to practice your pronunciation. Repeat out loud after me. Here we go. The window's fogged up after Tom and June started making out. Okay, so in other words, the windows became foggy. The windows became misty, the windows became covered in water droplets after Tom and June started making out. Now we need to understand what does making out mean? Mm. Making out means kissing like crazy. So they were. They were kissing each other like crazy. And if it says the windows, I'm going to guess like in a car, and because they're kissing and having such a romantic time. The heat. It became warmer inside the car than outside the car, and the windows started to fog up. Small droplets of waters formed on the windows and made it misty made it foggy so you can't see through now. You can probably see the shapes moving around, but you wouldn't be able to see the details like this picture right here. We can tell that there's a guy. There's a person sitting in the seat and we can see the outline, the silhouette. But we can't, you know, see the details okay, so fogged up after they were making out. And they must have been making out and kissing for a while to fog up the windows. All right, let's do the president. Repeat out loud. Turn on the heater, the windows air fogging up and I can't see the road. Okay, So similar to what I had mentioned before. When there's a strong temperature difference between one place and another, maybe inside a car inside a train, inside a room and outside, then it's common for there to be condensation. Small drops of water on the windows, and it makes them fog up. It makes them cloudy. It makes them misty, so it's difficult to look through. So we could say the windows are becoming misty, the windows air getting blocked. The windows are getting full of water vapor water droplets, and I can't see the road. Uh, this is quite common, I guess especially if you had a car like I did when I was in college. It was a good car, but it has issues. And one of them was if it was really cold out or, uh, even weird times, there would be condensation. There would be far gone, the windows, and it was kind of inconvenient. And I would just have, like, a towel. Sometimes I would wipe it off. But you do what you have to do. All right, let's do the future. Repeat out loud after me. Whoa! I'd better slow down my glasses. Air all fogged up and I can't see. Well, okay, so sometimes I wear glasses. I have glasses like this, and these are really glasses, right? So they have glass and these ones, they're just big glasses, in case you didn't know. But when I wear my real glasses and if I've been inside where it's been air conditioning, it's quite cold. And I've been in there for a while. Then I walk outside into like, hot, humid weather. My glasses fog up almost immediately, and it's like, Oh, I can't really see where I'm going. So that would be like the worst time for me to start running or meet the worst time for me to start driving. Usually I just take my glasses and put him like this and then eventually the far kind of disappears. And, no, there's no problem. But as it's adjusting, it's kind of, you know, inconvenient cause you can't see anything. Maybe if they had little windshield wipers, that might be helpful. Okay, so we talked about the phrase over fog up to fog up. And here we're going to be talking about windows or glasses, something that you need to see through, right, your windows, maybe even your windshield on your car, the side windows or your glasses that you wear. All right, fog up means that to become covered with small drops of water. And as we see the pictures down here, you can see through kinda. You can see shapes and outlines and silhouettes, but it's not clear. Probably gonna need to wipe off the window or wait till the temperature on the inside and the temperature on the outside become almost the same. All right, another wonderful phrase. Oh, verb 4. "get away": Let's talk about the phrase Oh, verb. Get away to get away. It just means to take a vacation or go on Holiday Could be. Take a trip, go somewhere and it's not like, you know, go down the street to the market. It's like you're going some going somewhere for vacation, going to spend some time there. And it's not part of your regular schedule, right? So you get away, you get away from your regular life for a while. Could be like that. All right, The lady, she's like, Yes, Oh, yeah, I get to go get away for two weeks, Go on vacation for a month, something like that. Maybe she's going to some tropical destination and she's going to drink this fruity cocktail drink, whatever it is next to the ocean on the beach in beautiful weather. So she's going to get away. In other words, take a vacation or go on a holiday. All right, so let's take a look at this phrase over been the past, present and future. I'm going to read each sentence out loud and then pause so you can repeat out loud after me . That's boost your pronunciation. Here we go repeat after me. We got away to the south of France for three weeks last summer. Okay? So in other words, we went on vacation to the south of France for three weeks last summer. We went on holiday to the south of France for three weeks last summer, All right, and in my experience, it's common for more common for Americans to say vacation and the British seem to say holiday. And if you say holiday to me in the US, I don't think necessarily of a vacation. I think of one of the special days in the year that school is closed. Or maybe the government says it's a holiday. We're going to celebrate something. But when I think of holiday, I usually don't think of vacation. When I think a vacation, I think of a trip somewhere. You go, you leave, you go somewhere in holiday. Maybe I leave. Maybe I don't. Maybe I stay home. But when I think of holiday, it's just today that businesses are closed or school is closed. But it's just different, depending where you're from. Okay, let's do the president. Repeat out loud after me. Sam gets away every six months or so we wonder well, where he'll go next. Okay, so we could say Sam vacations. Sam goes on vacation every six months or so. Um, Or if you want to use holiday, Sam goes on holiday every six months or so, and we wonder were curious where he'll go next. All right, so every six months, Sam goes on vacation. Nice. Alright, future. Repeat out loud after me. It's OK. We'll get away next year when you have more time off from work. Okay, so it's OK. You could say no worries. Don't worry about it. All right? We'll get away. We'll go on vacation. Will take a vacation next year when you have more time off from work. All right, so maybe during the year, they accrue time. Maybe like every two weeks, you get a few hours of vacation and so it accrues. It adds up, right? And then ah, they're thinking maybe they'll take up maybe a bigger vacation next year. Maybe this time they only have a few vacation hours with the like. OK, I'll work the whole year next, the whole next year. And then in the future, I'll have more time and we can take an even better vacation. We can get away to somewhere even better. All right, So this is the phrase over. Get away to get away and it means to take a vacation or go on holiday. 5. "let up": Let's talk about the phrase Oh verb let up to let up and we use this phrase over. But when we're talking about a situation when the weather becomes more pleasant, all right, so maybe there was a horrible storm hurricane, a tornado, something that was creating problems, maybe destroying things. And it was dark and rainy and thunder and lightning and are right. And suddenly it stops. It gets quiet, the sun starts to come out, the cloud start to move apart and you can see blue sky. We can say the storm has stopped and the weather is letting up, right? So if we look at the picture here, we could see clouds. It's there's a son off in the distance. It looks like it's going to be really nice weather, however, like five minutes before, a few minutes before, it could have been storming and windy and rainy and just a horrible weather, and it's leading up. The weather is improving, the weather is getting better, weather is getting nicer. And this lady, she's like, Yes, finally, I've been waiting for the weather to let up. I've been waiting for the weather to improve. Okay, let's take a look at this phrase over Been the past, present and future. All right, I'm gonna start with the past and I will read the sentence out loud. And then I will pause to give you time to pronounce and do pronunciation after me. Let's do it. Here we go. It had been raining for 20 days when it finally let up, We were so relieved. Okay, so 20 days is a long time for to be raining. I mean, that's almost three weeks, right? Okay, so let's see another way to say let up in this sentence. You could say it had been raining for 20 days when the weather finally improved when it finally stopped raining when it's finally stopped storming, Uh, so it let up, the weather became more pleasant, became nicer, and we were so relieved. Relieved means like, Ah, right now you're more relaxed. Before, you were kind of stressed out and now the stress has gone away and you're like, Ah, I feel so relieved. Relaxed, calm, tranquil. Okay, let's do the present. Repeat out loud after me. Look, it's letting up, I think will be able to go outside and play soon. Okay, I can remember when I was a kid and I had to stay inside, it was storming outside or the weather was dangerous. Or some reason that my mom wouldn't allow me to go outside because of the weather. So I would sit at the window and I would look, you watch the rain. You're like, I want to go outside and finally, and as a kid, it seems like forever, right? It starts to let up. The weather starts to improve, the clouds start to move apart. The sun comes out and stuff like that. And then I could go play soon, right? Okay, Let's do the future. Repeat out loud after me, it will let up soon. How do I know I don't. I'm just trying to make you feel better. Okay, so this sounds like a situation where there at least two people and they're talking. And one of them is kind of depressed. Feeling stressed out about the weather because it might be dark and gloomy if there's no son in the skies rained like crazy into a kind of gloomy, melancholy weather. And the other person is trying to cheer them up. Ah, it'll let up soon it'll get better that the weather will clear. This bad weather will pass, we could say, And then the person says, Well, how do you know? What information do you have that I don't have? And the other person's like, Well, I'll just be honest. I don't know. But I'm just trying to make you feel better, right? I'm trying to raise your spirits. I'm trying to improve your energy. I'm trying to make you feel better, right? Okay, So we talked about the phrase Oh verb let up to let up And we use it when we're talking about a situation when the weather becomes more pleasant, when the weather becomes nicer when the weather improves or the bad weather passes by and it's like, Ah, it's nice again. All right, sounds great. 6. "try on": Let's talk about the phrase Oh, verb. Try on to try on. And in this situation, we're going to be using it as it's related to clothing like you're trying on clothing. So it means to test and item of clothing to know whether it fits or if you like it. You know the words you're trying something you're testing clothing to see if you like it or not so much or to see if it fits. It could be too big. It could be too small, too tight. So you're trying that you're testing it right in the picture. Here we have. Ah, nice. And some guy. He's wearing his black glasses and he has thumbs up when he's wearing, Ah, red shirt, red polo shirt with black stripe over the shoulders. Now the right here. We just have a simple red T shirt. Okay, so let's talk about this appraisal verb in the past, present and future. I'm going to read each sentence out loud and then pause so you can repeat out loud after me and boost your pronunciation. Okay, here we go. Let's start with the past. Repeat out loud. Joe tried on 50 shirts before buying a simple red T shirt. Okay, so Joe went to bind clothing, a new shirt, and he was overwhelmed with the selection. And he had a whole bunch of shirts that he brought to the fitting room, the place where you contest your clothing in the store. And then eventually he's like, I'm just going to get a simple red T shirt, something like this. Okay, all right, let's see it in the presence. Repeat out loud. Angela is trying on a new dress right now. Hopefully, it fits well. Okay, so Angela must be in the fitting room, A place in the store where you contest your clothing, all right? And so it could say Angela's trying on a new dress. Angela is trying trying out. We can also say that as well, trying out a new dress, testing a new dress, seen if it fits type thing. Maybe there's a party tonight. Or maybe it's a big celebration, and she wants to get the dress and make sure that it fits right and make sure that the color goes with I don't know her hair color, her shoes and all that stuff. So she's testing it and Hopefully, it fits well, so hopefully it's not too big. It's not too small. It's not to beg. You like hanging and not too tight and not too uncomfortable. All right, so let's see the phrase over. Been the future. Repeat out loud after me. I'll try on the coat when I get there. Remember? I don't like the color pink. Okay, So in this situation, I'm imagining someone is on their way there traveling to the store. Or they're traveling to the location where someone is waiting and someone is waiting with the coat. Maybe they called and said, Oh, I found the last coat. It's on sale. You'll love it. Quick, quick. Come on, hold it before anybody buys it and you can try it out and see if you like it. And the persons like you, I need a new coat. Wonderful. I'll be on my way. But remember, I don't like the color pink. All right, so hopefully the coat is not pink in color, So what would happen next is the person would get there. They would probably bring the coat into the well. It's just a coat she might not have to go into the fitting room. Usually the fitting room is for more private, and there's also big mirrors, so you can look yourself. But if it's a coat, you might just try it on outside in the store. Okay, so we talked about the phrase Oh, verb. Try on. All right. To try on. And it means to test an item of clothing to know whether it fits or if you like it. Okay. Very useful.