Useful & Common English Phrasal Verbs | Group 1 | Able Lingo ASL | Skillshare

Useful & Common English Phrasal Verbs | Group 1

Able Lingo ASL, American Sign Language (ASL)

Useful & Common English Phrasal Verbs | Group 1

Able Lingo ASL, American Sign Language (ASL)

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6 Lessons (23m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:20
    • 2. "bolt down"

      3:43
    • 3. "chip in"

      4:04
    • 4. "fall behind"

      4:59
    • 5. "get by"

      4:37
    • 6. "squirrel away"

      4:37
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About This Class

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EXPLORE AND MASTER essential English phrasal verbs with a native English teacher.

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IN THIS CLASS:

  • We explore useful and common English phrasal verbs frequently used by native speakers
  • We examine the definition of each phrasal verb and use images to guarantee understanding
  • We see each phrasal verb used in the past, present, and future verb tenses
  • We do pronunciation practice using each example sentence
  • We explore each example situation to better understand why and how the phrasal verb was used
  • We master essential English phrasal verbs

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THE TARGET PHRASAL VERBS ARE:

  • "bolt down"
  • "chip in"
  • "fall behind"
  • "get by"
  • "squirrel away"

THE TARGET ENGLISH SKILLS ARE:

  • English phrasal verbs
  • English vocabulary
  • English verb tenses
  • English pronunciation
  • Active English grammar

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AFTER TAKING THIS COURSE:

  • Students will be able to use important English phrasal verbs immediately
  • Students will have mastered useful English phrasal verbs frequently used by native speakers in common life situations
  • Students will be more confident with their English proficiency and vocabulary skills
  • Students will be more fluent in English

REQUIREMENTS:

  • A desire to improve, have fun, and be more confident using English
  • A computer, tablet, or smartphone to access the study material

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THIS COURSE WILL:

  • Improve your communication fluency as you master common and useful English phrasal verbs
  • Boost your proficiency with important English vocabulary and phrases
  • Increase your overall vocabulary by learning alternative ways to say essential phrasal verbs
  • Increase your confidence and ability to communicate using the English language

LET'S HAVE SOME FUN as you expand your vocabulary and become more fluent in English.

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Well, hello. Hey there. We're going to talk about Raisel verbs. That's right. And we're going to talk about these phrase of herbs. Hold down, chip in. All behind. Get by. Squirrel away. Okay for each phrase. Oh, verb. We're going to talk about the definition. What does it mean, Right? We'll also see each phrase of herb used in the past, present and future. That's right. We're also going to do pronunciation off each of the examples sentences. This is a great opportunity for you to improve and repeat out loud after me. Then we'll explore each example situation. This is a great opportunity to talk about vocabulary in other ways to say the phrase over of it. Okay, so we are going to master some essential appraisal verbs. I'm excited. What do you think? I can't wait. Let's do it 2. "bolt down": Let's talk about the phrase. Oh, verb. Bolt down to bolt down. Right. Has a simple definition. Wonderful. It means to eat something quickly. All right, so you eat like a bolt of lightning. It's quick. It's fast. It's incredibly fast. Incredibly quick. All right, so the picture we have a fork and a spoon. Kind of like a sign indicates that we're eating right, And we have a cheetah. What do we know about cheetahs? They run really fast. So bold down means eat, bashed. Eat quickly. Okay, so we're gonna look at this phrase over been the past, present and future. I'm going to read a sentence out loud for each one, and then I will pause so you could repeat out loud after me. Okay, here we go. Repeat, out loud. The cheetah bolted down its meal because of ferocious lion was coming. Okay, so the cheetahs have pretty powerful mighty animal. However, when a lion comes, it's like, Ah, no need to fight with the lion. So maybe the cheetah had some sort of animal or food or meat or something, and it ate as fast as it could. The cheetah bolted down its meal. The cheetah swallowed its meal quickly. The Cheetah eight. It's meal incredibly fast because of ferocious lion was coming. Now ferocious means, like for an animal. Strong, aggressive, possibly angry upset are wanting to attack. Okay, let's do the president repeat out loud. Henry is bolting down his spaghetti because someone might steal it. Okay, so this might be a strange location If someone is going to steal his spaghetti, maybe he goes to the fridge to get some milk or something, and he comes back and poof, it's gone. So he's like, I better eat it quick. So Henry is bolting down his spaghetti. Henry is eating his spaghetti very quickly, right? He's just shoving it into his mouth. How? Come home, right if you bolt something down. We're not really worried about manners. We just want to eat quickly. We want to eat fast because we I have something else to do. Or in this case, because Henry's word that someone might steal his spaghetti. All right, let's do the future. Repeat out loud. After me, we will bull down our food if there's another emergency. Okay, so we don't know, but maybe, for example, maybe they're firefighters and if the siren goes off, you know they have to leave. Then they're just gonna put some food in other into their mouth, take a Zeman e bites as possible and then two and swallow while they're getting ready. Right? So if there's an emergency, they have to work quickly. You have to move quickly. So they're going to bolt down their food. They're gonna eat their food quickly. All right. Wonderful. So we talked about the Fraser verb bold down to bolt down, and it just means to eat something quickly. All right, so we're not talking about eating like this We're talking about how large chunks. Barely chewing, swallowing quickly. Okay, wonderful. 3. "chip in": Let's talk about a phrase over the Fraser verb is chip in to chip in. All right, so it means to contribute money with other people. So a group of individuals, it could be two people, maybe 34 however many they each put in money. So there is some reason they need money. Maybe a bill. We're gonna donate something I don't know, but there's some amount of money and everybody puts in a little bit. So they're helping each other to be able to pay for a larger bill. Right? So that's chip in ladies smiling. Because if they work together and they all chip in, then they can get something bigger that each one of them by themselves, couldn't really pay for. And here we have two hands with a ball of cash. Right. I guess, uh, you're gonna be chipping in and buying something. So I have the I have some examples of how to use chipped in in the past, present, and the future down here, we're gonna do some pronunciation, so I will read each sentence. We'll start with the past, and then I will pause so you can repeat out loud after me all right, Here we go. Read Chipped in to help the flood victims on Li after his girlfriend forced him to. So in other words, Fred helped pay bread, donated money bread gave some money to help the flood victims. But on Li, after his girlfriend forced him to Fred was like inside his mind is that I don't want to give the money, but his girlfriends like, Oh, Fred, honeybunny you gotta help Help give some money. And he's like, Yes, baby, anything for you. I'm alright. So let's talk about the present. I'm gonna read the sentence. Repeat after me. Here we go. Maria is chipping in with us to get a new couch for our crippled neighbor. Okay, so in other words, Maria is helping us to pay for something. We're all going together. We're gonna give a little bit of money each so weakened by something bigger when it says for our crippled neighbor, crippled is just another word for handy camp. It's a person. Maybe they can't use their legs. Maybe they can't use their arms. Maybe it's difficult to move around, but there's something physically wrong with their body and it's difficult to move around. So, Maria and and us, we're all together. We're gonna buy a new couch for our crippled neighbor. Let's do the future. Repeat out loud. Here we go. George will chip in on Lee if we get at least one pizza with sardines on top. Uh huh. So, George will Onley help pay? George? Will Onley give some money? George, will Onley contribute if we get at least one pizza with sardines on top? So we're saying we hear. So there's if we're getting more than one pizza, there's probably maybe a small group or a big group of people. And George, only way he's going to help pay is if at least one pizza as sardines on top. Okay, So, George like sardines. Okay, so we talked about the phrase over Chip in to Chip in, and it means to contribute money with other people. In other words, you help to pay for something. You're not the only one pain for it. There might be 122345 more. At least two people paying for something, and they divide the constantly each help out. All right, so that is two to been. All right, 4. "fall behind": Let's talk about the phrase a verb fall behind to fall behind, All right. It means to be unable to study at the same level as your classmates. Right? So you are at a level where everyone else might be appear. But you have fallen behind. You're not where they are. You might have been at one time, but now you're behind. And usually people don't see this as a good thing. Especially teachers and parents and principals and other school personnel. They usually put more pressure on the child or the student, too. Hey, improve! All right, So the lady she's like, Ah, it's terrible. I've fallen behind. And this student has a question mark over his or her head. Maybe they don't understand the material. Maybe they don't ask for help. Maybe they don't do the homework they don't do. It's necessary to be up with everyone else. So they've fallen behind. They fell behind. Okay, so let's take a look at this raisel verb in the past, present and future, we're going to do pronunciation. I will read the first sentence and then pause and wait for you to repeat out loud after me . Let's do it All right, let's do the past. Henry fell behind because he refused to do the assigned homework. Okay, so a sign just means what the teacher chose to give, as asks as homework as assignments. Things you need to do to complete the class successfully. Right? And Henry, you decided he wasn't going to do the homework. And our actions have repercussions. They are. Actions have, ah, reactions. Things happen when we make choices. And Henry made this choice and he fell behind. But he's no longer up with his classmates. He has fallen behind. He fell behind. All right, let's do the president repeat out loud. I don't go to bed until 3 a.m. That's why I'm falling behind in history class. All right, this sounds like another situation where we've made a choice in our choices. Have consequences, right? So I don't go to bed until 3 a.m. Maybe I'm playing video games or watching movies, or who knows, But I'm not sleeping when I need to sleep. Maybe I need to get up at five or six or 7 a.m. So I don't have enough sleep, and that's why I'm falling behind ING history class. Okay, so the person here is not up at the same level as the other students. They've fallen behind and they're continuing to because this is President progressive. I'm falling. So it's falling farther and farther and farther behind. Right? So obviously the person needs to go to bed earlier. But that's their choice. All right, let's do the future. Repeat out loud. Amy will fall behind when she goes to stay with her sick grandma. Okay, so maybe Amy's in a course. Maybe she's in school. She's studying, I don't know. But something has happened in her life. Probably a big deal. A big incident with her grandma. And she has to go stay with her grandma. It doesn't say visit. It means stay, So that might be an unknown amount of time. So if she has to go stay with her sick grandma, maybe she has to help take care of her grandma, which means that uses up her time and she can't study. So she's going to. She will fall behind, so she's here right now. She's up with everyone. She's good, but she has to leave so she can't spend as much time studying so she will fall behind. We don't know exactly how far she'll fall behind, but we know it will happen because she won't be able to study. And she's going to be focused on her sick grandma. All right. Sounds like this is a time when something bad happens in life. That's how it is sometimes. Okay, so we talked about the phrase over fall behind to fall behind. And once again, it means to be unable to study or keep up at the same level as your classmates. Right? And it could be Maybe you made bad decisions or we don't go to bed on time. We don't study. We don't do our homework. Or maybe there's something that happened that happens in our life, and we have to re focus on something else. But either way, fall behind means you were here. But you're no longer the same level as everyone else. Okay? All right, 5. "get by": Let's talk about the phrase over. Get by to get by. Okay, So get by means to have just enough money for what you need in life, right? You don't have extra money. You don't have less than what you need. You have just enough, all right, so you have enough money to pay the bills. But nothing more, right? This lady, she's not happy because she would like to do more in her life, but she doesn't have enough money. She has enough money to cover bills she could eat. She could stay somewhere, but she can't do anything extra, and she's getting frustrated with that. So this guy over here, he's pulling out his showing, his empty pockets because he already paid his bills. And now you can't do anything extra, All right, so get by just means to meet the minimum right, Nothing extra, and it's not less so. It's usually in my experience. It's not really a good thing because you're just stuck. You don't old money, but you don't have any extra money, right? So if there's an emergency or something, you don't have any extra money at all to be able to do anything All right. So let's see this phrase. Oh, verb. In the past, present and future, I'm going to read an example. I will read the sentence and then pause so you can repeat out loud after me. That's do pronunciation. Here we go. We got by but on Lee after our neighbor loaned us $2000. Okay, so we were able to survive. Just pay our bills. But Onley because our neighbor loaned us $2000. So in that case, maybe we're if we have to pay the money back, it's going to be very difficult because we just get by. We don't have any extra. Maybe this is the first loan from the neighbor, and we gave them an empty promise that will pay them back. But in the future, the neighbor will probably not give any more money, cause it's very a low chance that they're going to get paid back. All right, let's do the president. Repeat out loud. Here we go. It's tough, but salmon Jill are getting by. They hope to improve their situation. Okay, so maybe salmon Jill are just starting out. Maybe they're young. They just got their first jobs and it's difficult to pay for everything. They're doing it. They're paying their bills, but they don't have anything extra, right? So maybe in the free time they're studying, maybe they're learning new skills. They're learning how to program, doing different computer skills and becoming more valuable. Maybe they're improving their English right end with more value. Hopefully, they could become more valuable and offer their service services to people who are willing to give them more money than they won't Onley. Just be getting buying. Okay? All right, let's talk about the future. Repeat out loud after me. Here we go. Don't worry. We'll get by somehow. If not, we can always sell our car. Okay, so in this situation, the car What? We can always sell our car. Our cars kind of like the emergency fund that way to get emergency money. So if suddenly someone gets sick or they have extra hospital bills or a window breaks or there's something that needs to be fixed at home because we just get by, we don't have extra money to pay for those things. So we might have to sell our car. But if we sell our car, that means we have less chance less opportunity to be mobile to have transportation, and that could make it so we don't get by. Mm, a good situation. So we covered. We talked about the phrase a verb. Get by to get by. So it means toe have just enough money for what you need in life. And it's not really a good thing. I mean, it could be worse. Most things can always be worse, but they could also be much better, right? If you just have enough money to pay your bills, that's it. OK, but you could be doing better and having a better life, more incredible experiences and stuff like that. Okay, so this is the phrase over to get by. 6. "squirrel away": Let's talk about the phrase a verb squirrel away to squirrel away. Mm, it's an animal, so it's kind of similar to the behavior off animals. The squirrel. The squirrel likes to get nuts and Berries and stuff, and they squirrel it away. They put it in a safe place to eat during the winter. All right, so it's similar here. Squirrel away means to store, pack, hide or hoard something for future use. Okay, so store you store something in the fridge or the closet, Or maybe in a bank, something like that. You pack, which is similar to store. You put something inside something else, hide who? You could store it and hide it, which means that no one knows about it or you're trying to keep it from people. Or it is kind of an interesting one because, uh, hard means, like you try to get as much as you can, and then you just keep holding onto it and you never let it go, and it just fills up your house. Maybe there are people that are called hoarders, and they just they never throw anything away. So their houses were, like, full of stuff and It's disorganized. It's just full, full, full and right so hard congest be to hold on to a lot of stuff and not let go. Okay, so let's take a look. This lady is on a smiling. She seems happy. She seems content with herself, and it probably has something to do with this safe box over here. This safe deposit box or just a safe was inside. It's small, but we can see there's some money and maybe some gold bars. So she has squirrel, the way her savings, her money, her valuables and we can use to squirrel away. It could be for money, something valuable. But it also could be stuff, right? Maybe supplies, money, clothing, tools, something like that. All right, so let's see this phrase over been the past, present and future. I'm going to read each sentence and then pause so you can repeat out loud after me. Let's do some pronunciation practice. Here we go. I start with the past, Jenny squirrel, the way as much money and gold as possible. Okay, So similar to this picture up here, she earned money or she got money somehow, and she put it in her safe and she's storing it. They're she's keeping it there. She probably wants to save it for the future. All right, let's do the present. Repeat out loud after me, we're squirreling away many valuable paintings to sell in the future. Okay, so in this situation, we could say we're storing many valuable paintings were maybe hiding away many valuable paintings. But the idea here is that we're keeping the valuable paid paintings, maybe kind of as insurance in case things go bad in the future. Then you can sell the paintings and still have money. I don't know, but if you're squirreling it away, you're kind of storing it, keeping it hidden. And you're keeping it in a safe place, right? Okay, let's do the future. Repeat out loud after me. As soon as Tom gets a job, he will squirrel away 30% of his paycheck. Okay, so this one might not be like hidden. It's nothing secret or mysterious. It's just someone wants to save 30% of their their paycheck. So as soon as Tom gets a job, he will save or keep or put away 30% of his paycheck because he's maybe saving to buy something, Maybe a down payment on a house, maybe a new car or something. But he wants to save that chunk of money and have it for when he needs it in the future. Okay, so we talked about the phrase Oh, verb squirrel away to squirrel away. And it means to store, pack, hide or hoard something for future use. So in other words, you keep it. It might be mysterious secret. Or maybe start a secret at all. You're just holding on to it for the future. Okay, wonderful.