Ultimate Line and Wash: Techniques and Landscapes | Watercolour Mentor | Skillshare

Playback Speed


  • 0.5x
  • 1x (Normal)
  • 1.25x
  • 1.5x
  • 2x

Ultimate Line and Wash: Techniques and Landscapes

teacher avatar Watercolour Mentor, Art Classes, Mentoring & Inspiration!

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

25 Lessons (8h 40m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:58
    • 2. Materials Required

      16:04
    • 3. Pen Drawing: Techniques

      23:40
    • 4. Watercolour: Techniques

      18:19
    • 5. Watercolour: Using Values

      14:06
    • 6. Italian Buildings: Warm-up

      17:00
    • 7. Street Scene: Warm-up

      16:32
    • 8. Burano Scene: Draw Foreground

      31:02
    • 9. Burano Scene: Draw Background

      31:43
    • 10. Burano Scene: Paint the Light

      28:17
    • 11. Burano Scene: Add the Shadows

      27:39
    • 12. Burano Houses: Paint the Light

      22:43
    • 13. Burano Houses: Add the Shadows

      21:23
    • 14. Cafe Scene: Painting Steps

      19:54
    • 15. Charles Bridge: Painting Steps

      20:52
    • 16. France Scene: Paint the Light

      23:48
    • 17. France Scene: Add the Shadows

      21:05
    • 18. Big Ben London: Painting Steps

      24:48
    • 19. Paris Street: Paint the Light

      18:23
    • 20. Paris Street: Add the Shadows

      23:52
    • 21. Prague Scene: Painting Steps

      16:04
    • 22. Venice Scene: Paint the Light

      24:16
    • 23. Venice Scene: Add the Shadows

      24:09
    • 24. Venice Tower: Painting Steps

      31:30
    • 25. Class Project

      1:00
  • --
  • Beginner level
  • Intermediate level
  • Advanced level
  • All levels
  • Beg/Int level
  • Int/Adv level

Community Generated

The level is determined by a majority opinion of students who have reviewed this class. The teacher's recommendation is shown until at least 5 student responses are collected.

95

Students

--

Projects

About This Class

Hi, I'm Darren from Watercolour Mentor and welcome to Ultimate Line and Wash: Techniques and Landscapes. Line and wash and was one of my first introductions to watercolor. It combines the benefits of both mediums and it is a great way to learn the basics of drawing and painting. There were so many things that I wish someone had walked me through when I started learning pen drawing and watercolors. I want to share these essential tips and skills with you so that by the end of this course, you'll be able to show off some beautiful line and wash illustrations to your friends and family!

This class is aimed towards beginners with 12 classic line and wash demonstrations which I'll help guide you through step-by-step. There are drawing and tracing templates included as well for each demonstration to help you transfer your drawings over quickly and easily.

No prior experience is needed for this class. I will cover how to draw and paint simple shapes to more complex ones. Materials you will need are; watercolor paints (primary colors - red, blue, yellow), watercolor brushes (assorted), and watercolor paper (preferably 100% cotton).

I take a different approach from other instructors by narrating my demonstrations in real-time. I explain every technique I use in the context of the painting.  Some landscapes featured in this class are; Venice, Burano, a Paris Street Scene, a London Street Scene, and the Charles Bridge in Prague. In this beginner's class, I'll be going over all the pen and wash sketching basics. I'll talk about what materials you'll need, your options, and which ones I use and recommend. If you have a pen, some watercolor paints, and paper, then you're pretty much ready to go. I'll show you how to sketch with a pen quickly and accurately using a variety of techniques including drawing lines in segments, hatching, and using different sized nibs to your advantage. I also demonstrate essential watercolor techniques you can use over and over again for any painting. And don't forget, there are 12 narrated painting demonstrations of some classic landscapes included.

In this class, I will cover basics such as:

  • Materials - what paints, paper, brushes, and pens you will need.
  • Hands-on pen sketching techniques - follow along and sketch with me. Learn how to hold your pen for different effects, draw basic lines and shapes, how to create depth and light/darkness in your drawing through the use of 'hatching'.
  • A crucial video on understanding 'tone/values'. This includes practical exercises and demonstrations for you to follow along to.
  • Understanding light sources and how to paint realistic shadows.
  • How to sketch a subject easily by simplifying a landscape into basic shapes and combining loose and accurate drawing styles.
  • Hands-on lessons on essential watercolor techniques such as wet-in-wet and wet-on-dry.
  • How to paint skies, clouds, water, land, figures, boats, and other objects.

So join me in this class - I'm excited to get started and to show you how easy it is to create your own beautiful paintings that you can be proud of!

Included demonstration paintings:

36b3f8c0.jpg

 

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Watercolour Mentor

Art Classes, Mentoring & Inspiration!

Teacher

Class Ratings

Expectations Met?
  • Exceeded!
    0%
  • Yes
    0%
  • Somewhat
    0%
  • Not really
    0%
Reviews Archive

In October 2018, we updated our review system to improve the way we collect feedback. Below are the reviews written before that update.

Why Join Skillshare?

Take award-winning Skillshare Original Classes

Each class has short lessons, hands-on projects

Your membership supports Skillshare teachers

Learn From Anywhere

Take classes on the go with the Skillshare app. Stream or download to watch on the plane, the subway, or wherever you learn best.

Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hi, my name's Daryn from watercolor mental and welcome to ultimate line wash techniques and landscapes. Line and wash was one of my first introductions into watercolors, combines the benefits of both mediums and is a great way to learn the basics of drawing and painting. There was so many things that I wish someone had walked me through when I first started learning pen drawings and watercolors. I want to share these essential tips and skills with you so that body into this course, I promise you'll be able to show up some beautiful line in Washington illustrations to your friends and family. This class is aimed towards beginners. Wolf classic lawn and wash demonstrations, which I'll help guide you through step-by-step. The redrawing and tracing templates included as well for each demonstration to help you transfer your drawing over quickly and easily, I take a different approach from other instructors by narrating my demonstrations in real time. I explain each technique I used in the context of the painting. Some landscapes featured in this class are, then is Breonna, a Paris street scene, a London street scene, and the Charles Bridge in Prague. In this beginner's class, I'll be going over the basics of pen and wash sketching. I'll talk about what materials you need, your options and which ones are used in recommend. If you have a pen, some watercolor paints and paper, then you're pretty much ready to go. I'll show you how to sketch with a pen quickly and accurately using a variety of techniques, including during lines, segments, hatching, and using different size nibs to your advantage. I also demonstrate essential watercolor techniques that you can use over and over for any painting. And don't forget, there's over 12 narrated painting demonstrations of some classic landscapes included. So join me in this class. I'm excited to get started to show you just how easy is to create your own beautiful paintings that you can be proud of. 2. Materials Required: Okay, So in this video, I want to talk a bit about the materials that I'm using. I'm going to talk about paper, the pens, pencils, and of course the paint brushes and paints. So this is basically to inform you of the executives or I'm using if you want to get similar results. And also if you're searching around for materials where they session or in your house and find some good materials to use for this course or whether you want to go out and buy yourself some materials. I'll give you a little bit of advice that will help you decide to essentially get some good quality materials with the cheapest price possible. So what I'm going to talk about first is some real basic drawing materials. So I've got a mechanical pencil here and an eraser. And this is really important. I think when you're starting out. And I know some artists, they draw straight in with the pen. But when you're first starting out, it's really crucial to have some kind of pencil. I use a mechanical pencil because it maintains the same point and it just has a more low key profile rather than having a larger pencil that you've got arrays and you don't want too many marks on the paper. What I used this for is essentially getting in some real basic marks on the paper just to mark out the larger shapes. So for example, with this painting here, I've just gone over marked out the side of this building, kind of where it hits the sky there, where it finishes here and then this one there. That's about all I've done a thing. I'll put in a little bit of the cars and maybe a little, a couple of figures here and there. But that basically helps me when I go in with the pen so that I don't make any obvious errors like making this building way too short or too high coming out of the paper. So It's just a really good, I guess, drafting tool that you should have, obviously an eraser that's for afterwards. And basically what I'll talk about now is the pens that you be needing. So two types of pens here. I've got these ballpoint pens, these metal ballpoint pens, and essentially they've got permanent black ink. And you gotta make sure when you are buying these black pens, you know whether they felt tip pigment liners or whether they're just these ballpoint black pens that they are liquid ink and they're labeled as waterproof slashed fade proof. So really important that they're waterproof, especially when I end up with similar results as me. When you go over the watercolor. When you go over it with watercolors, it's not going to run and go everywhere because some inks are water-based and that's going to just make everything run everywhere. And some people actually like that style, believe it or not. And if you're one of the people, just disregard what I'm saying. But if you do want something that retains the lines after you go over with the watercolor. Really made sure that you've got waterproof ink in there. So these are the ballpoint pen over this side here. I've got a bunch of these pens called pigment liners, and they come in all different sizes. Now, these three pens, you come in as 0.7 millimeter tip and 0.5. And I think this is a 0.38. So there are three different sizes. This one's the largest, that one's the smallest. And I've got these ones here which range essentially from 0.05 up to 0.8. So there's definitely a large range of sizes here in these pigment liners. And at the end of the day, you don't need so many of them. If you're only going to choose one, I would just recommend getting a 0.5 that would cover you for pretty much everything. Why do you need all these different points though, if you were to buy something one of these packs and get a few of these pens. What will be advantages of having a few different sizes? So Let's have a look at some of these shapes here in the front. So if you have a look at this figure here and this car, you notice that the lines are kinda thicker in the front. So it actually if you use a pen that has got a larger thickness and a larger nib, it's actually going to push that shape forward more. So then when you're doing things in the background and he switched to a smaller near maybe 0.1 or 0.2. That's going to push it backwards as well. Another advantage is that small and nibs allow you to get in more detail. So I've got this little one here is this is 0.05 nib and you can barely see that coming out. It looks like it looks like a needle that you can barely see it. Then on the other hand, you've got something like this, which is 0.8, very obvious kind of marks it makes. And if you're gonna go in with a large object in the front, for example, it's definitely going to come forward. So those are the two advantages. And you get the same sort of effect here. The big difference with these ballpoint, metal ballpoint pens here, the black pants on these pigment line is is that the pigment liners have a felt tip. So it's almost like a text and where the ink sort of runs through a little diffuser or something here. And then the Draws through to the tip and I find what happens is that you do tend to get a little less kind of running marks on the paper. You can draw really quickly the paper and it will also skip, skip over parts of it. So that's one of the differences and it just runs better. I find on paper that's rough ER, when you're using a pigment liner. Whereas if you're using one of these pens, which has a ballpoint tip, middle ballpoint tip. It can feel a bit scratchy on median to rough paper and you just got to be careful doesn't catch in areas of it. And how I deal with that is I just hold the pen lighter. And you might think you might be asking which ones do you prefer? At the end of the day, I use both of these and nowadays are actually prefer the look of these ones here actually because they just have a more kind of crisp and uniform kind of line. Another thing is that once you draw the line as well, it goes in completely unlike the pigment liner, which sometimes if you do it quickly, part of the line will be just indicated and you have white beans, just areas where the penis skipped over the paper. That looks really nice as well. But this, using these pens here on the right-hand side just has a sense of finality to it where I draw the line and that's it. It's done. I can't go back into it again. The line is there. So I just like the style of those these days, but I also use these and in this course I actually go through and use both pens so you can have a look at the differences between either of them. And so you can make a decision yourself. I think at the end of the day, you need to try them both. But in terms of budget wise, one of these pens here costs about two or $3 and you know, it's a 0.5 normal ballpoint pen. That's gonna get you buy pretty much in almost any situation. So that's about all I'll talk about in terms of the pens. I do have one more paint here. This is a bonus pen. It's a white pigment liner, so it's just a ballpoint pigment, pigment liner here. And essentially this allows you to get in some tiny little white highlights. It's almost like correction fluid or something like that. Just a little thing that you can add at the end of your painting to get in some small highlights if you like. Okay, so that's about it for the pens. Now, in terms of the paper that I'm using, There's two types of paper. Very generally speaking, you've got hot press paper, which is completely smooth, and then you've got textured paper which ranges from cold press, too rough. I'm using cold press paper for this course. And the reason why is because I find cold press paper and rough paper. You can do lovely skies and washes and wet in wet techniques, the paint just sort of spreads more evenly. You don't get too much paddling. Whereas if you use hot press paper, I find that the paper just dries, can drive quite unevenly and timed areas or Pottermore, sometimes I do find that the hot press paper is sized a lot more heavily. Well, so you find that the paint is sort of sits on top and refuses to soak in for a bit. I would recommend using a 100 percent cotton watercolor paper in cold pressed or rough. Probably Cold Press would be your best bet if you don't have any of that cellulose paper, a medium texture to cold press cellulose paper that's completely fine. Often that type of paper is not labeled as cotton or it might be 25 percent cotton, that kind of thing. As long as it's labeled watercolor paper, you'll be fine, but you get the best results with cotton paper in terms of the sizing, the techniques that I'll be using, some of the wet and wet techniques, especially the layering as well. The paper can take that that continuous layering and abuse when you're going in with multiple layers. So it's something I recommend, but it's not a 100 percent necessary. Use what you've got. I work out of a sketchbook. You can use loose sheets of paper and just Iike take the size down. You can also use a bit of glue or he said behind that sort of little texts that he's put in the back of posters to stick up on the walls that will fix the paper on to whatever surface you're using. A lot of the times I use a bit of board and little plastic board or a bit of wooden board to just keep my paper onto to keep it completely flat. Really important because when you're painting ladder with watercolors, the paper is going to warp and it's going to bend an error. So you really want to make sure that it's fixed down so that you can get a really nice even wash in there. Okay, so a little bit about brushes. These are the brushes that I'll be using for this course. And I can break these up essentially into real basic kind of shapes. So I've got flat brushes, a bunch of flat brushes here which come in these sort of squares shapes. I've got some round brushes here. These three, I've got a rigor, which is it's got a longer kind of brush here with a longer tip. I've got a cat's tongue brush and got a normal watercolor mop brush. So I'll start over from the left. These two brushes here I tend to use for areas like skies, large bits of ground, things like that where you need a lot of water, you need a lot of soft shapes running through. You want to pop in a cloud, pick up a bit of water, drop it in so that you've got enough paint on the brush to get that large shape. And if I were to go in with this little brush like this and tried to do a cloud. It's just not going to work. It's going to look way too detailed. And it's just not going to pick up enough water. So you can also use one of these flat brushes here to getting larger washes. So I kind of alternate basically between these three written nowadays, I tend to use this one here, just this water column mop brush. And in the middle, I'm going to talk a little bit at these. These are basically some of the round brushes I use. And they're kinda go between. So it's when you're not doing anything like like the sky or very, very small details such as and little tiny little fingers at the back. Yeah. Maybe you're using getting a little bit of that shadow on the side of the building like that, or maybe just putting a bit of color into the car. So essentially you want to pick a brush that's about the same size and appropriate to the object that you painting serve your painting a car like this, you want to use a brush that's big enough to cover that anti area. I often use the biggest brush I can to cover an area essentially. So that's a number ten and this is number eight round brush, and this is number 6 round brush. So they're just decreasing in size. This one, I'll probably use more figures because I get more control. And this one here is a rigger brush. And essentially this is used just to get incense. Very slight marks here, maybe putting some areas and things coming off the roof. Vertical shapes like the mast of a boat, that kind of thing. This brush works really well for that. And of course we've got these flat brushes here. And I find these work very well when we tried to getting a sharp edge on the side of buildings and maybe on this side of the building where I just want to get a real sharp edge. The flat brush allows you to do that. So It's just another type of brush that produces a different sort of result. And they come in different sizes as well. I've got a little flat brush here. This is a number 6 flat brush, which I actually use quite often. So that's about all you need if you're getting a pig. If you're only going to pick a few brushes, I'd say go for this one, the mop brush, maybe a couple of the smaller round brushes and a smaller flat brush. I'm at three or four brushes will do you find for this? Okay, So I want to talk a little bit about the paints here. So it looks like I've got a lot of paints, but in reality on these few of these for most of my paintings. So starting off here on the top of got some Naples yellow, which is a creamy sort of yellow or fall with some of these Italian buildings. And where I want to get into but a sandstone or just a creamy sort of color, that color works really well. Now you can mix a bit of Hansa yellow or a kind of a brighter yellow like this with some whitewash to produce a similar color. So just something to remember. If you don't have that color, you can make it. This is a bit of yellow ocher is a bit of a muted down, down yellow. And we tried to use with buildings, grounds, and general soft light bit of burnt sienna here, English read, which I do use from time to time, mainly the burnt sienna going to bid of raw umber here as well. For the blues, I've got a bit of ultramarine blue, Buddhist cerulean blue, and a bit of cobalt blue. I basically use the cerulean and Cobol for him as all my paintings. Got a bunch of greens here. These are just dark ones. I think that's emerald green. I've got a bit of green. I've got a bit of sap green as well here. And I've also got a bunch of these other yellows, brighter yellows here. I've got an orange and a red, permanent red. And this one here is a kind of pinkish red as well. The bonus color that I use is just neutral tint and nutrient tend to just dark into any of these colors without affecting it all too much in other ways. So I use that one I'm trying to put in shadows or just trying to dark and down in an area. And I don't want to change that color all too much. I'll pick up a bit of that neutral, neutral tint. It's kind of a black substitute. Suppose. So. That's about it. And in terms of the materials you'll need for this course, if you have questions, let me know and I'll get back to you. 3. Pen Drawing: Techniques: Okay, so before we get started into the actual landscape drawing and painting, I want to talk to you and give you a bit of information on how to actually draw in pen. So I'm gonna go through some techniques. What I do, things like even holding the pen, different pen characteristics that you need to be aware of. And I'll start off by just talking about these two sets of pens. I've already discussed these a little bit in the materials, but essentially I'm going to demonstrate what they look like when you're using them on paper. So with the pigment liners, one thing you got to remember is that they are made of a felt tip. So if you have a look here, what happens is essentially the Incas just drawn into this felt-tip and it's controlled, is released in a very controlled manner. So you don't get sort of bits of ink pooling. You also get a bit of a dry effect. So if I'm drawing a square or something like that, you'll notice if I move the pen really quickly across the paper, you get areas in which the pen skips on the paper. Especially if you've got paper that's literally Raph for this beautiful grains of the paper, you do get that affect is a very nice smoothness to it as well. So I'm just like you drawing with a text or something like that. Every small text that because of that felt tip. So that's one of the differences as opposed to when you're using these felt-tip pens. The other option is using these pens here, which basically ballpoint metal tip pens. So if we draw a square just like we've done over on the other side, you've noticed the marks are sharp so you don't get areas with the nib just skips over areas, especially if the paper is quiet, smooth or even cold press. I find with rough paper though you've gotta be careful, don't press down too hard because the nib can get caught in the in-between the grooves of the paper and really rough sort of pipe and it can be difficult to draw. So if you're using rough paper, I would suggest using these pigment line is anything else. You can use these ballpoint pens. I think the pigment line is very effective in all types of paper, but they both have different styles. So you just going to have to try them out to get used to them. Like I said, you don't get that sort of skipping affect the longe, a lot sharper these pens and they just have a different kind of feel that feel a little bit less flexible than, say, using these pigment liners which you just saw sort of glide around the paper and you can scribble a lot, a lot easier with the mod. But with that said you can probably still, you can still do it with these ones as well. It's just that there is a different sort of effect. This is as good as you can tell here, just a little bit more sharper. Okay? So another thing to keep in mind is how to hold the pen. So a lot of people ask, how did hold the pen tool holder, the front or the back? And the simple answer to that is you do both. It just depends on what you're drawing. So if I'm drawing a little border, say I want to get in a little border of a painting that I'm going to start off slim drawing or something like that. I'm going to hold the pen closer to the back and use my entire arm to draw. So there we go. We've got one there, we've got another bit here, there. There. So you can get in lodge a stroke and they're kind of looser as well. Whereas if you hold the pen a little bit, close it down. If you want to draw in things like maybe a pop plot with a bit of tree coming out. You know, for example, maybe even a tree or something like that. The base of it. I can actually get a lot more detail and control in when you're holding the pen closer, dad is very similar to when you're painting and watercolors and you're holding a bras close down to get in small details. Verse, holding the brush near the back to get him more looser feel, more looser sort of brushstrokes. And you can get good details in beholding the, the pen further down the back. It just changes the overall style and feeling and a fine if you hold it too far down the front and you try to draw everything in, things, just lose that sort of organic, kind of flowy kind of look and you end up getting shapes are just too harsh. And especially buildings and things like that, you might get errors that does pop out a little bit too obviously then if you hold the pen down the end and do a little bit of this sort of work there. And it just looks more understated. So it really depends on what you draw an iPhone using. A combination of both hoarding near front, coating of the back really makes a difference at, and you get different sort, sorts of marks on the paper, which actually makes the drawing looks so much more interesting. So that's something to keep in mind. And so I'm going to talk a bit about implying depth now. So using different size needs, now, you might wonder why do I need different size nibs? And the simple answer is that you don't really need all different kind of needs. You just need a medium-sized name which is about a 0.5, maybe a point for nib, but having different size and that allows you to do something interesting, allows you to imply depth. So I'll show you an example. I'll draw just here. So if we're going to get in the horizon line around about here, and I'm going to get in, say, a building here in the middle of the page and just get this side of the building running towards the back like that. And then we've got maybe another building here like that and comes up the down the front. So we've got all these buildings in the back. And then what we wanna do is maybe imply some buildings closer to the front. What I'm going to do is pick up a pen that's got a thickening of this is a 0.8 from me. And I can go in straight here and pop in this building in the front like that. And straight away. You can tell that this area, these Kooning's during the side, are a lot closer than the ones further in the back. So it's just something to keep in mind even if your drawing figures say if I want to make a figure here closer to the front, I'm going to use a thick knit. If I use a really thin nib for figure in the background, like this, they can appear a little bit further back into smaller even like this. So it just pushes them back. Anything that has a thicker line will come forward more. So that's the way to imply depth and a reason why it's good to have multiple pins of different nip sizes if you can get it. But if you've only got one all you, but if you only can choose one, but really you only need one, that's about 0.4.5 NAEP. And what you can do as well is that you can just press down a little bit lata and, and getting a, a, a thinner line. So for example, if I'm going to draw a building instead of a loop as trachea building press down a bit hotter, That's going to look and obviously thicker the line. But if I press down a little bit more into, you can already change that line and make it louis thinner. So it works also with these other ballpoint line is, but it's just harder to get that affecting pigment mana. So you can sort of turn the pen a little bit on the side like that. And then that will reduce down the width of the line like that. And if you hold the pen straight up and straight down facing the pipe, you're gonna get the same sort of mock. So that's one little trick that I use. I thought I'd pass it on might be useful for some of you out there. What I wanna do now is talk a little bit about shading. So it's really important when you doing a bit of, it's really important to add some tone to your drawings, especially if you're not going to paint over them in watercolor. But even if you are working on them in watercolor, it's still good to add a little bit of detail onto the buildings with some light and darkness, just implying some of that detail in there. And that says two purposes. It serves to add some darkness already so you don't have to do in watercolor or to just remind you later when you're using, when you're using your watercolors to shade in that area a little bit darker. So I'm going to go through and show you just a few techniques now, one of the things that I really recommend you doing before you even start drawing is to just practice some marks on the paper. So what I often do is just grab a sketchbook and I true lines, I might draw off that 50 lines or something like that before I even start get used to drawing. And another thing I do find helpful is when you're drawing, try not to use your fingers to move the pen. So a lot of people, when they start off, they use their fingers to draw. But what I find this can do is you can get these artificial looking lines a little bit too forced. Rather than if you use you hold the pen and just literally move your arm in that direction. So you gotta get into the habit of using your arm to actually draw. And when you get into more final little details, yes, then you can use. Your fingers a little bit more for that fine motor control. But generally speaking, you want to try to use a little bit more of your arm when you drawing. Okay. So little lines like these and this is a form of hatching. So in terms of making an object Docker. So if I want to get these little imaginary buildings here, say if I want to get them a bit darker, you can hatch it vertically. We can hatch horizontally. So for example, we might go some of these horizontal lines here. So that's already, given that appearance of the little blue darkness on that building compared to this one or this one. And we can hatch downwards as well. Same kind of effect. You can hatch diagonally like that. So what way do you hatch then if you've got all these different directions, how do you do it? Well, one thing I like to do is try to follow the contours of a particular object that can hatching can have that, I guess, additional benefit of implying contours. So we've got this building and it's going in this direction. Perspective wise. I'm not want to hatch in this direction like that and just draw some lines like that. And so that way the building looks like it's going skinny small in that little direction there. So even on this side of the building here, I might pick out a small append, small opinion and I'm just putting some directional lines like that, following that sort of direction of the buildings. And then we've got here maybe some flaws and the buildings just hatch in this direction, horizontally, like that. Okay, so it's just a different way of doing things. You don't have to do it this exact way. But it's the way that I do it at times to kind of get more of a, I guess, more detail into the buildings by creating this contour like effect. Another thing I noticed some artists do they use the same hedging direction for the entire drawing. So they all go in the same direction. And in terms of crosshatching, It's very simple concept to understand. If you've got hatching going in one direction such as this, you're going to turn the pen into the opposite direction and just essentially hatch like this. So you get these crisscross sort of effect as dark as that object a little bit further. I don't use this also often I tend to just hatch, but that's just another kind of technique which allows you, again to vary that hatching darkness, make it even darker than the four. Another thing to keep in mind is when you're hatching the further out space, the lines, the lotsa, that object will feel. So if you've gotten that one there that I've just done, and then we've got, say this one here with a Lonza, doubled Alonzo and then close that one looks darker than that one. So grab your pens out, have a bit of a play around. Practice all these little marks. And then when you start out, it's so difficult to getting some of these lines because essentially you haven't gotten used to drawing these lines yet. Often keep sketchbooks just like this. And before I start any drawing, I just start scribbling and getting my muscles. Fine. Motor control to skip that used to drawing and loosening yourself up. Because otherwise, sometimes it's beginning when you first get into drawing. You've got the nerves and you're holding the pen a little bit too tightly. You just not used to making those marks and the papers. So it's kinda like throwing a ball, just practicing first before you actually get in and throw the ball. You know, it's the same concept here with these drawings. Here we go. Just drawing a bit of little bit of hatching on the ground here. Again, just to imply the 3D perspective fallen those perspective lines into the distance. So that's all I'm going to talk to you about shading. I think that covers most of what I wanted to talk about. What I want to discuss now is drawing lines. Now. You might think I'm talking about drawing lines. I've drawn so many lines are ready. But I want to just show you a way I guess that I draw lines is a couple of different ways that I draw lines. And you may find them useful too. So at times, when you start out, it's hard for you to just draw a straight line. I find people go a little bit slow and then they go on their own. Obviously have that experience and confidence yet to sort of draw straight line different directions. That's okay. In fact, when I draw lines and most of my drawings and draw them in little pots. So I'd go in and I start off here, stop and then continue, stop, continue, stop, continue. So these little areas here with a little bit sticking out all of the page like that. So I'm going back even this bit here. I made a mistake, went back and just redefine that line again. And that way you get these kind of spontaneous looking, classic line drawing taught few. So if you really try to make things too perfect, so say if I drew, for example, in a, in a painting ahead, like drawing a head of really, really exact shape. Like VCE, maybe a building like that. Okay. And then I wanted to draw more buildings. If I then started a jaw and other building in a more sort of loose style like that. That is going to look really out of place. So you've got this kind of super detailed, very rigid style here. And then you've got wonky, That's a little bit more loose. So one of the reasons why I'd recommend you to try to draw a little bit more loosely when you start with, so it comes down to holding the pen and then if you're drawing a line, don't feel like you have to draw all in one good, You can go through and just draw in little pots like that so that it's straight rather than drawing the entire line going across. You can just you can stop lifting, join it on your enjoy that line in a few different segments like that here. And you'll notice even on go back and do a little bit of a scribble, what can go sort of like v. So if I go down accident and go back through it again. So that's just something I really wanted to sort of talk about. I think it's important. And I don't want anyone to get frustrated drawing for joining along. It's not straight. You know what? I never have any completely straight lines even today. So you find a kind of leeway kind of style that you're interested in and what you're comfortable in. People who are extremely detailed. And really, I mean, everything just goes in one direction and everything, all your lines and angles are completely perfect. Some people like doing that, and some people like doing more loose sort of shapes and having the entire style structure following that. So that's about all I wanted to talk about that another thing I wanted to discuss is correcting mistakes. So I think I'd talked a little bit about this already. So say if one of the most common mistakes that I make is drawing a line. So I might draw a line and I got a little bit further down flat piece and I want to go across. So what I can do is just literally correct that line like that. But if you start going in and stop touching that line and keep doing this sort of thing, going back into it and doing that thing. It's just going to make it worse and it's going to make it look obvious. So having a little bit of imperfection and areas, it actually, it's really strange. It actually makes it look better, but only if you don't draw attention to it too much. So that's just one thing I can recommend. If you are drawing a line, you sort of go off like in the wrong direction. Don't worry about it. Just restate that line downwards. It's going in this direction. Okay, I want it to go further down. Oops, there we go. That's in the wrong direction. So I'm just going to restate that like that. Okay. Then you've got a cube. So that's one of the tips that I have. Don't continually go everything's drawing a figure. I'd come in a lot, lotsa to begin with. Then I stop putting in the legs like that. And then I will redefine it a little bit more. And as I keep drawing, redefining a little bit. Okay, so that's one way that will help you to prevent mistakes. But if you're, for example, during a figure and for example, you put in a leg down here and it shouldn't be there. The worst thing you can do is start coloring that in and trying to mix it and fix it up, that kind of thing. Just restate it. Just draw the legs in the position that they're meant to be. And somehow you need a work that you turn that into another figure. That could be another figure here that's just walking in this direction. You could turn it into a bag, anything like that. Font, it's going to work a lot better. You have to work with your mistakes when you're using pen, there's no rubbing out. And especially if you're not using a pencil to draw first, which is really my next, my next point. So when you're starting out, it might be a little bit intimidating for you to go straight in with the pen. And I still use a pencil to pop in real basic details of perspective before I even getting with the pen at times. So things like the horizon line, maybe I'll put a building coming huge general building here, you know, building here will have a figure here. Ca hea, something like that. And what that would do is it will stop you from making those real basic mistakes like placing this building in the wrong part, maybe here and there's not enough space for this building on the side there. So placing basic shapes in pencil first, stop you from making those classic mistakes. So it's just something that I still do. I don't draw everything in pencil. I want to do most of the drawing independent, but all this does is that it a pump and the horizon line and get myself going. Another thing that I tend to do as well, if I don't working with the pencil, I'll just use the pen and say for example, this is the landscape. I'll turn the pen on the side and then I can just mock in very lightly, we are, I think the horizon line is, so you can just barely see it's quite faint. A line running across the page like this. And i'm, I think it's actually too high. So what I can do is I can restate that line, bring it further down like that. And then this line at the back, you know, when you start drawing in your landscape and bits and pieces, you barely be able to see it in the end. So that also helps in terms of just another way of drafting things out. And you can use pens, we can use pen just like bits and pieces. And when you measuring out how far that building is from the top, Where's the horizon line style? And I can use really lots of pen marks on the paper to guide your way to fully going a bit stronger and pop that line and completely. So that's about all I wanted to talk about. And let's get into the next video. 4. Watercolour: Techniques: Okay, in this video, I'm going to be talking about all the essential watercolor techniques you need. I'm going to be talking about flat washes, graduated washes, wet and wet technique. And we're in dry technique. And I'm going to be showing you how all these techniques that are used in specific contexts. So whether you're painting skies, you're painting a car, you're painting a building, that kind of thing with contexts in which you use it. So these are all the essential techniques that you need to know. There are a few others, but I find with 90, 95 percent of all my work, I only use these techniques. So let's go ahead and get started. I'm going to start off first the by showing you what a flat washes. So when you're using a flat wash, It's basically when you're using one color and you're trying to get an even tone all the way through. So you don't want some areas to be light, some areas to be dark. You just want the error to be the same color all the way through. So for that, what you need to do is firstly, mix up enough color to cover that section. So if you have a look at what I'm mixing up here, it's just a bit of ocean marine blue. And I'm making sure that there's enough color in there, enough water in there so that I can cover this entire bit. Now, I say that because it's important if you don't mix up enough color, what happens is that you're going to have to mix up some more halfway through the wash and that may change the consistency of the wash and the not gonna get a completely flat tone all the way through. So to avoid that, we want to mix up that color first, estimate how much you need. You'll get better at this as you practice. So let's start off at the top and I'm just going to go in. Just like this. It's a very thin wash of blue and cut across here. Move that down and really just color in this entire area. Okay? And some of these areas that look a bit choppy, it will start to sort of blending nicely over time, okay? And I like to have my paper on a slight slope as well so that it forces the paint and move downwards. So as you can see, this is a very flat sort of wash. You've got the same color, sand consistency running all the way through. It's important if you're doing things like your painting a sky. You want the sky to look the exact same color throughout your whole painting. So that's one way that you can do it another way, obviously another context that you're gonna be using this, if you've got a specific object, maybe a building or something, and you want to get the whole side of a building the exact same color. That's what you're going to have to do. Okay? So we'll try and along with another color here on the side. So I'm going to use, let's have a look. We use a bit of maybe just a grayish color. Okay, So what I'm gonna do now is show you another way that you can put in the flat wash and you see is usually better when you've got larger bits of paper that you're working on, normally what I'll, what I'll do if I'm working quite large, I'll start off at the top like this and just bring this whole wash across like this and saturate that paper quite ally. And as you can see, there's a little bead of water that's forming down the bottom here. So the point here is that you then just carry this down. You bring that down and you've got the paper and move it tilt, it will come down with you. Okay. So you sort of work in these left and right brushstrokes using the same same pool of paint that you've mixed up and just go left to right or right to left. It doesn't matter because I'm right-handed. And this just comes down all the way like this. Okay? And essentially you have pretty much the same effect as you have on the left. It's just that it's a little bit more easy to control this way. And especially when you're working on larger sheets of paper, I find this one is a bit more consistent in terms of the washer, the end. Otherwise, if you start sort of fiddling around, mixing things around too much, you get sort of Blache areas. But that's a second way to do the flat wash. Okay, so let's move on to the graduated wash. So for this bit here, what we're gonna do is essentially use one color to begin with, and we're going to add some more water halfway through. Now if you add more water into the actual paint, what happens is that the paint becomes lighter. And acrylics and oils, people often have to mix. It's black and white painting side for it too. And it's a lot and, and dock and things with watercolors, you just vary the amount of water in there. And that will in turn vary how light or dark the panties. So if I say start off here, I'm just using the same color, just a bit of swimmingly and blue and this is a cobalt blue. So I'm going across like that. Okay. And I'm going to bring this bead of water down. Okay, Just a random about say here. Okay, and then what I'm gonna do from here on, I'm going to go and lighten this mix by adding some water. So I'm adding quite a bit of water in here like that. I'm going to go back in here, maybe mock that up. That absolute it. So it's not too much paint in there. And I'm going to pick up this new mixed paint here, which is fairly light, and I'm going to drop that in like this. Okay? And move these downwards. Okay? To mix a little bit better. And sort of going there again like that. So now what I can do is again, just adding some more water at the bottom and Latin that even more. And at the bottom, lot met even more like this. Okay. And I can sort of lift off this last bit and just put some water at the bottom. Again just to lighten that up completely. So you can see essentially that there's a kind of transition between the lots of colors, lots of bits, and then the Docker be documented and a lot of it down the bottom. So just by altering the amount of water. So I'm going to show you how to now transition to colors. So what I'll do first is say if I'm painting a sky, I'm going to be grabbing a bit of this blue paint, pop that in like that. Okay. And we might want to put in a sunset. So what do you do then? Well, dry off your brush and put it just reads it off in some water. Then we're going to pick up the color that you want to pop into the sky. So for example, I might want to put some orange in there just to mix up enough of that orange. And it has to be a similar consistency is that as well? And I'm just going to touch it onto the edge of where that beat finishes like that. Okay. You might get a big way sort of comes guys be funny but, and bring that down. Maybe go like that. And it might take a little bit of encouragement and some of these sort of transition areas, you can just try adding a little bit of orange like that. But essentially what this will do is that'll just blending with each other and you have a transition between these two colors. Okay, so that's one way and technique that you can use to just transition colors from one to the other. Or you can go just from the same color and dot from dogs a lot. So I'm going to go through a couple more techniques here that I use, which are pretty essential. So wet in wet. Now, this is basically can be good. Now you can basically do this in two ways. So first way is just to wet your sheet of paper first. So I'm just going in with these air and it's just with clean water. Okay. And look at the pipeline from an angle and you should be able to see a slight sheen to the paper That's when, you know, it's being completely wet to go over the areas that look dry, make sure it's completely wet and that there's not any big puddles of water anyway, and that's really important. Okay, So the patent of the pipe is soaked through but it's not, um, do you oppose everywhere because it's going to make you watch, look really funny. Now what I'm gonna do here, I'm gonna go ahead and pick up a bit of color. So if I say want to pick up some blue and dropping, want to get like a sky. Seeing going on, I can drop in a bit of blue like this. Okay, and notice how the color spreads. So it doesn't stay put in the same spot, moves around, fake it by gravity. I see because the paper is tilted in a particular direction, you can see how it's all flowing down, but you get the soft and very edges. And this is important if you're doing things like clouds. You painting things like clouds, are you painting areas like water? Even so, it's really important to make sure that you've got some of the softer looking colors running through. Okay. So that's that's one example of wet into wet that you might use the clouds. These areas still pretty wet. It takes a while to dry, and while it's still damp, you can actually pick up some additional colors. So if I wanted to make some, some darker blue, for example, some purples on that and then drop some of that in to dock in some of these clouds. You can also do that. Okay, So it's just another technique. And the great thing is that if you can paint things went onto where I think it's really good idea, makes things so much easier. And you really get to use the benefits of watercolors in terms of just these amazing fluid effects that you can't get in any other medium, so difficult to control, but when it works, it's amazing. Now we're going to use two colors now and I'm going to show you an example. Maybe we'll do some waves. So what I'll start off with is just a flat kind of wash of ultramarine blue. And we'll carry this down all the way down the page to the bottom like this. So we've essentially got one coloring here ready? And I'll let this dry off a little bit. The longer you wait, the better and sharper the brushstrokes will be when you go back into it. If I go in right now and draw some waves, they're just going to spread all over the place. And I'll show you this now. So if I just pick up, for example, you know, a little bit of this blue with the mix with neutral tint. And I dropping a wave kind of light that you see that it spreads a fair bit. So it really depends on how when you go in and also the size of the brush you're using. If you're using a smaller round brush like this, there's going to be less and less spread newbie or a control that a bit more as well. If you work on a flat surface and the paper is not tilted, spreads a little bit less. Two papers tilted downwards so you see just some of the water bits start to move downwards like that. Okay? So if you end up waiting a little while, you get sort of strokes like these which don't spread as much. Okay? That's another technique that you can use. The only thing you have to keep in mind is when you're going in with that second layer of color over the top, the paint has to be thicker than the paint that you put in there previously. Because if it's not, it's going to spread and cause a lot of blue, like a fix. So there we go. Just a little demonstration of that. And now we're going to move on to the last one. And it makes sense. And it went on dry essentially is how everyone begins painting watercolors. You pick up a bit of paint, drop it into the paper, and we'll go through some of, I'll go through an example. So we'll pick up a bit of paint and I'm going to draw like a square or something like that. So you can see the edges of this object on drawing, painting. A completely, completely sharp and defined. If I want to draw another square, something here called that in completely sharp on the edges. Whereas if I went in to this area, wet into wet and try to draw a square or something. So we'll try to do that here. It's not going to work. We'll just spread out work to a certain degree. But you're going to get these blurry edges, but not when you are doing wet on dry. So when do you use wet on dry? Really, really depends, but in most cases you're using it when you want areas of definition. You want to define an area and you want to create sharpness. So things like, you know, if we got a building and we don't want the color to spread outside, That's what we can do. We can just put in the silhouette of a sort of building scene like this. Okay. If you're doing tree branches or something like that, okay. You don't want those branches to spread all over the place so that you can't tell what they are anymore. So this is one way to paint tree branches, okay? Like that. So there's a few different applications. Even if you're painting portraits and things like, things like that, I do find when you want to define things like eyes and eyelashes, for instance, you need to make sure that area is completely dry before you pop in those eyelashes, like what I'm doing here. Because otherwise, it's just going to blend in and not look like anything. So very basic. I mean, so that's one way. You use it as the only way that essentially I used to get in a lot of detail and you can layer over the top as well. Once that's dry, go back into it again, pick up some more paint and go over the top and create another layer of data on top. So if I wanted to do a square of this square, I can go ahead and do that and check this out. It actually creates a sharp edge on the side of that square. So it's just really important to figure out which one you want to go, which one you want to do depending on what you're painting, the effect you want to achieve. And that just done another one here with some objects. So for wanna get is a nice circle without any color bleeding around the outside. This is what you use wet on dry for. Okay. Whereas if we use the bit of that, tried to do that here it will go all over the place. Might think of an example where we've got a light source coming from the right-hand side of the painting. And we wanna make sure that the, the roof and the side of the building is illuminated. So we might go through and just coloring this side here. Looks now that the light's coming in from the right-hand side. So similarly here, if the light's coming in from the top left, it might be a bit of shadow here, like that. Okay? And if you want to create a shadow for building as well, often the shadows are quite sharp across the, across the ground or maybe you might have some softer shadows as well. If you don't want them to look too obvious. But normally you have some sharper ones maybe coming in from this direction here. Like that. Maybe you've got bit of light coming in behind. So that will make sense and join onto that shadow on the ground. That shadow is not going to spread all over the place. Similar here we can do that thing. So we've got a car here, for example, we want to say there's a light source coming from the left-hand side. We can join up all these things and put a bit of darkness under the car, bit of shadow running across the right-hand side like that. And we can create a bit of detail through this wet on dry technique. Okay. So that's about all I wanted to talk about. If you have any further questions, let me know. But these are all the techniques that you're going to need to use an error. Basically everything that I talk about through each of the subjects that I paint. 5. Watercolour: Using Values: Okay, For this video, I wanted to go through really quick crash course on tone. Tone is so important and it's often neglected by beginners. Often you focus a lot on colors when you start out. And I want to go through this because just to highlight essentially how important it is in terms of making your painting look like. It has depth and creating that sort of realistic feeling in terms of depth and perspective. So I'm going to start off just with a really quick explanation and demonstration on these to the bottom. Now, when we think of tone, what we're essentially thinking of is whether a color is lighter or darker. So in terms of watercolors, in to get a really dark tone, you need to use more pigment and less water. And I'll give you an example. We've got a bit of ultramarine blue here. Okay, so I've just picked up a pretty thick mixture of ultramarine blue. And I'm just going to drop that in like that and I think that's not enough. So keep going. And we've got a really thick mixture like this off in the corner, so it's really, really dark. And this would be essentially called a four time where the paint is completely saturated. Mixing water with it. By the way, we're not picking it straight up from the palette. That's one of the differences with watercolor and things like acrylic, where you do mix whites and things like that in it, but with watercolor, it's actually dark in color. You add more of the actual pigment, but still have some water in there. Lighten that pigment or to get a lighter tone, he add more water. So that's almost a full tone. And so what I'll do is I'll add a bit of water into that at the side. And as you can see, it's already starting to lighten up in the edges. So bit of a transition there. And then I'm going to add some more water in. And then a lot in this area here. Okay. So that's even starting to get to get lighter running over to the right. And what I'll do, I'll grab a little bit more water as well and just start adding that in like this. The point where it's just really, really light. So you can sort of see the transition from, I guess, a lighter, darker tone to a more lighter tone on that right-hand side. So depending on how much water that you drop in there, you're gonna get a more pronounced effect. But essentially, that's it. I'm going to go through another example. So we'll pick up just some brown paint highlight that this is sepia and drop that CPR in the corner like this. You can even mix a bit of blue in there on a dark and then up a fair bit that maybe some, actually some neutral tint would be better. Just drop that in. Okay, so we've got a really dark color here in the corner, just a dark gray in the corner. That's a full tone. And I'll add some water here. Okay. And spread this off to that right-hand side like that. Okay? But remember we've still got that full turn here to the left. And as I continue on, just adding more water like this, be more water to the point where it's almost clear right-hand side. Okay? So that's the sort of continuum of tone I suppose, where you can have almost infinite amounts of variations of that color in terms of light to dark. And this is really important with watercolors because when we look at shapes that are really far back, you notice that the tone is going to be lighter. And when you're looking at shapes that are closer, that turns going to be darker. So in order to portray how far and how close a shape of figure, a building, anything is, we have to keep in mind the rule of this tone. So another issue as well. We're not an issue, but another example where tone is important is where we want to indicate a light source. So for example, we might look at this, this sphere here and imagine a light source coming from the right-hand side. So I'm going to put in a little bit of water here like that and that right-hand side of this sphere. Then I'm going to pick up a little bit of blue paint. Just drop that in like that. It's not enough. Just a little bit more a little bit more in here. And as I go over to that left-hand side, I'm just going to add more and more paint so that we've got quite a dark color runnings of that left-hand side like this. Okay. So essentially what we're trying to do. Is to just get an indication that the lots coming from that right-hand side. So can even pick up a bit of paint here on that right-hand side. Like that, just using the brush, lift off a little bit of that paint. And we can indicate that there is a light source coming from the right. So that's another example of the importance of tone. And you want this area, the bottom here, pretty dark. And there might be a shadow on the bottom of the bowl here as well that you can just popping join on. Okay. Which is also going to be quite dark. And that's an example. And we've got a couple of other ones here. We've got a kind of a bowl. A square means we bought it. We want, imagine that there's some lot, again coming from that rod hand side. And pickup bit of orange, for example, just put in a very light shade of orange for that right-hand side and had been at the top, that lat kind of catching day behind though. It's going to be DACA because this area is going to be in shadow. So we need that to be Dhaka in time like this. And they might be a shadow underneath as well, costing to the left. So that's an example. This is, this would be a very similar example as well, where, for example, we might have light coming from overhead. So I'll pop in a bit of can a creamy yellow color to the top of that building like that, Just really quickly. And then at the bottom, I'm going to pick up a darker color, probably a kind of bluish gray drop that in. And that's going to look a bit like the bottom of the building is in shadow. So the light's coming from directly on top. And another thing you have to remember is that some colors will have a naturally doc time. So for example, this Naples yellow, if I picked up a full timers PWM Naples yellow and dropped it in there. That's going to be the darkest tone that I can get with Naples. Yellow is not going to get any doc and then that. But if I went in there and picked up, for example, a brown, a very kind of brown and just drop that in like this. This is a kind of a medium brown, but even this one here, Where's water down? No fear beat like that. It's still actually darker than that. So really good to keep in mind. The color that you're using as well has a natural tone that you have to take into account. So there's a bunch of figures here on the left. And you might want to pop one in, figures in like this, just a light wash of color going over the top of them like that. Okay. And these ones maybe a kind of closer. So you've got them fairly doc, suppose just fairly dark because they're closer to the front. But then you might have some small figures at the back like that. And it just so far in the distance, you can't see, you can barely see them. And so that's how you imply that there is some other fees and the distance just from lightning that color, and it pushes them further back and you have to put in less detail and the ones in the front. And of course, the legs are really important and joining on. Often getting a darker tone from the legs will create more contrast with the ground like this. So I always like to put in a bit more paint for the legs to grab the figure. And then of course, add in a teeny bit of water to that darkness and join a shadow underneath. Okay. Shadows are often a little bit lotsa. So you want that the blending with the feet of these figures and you can do these ones in the back a little bit as well if you want, like that. Okay. That's another example. Fano example that I'll go over is very, very small sketch over here. And I'll demonstrate by just showing you how this would apply in a basic same. So if I'll just start in with a really light wash of blue for the sky. Want to make that really light so that it's almost like water. And I'm going to have a cutting around the buildings like these. Okay. So the sky is going to be a lot as part of the painting. And that's going to be pushed as far back as I want, as far back as I can. Okay. Then what I'm gonna do is I'm going to start looking at these buildings. Now. I want the buildings to be darker than the background, then the sky, because if they're not dark, they're just going to blend into the sky. So we want to ground these figures and make them closer. So I'm going to add in a little bit of darker paint in there. Could even be some blue mixed in with some neutral tint. Okay, we're gonna go over it quickly. It's mixing in the sky, but that's not worry too much. So you can see that's already bringing the buildings forward. Okay. You might then go into the foreground here and adding a little bit of yellow here for a grant. And get some darker color here for the front. Like this. Very much tone for a lot of Dhaka, sort of in there. Okay. Then you might ask yourself, What else can we put in here? So you might want to have buildings which are closer and figures, well, you might want to have this figure closer. So what you need to do is just dark in these two bits. Okay? And I'm going to go in here and do it quite quickly. Normally, I'd wait until it's completely dry. But that's what you do. You'd go through and you pick up a bit of darker paint and you drop it in over the top. And then this building suddenly comes forward more. And same with this one. This one here, maybe a little bit on the side. So now you've got two layers of buildings. And you've got this figure here in the front. And we can make this figure really dark like this to bring that figure even further forward than the buildings. So this is a really simple example of tone just applied in a general streetscapes, cityscapes setting. I hope this was helpful. When you watch the individual videos and demonstrations. I actually go through how Doc, How lot things are that I'm painting in. You have a better understanding, but Try of these exercises and try to get yourself used to mixing different times. Experimenting around, even just use one color and just try to paint something in a monochromatic format, something like VCB. And you'd be amazed how much detail that you can get in and the amount of debt just with one color, I find that's always a fantastic way to learn. Tone. 6. Italian Buildings: Warm-up: Okay, I'm going to get started with the drawing for this one. This is a very simple, well, I think one of the more simpler scenes anywhere where we can reduce down the main shapes to this big building in the front, we've got the shadows, really obvious shadows sort of crossing over to this building here. So we'll start off by just popping in the area right at the back. Oh, it's the horizon line. It's not even IV. And it's not an even horizon line because you've got this sort of area APA bit further. So we're going to have to just draw it in very generally and look at where the, the buildings at the back end. And I'll say that sort of finishes at around about a third of the way on the paper. So this is where I'm just going to draw a few little loose sort of lines coming up there. Then what I'm gonna do, I think I'm going to start straight with this building here. So we're going to go out and measure where it kind of finishes off. So I said rant about here, come down like this and I'm holding the pen as well, like I've mentioned before, just further down the end. So I'd get a looser kind of line. And I'm getting the side of the building just like that and kind of goes up there. And I'll bring this side of the building down as well. And notice I'm just going in with some really loose line work here. There's a looks like there's some kind of window, something like that here as well. So I'm going to put in a little bit of detail for this window, but I'm not going to get too bogged down into the detail. With that little separate. A halfway ran about a halfway down. And you've got another window here, which we can pop in like this. And then at the bottom we've got a kind of interesting, so we do, it's obscured kinda Bye. And vines and things like that hanging over the top. But we can go ahead and just getting a little bit of that actually goes all the way down to the bottom here. It's an interesting sort of shape. These areas, these sort of criss-cross patterns like this. And it's up to you how detailed you want to go in there. For the sake of this demonstration, I'm really just going to color a little bit of these in like that. If you had more time, I'd say you can draw out those frames a little bit more, slightly more detailed, but you get the kind of idea. So that's the bottom here at the front. You know, I think that is this will show what it is. It's a kind of plot or something just growing in the center. And I'm just going to get a bit of that in there. It kinda overlapping. We've got some pot plants or something like that here as well. So tiny bit of detail like that. And what I'll go around it back here is just I'll find the buildings and sort of draw the mean, the sod of that building like that and bring that sought of it down here. We have got an area rant about here. We kinda comes down. You've got the section of the roof there. At the bottom. We've now got a few other bits of building and this one just sort of going all the way up. So it's more lot closer. So something like these, but we've got this building that's in front there, some little windows and things like that. I'm not also foster that what's going on in here. I'm just wanting to put in some real basic details. And then just essentially move on a little bit at some little frames and doors and things like that. There. Another thing you wanna do is essentially just start putting in some figures. I've got one, pop, one in here and it's just a lot closer to the front like that. And it's best to kind of draw the mean or it is not all too many things in the background. So I can get away with this on because there's still a lot of whitespace going on. But put one here, for instance, is well maybe larger one traveling into the into the scene like that. And I think that's pretty much enough for that. We can add some smaller ones at the back, doing their own kind of thing. And we'll get this building in here on the left as well. And notice where it finishes off as sort of in the corner here, like that. And again, we've got some of these prospective law is sort of running down like that. And you can use these to putting windows, that kind of thing. We're being very loose. I'm not 0, so worried about how these look in terms of accuracy, just a real basic indication of some doors. We sort of arches like that. That's completely fine. Bits and pieces kind of hanging over. It looks like some washing, just hanging out, connecting up to those buildings or something like that. There's also things like little labs which are attached to buildings. But essentially, this is a real basic seen already and we can get started on these now. So what we're gonna do, I'm just going to pick up a brush, just going to pick up a mult brush. And I'm going to go straight into that sky and putting some cerulean blue. So I'll do, just grab a little bit of it here. Tiny bit just circled in blue. And I'm not even going to bold it to mix this up too much, you'll just trumpet striding. Okay? And we're gonna getting that sky and I'll want it to be a real flat kind of color. You can also drop in a bit of this cobalt blue as well. Fine, that works quite nicely for skies. And if you've got a bit of ultramarine, That also works well. Okay, So just cutting around the buildings and keeping it nice and nice and fresh, like this and going all the way down into some of these areas as well. Like that. Beauty cutting around using a large brush, it forces you to paint loosely in with Lazada sort of brushstrokes. Now what I'm gonna do, I'm gonna go straight into the ground and pick up some yellow ocher. And I'm gonna make sure I just get make sure it's warm enough and drop that in like that and I'm not pick up a little bit of a normal yellow. Also drop that in there as long as it's a warm color, you're going to be fun. 10 tag Stanley mix up a bit of green. And I'm doing this actually because of the blue that I've used before. So just be wary of that. And it's a little bit of cutting around those figures. But if you look at what I'm doing, I'm not really getting old too bogged down in what the exact colors and mixing and middle Naples yellow, as long as this area is nice and warm, we can even put in some red, tiny bit of English red at the bottom, for example, just mixed in like that. That's not a problem. So we just want to get that contrast between the sort of coolness of the sky and some of these warmth here, the ground, even some of these darker brushstrokes up the front. You can do that. Let it sort of mixing with the buildings. I'm going to drop in Naples yellow for most of its interested thin wash of that Naples yellow coming down. Connect that all up. And if some of it just mixes into the sky and let it do its thing, don't worry too much. But generally speaking, keep a bit of space from that sky if it bleeds in, let it do it. That's completely fine. This building in the center as well, Naples yellow. It's really just a slightly opaque, that creamy yellow. And you can mix this yourself if you've got any other type of traditional brighter yellows like a Hansa yellow. That kind of thing just mix a bit of white quash in there and, and get these effects essentially. While I'm here, I'm just going to mix up a little bit of green, drop a bit of that green in some areas because if it mixes with the yellow, that's completely fine as well. It's just going to dial it down a little bit because it's got that sort of creaminess in there. But I want to drop in a little bit of green in air is even here. There's a bit of greenery, is maybe in the corner there like that. I don't want to overdo it. But something like luis do the trick. And the figures is well, at this point you can leave them and this color or you can start dropping in a few colors of your own bit of a bit of a cooler color here I've decided to popping, mix it up another bit of a cooler color. Just dry it off a little bit. Don't want it to be too obvious. Stuff bit of color there essentially. So I think that does the trick for the first wash. So we're going to let it dry and I'll come back and finish it off. Fantastic, That's all dried off now. And what I'm going to do next is start popping in some of the details of the shadows, some of the details of the buildings. I'm going to be using round brushes here. I've got a number eight and then number ten, round brush. So start off with the number eight and let's give this a try. So picking up a neutral tint, I'm going to actually make some red in here. To just warm up and neutral too many, we can get it, put the leash sort of color and also dropping some of these blue, okay. Look more blue to green. Let me drop some more blue. And maybe a bit of a break in there as well. Okay. So what I'll do, I'm just going to start with a bit of darkness in the corner here. And remember, we want to imply the shadows kind of running from the rock to the left-hand side because we've got this sort of I've got this light source coming from the right. So leaving that area of the building in the darkness, I'm going to go ahead, stop pumping this shadow here and we'll cut around the figure here as well. The shadow comes all the way through the ground and we can even gain a bit of that figure. I'm like that maybe leave a tiny bit on top there. But essentially we've got this shadow that just crosses all the way over to that side. So we're just using a lot of these docs to getting these tie a shadow. Just one big wash, essentially. Bit of blue in there. That's all good as well. I'm going to swap to a larger brush like that and merge this sort of shadow over to the left-hand side. Blue here near the front. Okay. Shift this all across there. We've even got a bit of shadow on the left-hand side of this building, which then creates a shadow on this side of the building and going across like that. So you're going to get that in there, a bit of shadow costs and assad, this will join up with some darkness again here and that left side of the building. So k is get a bit of that darkness in here. And testing also got a bit of light coming off that plot. That's all good. I think a tiny bit of darkness running through here as well. And for this building in the front that needs to be dark and a bit like that, bit of dry brush that. So I want to do so. We have essentially just putting a real basic shadow over the top of everything. And this is what I'll kind of let it dry it off. But while that's happening, we can pick up a bit of light blue sort of color who whenever you want. And we can stop putting in some softer shadows. So This building here, just a little bit of shadow I want to pop in like that sharp edge coming in from the sod little bit. Maybe the shadow here. Having a look around and just seeing if I can blend that into the side there a bit. And there's a bit of shadow on top there for that building. You've even got windows which you can emphasize it be these little bits and pieces running through and perspective lines on the buildings. And also some darkness underneath here with these trees. Because we well, to imply a new shape like that caused by those trees and it will mixing the ground. That's okay. Not a big deal at all. I'm really just trying to be as efficient as possible. Popping a bit of color here is just some, a lot wash of blue. And we can do it here as well. And give the so a little dry, finish it off. What we're gonna do is pop in a lot of the dock date house. And for that I'm just going to be using a smaller brush. This is number 6, round brush. Picking up a lot of these neutral tangents, that dark neutral tint that I've got already mixed on the palette. And we can pop in the legs, some of the legs of these figures like that, and stop putting in some basic shadows, maybe coming across the same like that. I like to join up the legs to the shadows and just makes him look more convincing. And we can put a little bit of darkness onto the body of these fetuses. Well, something like this, just to join that old up. And these are essentially the darkest areas of the painting. So you just want to get in a little, little bit of variation, color variation, especially with these darker sort of doors and things in the background, I find getting some doc, brushstrokes running through them really makes things look more interesting. And then we can pop in a bit here, a bit of little bit of detail here for some windows. All that jazz. Little bit here on the roof, some tiny bits of bits and pieces of things like that. So this actually needs to be darker to more neutral tint wherever in that roof. Notice I'm also holding the brush quite close to the end so that I can get more looser sort of marks on the paper. Okay. Maybe just a bit of shadow was something they had for that plant and that kind of thing. But essentially what I'm highlighting here is how simple it is to get an a few little brush strokes like this and imply the tonality of the same, the mood of the same. I didn't take very long at all. So so we'll leave this. I'm quite happy with it. And, you know, another thing you can do is maybe popping some birds or bits and pieces into the background like this. It's not a 100 percent necessary. But essentially this one is finished. 7. Street Scene: Warm-up: Okay, so for the second little sketch, I'm going to get straight into it and we'll look at the back of the buildings here. We can see that it ends about a third of the way down the page. So again, just draw little rough line as to where you think that is. I'm not even putting that in probably just in case it changes later. So we'll go up and I want to just start with the car. And a few of these details here in the front of the same because it's going to be real hard to stop putting stuff in afterwards once we've essentially done the background or go over things. So I like to do things in the foreground first. So I think that's good choice, especially for beginners. And I'm just connecting that up. You've got a car here, pop popped in some wheels. It's a windscreen there. Couple of Windows, side windows and things for that car. We've got another car in front and I'm emphasizing and making a lot bigger than they actually are as well because I want these cars to really stick out a bit more than they have in the reference photo. And just because there's a figure here doesn't mean you have to put that figure there. Same with this one walking. So I'll start off just put this general figure here. There's body. And especially because this person is near the front, we need to do them first so that we can cut around them with the buildings and things later. So we've got an legs, leg sort of coming forwards like that. And then we've got another leg, this sort of bent at the need there and coming down like that. There we go. We've got someone walking in that general direction here. The arms and just tucked away so you can't really see what's happening. He's wearing a hoodie or something like that. There are like to get in another figure sort of around just closer to him. Like that maybe walking could be walking away from the scene to be honest. Like that I'm coming out or something that he's holding onto like that. Got another figure, smaller figure here that I'll pop in just for scale so we can get this sort of sense of depth in like that. So we've got a few figures. We've got the car, we've got this area here. So just to decide walk, I'm gonna pop that in like that. Could base of the buildings is a bit sort of coming out there. And now what we can do is start popping in the buildings. So again, we need to measure about where all these a, beginning with the ending. So we want to leave enough of that tower in the center. So essentially it almost comes in this building here on the left. It comes in about a third of the way. So we're measuring about outside, just did that here. So I'm gonna draw a general line going up like this and look at where the building ends as well. So it's about halfway between here and here, maybe a little bit higher. So between the horizon line and the top of the page is about halfway, halfway point with a roof finishes, so popping a little roof like that. Okay. And coming down there is the sort of windows like that. Then we've got the right-hand side of the building. It's another interesting sort of, I don't know what it is. I mean a dome or something that connects up. And we've got a section here and we've got a section like that and the rest of it. It's just doors down below in and things that we don't need to worry about too much. You little breaks and things here if you really want to put them in, I don't have time. If we're doing a sketch really quick sketch out these really bother with that as a sign or something like that here. What you wanna do is just popping the main things, windows, doors, general structure of the building. That's an essence of what we have going on here. So that should do the trick really. I mean, you can start, you can add in a little bit more detail to these windows. It's not really necessary though. So that's that left-hand side. What I'm gonna do now is just find that left-hand building here. So it actually comes in teeny bit more, say random it here. And we'll start just drawing in that left-hand side of the building. It hits the top of the page and kinda comes in like that. Okay, so I would leave that for later. And we'll start working on these buildings here. And I've got a bit of that one. You can barely see what is happening. The amacrine bolder or too much. It's mainly this tower that comes up. And if we look at where the tower of sort of this long bit at the top starts. It's almost where this root begins here. So I'm going to use this roof to kind of measure where I should put in the top of this tail. So that's what I've done, popped it in like that, easy-peasy. And then we're just going to get in this side of it like this. So just bring that down to that side of the tower there. And it's more complicated. Then that in terms of the actual details in there, but you don't need to worry about it when we're just doing something quick like these nice gesture drawing. And we've got even bits of buildings and things here in the background as well. So that's a lot you can do and you can sort of Hatch away at stuff, for example, and that will bring out the other bits and pieces. Anyway, we'll get started with this bit here. So I'm bringing this section down. This is the section of the building that's kinda facing the sun coming in from the right-hand side. So that's the topic there. And I'm going to just getting a bunch of windows following that perspective. Like these few windows, real basic sort of stuff in this door or something down and bottom, like that. There's a side of this building here are going to be too close book I just like that. Even some windows he asked. So just basic, basic squares like that. We've got a balcony or something like that here that we can popping like that. What else have we got in another window here sort of follows the perspective of this building. And there's a doorway of larger kind of doorway here as well. Little signs and things like that. Running down the sides of these buildings and not a window off the top there. But that's about all that we need to sort of get started. And I think I'll get, get, get painting now. So again, we're starting off with the sky. And this time around, I'm going to pick up some orange, drop that straight into the sky. Just like that. It's an orangey sort of color. Maybe a bit of red in there as well. Tiny booth, these red drop that in the cut around those buildings like that. Okay, so we get kind of a glowing effect here in the background. And another thing I can do as well, I can pick up some DACA color, could be some blue, could be some neutral tint. We can just drop that in like that to create little cloud effect like that. And just leave that to mixin. Do it, do its thing. And what I'll do is just start mixing around some more of these kind of orange and red spot to put in maybe the yellow ocher as well, mixed items so that we have a kind of wash for the ground. And I'm just going to carry that down as well through some of these buildings. Get that running as well like these. And you're going through the cutting around the cause it if the roof top make this one darker here, like that. And essentially just carry all these kind of warmth downwards. So we've got a bit of the sort of sky reflecting off the ground, just showing the lot. I guess the same. So I'm keeping it very nice and warm, very light wash. Nothing crazy at all. It will be little bits and pieces. He had just some darker strokes here into the foreground to change things up a bit. Okay? And what we'll do now is just start painting a bit of the buildings in. And I think I'll grab a bit of this neutral tint, but I'll pop in some blue. This is just a bit of cobalt blue, which I can actually mix with some brown, little bit of little bit of Tonga. And this is going to create a kind of grayish color. And I'm going to use that to dropping to these buildings like this. Trying to hopefully get it to blend into beats of the sky too. So it's really, really light wash of that color. I want everything to stay fluid. And blending in this bit too like that. Okay. Just drag that down and be more warm from this side because we've got maybe the sun coming off that side and we'll bring this down. This can be DACA here, like that. Here we've got the figures so we can cut around them as well. But all this is a lot of blending. So that's all done and we'll let this dry and get back to the second wash. Okay, time to get into more of these little details. And again, I'm going to start picking up these round brushes to get into some more details. So this building here in the front, I think I'll start with it first and carry on with the neutral tint makes with the blue so that I can get a kind of bluish mixture here, maybe a purpose almost like a purple color, to be honest. And I'm going to stop putting in these darkness here on this side of the building we need to dock and this one down, especially here we go. Bring that down. Here. At these little windows. We can cut around some of them like that. For example, these figures cut around the figures just to show the shoulders. That kind of thing, loose marks on the paper. And I'm going to join the song to the side of the building here where we've got this area that's kind of in the sunlight and that's why I'm doing it quickly so we can get in all the shadows and things at the same time, running off that building. And a bit more darkness also. And here in this building behind doing this so that I can make the solder the building Paul pap data. Then we've got this tower in the background. And that's just going and pulp that bit of color through like that. Okay. Can leave a lot of that sunlight bouncing off the side like that. Just a little wash over the top of that building there in the background. Okay. But if darkness here to create some contrast between the tops of these cars like that. And essentially which is bringing that wash off a little bit. Just a nice little dry brush strokes like this and I'm trying to connect up. Everything is well be sort of left and right hand side. So that we've got some harmony between the two sides. Always important to connect your shapes. And we've got the car as well, some here I am, I'm just putting a bit of shadow underneath, joining that on to the wheel on the side here. So that we can all get that in at once, like that. Even the car here, the front, a little bit too wet, I'll just draw it off that brush a bit. So we've got some shadows running to the left. We can go ahead and do this figure as well. And we've got the legs. Then. We've got this figure here to here in the background. Bit of a shadow, it going over to the left, like that. Sidewalk just popping. Couple of strokes running across like that became get a few running through the same in that way. Bit of color for the windscreen of the car like that. Drag that down here. Connect that onto the back side of the car and Jose to the sod of the car here, Something like that. So we've got this car kind of in the background that's more kind of hidden a lot like that, but this one's more in the darkness. Another thing you can do, stop putting in little brushstrokes, DACA brush strokes, and just picking up some neutral tint and just adding the mean for some areas where I wanted to create some darker windows and things like that. So yes, and she's doing a little bit of drawing near is darkening up some spots. What else have we got? We've got bits of this. The windows, the roof tops, that kind of thing here that we can play around with in darken up these bits here as well. Just some little brush strokes and they hear. The last thing that we need to do is just add a bit of color to the figures. So I want to add a bit of orange here for these person, just the top they're wearing. And maybe this other one we can grab some red and put that in. So it's up to you. It's interesting, interesting sort of part of the painting where you can take your colors and add some colors that sort of just stand out and draw attention even but it's, it's really up to you. So that's essentially it for the two sketches. And as you can see, it's really quite simple to get that sketching really quickly. Hold that pen down the end goal with your brush work and put those two basic washes, the light colors, let it dry, put the dark colors in. And often you can do that in two layers and have a really nice sort of seeing representing light shadows and just this fluidity and spontaneous look. So we'll finish this one off and get started on the next video. 8. Burano Scene: Draw Foreground: Okay, so for this video, I want to go through my process when sketching in one of these scenes in line using a black pen. And I've got a more complex scene here, which I'm going to start off with because if you can get the process in which if you can get the process in which I'm using to draw this, you'll be able to get everything else because this has got everything in here from figures, buildings in the front building that bag overlapping shapes in the front. It's quite a lot of detail in here. So first thing I'm gonna do is I'm just going to draw a general border. Now this is a landscape type of painting. So I'm going to just start off here and go ahead and just get in a really basic border with the pencil. I'm not even going to mark it out and percent I'm gonna go over all this in pen afterwards. You just want to give myself a little indication of where to stop at the site. Now, the next thing we wanna do is just divide the, the, the. Now the next thing we wanna do is essentially just divide the picture. Roundabout down the middle where all the buildings stop off at the bottom. So if we just have a look, It's just about So if we look at the bottom of all the buildings, we've got a section just underneath the middle part. So middle part of the page. So I would say it's around about here. Okay. And let's just estimate around about here. And I'm going to just draw that in with pencil. This can change later on. I think that's about right there, but that's a really important factor. Now, another thing to keep in mind that we're not trying to get in all the detail here in pencil. We're just trying to get in the real basic components like positions of some of the buildings we want to put in. Error of the sidewalk that comes in some of the boats and mainly positioning. So then when we go in and pen skin to be a lot easier. So I don't have to think so much. Whereas these, how far does it have to be from here, the main shapes are already in there. It's going to help you a lot. So same goes here with this section at the front on just going to draw in a bit of an indication here of where this path sort of comes in like that. So it's more actually in a bit more like this. That's okay. Another thing we'll do is start getting in some of the sort of pose these wooden poles sticking out of the water. So we've got one here. Now, this is where you can have a bit of fun and change things around. You don't have to keep them. As they sort of look in the reference photo. Just play around with them a little bit. Sometimes you might find that the reference picture just looks a bit. It needs something that's shakes it up a bit, adds a little bit more variety. So what I'm gonna do is just start getting in a little bit of detail here for the boat. I'm mainly just positioning where it is. Okay. So that's the back of it. And then we've got obviously this section here, which comes up just the back end of the boat. And there's another B over here. That's the thing, that's the engine sort of at the back and it comes out of the MST, comes out like that. So it's a lot of stuff going on here. This is just going to be scribbled on essentially. But what we wanna do is get in this back section of the boy that's going to kind of anchored down a bit more and then we're going to just get it through. So god, and in fact, this needs, this poll needs to come up more. So this is one of those. So that's the good thing about getting in these little preliminary sketches in pencil, just a little bit of detail. So then if you make a mistake here, you can quickly correct it. And that can form as a guide. So that both sort of ends off random here, it comes in like that here. And then we've obviously got the bottom section like that. Okay, so might have to change it a little bit, modified slightly more later on, but essentially, That's, that's our boat shape here. And there is also a novel or something like that here as well. I'm thinking we might put it in just just something here. I mean, this actually looks like a step, the side of a step or something which I'm going to pop in right over here, I'm thinking is, well, just change things up on our marketing. Another poll coming through the center, like movies and just see how that looks. You know, we might have another one coming up here like that as well. Okay. And I don't know if I'll keep that one in, but we'll try later on and see if it works out. And not. Another thing we've got to do is we've got a second boat here. So we've just begin going to pop in that back-end of the boat like that and just get that sort of shape coming in. I think it's looking here at the front like that. These little lines running across and the sides of the boat like that, you don't need all too much detail in there to indicate there is a boat and that little section. So let's go ahead and have a little try at these other modes here. So we've got one here. So just popping little section of that part of the boat. And, you know, it kind of comes down to the back and see where and it's quite gone a bit too much too far out with that one, but that's okay. We can sort of amended lighter section in the front, hits the water. In this section back here, finishes off random at there. And this is the Okay, so we're going to put some of these boats in at the back. And remember this line here is just below the middle line of the page. That's where the buildings actually start. So we need to add in the sidewalk, which kinda begins around about here. And it just goes off into the distance like that. Okay, so that's where we're going to start putting in the quote. I'm going to get in this sort of section like that. For that start, starting bit of the boat kinda comes down the back. And then of course bit that hits the water will go to section that kinda comes in more like this and then come down towards the back. We can refine that a bit more later on. Here we've got a little motor that's kind of covered up at the back there. So something sticking out of the water here, these little holes as well. They kind of important. And let's have a look what else we need to do with kind of getting in this section as well, we're sort of at the edge of the water. There's a beautiful wall there. Super-important yet, but just forms a guide of where I'm going to put this other boats. So you know, and again, you can just make this up. You don't have to place the boats exactly as they appear in the reference photo. That's really important point to make here. So I'm just putting down the shapes essentially. Here's another one here that kind of overlaps and then that comes down like this and there's something on top of that boat as well. Like with that. What else have we got? We've got none of the boat here. I'm just putting in a bit more detail in another one coming in at the back, can barely see what's going on as you go further up into the distance. Okay. And we've got these blue poles sticking out of the water and a slanting towards the buildings. And having some just behind the boats and summing some even cut through in areas that really makes it look more interesting. Okay, so there's a few bits and pieces where we want the boats. Now let's start working more on the buildings. And again, we're doing micro measurements. Here we go, big set of buildings here on the left, we want to say about where does it end in the paper. So I would say it's just if we look at that kind of orangeish colored building, sort of in the middle of the page here. It's almost to the middle, right. So I'll say it's about here, it finishes off. Okay? So I'm gonna draw a general line up here, okay, and then we're going to go in from this side, we're going to look around about where we started. So here's the base of the buildings. And then we've got this little area here where it comes in from the side and estimate sort of comes up with that here. Like that. Okay, We need to leave some room and here and then start moving that across here. So just a bit of little bit of space k. And I'm going to bring this line down here, just separation, blue separation and building. Another separation in that building. That should do the trick. We've got one, this sort of separate out into three portions. So we're gonna go ahead and do that like that. Okay? And essentially what we've got here is the sort of nuts and bolts. These buildings on the left, we're going to do these ones on the right now. So let's go ahead and I'm going to start. Let's go ahead and get this large sort of secular buildings in here for, so we're gonna simplify this down and start working on this section like that. Okay, we've got a bit, sort of this building here, pops out and we've got windows. I'm going to the tree, larger sorted tree that sort of covers up some of the windows like that. But essentially this here is one kind of building and that comes down like that. Then we've got a roof top of another building here that has a chimney like that. That sort of comes down the page there. And let's have a look. We've got another one that sort of comes up like this, simplified down the shapes, triangle and a square. It's what I've always loved to do with these with these drawings just simplified down the shapes that you see. Okay, that's the only way that you can do this without going completely not trying to put everything in when it's just not possible. Even now I'm doing a little bit of scribbling with the pen lighter will go through with a lot more fine detail. Okay, so that's the side of the building that's going to be in the sun. So this bit here is all going to be in the darkness. And as we move along, we've got another rooftop here. Again, just measuring that where it's sort of finishes that. And then we're going to bring this down the page. That's another building. And you've got another sort of building behind there with the chimney looking at the roof top is sort of starts here and then goes up a little bit thing comes down. And we go, that's another building that's going to come down, extend downwards like this. And we've got this tower here in the background. And I'm gonna go and pop that in like that. And said, Look, it's going another sort of square section on top like that. And then we've got lease with sections that come up like that, roughly that we're the tower is. Then we've got this building here in the background. A couple of windows and is some kind of shade here. I'm not sure what it is, but it's some sort of shade there. And we're going to pop in a lot of this stuff here. We're going to put in more detailed later, okay, but as you can see already, we've got a basic layout of everything in here. And we don't have to worry all too much later on. So you can also skip this section, goes straight into the, into the drawing if you'd like as well. Okay. So let's go ahead and get started. I'm going to pick up a zero-point 85, line up the 0.8. Because all we're gonna do is I'm going to start joining the stuff in the front first. It's important, anything that overlaps, we want to make sure that we're getting that info. So that includes these sort of pose these wooden pulse. So I got the 0.8 mana and I've got the 0.5 liner. And I'm going to go in and I actually like this little poll that I'm putting him in to start off here and just adding in little indication of this pole coming into the ground like that. And then we're going to get in this one. Here's where a little bit more. And let's have a look. What else have we got? We've got another poll here and that sort of comes all the way down. I'm trying not to try to keep it loose too, so I'm not constantly just caught up and trying to detail everything. And so keep it sort of quick and loose and come down. That's another one here. And we've got another, yet another one here, the side. And another one that's sort of exits out the seen here on the side. And I think this area looks a little bit sort of sparse. So I'm actually going to put in another one coming in right about here, maybe out of the photo. And then just kind of going through that book there. Okay. I'll think of it. Look, it might be a bit too much lighter, but woo, woo, make it work, we'll make it work properly. Another one here as well. I just feel like I wanted to get that area filled in a bit more at the front. K. So start off with the easy stuff first, I'm going to just go in, get these kind of stamp or whatever it is in here and hatching like this. Okay. And I'll just draw in the edge of the border, make things easier for myself. And we're getting this side of the foot path, whatever it is. And one chance at these, just estimate that like that. And essentially now what we wanna do is stop putting in the boat. So it's go ahead and just getting this section here first of the backend of the boat. I think this is important here just to get in and be a little bit more detail. We've got this bit that's covered up and there's a lot of stuff going on here. I just want to reduce this data look kind of like a cloth shape, just a general shape of something covered up here. And it's part of the engine obviously, but we just need to indicates some slight details here. Okay, so I've got now going on to the part of the engine there, the backside. And we notice we've got this sort of section that sort of comes in. We've got this beam here, it pops in. So we can just go ahead and add in little detail and sections like that. There we go. And the back end of the boat as well. This is what I just wanted to start hatching away here, like this. Okay, just a little section. And once you get once you sort of get to the bottom, this area is pretty much just completely dark underneath the boat. And you can either get in and use the liner to actually just mock that air in color that section all in or you can wait into lighter with the watercolors. So I'm just going to start drawing in the other VM ages of the boat. So getting sawed like that. It kind of just, you know, again, just depends on how you've drawn the pose as well. So coming in from this saw we've got another bit here and that's going to come straight in like that. And like that. And just say to some kind of little point up here, just curve that in a little bit. And the birds just pretty much covered some sort of top or would have on top. So I'm just going to cover that in like that. So that should do the trick. And suddenly look, what else can we do? So this bug here next to it, just in front that needs to be popped in right now. So let's just get in that back end of the boat like that. Okay. I'm going to dock and this one down liter mole. Okay. And just bring that section out and be like that. Who's going to also extend this poll? Here we go in that sort of comes out to, again another point up to the top little bit of line work running through like that. Okay. I mean, come back to that one a little bit lighter. I K. And let's continue on to the boats here now in this section of the painting. So pop that in. I like that. The main thing is these little sections here to die little bit, so they really signify the edge of the boats that are made sure I got those in better and hear the back is sort of slants down to there. So nothing too special really. Carry There's a little cover them back to cover the motor or whatever it is as well. So just scribble there. Okay, and chance now to start getting in this section and running through the back side of the boat. Okay. Then we've got this section of the book, just party the putting some more data so you can stop at this point as well. So some of the shapes start getting smaller as you move AND gate becomes easier to actually start drawing with a smaller. Hence, just something that you might want to do. And we go, So just getting a minute detail for that section. Like that. There we go. That's a general boat shape like that, might have sort of rule. Kids running towards inside the BOT-2, going to do another one here, simplify down, That's the back. And then we've got all these stuff sitting inside the boat. And again, just the general section, this and that's going to come down, join up in the water like that. The ones in the back. You really don't need to put into that much detail at all. Use Donbass, box shapes or things in the distance, and especially these ones over here in the far distance. You might just have some overlapping shapes running through there, but it's nothing too detailed. Nearly. Okay. So again, it's just not knocking out these little Age at the wall. And the great thing now is like you can pop in these little pose at the same time. Get them to overlap with the boats. And just like that, some running behind the the buds. Like this. Okay. A few more, just little ones in the back section as well. Getting them to be slightly smaller than the ones at the front, you can have some kind of come in off in a funny angle as well. We've got these kind of one here and the Mu, bit more detailed and it has these little red stripes running across as well. So that's something a little different, Paul, that you can pop in there. To add some variation. Let's try that here as well. Something like that. Okay, great. What I'm gonna do is actually start adding in some small figures or should have done this in pencil before. Well, it's not a 100 percent necessary. And just getting getting a little bit of detail here for the fingers off in the distance isn't a fellow here in the corner. Is someone here just kind of walking a dog. And very, very basic, very basic detail. You just scribbling in some small little figures in the demos. And it's so important to do it at this point because you don't want to do a lighter when you've got the buildings in, kinda use the buildings to cut around these figures. And it just works better if we do it this way. Okay, So just popping the legs and things like that, have a bit of a play around. I really want to make it a fairly busy same in the references. Not really all that much. So few little figures and things here, but I just want to add on, I'm going to go beating more activity going on. You know, one of the person he just kind of walking. Walking in this general direction, ends a bit big, but that's all right. Pattern bit of a play around with what you want in there. And then remember also that the figures at the back, as you keep going further down, they become smaller and less detail as well. So don't be sort of trying to adding all kinds of little details and things for these ones at the back. That's just going to look a bit too much. Kind of overlapping as well, maybe with that. But another figure here, just enjoy popping them in. Okay. And I kind of stopped just getting in some edges for this tree or whatever. They're going to just start there for some reason. But what we wanna do next is actually getting this Lodge Building here in the front. I'm going to go in with the 0.5, okay, and just stop in the corner here and work my way in like that. And go ahead again and just drag this across here. Notice as well the way I'm drawing, I'm not sure on the lawn all at once. Sometimes it just makes it easier if you draw it in small sections so you can make sure that it's generally strike you get a little bit of this sort of stuff going on as well. Don't worry about that. Just plug, just continue on with it. If you go back and try and correct little things like that, it's just going to look at a place in a couple little roof on top, just an indication of a kind of section on to that. And maybe that one is well, okay, kinda really see the roofing this building anyways. I'm going to take him for his hiding from a shorter A lower angle. So there's the side of that building. I'm going to get that in here, just coming down like that. Got another part of this building here and just bringing this one down again like this. And it sort of separates the green building from the red building. They're roughly about the same size, width, I mean, so we just separate them out into threes and we should be fine. Okay. Roughly the same size or these two a little bit bigger than that one actually k. So another thing we wanna do is pop into general separation for the floors. It's just a guide so that I know where to put the windows more than anything. Okay, so this one here, That's going to be quite similar actually. And you notice I'm not even really marking the page and just putting in a little bit of ink in there to sort of, so that's what I was doing with a pencil before. And you can do that is instead of going into the pencil to begin with and start already marking it out, new guidelines like that, like I'm doing. So it's getting this area of the building, the top that kind of a little chimney. And we just basic details like that and pumping some little top of the buildings, you notice all these little antennas areas and stuff like that. I like putting the mean. They just add a bit more detail and characters and the building. Just going to be careful not to overdo it. And so K, this section actually pops out more from the top like that. The, you know, when you call it top part of the roof gutters. And then we're going to go here during this building all the way down. This is an interesting sort of building actually. So it kind of another two colors. So we've got this section here is where the light bluish building is. So I'm going to just bring this line down like that. K also that a separation here for these buildings, human rot, which I'm going to get in as well. Why not? Okay. And then here, of course we need to separate this out and the lines that you draw it downwards. All these, they need to be relatively accurate because this isn't rod a big focus of the building and you've got these sort of light and dark areas. And I'm going to pay more attention to those bits of details. And again, let's just separate out the flaws to make it easy to join them in. Notice it just a little bit of it is Mach king on the page like that. And the great thing is that if you get it wrong, It's not a big deal. We haven't drawn that line and you haven't fully committed to drawing that line in. Say, that's all good. And we got to that side of the building always. So we separated them out into the three floors. This is now going to be a lot easier going into the windows. So let's start off. Let's start off from this bigger one here. So we'll go in and get these. We know, we know sure. You basically just getting the sought of it like that actually goes up further is as these openings, the shutters of the windows like that. And if you sort of what beats underneath here, and it's actually pretty dark insides. So we can do a bit of hatching. We can just color that in Thai area that we know a0, a1. And that's fine as well. And a little bit of detail on the shutters. Okay. 9. Burano Scene: Draw Background: And we'll go into the other one. And the same sort of deal with the other one, you know, try to get it accurately, but actually, if you, if you ever do it, it's just going to MOOC too stuck on. So if you notice what I'm doing is essentially sort of going over little bits of areas again and again, varying the lines that I make some of them a little bit harsh or some of them a bit lotta like that. And that's just how I do things and it makes it look a lot more sort of blends on to the rest of the drawing. So let's go ahead and pop in this one I remember follow the perspective of the building. So you've got these lines running in this direction. You want the launch of the window frames also running in that similar directions sort of serves as the perspective guidelines on the building as well. Very important. Kay, couple more windows down the bottom and you've got sort of these. Again, some shite is coming out like that on this one maybe sounds a little bit sloppy and jobs usually with the coloring in beads on pick up a lot and that's just going to be thicker and help with the coloring in pots much more. So it's kind of half or a pin or something like that. I don't know. So I'm just going to get in a little bit of detail there. But essentially just have it more dark and the body like that. This one's pretty much close, so I'm just going to get the window sills and why we do see who's in. You only need to indicate it like that. Okay. Little gap in between like that. One of the sections they say. That's what we need to kind of indicate it and gain some perspective lines running down the sides of the buildings. We've got a bit here. This section of the building, VCE. The frames, just pop those in like that. And we can go ahead and start coloring in some of these areas of the windows like that. Yeah. Just leaving in that White frame. And that's going to and make things more interesting. Ones open halfway, you can see in the reference photo. So we can go in there. This topic, I'm just going to use it. You've had a few little marks like that and that should do the trick. Ok, and there we go. That's that one pretty much done. Let's go into this section here. So again, just drawing the rough position of the windows. Take your time for this. There's really no rush at all. If the windows are different sizes, don't stress as well. Again, we're not trying to and replicate the reference picture exactly one and put our own little, I guess, flare onto these and Yarn style. So let's just go ahead and got those windows, the top two windows in pretty quickly actually. And now we can start again working these windows, these ones are slightly lower. So if you compare that one's actually lower than that one. So you kind of use other bits of the drawing as a reference. So that's why I was saying before Wass would have stopped off by adding it a very light pencil sketch and adding in the relative position of all the buildings. Because almost using that large macro level design to then decide and place all these other small elements. So if you've got the big bits and pieces wrong, then these ones will be out of place as well. So there's a certain level of accuracy in the with these drawings to begin with. If you want it to resemble the incident aspect that resemble the reference photo. So this going and popping, these shutters, being faster than when I'm, again, just work at a pace that you happy with. And then you're comfortable with tiny little bits, little bits of shading here for the windows like that. Okay, Just quick sections. Then we've gone a bit here. We've got the doorway. Sort of extends downwards like this. And another section of the doorway that kinda goes in there. And then we've got TV small windows. And this is where it really helps to have obviously the smaller pen to work with. I came because he just able to getting more detail and things like that as you go further back into the distance K. So it's getting that and that window shutters on this one as well. So that's popped that in telling you shut is an a section here. Okay. There we go. That's a little bit of detail. And then we've also got this door, this darkness of the door that I need to indicate as well, little bit of white on the edge. And in just doing a little bit of coloring in here, that darkness in your choice. I mean, you can go ahead and get that in watercolor afterwards. Even it's not a huge deal. I just like doing pen. And notice I'm cutting around these figures. The figures is still here. No, I haven't gone over their heads or anything like that. Unless you're using these windows in a way to frame this because more. So use that darkness behind TO advantage if you're able to k. So that's pretty much it. Let's forgotten the door here actually, let me just getting DOF completely forgotten to put it in. Bring that down here. There is some kind of this is this some kind of know what it is cloth or thing running down this window and this door meetings, bit of indication like that. You've got some blue shade then runs. I think that over the top. So I'm just putting some small details. Then. Let's go ahead and in the bottom of that building, got this one as well here to getting, as well as the ones of human back. It's very, you know, you just gotta have fun, enjoy the process. Don't rush through it. Did that, used to do that in a long time ago and I'll still do actually with some of my other paintings, but with these pen and wash paintings, you really gotta take your time to make sure that you, I'm giving yourself the opportunity to pull all those little bits and pieces because I'm depend, always shows through afterwards and it's part of the beauty of these sort of little, little pen and wash sketches. I spent a lot of water colony just go over the top of the pencil and it's gone. The sort of remains all the way through. So you want to make sure that you've got to you've got what you want in there. Okay. More gestural details. There's a window here again. And the frames of the window like that, just pop that in like these that we'll be covering for that edge of the window. And we've gotten again, just another sort of mourning. And we call it a thing in the doorway. And the date WHO? Then we've got the door frame behind the watch section. Little bit of darkness in here like that. Can you you've got beats running up the building as well. If United is just little things, don't even know what they are, but it's probably like it got a pot or something like that. Really easily with things just add character. So let's continue on doing our thing. And suddenly look here, there is another window here. So in this building I've drawn a little bit, too little bit too wide. Okay, but that's all right. We can change things up. We can make these window lodge up. We can shift this window inwards. So took me a while to kind of not stress and getting everything perfect. And just enjoy drawing. And, and there's some of you might trace. And that's perfectly fine too. I'll do suggest trying both tracing and drawing from the reference photo. Because he drove from the reference photo and you come up with your envision. Something always surprises you and looks different and makes you think, Hey, I want to give that a try later on. In the future, or even trace it sort of left with the same moment. The same vision is what you've seen in the reference. And I think it's so crucial to add a little bit of your own flair to it. And let's just going almost done with the detailing of these windows. Just going to pop in the top. These are the top sections of the windows is three windows. There is three years. Well, so just be putting that in generally and then we're going to just start with some new frames like that. Okay? And same here and there. And we got ones here at the bottom of the door frame. And on the one hand, maybe good. And Tom, to getting the little white frames. We can swap also to yet another small opinion is one of the advantages of having different sides people in line is almost gets to the point where I can't see what I'm doing. I'm going to put my head right next to the page. Okay. But but again, it's not all about getting it perfect. So just some indications of these sections on the outside he's watched sections. Okay. Because we're quite free, lighter. If I remember, I'll come around these little white beat so we can always go back in with some quash. My case, it's called the mean. I want use a larger, larger one to do this. You're going to 0, three Actually, yeah. And just to be darkness and these windows like that bring out those wireframes. These old don't have any of the shutters on them. Can't see them anyway. I've got some internal ones. I don't want this to be able to detail as well. And just bring this side of the building up all the way here to this corner of the building. Right there. Good. Point to stop it. Okay. It's running up the building. Look at that. Just things old. Running through this section here. Just, I'm going to darken up the speed of the painting and drawing, I mean, in some little white sections, I don't know what they are but just usually macaca to cut around, docking like that. Okay, nothing too complex. And some dark and beats on the earth like these, just sort of these funny little. And he sort of tiles that run across the top. That's one, just getting this sort of Christian jaggedy sort of effect up there to indicate that here as well. We've got something like that even makes a difference. Okay, let's start working on this one here. Go to Window here, Which 01:00 AM I using 0.3, and it's about right. And we've got another one here. And this building, I'm done almost a tiny bit too wide. Not a problem. And just work with it to me downwards and we're getting the second one. Makes drawing these windows 7 chasing when you've got these little tiny bits of guiding lines that you've put in a bit earlier. So remember, for follow it the perspective of the building. And they fall, they sort of go on. The Windows Start in the same sort of slope. This one here at the bottom. And I've got another one here like that. And then the door here in the center. And then just joins onto the ground side like that. And I'm going to leave these more or less. How would these, because it's kind of direct sunlight. Maybe good window there. And little bit of hatching. Hatching. Hatching for this one as well. Because this building is more direct sunlight. Okay, I want a bit of variation as well. So the oval window is just completely pitch black. Then really at this point, you know, you've got moisten details down for this building. I mean, it's it's looking pretty detailed already. All you have left to do if it even really is just to add in some little sections and pipes and things are running down the building has on doing at the moment indicated kind of work. The more nuances of the building and the white section there of it. You know, it's really it's really up to you. Okay. All right. I'll just leave that one for now. I'll come back to light. I'm going to start working on these kind of building here on the right-hand side, all these smaller buildings there. So I've got myself the same line to the 0.3 little motif to adding 0.2.1 later as we move further down the back. Okay? So this year is actually the techie route. Barely see it before. These little window actually HID behind. Kind of COVID up, almost bought a tree like that. Here in the background. Okay, we've got a section of the building. One of these given just make up because I can't quite see in the reference photo and I don't want to zoom in and get bothered as til the small, tiny details that and the back. Remember the stuff in the back. We don't need to detail is much detail. It is much, it's going to pop out and it's kind of look, I'm just going to look at a place. It's going to draw our attention to that section and we don't wanna do that. Okay. What do we got? We've got more sort of buildings here. Let's see. So I've actually these sections bit tricky. There's a lot of stuff going on in keeping with the pencil sketch, I kind of just data bit of guesswork. So let's get in this top part of the chimney. So it kinda goes up like that. Comes out to the side. Day comes down there, got this sort of triangular kind of thing on top. And this just comes straight down the building. Like these kind of flares out a bit and the bottom then goes down again. Came out a huge deal. So now I'm just going to get in this side of the building here. And notice this window is a bit off, Not a problem. So we don't have to follow the picture exactly. Who's going to notice. So here we've got the two windows that pop in, the window frames. Hatching, coloring in. For those windows like that. We might even look at putting another window here. This could be part of another house or something in between. And this is the top section here. And we've got random the way here and then it comes in like this. And it's just a triangular shape around the same height as that one. Just lodge window here. I like that little window section coming out the back like that. And we've got another section coming there. And then simply look the speed running out through the back. And coming down here. These bits important because we've got a sod of the building that is facing the sun, the side here. So it's going to go ahead and start working my way down the side of a building, connecting that to the ground and sang with this side here is my Cloud. Connect that down to the ground. Okay? And now we've got these sort of chimney kind of thing and I'm going to extend that down and duty, as well as just the beauty of detail. There. And now we can just stop pumping in the the windows and just separating out the flaws and label like this. Popping a dice and the lunches with some small lines. This is the point to another to hear these things. These 1's oil really case this side of it. And test stick. We can start going do these buildings as well. There we go, a tiny bit of that bottom one and we're going to now that we know a bit of detail like that. Fantastic. I'm thinking on why actually invent a couple of other windows and just pop them in here as well. Because there's just a space here which is just looking at a place that does putting in some frames ending in some windows like this. Maybe you got a fantastic I think we're probably going to need some more here as well. That no one here like that. And behind the tree, that's the thing that kinda obscures some other date house. And you can only see positive through the tree, through some openings and things like that. So I'm just going to indicate some little bits of details and things like that in there. Okay. And leave that one for now. Let's go on to this other building here in the back. So that's the roof. Just that coming down and saw everything here also in the lot. And we'll go in and adding the top part of these roof as well. These building here. You need to be more careful with the shapes, especially because it's quite a distinct triangular roof top like that. Bring that down the page. And this is a kind of shade or something here. Bring that across another building. In the background. I tend to get a bit lazy with details in the back, which is can be a good thing as well because he doesn't want to overdo it, but at the same time still want to take care to make sure that the perspective in the details still there. And down here, we've got a bit of darkness. Bits running across. Maybe we have some figures, some heads and things in this section. And just want to pop in a bit of that. So that cutting around some areas and getting a bit of darkness in here as well. So it's not all just complete darkness underneath like that. I can attest take what else do we have to do that's popping these little chimney, year sod and top part of it like that. And it comes down. It would be more to the side of the building that these windows here really quite a lot. I'm just going to leave them how they are directly in the sunlight. In the middle. Again, just little sort of perspective lines on the buildings would want is okay. I'm mostly going to just do the hatching on the roof tops. Here. The pinching work. The post and just be patching is part of the roof. I'm going to hatch that in the same direction at the top. So whatever they laid that direction. Okay. Let's stop putting in some details when we News 1 is 1 here. What else If we go, we've got four here on the second fool here. So 123, oh, like that. And we've got a normal window you could do or something here. And another window next to it are the next two in another window. Here. I should do the trick. And little window here on the side of the building. Maybe an entrance here. This is a bit of darkness and we'll show what it is, but I'm going to use that to cut around the figure that's walking in the front. Sort of nth station. Didn't have hatching here for these routers as well. You see here for these rooftop. And this whole area is pretty dark. Though in general, the entire buildings, you don't fast. Like Hey, WU separation in between that part of the building many. Yeah, that kind of thing. Pol pot of that building there. Okay, now let's go over the Taboola here. So small as 0.1. This is just going to make it easier for me. Okay, So just this isn't detailing it a little bit more here. I'm not this tau is to like I want to add more care into it. Come down like that. And this one coming down to right here. And then we've got a section that goes up like that. I released two little triangular thing I was doing that then the middle is the separation point here. Connect that up. Then we've got the top section which just want to draw directly that section that comes across like that there. And that's pretty much it. The left side of this is just a, it's just going to be hatched in a bit more. Pop from that. We're all good. This is a square shape, so it doesn't show what they are running down the left-hand side. Okay, so just a bit of hatching on that left-hand side. And then we go on it. It doesn't stick out all too much even though date out at a baby. Okay. Fantastic. So that pretty much sums it up. I'm, I'm going through it a bit lighter and adding some small little shopper effects and just sharpen up some of these windows. That is all that you need to do. And my entire process for converting a reference photo into a line drawing, as you save is, say, general process that I do follow in terms of just join them basic large shapes in making sure that we've got enough space to put in the buildings. By putting in general lines indicate the bottom of all the buildings. We start at the front with the larger objects first and things that overlap. But take your time and you'll be able to do pretty much the same thing is ADU with a lot more practice. 10. Burano Scene: Paint the Light: Already now time to start with this one here. And again, I'm going to go with the sky just to begin with. And I'll start with just adding a little bit of water into the sky. So this is really just clear water that I've picked up. And it's not exactly clear because I do have some blue paint on this too, but that's okay. We're just cutting around the buildings and very loosely. Okay. And then just go ahead and use a larger brush for this one. Okay, and I'm kinda just work my way all the way around these ones here and little chimneys and things on top like that. Okay. Okay. Back again and pick up a bit more water. And the reason why I'm doing this, because I want to drop in the blue paint and get it to sort of mix and form these sort of cloud-like effects, hopefully leaving bits of whites on the paper. Okay, so that's all I'm going to do. So let's pick up some civilian blue mix, a bit of that up and I'm going to drop some of that in like this. It's almost straight on. And I'm going to go ahead and just leave little bits of white in areas of the painting. Okay. But other than that, the rest of the painting, we'll have more Kind of Blue beats in it. So that's some of it traveled down. And you've got beats here. Some of it's touching the building, not a problem. As long as you've got bits and pieces that do work. And even a bit of purple, you can pop in some purple in here. Of course, for that leftover from previous, previous wash. This bit here it looks a little bit strong. Things you can do while it's still wet, just lifting out a bit of that paint. Here. I'm just dropping in some more of this color in here to sort of mix around, do its own thing. And let's go back to some more of that spirulina and blue, drop some of that in the edges and corners like this and carry that down. We've still got that little purple bit which are picked up some and drop that into the sky here. Okay, so I'm changing it up a bead from the reference photo. It's not completely cerulean blue all the way through there are some warmer reds, sir, woman who's running through there. Okay. And there we have it. We've got a very light wash in for this guy. I'm going to leave that as is and start working on the buildings now. So firstly, what I'll do is I'm going to pick up a lot wash of sort of yellow for this back building. I'll write, I reckon I'll just go actually with number eight, round brush. This is going to give me a little bit more control and mix up a bit of that. Yellow. It's just a bit of yellow ocher. Okay. I'm going to drop that in here. And my mixing with the sky and Vt as it's done here. Don't worry too much, just let it limited time travel and a bit of that warmth from the roof. As we go down, I'm going to pick up a little bit of blue and just work that in here. Okay, carry this down. It's kind of the lilac sort of color AS picking up a bit more of that purple, just dropping that in. Maybe a little bit of carmine editing here, which is pinkish, sort of read and carry this down the page. I've got the paper on a slot, slot as well, which really helps the side of the building and journey to getting as well. Just popping again, that sort of purplish color that the speed of the roof we're gonna do is, well, just to be to that sort of Kuhn is running through. I've got this building here in the back, which I'm going to add in a little kind of reddish color in here, like that. Shrink that down tronic, get a lot of these two blending wet onto wet and sort of merging with the other parts of the buildings to the left and RA, that kind of thing. Beautiful, warm from the roof, Lassa. Okay, so moving on now to the left-hand side. What I'm gonna do is just pick up a very light wash of Naples yellow. Very, very light, almost just water. And just drop that into. And I think here. Okay. Just to get rid of that, what color would it be? More coolness into this side of the building off the garden to paint the whole thing. Okay. And, you know, the roof top again, we're going to pick up a bit of brown. You can pick up some night, Uzziah, Naples, yellow bit of yellow ocher and drop that in as well like that. And just this quick brushstroke going across, moving onto these buildings. Here, it's pretty much yellow in color. Yellowish, green, kinda copy. I'll just go with yellow. And this is a bit of what Is it a bit of? So this here is a little bit of yellow, hansa yellow. And we can drop in some other bits in other kinds of yellow in here as well. I've actually edited and bit of yellow ocher and a tiny bit of Naples yellow too. And just carry that across like that. Okay. She's going around the window sills and things, shutters, that kind of thing. I'm not trying to be too accurate key the mall important thing is I really want to get in the sort of merging of colors on the page. So here for this building, again, it starts going blue. So I'm picking up some blue. And maybe you could have this purple troponin here like that. And we've got a section of this building where it starts merging to a different color like that. So put a softer edge on the side of that building. Then we've got maybe a little bit of red on this side of the other buildings. I'll pick up some red sort of hues. Just drop that in here. Maybe more vibrant red. And just drop a bit of color through there. Like that. Another thing to do is split the rooftops again, just grab a bit of that burnt sienna. And while you can drop it in here like that to the roof, there is. And this is kind of blending a bit downwards as well. I'm not so fast, I just want to get into a bit of color through their forgotten this part. Just get that in here as well. Moving on to that side again, that's probably to that yellow here to sort of merge downwards into the page. Over here we've actually got some green, so I'm going to get some sap green, just a light wash of sap green and drop that in here and let it emerge as well. In areas. I'll leave bits white, some little bits of white in there too. And what I'll do just on this side, I'm going to get these little spray bottle and just keep that be well, the reason why I'm going to keep this bit where is because I want to get the the bottom of it to sort of merge onto kind of yellowy color. So really important to just keep that area fresh. This bit here. I'm going to go in with orange. Kay, so just a very broad orange. I'm going to take advantage of how close this is. This section of the painting is amine and just dropping a really red, vibrant, I'm a very orangey vibrant call. This is cadmium orange. Okay? And again, just letting it, if I can emerge onto some errors on the right, connect up all these shapes. Okay, so it's modal. The same thing. Great. Sleep at all. Like that. Okay. Moving onto the left-hand side, there's a bit of a greenish color here. And I think it's probably more of a yellowish green, so I'm going to drop in a bit more yellow in there. So we've got lotsa colored green. So I'm a little bit, It's almost like a lime green color there. And moving that across, there'll be probably a bit of merging in here as well, like that. Okay, and just popping in little bits of detail for the windows, really just leaving out some white. And essentially. Good, down cutter n bits and pieces and then go, that's that building done. Now moving onto this one on the left, I'm going to pick up a kind of yellow ocher color mix with it. Let's have a try or Incan more hansa through here as well. So I'm just changing up some of these colors have been mole. Don't want it to be too vibrant. But also just to have a lot of variations, these yellows. So maybe that's all I kinda wanted to do. I'll move these downwards here that we got just cutting around some of the windows. There's a door or something like that. Maybe a little bit of merging again as we were trying to do before. And I think what I'll do is just some little wash of yellow, little bit of Naples yellow on the top there. And then I'm going to grab some of this burnt sienna. Just a lot of wash it burnt sienna and the corner drop that in for the top area like this. This is just an indication of a roof top and join that on. Merge that in nicely like these. Okay. As we move on to this left side of the building, again, I'm just going to mix up some yellowish hues and keep it fresh as well. We're going to go over this entire section later anyway. So we don't need to stress or too much really about what it looks like. This as long as it's got that yellowish hue to it, you'd be fine. Because we're going to dial that down later. But you have already noticed I'm using a duller version of yellow. It's more leaning towards a meaning towards the kind of yellow America. Okay, so moving that down. Okay, fantastic. Again, we're going to swap over to a bit of the purple color here. I'm going to merge that on like this. Okay, bring that down and let it do its thing. It's going to carry all the way across here to the other side of the building. I'm going to just get that all in one big go like that. Okay. They mix and do its thing on the paper. Fantastic. And the roof top as well. Just a little bit of this burnt sienna. And I'm going to drop into the top of the roof members here just a little bit of color. That's all I wanna do. Okay, Now further down here, what I want to do is adding this kind of warmer brown. So I'm mixing up a bit of Naples yellow and also a bit of yellow ocher. And what we're going to do is drop that straight into the ground section and before where I've just wet that area down, this is where this is why I'm doing it manually. Little bit more, little bit more help like that. But that's the reason I want that all to merge downwards and join on the ground slightly later we'll get the shadow is in properly as well. Okay? But just want to have the continuous blend of colors. Okay? And the main thing is just, I'm leaving a lot of the figures, especially here in the foreground, leaving them wide so that I can go over later with another column, a cooler color usually. But what we can do here is essentially just emerge on that same wash that we've used for the buildings through the ground. Like this, you know, sort of funny. Stops halfway through. Okay, So here we go. That's looking whether we've missed out any bid. And if you've left out a bit, That's okay. It's not a huge deal. So that's kind of this section done. So we can, we can relax for a bit. Now. Here comes the little bit here, which is going to be more tricky. So I'm going to continue on with the same sort of, I guess, technique that I've been using before. And essentially start by popping in some water. So we're going to use, I'm just going to go and go over the top with light wash of blue, kind of greenish colored blue. So that's just the beauty of these. If you see here some turquoise color which is mixed from cerulean blue and a little bit of the yellow mixed up earlier, some Naples yellow. And this is going to form the sort of base color of the water. We're going to add in some dark colors on top. Okay, so starting off, we're just popping in this color here. Okay. So lot wash. If a greenish, sort of greenish kind of color. Okay. And I'm mixing that in the whole way through like that around the sides of these boats. Just got to be careful because we want to leave some white edges. And k is adding that in like this. And the top. Going over some of the polls, look, I'm not so fast that I just want to make sure that water is done probably this step I'm going to cut around, go underneath a random put underneath here. And we're going to wet these errors. Well, we can do the waterhole and one guy. Okay, then the rest of it we'll kinda just draw on afterwards. So that's about what we need. Just have all that sort of running through like that. Now what I'm gonna do is I'm going to mix up a little bit more all of these turquoise color, some more blue, cerulean blue and more Naples, yellow. Join that on. We more slowly in blue in here, if you like that, you should be fun. Let's drop that in there. Rw sort of Mark I am going to just drop it in and leave some areas of that previous green in there as well. Okay. Water, bit of water. But essentially what I'm trying to do is cut around some of these boats as well. So it's like this gonna do cut around coming down to the front here as well. But of course we've got the bigger bits here as well. The reflections of these buildings. I'm not going to bother all too much with them. A mod add in a little bit, put it in a little bit of color running through there just to mimic what's going on above. But it's not a huge thing, not a huge deal. We can get that in more so general, these general shapes here. Okay, so just little ripples in the water. So much you can accomplish your weight onto wet painting. Mixing up a little bit more blue in here as well, just some darker blue bit of ultramarine as well. And I've got some purple which we can just dropping as well at the same time around these books is where we need to get it in. Just DACA down here, crust the front. So I'm not dropping some neutral tint in this section. To get maximum contrast. Hear bits and pieces of the bugs and things in the water, for example. Just the darkness, maximum contrast. In this section like that. We can even do that over here and just start dropping in little bit of this darker color to indicate these buildings, the slot reflection of the buildings. And that brush is way too. Bb should use a smallest brush like what I'm using here and number four, round brush. And some of these, these reflections of the buildings above, I'm tearing down like that. Okay. And another thing is we've got these boats to some darkness underneath the boats to anchor them to the ground is really important. So I'm just using some neutral tint and just dropping that in directly underneath these boats. Okay. And just a little streak of darkness. We've got these, but here, which is really the doc has one in the front, the foreground here. So I'm putting a bit more effort to get that one in there. And we go to the back of that. But and I'll put in some red bit of English, read and hear. Maybe some burnt sienna. And just drop that in to the section here where we've essentially got this kind of wall. And hopefully part of that will bleed into the to the waters while creating a very subtle reflection. Okay, So I want that old to join on. I think the fluidity is so much more important. And trying to get the exact color or that kind of thing. So some of these reflections, just coming down, doing its thing. Okay? And you can even emphasize that you model. For example, Popper, Anybody yellow here. Let that work its way down. And it's all just quite muddy. And King anyway. But tiny bit of that may help. Indications. In the water. K is we draw off a little bit lotta as well. And what I wanna do is start putting in some colors for the boats. Okay, but what I want to just finish off this little section here at the bottom, first little bit of Naples yellow here like that. And it's just traveling down, connecting on like that. And then we go just lifting off a bit of this Naples yellow with a bit of just normal yellow ocher here for this section. Made of a soft edge like that, k, that will finish it off. You didn't think was yellow here as well. Oops. This is kind of run into that water. Trying to lift off a bit of that color. To begin with. That's a k. And more the yellow coming through. Fantastic. Great. And we can add more details lighter and emphasize that moist want to get on some basic colors. So yeah, moving on to these boats, I'm going to pop a little bit of throughly in blue, very light wash of certainly in blue. Fully split here. Okay, so let's drop that in. That's okay. Fantastic. Little bit of blue on top as well. And I'm leaving some white to that section. They are basically embedded. Take a look at the other boats. This one is going to be red. Speaking up, getting red paint. Drop that in here, keep it fairly watery. Release and let it blend downwards nicely. Just to kind of warmer color. Through the eighties, he's going to be important there. And the rest of these, it's very hard now to, to sort of play around, but just a light wash of color. There's going to be fine. These ones in the background of being and obliterated already, but we can start putting in a little bit of color on these top of his boat, which is kind of purply color and navy blue even. And here we have in the front some more. I'm going to go in with a, similarly in blue a lot. So really in blue here that for the back of the modes are there. And then we've got some yellow here. Oops. It would be this Naples yellow that I'm going to draw pain here. Another really named woozy, a little bit more creamy, creamy color a lot in that. Put that which around the same. And then getting a little bit of gray color here for the area of the boat. Okay. And we can draw panes here to signify the back side of the boat with purple, neutral tint. Let me go to that limit. Join on with the ground. I think that's so important. Some of these pots, you just need to let it flow on and just see I'm connecting that off with the ground bits here, for instance. And it's just going to flow a lot nicer if we do this in opportunity as well here to add a bit more darkness underneath the butt case, some of these areas, it does help to do that. I'm fantastic. And inside the boat, let's go with a bit of this yellow or RCA lot wash of yellow ocher. Fantastic. Okay, so this boat here in the front, that's getting a little, and again, some of these cool McCollough running through the button there. And the rest of it is really just a blue, very vibrant blue bit of color, right? Okay. Fantastic. So that's most of the colors in now. So I'm going to let these old dry off and we're going to go back into it and getting those final shadows and things. 11. Burano Scene: Add the Shadows: What I'm doing now is I've just mixed up a little light wash of some burnt sienna. And I'm going over some of these polls. So just to get in that kind of brown slotting brand color, that's essentially what I'm doing. So we've got a few here. I've done a few in the foreground as well. They want to make these ones in the background to dock as well. You want to make the ones in the front DACA. So I'm essentially just dropped in bidded color through here and it's still wet. This area of the paper is still wet. But it's just getting through a little bit of that color. And then later we'll go over it in a big DACA. Going through that's dropping some of these brown here, some areas here, here, another one there. They're so subtle like that. And also we might go over the top of it. Lights if we feed SEM needing to be dock and okay. All right. Let's have a look at these one is if you've read these pole running through these, and then what you call me stripes and Greece. Those two. And another thing we wanna do is add some colors to the people. So it could have been a vibrant blue here. Let's drop that in for this guy. Okay? And I always want to look at the context. And if we look around the figure, we've got all these warmer colors. So it makes sense that if we adding some cooler color of the top, it's just going to look a lot more vibrant and go for this one as well. Maybe a little bit of green there and pull the legs. I will just merge that down to this sort of color like that. And again, the actual shadows are running towards the left-hand side. So you've got all these shadow when the building and things like that. We're going to get the shadows in for these figures. At the same time, a hopeless beats dried. But firstly, we'll just pop on some colors for them, like this. Okay, manages the torso and it's just popping a bit. A color for the torsos doesn't have to be very dock at all. Just put a light wash over the top there. The purple for this one. We got some more brilliant sort blue for these ones here, for instance. Another one here. Just very up. Some of the colors on them. Some of them in the background. Now what I'm gonna do, I'm just picking up some neutral tint quantity, medium and neutral tint. And I'm going to drop that into the lakes. And just to get some darkness in a case like that. Here's another one day and another bit here. Just trying to do it as quickly as well, I find if you do it, So to spend too much time trying to add on the legs, then it starts looking funny. Right? And now comes the direction of the shadows. So we'll look at the reference photo that they all just going in this direction. So I want to just do that. It's very lot indication of a shadow just joining on. Gotta beat here. And here as well. Oops, what's kind of going to go haywire? And here, there is one kind of nutrition join up. So all following, going in that direction. Okay. That's the only way to really get a consistent feeling of the source of light coming from that direction, that right-hand side direction. Okay, these ones in the back, it's really hard to see. Smaller the ones here in the front. We've got to nail and join onto the legs. Okay. There we go. Add little things. Maybe they're holding something. This person will have a bag strap or something that in a blue here for the back of the Spotify gotten to popping? Yes. And just dropping some color like that. I'm going to be E2 for the back of his book there. Okay. Cohesive that boat. All right. I'm going to leave this off to draw and we'll come back and finish off all the rest of the shadows. Already everything is drawn off now and what I wanna do is start adding in some of these shadows to bring the entire painting together. We've got some DACA beats in the foreground as well with some of these pose. I want to start off with the buildings in the background. And what I'll do, I'm going to mix up a bit if neutral team here, we've got some cooler color here as well. I'm going to add a bit more blue in there. And then we've got some kinda warmer colors here, here and here. So I'm going to just vary the mixture is actually a shadow color so that we've got some sort of cooler shadows and maybe some warm in there as well. Just going to use whatever is left on my palette. So I'll start off with the building in the background first, and that need to getting a little bit darker. So let's test that out surrounding rock color. And I'm also making sure that some of that burnt sienna running through the 2D. So there we have it just popping on a little bit of that color with the flat brush just makes it a lot easier to find and cut around things. And when I've got the flat brush, especially the sort of buildings anyway, I'm fantastic and I'm not just water that bit of the shape down like that. They've got now I'm just going to go into again this side here, it needs to be.com. So I'm going to just go all the way down and do a teeny bit of cutting around the back of that building. And this is going to contrast with the make that lot pop out on the side of doing that side of the building. So you can say rooftop needs to be darkened as well, slightly. And and be more wold thing they too. So just some yoga, some the CNI running through there. That would be nice. Okay. I'm not spending too much time on these ones in the background. Just be careful because you don't want that to take up all the time and to be the focus of your painting. This one in the back ground, I'm adding in a bit more kind of a brownish color through. And let's go ahead and just dropping some of that column like that. And it will blend on to the roof top here. So these little Taboola, Something like that. Okay. And that should do for now. And going. And I think this needs a little shadow. He interested, cool shadow running across the top like that. Maybe here as well. Oops. There. And the windows and little bit of coolness in the Windows, little shadows like that. Something very basic. And that's all we need. And can have moving across the VCE one. We're going to need to dock and up that area here on the left-hand side of the buildings is going to be interesting. Some, of course, some aroma color, but it's just going to be DACA. And I'm going through just popping in a bit of this color here. And the point of this is just to get that side of the building to P a lotta. Say, drunk, he's only in a random it, where it finishes off as well. So it does finish off with that here from the ground. So stop there, leave some of that yellow in the ground area that really lot yellow that we put in before. Okay. And have it we've got to beat of that shadow on. You can even drop in a bit of blue in here too. It doesn't have to be all the same color all the way through. So varied. In this section of the top here, I'm not putting, say some bluish color like that. Okay. Lots of what's coming in from that right-hand side. And the rooftops are already pretty light due to the sun coming in from that Ryan sides, I'm going to leave that but when a mess around with that roof too much, here we go. So just coming down the side here, I'm going to pick up a mole vibrant sort of blue color and start working that into these pot here. Okay, so just a more vibrant blue maybe with some purple stain as well. They just needed doc and that off like this. I'm okay. That does the trick. And what we're going to have to do now skidding this tree at the same time. So got some little bit of sap green. And I'm going to draw in some of that, fit a bitter than color through here, just a darker version of sap green. And I really want to make sure that I'm leaving some of it at lots of green color as well. Essentially so that we've got a mixture in it. Lots and darker greens. And K. And I wanted to blend on to the sod of the house as well. So it's not just sticking out for no particular reason. Okay, so just a little bit of that, see that it's just all merged together. This side of the house. Here. I'm just going to add a little bit more yellow to create a smoother transition. That's up to the top here as well. Let's go to join on. So you notice that times you just need to go back into dark and again and testing. And that's just my way of trying to just get that a lot of pop out from that right-hand side of the building mole. Okay. This will dry off lotta. Okay, so moving on to this building, we're going to go and just pick up more of this yellowish gray paint that we've got dropping in here. This is where there's a shadow on that left-hand side and the building. Yes, I cut down this section and we can putting the beauty of these purplish color as well. And very often people ask what college e-mail shadows. And sometimes what people do is they use a just a darker version of that color. So if you've got a yellow ocher, he had some neutral tint or some grains or that. I like to do that and also adding some complementaries as I'm doing here. So I'm going to be the purple in here, but then I'm also going back and I'm picking up more of these kind of warmer gray color. And that way you've got the best of both worlds. You've got these lovely play of complementaries and then you've also got just that mole plane. So to shatter that occurs when an air is lit up. Doc and still the same color. Just dock on essentially. So coming across here, I want to keep this section more cool. So we've got all this wall here. I want to balance that off by making this area Kula. So here's where I'm picking up more of these kind of purple color and I'm dropping that in like this and leave some previous wash too. And here I am, I'm just really dropping that in. Maybe some gray as well through there like that. Feed more neutral tint in here. Okay. This is quiet, dark. And I'm trying to emphasize that more actually, I think a bit of red here would be nice just to light orange or something like that here. That's better. Just to loosen up that bit and come down with all of these purple. Then the ground has the sort of that shadow that runs just across the bottom that shrunk going to get in. And just pull some more of this purple first like this. And just kinda doc and even bone. And I'm going to start, Lamott uses smaller round brush for these products. Usually. We're going to get it pretty dark phase down here.com. Picking up more of that painting, some neutral tint. And I'm going to just try to draw a line and comes off here actually so long. And just comes off like that. They're okay and and dark in that mall, more neutral tint. And just color that in. Ok. And it's going to look like the base of that building and the shadow. Okay. Just like that. Okay, so checking it out, I think that's looking at K. Really at this point here we're just looking for bits and pieces to finish off. For example, modifying, want to be full of some shadow a little bit in detail here on this one. Maybe some big hears well, where we've got the sort of the kind of cover over the top of the boat engine. Then I'm just putting in small color there, little bit of darkness into that section. Essentially, we might want to beat more darkness here on the cover. Pot. Just looking at areas that we can draw out extra details. I can't just a few mana brushstrokes, I don't want to overwork it. And the blue areas here as well on the boat. Very important. Okay. What else do we have some some rope and things like that. Just holding the butt to these polls. And which brings my attention to the actual post. So I'm going to be using some sepia. We're going to get a sepia and the CP is going to pretty much going to be the darkest section of these posts. So we've using a lodge was number four, round brush. It's bring that color down like that. And remember if it's too dark, we can always if it's too loud, we can always talk anymore STI. So what I'm doing, I'm just making sure it's pretty dark. So it's going to be DACA and the boats, and so that it will come forwards. But I want to have that with watercolors. It's important not to go too dark as well because then you lose that transparency. There we go. That's one there. Many beautiful here. Drag that down. Behind like that. And another one here like that. Now the poll here is dark enough. The host species one, doc1 here being more neutral tint and remote brown. And then to see, now I'm coming back in and ongoing DACA over the top. And this will melting. And the good thing is we've got a light source coming in from the right-hand side. So leaving a little bit of lots on the right-hand side of these holes. Makes it look more convincing as well. K and Destic. Yeah. I'm on a dock and these ones more now. Sloppy on the distance, remember, so we can't make them to dock. But looking at it to live at the same time, what leave that one? Some of them might be catching the lot and that turn may be suitable. So leave that one there. And since have a look, what else do we have maybe made of detail on the sides of the buds. Then intimidate the ground and stuff as well. Just disputed. Combat off from little k. And Destic. Looking at few other bits and pieces that we might want to add on. So the windows and we've got these kind of shutters here and I'll wanna getting less light wash of blue on some areas. Yeah. So become these bits here you kinda very wide and sort of blue cones in these windows. Huge contrast with the orange as well. Trying to just get these quiet light as well, because I don't want to color just to pop out to be too strong as well. Something like that. Um, shut as these windows, which I'm going to dock and down. And I have a bit of a play around and find what you think you want to add onto. Write the scene. You, you want to see some red there. What else have we got? Maybe a bit more blue door here. Like that. What else have we got? I think we can some perspective lines running really visible darkness on top of this boat. And Destic. And I think to finish it off, I'm going to add a few little birds in the sky, break things up. Just pick up a bit of collaborative neutral team to whatever you got to start adding in some bits. Especially in these areas of the scar where you've got sort of little white patches, a font that is a good place to put them as well. And if you have any splotches of any accidents and bits of paper which is lifts and little bits of why tourism Docker LU spots and turn those into birds. Just put these little kind of vague like shapes in the sky. And that term does the trick. Something real simple like that. And we are almost finished here. And really you can keep on going and doing whatever you want at this point to dock in and further exaggerate that feeling of lot on everything. But I would say that I'm pretty much done with this. There's a few other things that we can do. So pick up a bit of this paint, for instance, and you can go underneath the roof tops to adding a slightly darker shadow like this. It is little shadow here like that. Under here, underneath here, beneath this bit here. The end piece here as well. We can draw out every little thing that you can do. Make these sort of vertical lines running down the side indicates some detail, that sort of thing. You can also turn the brush on the side and getting a bit of texture like this. Some of the buildings, we're going to do it to all of them. Just the bitter than to give the character that sort of feeling. Maybe there's some breaks or loose pieces and I kinda thing there. And it only really works if you've got some of these rough for we call it takes should pipe a cold pressed or rough paper works well, and you carry on some of these to that side. So it's not just a one sided building on the ground as well. So2, the Fick's law of these though add up. Maybe guy. Really. The beauty of this verb here, some shadow here that carry that on like this. Here we go. Another bit of shadow. Strengthening out that perspective on the building. If you'd like to get some verticals running down and things like that as well. But I think we are finished. 12. Burano Houses: Paint the Light: Okay, so we're gonna get started with this one. And the first thing I wanna do is basically get in the sky color. And as usual, I'm going to go with some cerulean blue and drop that in straight on, and then going to move that around a little bit. Just move a bit of mixing going along. And I've kind of gone to us on the line, then it's K. And we just want to get in a kind of flat wash over the top of this entire section of the sky. And also being careful not to touch the buildings because it's important. We going light it with a more warmer color for the buildings. Contrasts with the sky. And we're just going to go left. Go to the edges like that. And there might be some sections, we're going to have to pick up a smaller brush, but I'm just trying not to that I think we should be fine. Okay. A little bit of mixing is normal and the worry all too much, especially when Gone with the warmer colors, lighter ETAs going to mix in air is so you can't prevent that. We can, but the good thing is that the actual mixing or some of these colors together, really crazy and really beautiful transitions that you don't want to control any house. Bit of cutting around work is fine, like what I'm doing here so that there is a distinction between the sky and the buildings. Okay? Okay. Just like that, I'm almost done. There we go. Okay. So that looks about done. At this stage. You can decide whether you want to drop in a bit more color into areas of the sky or not. I'm thinking I might actually just leave it, go straight into some of these buildings. What I'm gonna do first is just get a little bit of that blue gets almost, just get some purple and mix it up here with some of these Rumi and blue, very light wash of purple. And I'm going to go over this building and we might have to pick up a smaller brush to do this. And just try this little one. That does the trick. So just a light wash and I'm going to connect that onto the sky as well. Just have some of that blend downwards. But I want this to be pretty light. And it just enough color in there essentially, so that we've got lots of Section of the house and I'm cutting around the windows and leave a little bit so that we've got some highlights on the edges of the window frames. So just a little bit of cutting around there. Drag this wash down the page and disputes kinda draw to be funny, sorting color there again while the paint's still wet. So always possible to just go back in and modify things a lot easier. K can even drop in a bit of little bit more blue in here or something like that. So not a huge deal down the side of the building. We've just goes even more blue. So I'm going to pick up a little bit of that purple and a little bit of ultramarine, drop that in here like that. And I'm going to cut around some of these areas like that. Essentially just getting in a bit of coolness on this side. And I'll probably have to go if we begin with the darker color anyway. Then again, we've got some of these building here, which I'm going to drop in a bit of this purplish color essentially down the entire length of it. Yeah. Cutting around that rooftop, mixing and things going around. I'm not paying too much attention to the edges and things like that. Just essentially just to get some of the colors in. Because we want to have some nice sort of variations. And I'm going to come down here. Paid this entire building in color. And you can mix in a bit about the color as well if you want some other blues, but just try to keep it relatively flat. The color and quite a lot because we're going to go back into it again, like having a couple of different times running through here, we'll make it look more interesting. Say scuttling around, doing my thing like that. More blue here at the base. Change it up again and beat like this. Hey, we go, we pretty much at the base. Okay. For the rooftops, I'm going to pick up some burnt sienna, mixed that up the pallet here. Drop that in like this. Maybe a bit of yellow in here will help too. And it's going to go over the roof tops. And some of these will blend in as well with the sides of the buildings. Just let it do it, just let it, the blending occur naturally and it might even go into the sky a bit. Which is fine. Okay. Scheduling and got forgotten and just get some color in like that. And then I can just pick up the tiny bit of burnt sienna trough that in like that. Do its thing. So if we look here, this abuse of lots of rooftop on this side say to wash, very pale wash of color. And this building has a kind of yellowish, yellow toy cut, maybe as highly orange color running through it. So I'm going to speak up a little bit of that color dropping in, like these round brush in here, just so I can pick up a bit more paint, trump anything like that, and carry the stem. I just wanted to mix it in with the roof top a little. Get the same thing for that side. Domestic. Iterate it down here. Okay? Dropping some of the bits and pieces and I've just got a bit of grayish color that are I've popped in there as well. But keep in mind, we're going to going lighter with a bit more detail. So this bit of the rooftop here, again, just going to pick up some of that burnt sienna, drop that in and get it in before that. And it should work fine, something on that. And as we go down, I'm going to pick up a little bit of this kind of orangey color, blend that downwards. And then I'm going to go pure orange and maybe a bit of, a bit of red mixed in there as well. Okay, So let's give that a try. Needed to be pretty strong. This is actually some cadmium orange there. And I think we can go over this shot is fine. Just leave some of these roof at the window seals and down, cutting around doing your thing. And you downwards. More orange all the way to the base of the building. And it was still cutting around some of these figures. They going to be a different color, probably a cool color. Let me go back later. And here as well, we can just grab bit of paint that you've got, maybe just a bit of a cooler color and drop it in. In some places when you want to create some little tonal variations. Doing that and more sort of on the shutter is. Okay, but not all too much. Should do it. Let's go into this building here. This is again, a warmer color. Probably going to pick up a bit of yellow icon and just try to get these winning are pretty quickly, get whole thing. Somehow lots sleep, some bits of white on there are the windows and things. Then the rooftop I'm going to pick up and be bold. These kind of Sienna. Drop that in that. Yeah. More that yellow are coming up to this side and get that Ollie and mixed fine. And Assad of the building just carry this kind of orangey color downwards. Yeah. Okay. And Destic, we're gonna get into the ground now. And for that I'm actually going to use some Naples, yellow and maybe a tiny bit of red just mixed in this eye just to Walmart. Color. Just a little. Maybe if pinkish sort of green color running through the ground and got Naples yellow and it's kind of opaque, slightly opaque color. I'm hoping I can just go ahead and quickly get this in most some of this building here is running and going quickly like that. And still doing a bit of cutting around in areas to see for the boats here and around the figures and these little poles. Okay. So try not to let it pulled as well. So I'm just shifting that paint around where I can doing it pretty quickly so that I'm not overworking anything. Okay. So right about here and I'll just need to put in a little bit of cutting. I'm going to pick a bit of English red and we drop that straight him underneath here. Let it blend in with the Naples yellow above. Something like that. Carry that across here as well. And here to do its thing. Here we go. Fantastic. And let's have a look as any areas that I've missed that maybe because we're mixing a bit of color there. And it'll be done and tested. So now going straight into the birds, we want to put in a light wash of color on the boats. And for that I'm actually going to pick up some blue. This is some ocher marine, I think it is. Now this is a bit of a peacock blue, which is essentially a purpley sort of blue. And we'll drop that in the cooler blue pay. So just into the base of the boats like that. And remember to leave that top part of the boat and why it's really important. And I'm going to carry these motional across to the side of the boat here. Like that. Okay. And on the top of the boat we've got a booth, kind of spirulina and colored stuff here is just a bit of the colors and things like that. So just dropping a bit of paint like that. The one on the left-hand side, again, I'm going to pick up a little bit of blue, but I'm going to alter that a little bit as well and just go a bit darker. So just cutting around bits and pieces and then on the top of it, just a light wash of blue as well here for that middle. But if cover on top, and I want to pick up some red little bit, read from the palette and drop that into the cover here and get that to mix, mix on while we can. Now Manet actually getting a bit of wind heat to some mixing things on that. Okay. So another thing I'll do while I'm here is I'm just going to pick up a little bit of brown and I'll mix that Browning to these little poles. Get a lot, wash all the brown color going through. You're probably going to have to redo it lighter as well. But I want to get a light wash of that brown. Okay, So here comes the water. And for that what I'm going to do is pick up spirulina blue, mix it in with some Naples yellow. And that's going to create a type of turquoise see color. You can see here. And I'm going to drop that in. Pick up more yellow if you can't get it the exact sort of Turkey we see color, something like this. We're slightly opaque. And if you don't have Naples yellow, what you can do is just mixing essentially a little bit of green into your blue, or you can even mix a bit of whitewash into your blues as well. And normal yellows and little bit of white wash bit of lemon yellow, and slowly and blue that will create this sort of color going along and just try and get this in on not so fast that details and things, but I want to add in a bit more darkness in here, the lighter, just hoping you'd be more blue down the bottom. Let's spread these all the cross. Glad. Yeah. This side here, like that. Okay. And testing. So we've got a pretty strong Bosch coming through. And what I wanna do is also getting a little bit of a reflection of some of the, the boats underneath. So really basic sort of fashion picking up small round brush. I'm going to get myself a bit of neutral tint and drop that straight into this mix of turquoise. Occasionally get a DACA sort of mix, turquoise and drop that in underneath the boat here, just where it heats the water. And it's got to be pretty thick. These paint so that it doesn't spread all that much. And we want to get some of the repos and things that it causes. So am just imitating that shape extinction, dragging out a few lines as well. So something like that should do not have to go to go back into it in a moment, but maybe go just dropping that darkness underneath and this is going to anchor that but as well to the ground. It's really good trick. Especially while the water areas too wet. And another thing I'm gonna do is just mix up a little bit of woman paint and drop it in here and get a bit of the reflection of the, the, all coming towards touching the ground and some mixing in bits and pieces like that. I'm essentially that's all economy to do. Also just some smaller ripples and things like that running across the foreground. So little, little repos and things like that. Well, so that we've got some general wavelike effects happening. Say something a lot to do. Kind of thinking is this dark enough? Should be okay. Sometimes you need to go back into a drop in a bit more darkness under their spread out that shutter. And this is the best time to do it. You only get one chance to do the soft shadows and while the paint's still wet to essentially. Okay. All right, fantastic. So we're going to leave this to dry the bottom. And while that's happening, Let's put in a little more color into some of these windows and things. What I'll do first is I'm going to pick up a little bit of certainly in blue. And in fact, this is kind of a turquoise color. I just have to mix up a bit more here. Really light wash of subroutine like that. And I'm going to go and putting a bit of color into some of these windows and maybe some kind of gray down areas as well. That's too way too dark. So I'm just trying to lift off a little bit of that paint. Just the Kuhn is running through the window. And I'm doing this because we've got all these you've got all these weren't around the side of the window. So having some coolness in is going to help to balance things out. Okay, so just a bit of that in there. This one is well here, here as well. Just to get a bead of color and running through, I'm going to do it to some of these other windows as well. The reason this one's almost directly in the sunlight, so there's not much there anyway. And beat of coolness here for the bottom of that door. Like that. Let's have a look. What else we want to do. I think these windows you, we can dock and down beat. Intuitive color running through them. Okay. Maybe some I've got some really brought yellow, which I can drops trading little bit of highlights for me, turn blue now, grade nine and some more colors for these figures. I'm going to go bit of blue for these filler. Okay? Then we're going to go and maybe a bit of this turquoise color for this person. And maybe a bit of purple even like that. And forgotten to get these poll in here and just put a bit of coloring like that. Okay. There's a darkness, this kind of standing on the but maybe some purple here for this person to there. We're going to go in with this person, just get a bit of darkness that's cooler color, kind of a greenish turquoise color. This one here, we're going to go in with a bit of this color. Don't even know what color it is. Ten to almost grayish color, maybe with some blue. More blue in there as well. Okay. Standing behind the boat there. We might have another person here too, just in lot wash of color like that. Okay. Fantastic. So I'm going to leave that all to dry, get back to it and do the final wash. 13. Burano Houses: Add the Shadows: Okay, so for the final step, what we're going to be focusing on, basically going to say for the Fano step, we're basically going to be false. Okay, So folds upon a step, we're basically GUI. Okay, so for the final step, we're basically going to be painting in all the shutters now. And looking at the reference photo, we can see that water is pretty much the darkest area apart from these little shadows here on the left side of the buildings and this one in the back. We've also got some doc is shutters. Some hung, some dark areas on the boats as well. So we're going to get all the scene, but I want to start with some of the shadows on the buildings. We're going to pick a brush that's going to allow us to getting enough of this darkness. Just really small flat brush. And I'm going to be using some neutral tint, some mix up a bit of this dark neutral tint color here. And just some kinda coolness running through it. It's a little bit of cobalt blue. Be nice, maybe some birds is well running through the k. So let's mix up a bit of this paint, just a midtone, almost thinking about a coffee colored sort of consistency. Let's go straight into this one in the back. And it looks about right. And it's going to drop that in there. The shite is actually a kind of bluish color. I'm going to borrow too much. That, however, leave a little bit of that. Why team for the window? The equal frames. And I'm just going to dock and around like that around the doors and things, just little bits and pieces there where I can. I'm going to try to also leave a little bit of this orange in areas so that it's not all complete darkness, just having a little bit of that run through and I'm also dropping in some extra DACA pigment in some areas so that we've caught some variation in turn for this sort of dark area here, uh, do want to maximize the contrast and between this building and this building. So that's why I'm just adding in more color around the edges of the building line that nearly forgotten that this section Here's Docker as well. Yeah. Okay. Then we've got some areas of the rooftops and I might just grab a little rigor for these. In terms of just getting some new. I should have put it sort of patents on the roof like that. And later on I might go back in with the pen and just start to outline a bit of that. Going back through, Let's go and pick up a bit more of this paint, some more blue running through it. And we've got a section here which is quite interesting. It's essentially kind of a DACA sort of bluish color. I'm cutting around this area which is in the sunlight, like that's kinda using this small flat brush. Well, I can, and I'm going to drop in a bit of warm gray color. Let's pick a beauty with this Sienna. Trump that in the booth, the nature routines. So I'm going to warm gray and I'm just going to color this in like that the same time. So that's going to be a little bit of shattering. And that side of the building kinda coming down here. And same thing goes on. Picking that up, drop that in here like that. So we get some shadow, a facade of the building. Even on the door frames of thing, they walked a little bit of shadow there. You can pop in and coolness down to the bottom. Just changing that up a little. But going back into here again, just cutting around that section. We do have a shop Chateau running towards that left hand side of the building. So just sort of here, let me get that in. Like that. Needs to be DACA. Very, very subtle. Barely tell it's there. I'm okay. And also runs underneath this building here. Kinda connects onto here. So docking that down the middle as well. That DACA. So to shadow underneath that edge. Little bits and pieces underneath there. The rooftop also has some textures. Let me see if I can just dry brush a bit of that on this tiny textures like that. Here we do that here as well. I don't want to do it though. Some bits here. Okay, fantastic. So let's move along to these buildings. So we're going to need, again, this would have cooler color. Trump that in like this. And I'm going to just connect these all up is saying Where else would want me to leave some highlights? I think I'll just go off this left side document, left side down there. Going like this. Remember the side of the building isn't direct sunlight. And that can kind of go over these window actually. So as long as we don't touch the buildings here on the rod, we'll be fine. Yeah. Maybe cutting around the areas, bits and pieces. This bit of the building I'm kinda had to make up because I drew it a bit too long. Let me know. So that should do the trick for the shadows with this air conditioning system thing, I hear we can going with this smaller round brush populated little shadow is something that it's being caused behind there. Like that. Oh, all right. I'll just leave that white. Something simple like that. And a bit of shadow here underneath the top of this building. Bid of these gutter or pop there as well. The dole, we can start pumping in some small details and color in there as well. Now known in all places, but just in some areas, I think it's good to have you just looking at some other spots we might be able to, helping shadows indicates some small bits and pieces. Let's have a look. Where else can we guy? And to sort of say at this point, I mean there is some shadows may mean cost here. We've got these appearing here on the left, which I think I'll just popping in. Shredder running all the way across like that being caused by the top. So to sectioned that they would ink. And I'm just going to make sure that's pretty straight because it's closer to the front of the painting, so it's more noticeable. Bit more neutral tint. And I'm mixing up some of these neutral tint here with a cooler color and dropping that straining to these bits of window. Here, the saw, it's really gray, really dark gray sort of color. Like Luis didn't like that. So we've got these dockets would have windows ran here. Uses to cut around the figure. Like that. Dark spot here. The windows here. That inside here, this is going to be more darkness surrounding the curtains. Get those guys to pop out a bit more. And finding areas where I can put in some little bits of shadow, a joining up like that. We've got a shadow here. And then we're gonna go in darkness there. And the slides, please. These even up there. They began to monitor shadows running across like that. You know, sort of running through the windows. You gotta remember there are these little lines and things. It's really up to you how much detail you want to pop in. Now I'm just going to do needle sort of strokes like these running cost to break up some of that. Hello. Yeah, that's about it. Now we can start going a little bit more into these boats and think about some of the dark areas. Again, more neutral tint. I'm going to start off here, the edge of this boat. And it's really quite dark and it goes and it fades into a kind of cool color here. So that's what I'm going to try to mimic, just added a bit of darkness here and that left-hand side of the boat and soft in that off. As we get around here. I also just add a bit of darkness underneath there. And underneath the boat here as well. Slew darkness. Yeah. Yeah. This shadow here maybe. And that's section. Then we've got these pose as well, which I'm going to just add a little bit of darkness to the left-hand side of them. Won't be a bit much. So I'm just lifting off a bit of paint. Maybe got just a bit of darkness. I want to bring them forward more. That's the reason. Maybe bit more brown in them too, just looking ok. Dot routing here. Okay, fantastic. So look what else we want to do with the boats. An additive color and dad do outlines. And this one C, we need to put in anything else? Just some shadows and dark and B, underneath here, neutral tint I'm just using yours doesn't genome.com. And then we've also got some more darkness on that right-hand side of the boat, which fades into these two sort of took Boise color on the left. Like that's something simple like that. And then the back as well, I'm just going to darken that down. And I'm going to shatter like that. Caused by those kind of dabbled a little blots, signs and some shadows running through here as well. Just bits of the cloth or whatever it is, they're fantastic. And another thing I want to do is add in the shadows of these figures and we're going to follow the lot source of the rest of the painting. So it's kind of coming in from that side of the page, the right-hand side. So let's try to get some shadows here on the ground from this person. And this person here to join up the legs like this. Oops, on a bit too far. And you've got these people, he just sort of walking along a bit of shadow running to that left-hand side of the figure. This person here as well just get a new shadow running to that left-hand side. This one he can barely kinda see it. Oh, that's okay. On the ground also, I just thought I'll getting small details for the ground. Making guy, maybe branching out and raise some perspective lines. Oops, more kinda this guy. And really depends how much detail you want in here. You notice some people drawing even individual breaks and stuff like that. You can do that. Or you can just leave it out and keep the general perspective lines as well. That's always doable. You just depends how much you want to pop in there. I'm not talking those some of the shadows a bit more and I don't want his doc as I'd like them to be. And then also what a cool kind of color. Is that in a bit more darkness underneath some spots, maybe more darkness and some areas of the windows and shutting his things like that. We might want to emphasize some more darkness. Just do that. You can always re, layer over the top. Little bit of warmth here for this dual. That, and another thing you can do is pick up some paint, dry off the brush, and use the side of your brush to touch on two areas. Through these, you can get some textures of the buildings. If you want to indicate a slot me warn, look to some of these buildings, this is a great way to do it. Very Lee tool and f, k, j, some of these in the back. Then? Mm-hm. Yeah. Yeah. Some of these sort of break area here, front. Some texture, even on the ground. Bit of texture like that. Really pop from then on. I think this is pretty much finished. We're just really picking up any dark areas that we want to indicates. No, I think I'm on doc and down this door, like in the reference to be in the membrane, it dries off. And he's pretty doc afterwards. Sorry. Lot afterwards said I do have a few like and sometime you look at it, you think that's way too dark, but when it actually draws off the tens at looking the way it should. Okay. Or actually put some other brushstrokes here running through the water. Some shop is sort of waves and maybe a few small. So to stretch like that over the top. When I have to do with the This them getting in a bit of these reflections from the, the poles, the wooden poles and things in the US. Just a very light indication like this. And on the bottom? Yeah. Okay. And we finished just outline the legs of these one's a little more, connect them onto the ground so that they are DACA, especially these two here in the foreground. Just going to darken that up, connected onto the shadow. Better. But okay, and we are finished. 14. Cafe Scene: Painting Steps: Okay, time to get started with this one. And what we're gonna do is we're going to look at the predominant color through this entire sand. And you can see it's really a lot of this Naples yellow, really bright yellows running across it got shadows that are kinda running down the side of this building. You've got a little bit of darkness on this building, which I'm going to emphasize, but this side is really quite brought ground as well as kind of lit up and I'm going to add some darkness at the bottom. And we're going to start off just by putting in the yellows first, first thing that really sticks out to me is this umbrella. So I'm going to pop in a little bit of that color in here. And notice that brush I'm using, It's very large mop brush. I'm not really fussing about too much. I mean, the other thing you can use, another brush like this one. He is a number 10 synthetic round brush, which is really quite similar. We just wanted to pop in little basic bits of colors, indications of colors in here, a lot of the darkness and stuff we're gonna getting lighter on. So I'm going to stick with this brush. Just hold more water and he's just looser. And I'm going to mix in also other yellows. So if you notice here this is just a bit of yellow ocher. I've got some orange. Even you can pop some orange in here. And I loved to change things up and make it more interesting. Especially when you're simplifying down details such as this. You do find that in native bit of extra in there and just change things up a bit. The wall as well, it just looks a little bit more kind of weathered. And there's little bricks and all kinds of things in there. So sometimes when you have these little inconsistencies that mixing, it just creates some, I guess the feeling of texture in there. Let some of that paint mixed by itself granulate, do its thing. I'm not getting the, the size the shutters as well. Stupid of darkness in there and maybe a bit of neutral tint just trump that slightly into that region. Fantastic. And let's go along this side some more yellow and, or popping bit more than Naples yellow and some more of this yellow ocher. Remember, this side of the building needs to be pretty bright. So I'm going to be using more of a, I guess, a brighter yellow over the sides. So this is some Hansa yellow and the yellow and dropping that in. Remember, even if we get some of that overhears not a problem because we're going to go over it a second time and get some more, more darkness running through this. Going through, oops, this lamp should be a little bit lighter. Just modify that while I can and go around. Let's have a look. What else do we have in here? Remember this, all these trees and things, little bushes down below. So I want to preserve some of that. Kinda ran a little bit while I can and basically just mix a bit of green in. So let's just go around like that. Bits and pieces. We'll just leave. Maybe putting this reddish pink, maybe some. This here is a little bit of burnt sienna that we can drop in as well, something like that, even a bit of blue and you can drop that in there as well. Essentially, we just want a lot of warm colors coming through and a nice blend of colors in here, many just warm colors. Notice here I'm cutting around the trees and big because I do want more green running through there. Coming down here. I've almost forgotten about this big we just need to get in the yellow wall. So I'm just popping in some limited color through here underneath. And I'm actually going to make this a lot darker and lighter. So I'm not fast about the exactness of all the colors running in. Okay, great. My leave the share of that guy, white here. The rest of them. We can just popping a teeny bit of color in here. That's okay. Just to get rid of the white of the paper. While this is still wet, this is where I like to pick up some green. So I've got all kinds of grains. You have got to be that this emerald green chunk drop in to the section like that. And notice I'm trying to get it while there's still some witness in their area. This is going to essentially allow me to get some nice blending effects and softness through these areas. Essentially what I'm doing here. And remember to vary it up as well. I do find, especially on this side, we've got an area where it's kind of in the sun. I'm putting a bit of sap green in there. And then I'll put some more of the Engle-Granger, basically just a darker green on that right-hand side, just to blend in nicely, but a few different shades of green here is really important and you can even add some blue to darken up in some areas. And notice here this is just a tiny bit of blue. I'm dropping in at the side. Okay, So working my way down the bottom against more of this darker green and maybe some more sap green actually. And he saw it. But it's sap green over on this left-hand side as well. We've got a lot of these trees and indicative kind of work here. And also near the bottom, I want to get in just a bit of the warmth as well. So just dropping in a bit of orange, a tiny bit of yellow in here. Maybe some red, for example, just indicates some of these tables in the war. Here. I'm blending that all in nicely together. Moving further down the page is where I'm going to start again using more warm kind of yellow and drop that in straight like that, that mixing that top layer and continue on, we can add some other colors and things into this mix. Essentially, this is just a bit of Naples, yellow plus some yellow ocher mixed into this section. And I've got some darker browns and things in here as well. This is just a little bit of burnt sienna actually, which I'm dropping down the bottom. And maybe we'd have pink as well. We can pop in here just a tiny bit. It's just leftover paint from before. And I'm just picking up off the palette to create more interesting kind of transition through the page. You know, I'm thinking as well, I do want to get a shadow, maybe running across a soft, sort of shadowed. So I'm going to pick up and move darker paint. Let's have a look. Maybe some brown mixed with blue. Just a bit of brown and blue mixed together create a grayish color. Drop that in there like that. So if a MOOC, so the edge of the page, carry that in there. Maybe running over that side. And not on too much. I just want to kind of frame this area a bit better. Okay. The signed for the restaurant just glaze over with a very light wash of Naples. Yellow. Scary that want on there. Okay, Fantastic. So that's pretty much the first wash. And what we'll do, we'll let this dry and come back to it and getting that second wash and the rest of the details. Okay, time to continue on. And this is where we are essentially putting in a lot of the shadows and darkness things to frame the st and little bit more. And what I'm going to start off with essentially is just a dark in this top area here on the left. So I'm going to pick up a bit of just a grayish color, so I'm going to mix up a bit of blue. So this is a tiny bit of cobalt blue. And we'll drop in some of these birds amoeba like that. So I've got a cooler gray color here. Maybe a bit more and maybe more blue in here. Let's see stuff. This is some sepia. Okay. So have a look at what makes up a bit more on this side. Okay. That's looking pretty good. I like this one a little bit up, but we'll use both actually. So here we go, just dropping in a bit of color there. And I think what I'll do is also have a tiny bit of this. What is it called? And so I'm just using a little bit of sepia here. This is actually burnt sienna mixed in with the tiny bit of sepia. And all I'm doing is just trying to make this side a little bit dark. I know I've got three different pools of color to draw from, which is. Really what you want because essentially you, you do want a lot of variation in these bits and pieces here. He's going to make it look a lot more interesting if we do that. So that's what I'm trying to sort of imply here. Maybe have a bit of shadow, something running across like that. Tops pot of these window that comes down here. Sort of touches the top of this umbrella and cutting around little bits and pieces leave that area. Just like that. Under the umbrella as well. It is real beauty of darkness in some of these areas and it's a kind of warm gray color. So what I'm doing, I'm just going to glaze over that, be reliably and same with these bottom umbrella here. Okay. So like that, and I'm going to continue this wash and downwards. I'm also just dropping in additional bits of paint there. I can. And you may not even want it to be that shop. You can soft enough that h If you live, but I'm just trying something different, trying to exaggerate that area a bit more. And coming down here, I'm just going to add in little more darkness around these bits of trees and things like that. I'm adding in also some blue gray mixed in here as well. So we have a great little mixture of colors and variations in here. And also because this area here is pretty much the darkest, where I want to cut around some of these figures and things. And the reason why is so that I can get a lot more obvious contrast. So I think that's sort of does the trick in a folder. The blinds, shutters, I mean, I'm just putting in with a darker paint in the like that hurt that melting as well. Some of these windows, they also have a favorite of darkness inside. So you know, these two. So I can just add a little bit of color, mix that in like that. Drop that in there, but I'm leaving the bits of the watts on the window frames. Okay? So moving further down, not just putting some red in this hot chocolate, but ecologist indicate some of the table cloths and things in there start putting shadows on the right-hand side of some of these objects and stuff to again, just emphasize that light coming in from the left-hand side is just a little tricky day like that. And think a bit of darkness here on that right-hand side of the building is really going to help. So I'm just picking up some CPA dropping some of these burnt sienna as well. And that's when I am doing here, just a bit of darkness over on this side. Some cooler colors. So here's a bit of when a blue color like that, drop that in. And the trick is I'm really trying to leave some bits, some areas intact with that previous wash. Sorry. I don't want to dock and down this area, but really not too much if that makes sense. You've got a bit of mixing into that side of the building. Let's go ahead and try drop a bit more in here. So just around here and I can do some cutting around like that. And the trees as well, we'll be cutting around like that even a bit. He has some darkness. The section like these do imply the bushes and that sort of stuff running through this area. And it's still a kind of greenish mix that's coming through that spot. Okay. Fantastic. It's a bit of a darker color running around some of these bits of tree and pushes just, just, uh, popping some shadows in there. So it's not just one big clump of foliage. So this is just really lot wash of high wages to the rest of the paints that I've got mixed up here in the palette of golf, greens and blues, all kinds of things. And, you know, the trick is to keep it pristine lot as well. You don't want to overdo it. Okay? And test stick. And we can start putting things in like the sum of the shutters for these enduring not too dark, just a bit of color there, something like that. And there are areas we might want to imply some shadows and other bits and pieces running through like Louise. I think that's a good, always a good idea. Intersecting. Let's have a look. I think we can talk about some of these little shades as well. Just little b that side. Kinects on data. Ok. And for the ground, you can just putting a few that WHO and lines, directional lines running through nears have really kind of drawn an app before in pen. So it's not like a huge deal, but it's just something you can do. Notice here, look at these little bits of rock and things on the ground. The brakes. So tiny little things that I've even drawn some, some breaks and things in this building and even in these buildings. So it's just interesting. Another thing you can do to add variation to your paintings and add that lead to extra detail areas. And honestly you can just go forever and just keep on detailing, detailing and detailing. And to you pretty much happy with it from me on? Probably going to stop in just a moment because I'm happy with how it looks. Another thing I wanted to do is I think I'm going to just add in some yellow to the back of that cause shared it just looks too sticks out too much. Such stood a bit of yellow in the spread that around. Okay. Maybe some dogmas he and the bottom side that manage that on like this. Okay. And aesthetic. And I'll call this one finished. 15. Charles Bridge: Painting Steps: This is the Charles Bridge and I've changed it around a bit. I've actually put in a lamp here in the foreground. I wanted to have something a little bit closer, and I also just love these lamps that pop out. So I'm going to go ahead and start off firstly with the sky. And again, what we're gonna do is just wet that top area down with a bit of clean water. So I've got a flat brush here and just roughly indicating the edges of where the arteries and the buildings are main. So we'll go around, do a little bit of cutting around like fees. Go around the top of these building there and be sure to make sure you just make sure you saturate the paper completely with the water. If there's any excess, you can just spread it upwards and into areas like this. Okay. Just make sure that you've got enough in there so that when you go in with the paint, it's going to spread around probably. Okay, fantastic. So I'm going to go straight into the sky and you can use one of these brushes is that cats time brushing, use a round brush, a mop, even a flat brush. I'll give this one a go. And I'm going to pick up some cerulean blue. Just makes this down a bit. So it's just FECA. So it's just water down a bit. So maybe go and I'm going to drop into B up here. Let's see what it does. Okay, fantastic. Kinda to the edge of the paper there. And if you don't have enough water, just add a bit more in like that. Okay. Beats, just go ahead and indicate that as well. The important thing is to remember the white pots and just as important. So definitely make sure you leave enough wife in there. Okay. I'm going to go around a little bit more here. The bottom to the top there may be some coming down the side like that. Okay. Something like that, I think will do the trick. Okay, so that's all going to go in and mix about do its own thing. And while that's happening, I'm going to start working and bid on these buildings. So got some yellow ocher. Let's drop that straight in here. I'm not actually swapped to this other little mult brush. It's just going to be video easier to mixing. Maybe some orange as well, tiny bit of orange to broaden up these area. Okay, and go down. And this building hero so is pretty broad and can add in some just normal Yellow Hansa yellow through this as well. A little bit of yellow for the lamp like that. Okay. And go through bringing these washed down. If you've got a bit too much water, just make sure you lift it up. Okay. So let's go ahead. I'm going to get into top of it now. Spies on the side that, and you'll notice the little bit stop the blend into the buildings, into the sky as well, that kind of thing. Don't worry too much. Remember, we're just getting a real basic wash first, just putting in the colors, move a lot. So bringing this wash down the page, um, you know, maybe popping a bit of this color hue, which is a bit of burnt sienna. Okay. Shift that around a row. We've got the light coming in from that left-hand side as well. So we bring this around on the page like that. I'm just a bit of color up there near the top of that building. Some of it's dotted to bleed into the sky as well. And coming further down. Again, that's the beauty of that. But sienna through they coming further down the page, really just getting these warm colors settling through. You can even pick up a bit more of that yellow dropping here as well. Okay, Great. One thing I like to do is just leave the shirts and things of the figures so we can get in some more colors, lighter ones in the back. I'm not going to worry about. And coming down further here. Essentially what I'm doing is just darkening it down a little, but still keeping it fairly brought up until we get to the bottom pot. This whole liking getting completely yellow as well. That just some walk. And if beat of darkness down the bottom is just some neutral tint, bad just mixed into the bottom. Okay. So it is muted neutral tint to document. Further down. Few strokes up here as well, so that it looks like it's kinda transitioning to a darker color than that. Just putting a bit of color here. That b to the Cloud, that's where we draw it off. And you can do things like this as well. You can lift off paint to create a kind of cloud shape and to just sort of use that potty of brush to going Liftoff. Just like that. Pretty simple. Okay. You don't want to do it, overdo it so great. And now for the fingers, I'm going to pop in some little colors on the figures, just some real basic colors. Okay, So it's good peacock blue and pumping them in blue for this one here. It's really up to you what colors you want to use. Us suggest using some complimentary colors and some darker ones as well. In the variation of all these different colors, I find it looks a lot better. We can even put it in a bit in green for this person here, like that. Okay. Just have a bit of a play around. Just getting a really light wash it so for the close. Okay. Some pieces in the back but no need to worry about that. Okay. So give this dry off and get straight into it again. Okay. Everything's draw it off now and I'm going to go through with a larger round brush, number 10 round brush. We can also use the number eight round brush, I think might be better. And we're gonna go through and popping some colors and darker colors for the buildings were going and getting a bit of a cooler gray color over the top thing. That's going to be a good option given that we've got all these sort of warm colors in here. So we'd have conus would be nice. So we notice if you haven't looked at the reference photo, the light's coming in from the left-hand side. We just want to make sure we're leaving the left side of those buildings and significantly lata. So that's going here. I'm really just going striking and being careful as well near the top key, you've got to pay more attention where it sort of hits the sky. But other than that, you can go ahead and copy the rest of those details for the side of the building he is. And that sort of goes down, leave that left-hand side. We told a lot on. And we can come down straight here like this. We've got some buildings and things here in the background to which we can sort of add a little bit of color, but it's not so necessary to me to call on that left-hand side of them, these little buildings in the far distance. So coming down, okay, we're carrying this wash down the page and we've got some light coming off the top of this building as well, just sort of reflecting on the slide there. So I'm going to get a little bit of that color like that. The rest of it. We're going to go through like this, join that on. That's going to be DACA. And we've got obviously the lives of that left-hand side. Okay. Really basic wash over the top. Can bring these down the page now and cut around the roof of this one here so that we've got that lot represented like that. Okay. So just a silhouette essentially, come across, leave some of that on there. Like that's a lot to have a look underneath the bridge. There's a bit of little bit of darkness in there. Well, so the hits the roof and then little bit of light, oops, little bit of lots that to just get some more neutral tint if you don't think it's too dark enough. And it's good to pop in some of these windows and things while the paint's wet as well, still more so that it looks more natural, easier to pop him. So it spreads around better. Like that. Okay. These ones as well, it needs to be dark enough a little. Okay. Let's have a look. What else is going on beneath is to be Docker in this slide here so that the building here on the left pumps out more. And there we go. That's the bridge. And we've got Don, I'll just soften the edge there like that. And carry on to the side of the painting. Leave a bit of color off the top of that umbrella like that. And we'll just come down. And this building here again, we've got the side of this building which is hidden to sunlight. So we don't want to get in old that data. We just wanna getting some new lines and things running across there. I think I'll get in a shadow on the side like that. Blue shadow. You also got to building here near the front, which I'm going to just do a quick wash like that. There's a roof top here, burnt sienna. I'll get that in. Interrupt these kind of darkness and shadow. And this is what I'm doing essentially just because this side of the buildings hidden the sun. So it needs to be lata. And actually I'll just going into the back of that building with some burnt sienna like that. Just dock and off that H, that backends to, again to emphasize that sense of M lot on the building. And here we go, just putting in a few quick windows with the brush in the background. It just helps to get rid of that empty space. These statues and things as well. You can barely see what is happening. I'm just going to dock in them down. And then either base popping a bit of darkness. That right-hand side. And Sunday here as well. Same with this lamp. So I'm just going to dock and off an area like that. Essentially connected on to the bridge. The bridge is also a little and little Doc and, um, but at the same time, there are highlights there because some loop breaks and things that stick out and others that don't. So just varying that little. But what we can really start working now on the figures, let the sole dry off a bit and do its thing. So I'm going to grab some neutral tint. Is popping legs of these figures. Just in darkness underneath their need them to be pretty doc. That's this one here. Looking forwards, maybe you've got a child that figure there. Just the power joins onto the body and then sort of touch the ground. I think that's really important. And here we'll start popping in some little shadows. I'm going to get them going straight across just like in the reference, like an ad. And have some fun with these little shapes and things. Not spend too much time. And trying to get them to be exact is so much going on there. And it's kind of fruitless if we tried to do that. So I'm just really getting in that nice sharp shadow there on the ground. And you might even have someone else day or it could be shadow of something else coming in a poll or one of those lands again. So an imaginary shadows from coming outside is also a good idea like that. And just dropping a little more color. Base, they're mostly just going to soften these big color underneath is to brought under the building. Shouldn't be that brought here. Given that e is in shadow. But that lifts side. You could probably leave it lata and testing that going around. So for the figures, the heads, I'm going to pick up a bit of pink, troponin, little pink in there. Like that. Spot's just drop that in. Especially for the larger ones, that makes a difference as well. And it helps if you leave them watts and then it's easiest to sort of get that color in afterwards. Okay? And so that is looking quite all right at the moment, really, the rest is just adding in extra detail. So I'm talking about things like little lines on the rooftops and maybe beat here. The statues and things. Maybe there's just some shadow is more on the left-hand side, for instance, over here, I want to emphasize Byetta and pop them in. Like that. It's not necessary because they're not a huge focus heave. What I want to do that we'll draw off in a moment. Let's have a look. So the buildings as well, we can start adding in little more detail for the Windows and that kind of thing. Here. Just little bits of these railing at the top which you want to model it to indicate. Like these bits and pieces of the top end like that. This is some neutral tint that I'm using, just pure neutral tint to pulping these Fano doc pots. And a touching go, as you can see, sort of get it in and then you, you don't hang around for too often. Otherwise the the painting we'll start looking a bit too overworked. And that can be the sod of the annuity and this can be the kind of detail on the roof. What else have we got? We've got some darkness here in that arch coming down there that are long, would emphasize more little extra details there. Move darkness in the windows like this. Draw out that roof. Byetta. Okay. And I think I'll touch those other ones. And Pete, he is something coming off this side that again, just drawing out those yellows and things in just a bit more darkness on that right-hand side. Anything that you really can think of. As long as it doesn't disrupt the message. You want to portray. Say, I really want to have that lot sort of remain there. Okay. And we'll call this one finished. 16. France Scene: Paint the Light: So we're going to go ahead and make a start on this one. And what I'll be doing first is essentially just starting off at the top, I'm going to pick up a bit of light, spirulina blue and just water this down of February, I wanted to be pretty light for a lot of sort of circling movements. Drop that in there. If it's too if it's too dark, you can always lift off but that's around the right consistency. You want it to be very soft and remember it's kinda dry off, lights up. So we'll start off on the edges of these windows, okay, these little shutters, essentially, we're just going to color them in blue. Okay, and you've got these ones here on the left-hand side as well. And this would have joined onto the right-hand side, ones of the shadows there. And I'm just going to drop in this ruling in blue. Just a pure mix, very light mix of cerulean blue. Okay. Give that a good, We can add in a little bit more color down the bottom as well. Just a little bit of variation, slot tonal variation. And we're going to do the same here. And just getting we saw to the shutter as well. Okay. It's imbedded trope in a little bit of color down the bottom. Just wanted to have a high sort of fade down to another collages just so that there's some interest. And then be very self-aware, you won't be able to tell. Okay? So that does the trick for that. The codons on the inside, they're really just a very light car. They just white. But they do have a slightly cool tone. So I'm gonna, who hear you? So I'm just going to edit a little bit of coolness to them so that it's not entirely just white, just a little bit of color in there. Just so that they will stand out a little bit among the whites over the window frames. Okay? And what we're gonna do is that we're just going to repeat this process in the ones below here as well. So drop that in. And not pretty pretty light. Just be careful not to go outside of this area. And we're just going to cut around the car. Haven't quite decided what to make the chi yet, but it's definitely going to be some top of cool color. Okay, might even be the same. So cerulean blue, maybe some purple. But let's go ahead and get in these sides first. And then I have to spend all day on them. I'm just taking a little bit longer because I'm relaxing a bit at the moment. But take as long as you need to. Does not have to be perfect, but definitely try your best to keep within the lines here. I'm just cutting around the hair for this little figure that I've drawn in. Okay. This just allows me to get in and some different hues lighter and it's not going to mix up with the blue and gold, funny. Okay, so that's about it. And like I said before, we can go ahead and dropping a few other bits and pieces in here. To keep things interesting. Just sort of looking around where we might be able to drop in a little bit here and there. And especially while the paint's still wet. Fantastic. Now what we're gonna do next is we're going to pick up some warmer color. And for this I'm going to use a mixture of yellow and Naples yellow. So let me just, just drop it in here. Let's have a look at that. It was like, okay. So that's a yellow color and I'm going to just cut around the area of the window where we get in some more color lighter. We can, for instance, get a little bit of this blue to join on as well, like that, it will just melt through. So that is yellow. It doesn't stick out completely. I mean, in some areas you can draw on and on like that. And surprisingly enough it looks fine. And you can always whites if you want a shop assorted transition where you can do essentially what I'm doing and let the water colors blending and create some interesting effects. So you can already see the sort of bleeding into the sections. Okay? So carrying these down, going around the figure and we will obviously go the car here as well. Just using these little mult brush to pop in this column. Okay, and some areas as well, we might want to grab a bigger, these sort of brown color. It's a bit of sepia and, and burnt sienna. And we can drop the scene. I'm just around here where we've got a kinda separation and that kind of thing. Even here near the window sill just above there. Think a bit of a brown wood or something like that. Blending is going to be nice. Okay? Something like that. And I'm going to go through, and this is kind of melted in a bit. I don't want that to be 2. To mock the codons to be too wide. Sorry to balloon that ears. I'm just going to lift off a little bit of that paint like that. Okay. And we're gonna continue straight down again with the same color. Just really Naples yellow with a bit of yellow ocher. And encourage it to make some areas I'm going to do is think. Okay, I'm just cutting around a chi, you know, if he gets a bit difficult to pick up a small, a small flat brush and jump around. And you notice the column that I'm mixing a now's not the same color. That's OK. Now this wall, if you look at it, there's all kinds of stuff and it's not actually completely yellow. So in fact, this is a good thing just to let it all blending wet into wet. Okay. New man that he is and just shopping around. And we're kind of nearing the bottom here. This is where I'm going to pick up a little bit more. Sienna, dropped a bit of that in here. More women with forming a soft edge there at blended edge. I'm going to go around and just adding a little bit of this color here. So still light brown. And this will draw off definitely lot, lot. And it looks at the moment. But the key thing you wanna do here is join it on to this yellow at the top and lead pet sort of travel downwards into that area. Okay. For the bottom area, what I'm going to do is I'm just going to pick up a little bit of neutral tint. Neutral change by essentially gray mix in a bit of blue here. And I'm going to get even. And the bottom part of the page, which is just going to be kind of a grayish color. We can pick up all the paints and bits and pieces we have left on the palette to drop that in. And importantly, we want it to blend and mix with that area of the wall or the floor just further up. The very important so that it all just joins into one nice wash. Continue on all the way up to the front. Just like that. Um, I just added a new little bit more darkness in the front. Just ferry almost imperceptible, just a little little bit more darkness. Really tell. Just to bring this area forward more. I feel like it just needs something a bit different. Bit more contrast, especially in the watercolor painting compared to the the photograph. This is going to help just dropping it in B to that painting and letting it kind of mix. Together like that and let it do its thing will be more brown up here. Okay. And one thing I forgot to do was just to get a little bit of a cooler color on full. Again, these curtains on the inside, just so much to dock. With. Cooler color for the curtains aren't even in all areas. You can skip some bits and pieces like that. Even say, just muted color running through is really important. And especially some cooler color, because we've got all these wolves running around the edges. And it also just creates a bit of a contrast between these white frames of the windows. So we made these, It's a curtains to be slightly dot-com, kind of cooler color and intensity. And down the bottom I've actually indicated some little flowers, which I'm also going to dropping some little color, a little bit of color theory here. And for that I'm going to pick up a bit of calm. I do my brush, and I'm just going to add that little bit of common into these flowers. Some more red in it. Says to that it turns into a pinkish sort of color. Not being too pedantic with these register indicating really. Okay. Letting it do its thing will probably go back into it later and change at a bit more. Be more detail in there. For now, that's fine. Okay, So for the figure, going to have to choose some colors again. And what I'll do is over the sod, I'm going to make his pants a kind of a purplish color. I think so we'll just make something beautiful purple. Drop that in like that. Just a very light wash of purple. And I'm doing this. Essentially. I've got this warm, a background and a cooler. I'm sort of here in the front, which is basically hence leave a bit of the white on the papers. We'll see how that goes. Lighter just indicates some of the light coming in from the right-hand side. Okay. So just a little bit of that purple in there because we've got that yellow in the background. So again, I'm playing around with complementaries. For the shirt. You know, we've, we've got 10 beat of these interesting blue in the back and then it comes down to yellow. So what I'll try to do actually is maybe start off with a warmer color for the top. So we'll go and maybe with a bit of red and purple weeks to get this written purple, just warmer hue up here. So that it contrasts with the blue here. So we've just got these kind of move our engineer maybe as well, which is changing it up. Every time I go back to the palette, I'm changing it up. Okay? And this is actually the exam, so we need to create a bit more reading. They actually going to be carried away. So let me go. And as we start moving downwards, I'm going to be blending in a little bit more blue sides, turning into a kind of a greenish blue here. And as we go further down, mix up a bit more blue like that. And hopefully this will just make sense of the pants and little bit to like that. And there we have it, a little bit of data, they're going to pop in a little bit of common for his head and his face. Tiny bit of carmine. Awesome, permanent red will do you find to be better actually, I made a permanent red and make sure it's pretty lot so that when it dries, it kinda comes up in a pinky sort of color. Choose whatever facial and hues or skin hues you want. Every guy. And I'm just going to leave it off a little bit of paint here. Ryan side of the body, like that. I think what I'll do is also just adding a little bit of, instead of leaving that white on there, just doll that edge down. So it doesn't stick out or too much. Okay. Fantastic. Maybe for the hand profitabilities color brown or something. Right? Now for the car, one of the thing of going to do is we need to just go around inside the car and to get these areas of warmth from the background. So it's sort of shows through like that there. But these areas actually going to be, we're going to go over it with a little bit of neutral tint lighter because it is Dhaka. And we were looking through some glass. So it's not going to be this is Sam brought. But still a little bit of that color, that warmth in there's great dropping bit of some man brown or something in there as well to just dirty it up a little bit like that. But it's essentially keep it quite flat in there. It does take, now, here comes the car. I'm going to go ahead and actually make these kind of purplish red color. So let's drop that purple in there, see how it looks like. So it was similar to the parents of these fellow that we've got up here, popping a bit of red as well. And they keep these quiet. Just some coolant times running through Kula, Whew, sorry, running through is going to be fantastic. Gone a little bit too far up here into the window, but we'll just make DEI, see what happens. Say, coming on down this lovely purple. And we're going to move this down the page. You carry these older for us. Then lighten it up here. And we just essentially going to color it in this. And remember this will dry substantially lotta. I'm choosing a pebble again because it is a complimentary color to the yellows that are running through in the background. So I'm just fits and you can choose whatever color you like. Now, tie is wise, I'm just going to add in a bit of neutral tainting here down the bottom of the tiles. And we're just getting this part of the roughest. And here is a bit of stuff, exhaust pipes and things coming off. Hey, doll that down. Like that. We can pick up and just putting some dark areas and that you want to kind of maintain some sections of the calf, especially underneath here where we've got more darkness. That's why I'm picking up a lot more of these nutrient chain so that it just melt scene rather than sticks out to suddenly say just getting rid of detailing for the Taya, like that. Maybe guy leaving in some of the y's and that kind of thing as well. But just mainly just try and get the darkness of that tiering. Going to go ahead and do this one now, the ads at age of tires, just a lot darker. So I want to dock in that beat first with some neutral tint. Neutral tint. And sort of work my way in. You know, we've got these little rings which are rings of shadow which just sloppy. Daca. Let us doc as the outer edge of the tile. And that's what we want to getting essentially most of the detail. And what I'm gonna do now is pick up some really dark neutral tint, mix that around with the purple. Okay, I'm going to just drop in a bit of a shadow. Okay, running underneath. We've got this figure here as well, which we need to draw, paint a bit of shadow underneath here with that figure is standing. Okay. So very basic. So to shadow like that and that's going to come across. Now this is now the shatter that forms as part of the car underneath. So just adding that in and joining it onto the TI, especially while it's still wet. It's a great opportunity to start putting in little bits of this detail. Okay? And then kind of just carries on out of the painting over down the side. So something like that. Some of the kind of goes up the wall even is shed a and who's coming in from the back, the side. That's softer, just soften that, be the shadow up like that and wanted to be to shop. And another thing is we've probably got a shadow for these filler on the wall to I'm going to keep it pretty light. 17. France Scene: Add the Shadows: Just a little bit of darkness running towards that left hand side of him. Like that. Pretty, pretty subtle. Pretty subtle. But it's sufficient to just show that be consistent with that light source coming in from the right-hand side. Okay? And we can start OS and blending this on with a bit of detail in the pants. So there's little folds and things. He has or she underneath here. And there not be a bit of a shadow here behind like that. Maybe got a bit of darkness. If a bit of a play around and add in those shadows, thinking underneath the arms as well, the amount BB8 of this shutter here, maybe here, here on the neck, over this side, but underneath, they should not just any way that you think there might be some darkness. I think it's a good idea to indicate that. Okay, I want to keep that warmth of this should as well, so stop playing around with them. I'm happy with how that looks. And we will continue on with the second part. Okay, So pretty much from here on in we just finding bits and pieces that we want to emphasize, datas that we want to draw out a little bit of darkness here and then forgot to do the flower is up the top. So I'm going to just adding a little bit of color up here. You have read like that. Running through some of those flowers there. Maybe we've got another one here, popping a bit of orange as well. That would be nice. This. And we've got these flowers he down the bottom. And in a way you can stop. And just again layering extra details on here. And because we have all that sort of pinkish color in the back and we want to add some more. So the dock and bits and pieces running through here. Like that. You can even pick up some darker paint. Start indicating some little branches and bits and pieces coming off. Like these. Just have a bit of fun and switch things up. And darkness are running through these bits here. Underneath, just like that. And then a shadow on the case. And most kinda running here. That will be more convincing. Great darkness inside the windows. And just the window sill, small size and just these beats here, I'm going to darken up with the round brush. Just bring this down. He is, this is just a little bit of neutral tint mixed in with some blue like that. Then we've got a little shadow that's running on the inside as well, just a lot of shadows so you can make some bit of that blue again and just drop that in like this. Something like that. It doesn't have to be perfect, just running across through those bits and pieces inside that we don't know. And I'm dropping in more paint on the edges of the window seals to increase the contrast. Like that. There Okay. Hello, kinds of things you can do even with the little sides of this middle shadows underneath here, like that. Not going very dark at all, just a bit of shadow. Does the trick. This topic needs to be DACA. Yeah. So we're just going to repeat this on all the windows, essentially, so that we can get the feeling of light and shadow just running across the window. And you've also got pots of the curtain which join on like these. So we've got sort of shadows on the curtains. You see I'm doing joining them up with those lodges shadows, which she's helping to join on those larger doc and beats a shadow as well. So always be sort of modifying and heading on bits. If you feel each year you want to identify that area a bit more. Okay. Now these areas surrounding the windows and actually move the CNR lot brown color. So I'm going to drop some of that mean, just like that. Get that to blending. Like that. You drop a bit in here as well. Tiny bit of paint. Bird, kind of around this side as well, do the same thing. I'm going to keep it light. Wash of these brown running through. For these movies ones I forgot to kinda drowning and that's just a couple of asides like that. Great. And we'll go in again with a bit of the darker shadow running from that right-hand side. Drop that daka. Daka sort of shed on Colleen. Just a cool gray color is fine. You can mix these up in your primaries. So if you have a feel, you can't find yourself in gray. Just mix one up to get all three of your primaries and yellow, red, blue, and combine them together. And add just a little bit more blue to that mix. And you have yourself a nice little shadow color. More kind of darkness behind the ear actually. So I'm gonna just go ahead and add some more darkness into the, some areas of the window. And kind of ikea. Notice I'm using a bit of a purplish hue as well for the Windows insides. And this is doing this on purpose because again, we've got all these yellow and warmth in the background. So, um, I'm trying to contrast these warm and cool hues constantly creates a more interesting looking same. When you do that. Then you take everything you get with watercolors when you reducing down details and stuff. Some other things you get a need to emphasize to keep it looking interesting and pleasing for the viewer. And for me, I always just like to change something up in a way say, so have a look at the car. I'm just adding a little bit of darkness there. Start looking at what else I can dropping, maybe be KIA around the edges of the windows. Well, some areas that I want to darken up a bit more. This is the purpose of what I'm doing. Defining edges of the mall is even on top of the car, sort of know what it is. The thing gets a little hairy or the roof that's DACA. Some dropping in a bit of this dark and paint. Purpley should have paint. Coming forwards. We stop a random down there. Hey, just emphasize that area of the who'd more even a tiny is shadow here from the mirror like that. It's very hard to tell. Near the front of the car. They're out little bits of shadow from and just being caused to the front. So I'm going to dock and that bit up a little bit. Dropping some more neutral tint maybes, well, it's too much. Just lift off. Just go in and have a bit of I have a play around and change things around defined areas more. You want to and detail. That kind of thing is a sort of handle here with the doors which I haven't sort of popped in yet. So I'll just do that. Just a little subtle indication. That's what we need. The wheels as well. I do want to dock in the wheels a teeny bit. So thank you. You're off some neutral tint and just darkening, especially on the left-hand side of the wheels underneath the car here. The aim to increase the contrast and the sense of lights and the painting. Even underneath here that's going to be and should be a lot darker. Join it on. You sometimes going to add different layers on these. And I sometimes do it as well because if I'm not a 100 percent sure of the time, I might go just a little bit lata and that way you can go back over it lighter and add more detail. And whereas if you get it to dock, It's very odd to then reverse. So that's what I'm essentially doing here, is even a little dent here. Little ding. So just in the areas, I'm really just trying to accentuate some of the shadows and some of the weathering of the of the vehicle as well. And I think it's going to be something just something that I want to, for the emphasize with these guys. They're just struggling to meet your painting here. Just darken up that section a bit more because it's kind of draw it off to light. And a loved this contrast here between the yellow and the purple. That's made a huge difference. Okay. You're like I'm flipping around with these area way too much. Let's have a look. What else we can sort of add up the top. What I'll do is I'll show you how to add in a little bit of texture. I'm going to pick up a bit of this brown paint, wipe my brush off, and we use the side of the brush to start just dragging on the paper. And the suddenly really works. If you've got paper that has a kind of textured sort of surface. So if you've got a rough, rough paper or some even some cold press paper, which essentially is what I'm using now. This is perfect. Just dragging your brush across areas to just get that kind of weathered wall. Look. Okay. And we want to do all over the place, but just in some areas and get rid of character into these wall. Even down the bottom here where we've got these bits of, I don't know what they think is on the wall. Now we can just do a bit of work here. Darken up some bits underneath. Okay, on the ground as well, I think can really give texture here on the ground is going to be great. So I'm speaking out against the movement of these blue paint and purplish blue and I'm dropping it in. There's like these little big as it was a bit too much, but we'll live with it. And something like that can even start putting in some loose perspective lines in there. Let's have a look. What else should we do? And quiet. All right, with these shadows though, we'll emphasize or de-emphasize some of these little bit more. I'm going to dock and it up. Just to create more contrast. Again, going over that same shadow that's being cast on the wall just with another layer of neutral tint. So what I'm doing, if this underneath here we've got the shadow it connecting to the food and to the back of the car. There we go. The shadows and the dots. You need to be quite a feature because it's just all this light being caused all around the painting side. This is really just going to draw it out. Further. K, small little shadows underneath of the top part of the windows. You can even have a bit of them. Middle one is a face like that. Okay. So we're just going to dropping a bit of color underneath like that. As a shadow. I'm going to connect it up like that. Here is kinda holding in the plants. Cannot be CAR and these little tiny bit Doc and this area here. And a bit more neutral tint here. Soon as well, actually soft in a bit. And I think that is done. 18. Big Ben London: Painting Steps: Okay, so here is an interesting scene I've actually crop this. This is in London, UK, Big Ben and the bridge running across. So we've got one of these double decker buses in here, very, very London, and we've got basically just all these figures coming across. We've got a lady that's going to program. We've got sort of a group of friends. And this picture actually came quiet and lodge. It was a landscape picture. When I did, I just cropped it to make it a little bit more manageable when I've added in an extra lamp here in the side. Sometimes you need to do this when you're painting watercolors is so much detail in there. And a lot of that stuff on the side actually detract away from the scene. And initially it was quite a large picture. These figures were very far back. So this is something that you need to do when you're composing. Seeing yourself, pick out the best elements, choose what kind of story you want to tell me. I want to tell the story of these at pedestrians, people just walking cross. And I just love these lots. So I wanted to emphasize those a bit more. So let's go ahead and start off with the sky. And first thing I would ask yourself, what kind of scarred you want to put into it and make it a bright and sunny day? Or do you want to make it really kind of a moody kind of day like in this photograph. And I'm thinking I'm going to add a little more blue and I'm going to share things up a little bit. So dropping, dropping in a bit if this water straight into the sky. Being very careful as well, just to shop around these lights too. Here. I'll probably add a bit of gray in any way, maybe some clouds around this side especially so that I can draw out the colors that broad colors of the lamps light. So it must be maybe late afternoon unthinking. Be good. So we've seen to portray. So we've got some some docs and maybe on the top as well. So what I'm going to do, we're just going to start off putting a bit of blue in here. So I've got some cobalt blue and we'll drop that striding. You just let it blend and do its thing. And you can also mix up some other colors in the palette. I've got some blue and a bit of CPAs and mix that together. So we've got maybe be a little bit darker area in there as well. Okay. But have a play around and look at how everything mixes together, especially around the top section. Well, these Witton with activity going on, on my drop in some more over here. And be more, be more darkness around this side. And you notice these arrows are already starting to dry, so you have to work fairly quickly. And that's the thing, that's the thing with watercolors, but you could use once. And while this, everything is drawing, if you feel like you need more water, just go in and re-wet section like this. No harm done. Better that you've got enough time to put in all these colors. So let's have a look. What else do we want to pop in there? I think some pink would be known as just a just a warming up. Maybe down here. At the bottom is quite grayish. Little bit of little bit of that running through. And I do want to have more darkness or darker colors in the background of the Benson. And we've got the advantage of the broadness and all the warm colors sort of showing through. So that's, this is a bit too bright, so I want to dial that down slightly. Great. But this, all these little white bits that are running through, That's what you want. The soft white edges essentially in there. And really at this point, it's up to you whether you want to add in some extra clouds, extra darkness and things in here as well. I tend to fiddle around a bit, but sometimes you go back and you actually regret it. But this is just a good opportunity to do it. If you feel like you need something a bit darker. If you want to adjust, adjust the spot, for example, but be very careful not to introduce too much water in here because you're going to get kind of bleeding, interesting, sort of blooms if you do that and that can be a good or bad thing. But for most beginners I find it can be very difficult to control these blooms. So I suggest just keeping an eye on the water level that you're using in these areas, make sure it's not too wet. Okay. I'm just tidying up around the lamps like that and creating more contrast so that we've got just the shadow darkness in this area. But I don't want it to I don't want it to be to dock is well, I still want it to be nice and soft, blend in like that, but a bit of extra darkness There's not going to hurt. Okay. So I'm going to stop fooling around that area. I'm happy with how that looks. We've got a bit of ground, we've got a bit of blue in here. And what I'll do next is start picking up the warm colors case. So here I've just got a little bit of yellow. So I'm dropping that straight in. Okay, So the call tau is here. I'm just going to bring that down like that. I'll go to number 10, round brush. You can use any kind of round brush or even a flat brush that has gives you that bit of control. Okay? And notice how I'm also doing this while the paint's wet. And I don't always do this purposely because I just love things to blend together. Because otherwise it will stick out oh too much and look at a place I want it to be just blending dia that I don't want it to be too much of a, a I guess a focus in this painting background here, I'm just darkening down those buildings. And let's giving some bright red. He brought red orange book more red in there. And let's have a look. Let's have a look. I think just start off from the side. Bring that down. Again, letting it blending in areas so it doesn't have to be lucky to coloring in everything separately like a coloring book with just you want some of these to blend to each, onto each other. Bit of red there that, that you can even adding some darkness in some of the windows and bits and pieces while it's still wet. I love to do this. Some nice mixing going on like that. Okay. And we're going to go around to those buildings in the background as well. So mixing these old, blending it all in and so that the sky also touches and blends like that. It's nothing too dark back here. Just a bit of college indicate and even these buildings here, look at that. I'm just I'm just picking up some of these left of a warm color, dropping that striking. And actually these little pose here and things like that, you can go over them. This will just be careful not to go over the land lands because we want to make them a little bit broader than that. And so moving down the page now, and here on the ground, we're going to decide kind of how colorful we want it, whether we want it really dark. I'm just picking up a bit of yellow ocher. Let's have a try and draw petty and like that. And going around, cutting around some of these figures. But I'm leaving a lot of them and leaving a lot of them unpainted. Just kinda touching on today LH, that's all. Okay, so that looks about right. And again, this join, this boson as well so that we've got some mixing happening here in the page. And now we can also make scene a bit of dark a color to, in areas like that. I mean, near the front, I found that it really helps to have bit more darkness running through that page. And coming down here to these larger brush. Easier to getting broader strokes like that. Say yellow Erica, bit of Naples, yellow in the trunk that in and look at the way I'm picking up the college as well. I'm I'm almost just picking it up straight from the from the wells. Mixing in a little bit with water and dropping it, straining. Okay. Maybe guy, we got some more darkness here. Just to cool color, it's on us so much time to greenish color actually. Grab some neutral tint. Trump that in. At the front. Little bit of brown or something like that? Yeah. Okay. Just creating a bit of darkness here, the front, it's not necessarily actually there, but it's a good idea to create a bit of a darker shade running through this area to keep it interesting. And, and it's putting a little bit of Kula coolness in the front as well. Just a little bit of coolness like that. Fantastic and almost forgot. But the lot of the top need to be putting as well just a bit of color through this. I'm going to pick up, I'm going to exaggerate this more and get some yellow that's dropped, Eddie, and how does that look? Okay. Springy, yellowy through there. Let's put some yellow ocher so that it's brought. Okay. But just something I wanted to emphasize, mole dropping that yellow like that. Okay. Um, some of it's gone into the sky. That's about all I want to do. So we can go over, and now the figures add some colors into them. So for example, I'm not want to put some blue for this fellow here and continue just mixing in other colors things. We're just, we're just going to clump of colors essentially in the old joining together. The more you think about it, actually even more, you sort of mess around with things. The worse it looks. So you kind of got to just drop the coloring to be happy with it, modify and change it around a little bit. But don't sort of fetal around too much with everything. While it's they just let it let the colors settle and then go back into it again if you feel like you need more detail. Okay, so is a pram or something like that in the front of this figure there. And this is where I can start getting in shadows. We use all that sort of thing. And what I actually wanted to do here is get some shadows running across to the left-hand side. But what I'll do is I'll actually just wait. Yeah, I'll actually just wait a little bit so that this can all dry first because I also want to think I can get in some shadows for these lamps as well, kind of coming down and across the path. I think that will make a more interesting composition. And then if I get the light coming in from the left-hand side, moving towards the right, you miss out the shadows from these beautiful lamp so that we can connect onto the ground. So what I'll do firstly is a much as getting some of the legs of these figures in some, just a bit of darkness. And I'll give the bottom a little dry first. Okay, so let's go ahead and do the shadows of the figures and the legs at the same time. And that is just neutral tint Trump that striding. We're gonna get some blue, some kind of warm blue. So a kind of ultramarine, some picking off, just mixing this around so that I can get a DACA sort of tone. And then being able to also use some of these stuff here as well, which is more of a warmer gray. So we've almost got to a bluish gray color here. We've got a warmer gray here. Having both is going to be important so we can mix and match, change it around. So let's pop in the legs for these figures. And this one he had just comes down straight like that towards the ground. And this one here we're dropping bit of color like that. They're just essentially walking in this, this here is a kinase and we're going to just connect that on. So that goes in darkness on the left. These wheels here at the podium as well. Say something like that. Okay, these, these guys move more coming forward or maybe walking towards our side. Psi, just putting in a bit more extra detail for the legs. Then it's going here. So now what I wanna do is to join the legs up underneath like Greece and essentially just work on kind of a shadow coming towards that bottom left-hand side. Like that. So it's sort of moving on to other figures and things like that. But it's really important and to join this all along. And we've also got this lab here. So I'm going to pop in a bit of color here and drag these down the page and see that it's the red, is it finish off? So it kind of finishes off rat, he would have to bring it down further because the figures, but I wanted to blend too much onto the figures. So we might have the shadow coming down like here, saw him there. And then could that bring that across like that? Okay. Just one broad stroke like that. Okay. And then we've got this one here, the front, which is again, a fair bit DACA. And I'm going to connect that all up, just getting that darkness on that left-hand side. There we go. If you don't have enough darkness on this side as well, you can just go ahead and quickly dropping. Sometimes it takes a while for you to figure out how dark something should be based on the other objects. So here we go, I've got a bit of that. Then we can just gonna get that shadowed running down the bottom like that. Use another grays is a kind of warmer gray here. Like that. Okay. And another thing in-between, these little areas here, I'm just going to popping some shadow details for the breach. Sections inside like that, which a Dhaka, Even on this side here is like a condom. Now what is it? It's a platform or something like that. In the Shang. Just added some darkness underneath. Like that joy that all up there. And I'm leaving this topic what we're just not what I mean, just lotta cars. Well, some of that shadow underneath it. Okay. Let's go ahead and look at some of the other bits and pieces. So I'm going to color the scene darker on this side here. So we've got a few shadow just running across like that. And left-hand side. Some of it just kind of catching a lot. So we've got the right-hand side in the lot. Okay. And we've got a lot of these sort of things in the background, which I'm going to just add some color underneath. I'm glad we're sort of stick out a little. Then also this building here on the right-hand side, I'm going to need to dock and then a little bit as well to lot. Blend that in. It's closer than that building. So it has to be DACA and blending and joining all the shapes on to each other as well. It's just an opportunity to do so. And that needs to be maybe DACA. Okay. Fantastic. And then if you've got any areas that you want to darken up and add some more. In PE, you can go ahead and drop in some paint. And that section I'll fund at the bottoms tends to be a good place to add some darkness, especially with these figures, it helps to frame the mole. We need to do that. Okay, great. Now this bus, I'm going to add in some warmer color here, the front. Again, emphasizing that shadow to that lot catching on to that side of the bus. Okay. That droning on nicely here. Fantastic. And another thing is again, these background buildings, I think I'm getting this document groups and these as well as sort of sticking in a bit. They need to be dark and very slyly hope this and runs a bit as well into the into the bus. Okay, excellent. Reach. From here. We're just finding bits and pieces too. Doc and change up. If we want to essentially, I'm just adding some darkness to the top of these lamps. And it's more I mean, it doesn't look like this in the actual photo, but I want to create a bit more contrast here between the yellow and just the sort of somebody's darkest thoughts and I'm hoping on as well like that darkness there. Okay. Amman just adding a few little buds, checking if the sky it's drawing it, dropping little spikes and things and bids flying around. I think that's a good good right of break up the sky. And actually in these kind of what areas as well with helps to create some more interest. Actually. Not too much. I think that's that's fine. Yeah. And really it so up to you. I think it's pretty much pretty much finished. And really the rest of it is just touching up in pumping in some additional bits and pieces, maybe do a column for the heads and maybe some of the hay, that kind of thing. You can dropping as well. I was meant to be pink. Okay. Something like that. And remember they sold draws off to be significantly larger as well. So if you want to do anything, I think now's a good time to to sort of dropping paints and alter what you wanted then essentially what I've done, I've put a bit of a lot of color on this guy because we've got a darker color on this guy here with these shirts. So contrasting things very subtly like that just makes the figures loop more lively and more interesting. And essentially say, great. Bluetooth. Little bit more darkness here. Now we can also dock and down some of these bits as well here. Another wash, if you feel you need extra darkness to draw these out further. Shouldn't have darkness. Some of it's now starting to blend into the background. And it's no big deal. I can even add on some little Witton with a pizza. Yeah. As well too. And change up that background and beat. Okay. And I will leave it as that. 19. Paris Street: Paint the Light: To get started on this one. And I'll talk you through just in a minute how I sketched this out. And essentially I've straightened out this building a little bit more just to make correctly perspective of it. A bit. Sometimes when you're taking a picture with a camera, it just distorts the objects on the edges. So I've changed that up. So it's completely straight up, basically joined all of these buildings onto each other. If you look at it, it's all just one big shape. Starts here, comes down, goes up, down, and then up again here. And I've got the cars all in front fingers in front, again, all joined onto the same building. Emerged in some way. Now, I always recommend, just like in some of the other videos in this class, to draw the cause first and any objects, people, things like that in the foreground. That way you can draw the buildings around, cut around them. And so when you're going doing that first, you're basically not cutting over the buildings. Whereas if you do it afterwards, it's going to be a little bit hotter. You're going to have areas where it's just gonna be more difficult to get these what to show through, especially if your lines and stuff from these complicated sort of buildings, then some real basic measurements here, just looked at the windows, how many flaws that the building is, and basically just popped in the main details, especially here in the foreground for that building. And in this middle part here, maybe a little bit here, but the rest of it is very, very loose, even the cause. And I've added in a little bit more detail, some more figures and stuff like that as well. So let's go ahead and get straight into it. I'm going to pick up a mop brush and straight away just grab a bit of cerulean blue, drop that straight into the sky. Okay. And I'm actually going to make it pretty light because I want to drop in some darker bits of blue and things as well, maybe some, some gray and stuff like that. So you can even pick up a little bit of bit of mutual tint, water that down, drop that in so it just graze down that area a bit more. Okay. But just wanting to get a really light wash coming through, remanent chop around the buildings. It's important because you do want the buildings to have a bit more light showing on them down the bottom here where the building starts. Another thing you can do is just add a little bit more color. That's probably way too much. But just more colored down the bottom. And that way what happens is that it's going to make these buildings pop out a little bit more, just create more contrast, especially with that. Some of the yellow that we're going to pop into this area later definitely help. So still going through very thin wash and just a bit of care to cut around bits and pieces. But honestly, it's not a huge deal. Just as long as you don't go over most of the building, you'd be fine. So what we can do now is we can pick up a little bit of neutral tint. We can pick up some purple. I'm going to read on here as well and just dropping some bits and pieces into the sky. And hold to that is the little cloud or something like that. Then maybe put a bit more coloring here as well. Maybe another soft Cloud running across that side. It just keeps it interesting and gets, allows you to get some soft clouds shapes running through the same like this, and then change things up. You can also lift up some paint as you see I'm doing here, lifting up a bit of paint and this is going to just essentially make it look like this and lighter clouds, things like that in there. But essentially that's it. I don't really want to touch that sky anymore. It's really basic sort of composition here for the sky or wet into wet, let the paint do its own thing and dry off. So what I wanna do now is start popping in some of the yellows. So I'm moving directly down the page. You'd have to be careful here because sometimes when you start mixing a bit of the blue and the yellow is together, I'm using the same brush, it tends to turn into green. So here we go, just a little bit of yellow ocher. And I'm going to grab some of this stuff as well, which is just some Hansa Yellow. Hansa yellow. What we need is just a warm color. Okay, just dropped into this area. We can use some orange as well. It doesn't really matter, but I do prefer using a very warm colored paints, so yellow is a good choice. So what I'm doing, I'm just joining this area of the Buildings and sky up and it might lead into the sky slightly or the blue might come downwards a bit. Just let it, just let it do its thing. And we just want to get on a really basic Washington. Remember it's going to dry up. He's a bit of Naples yellow one, not just popping some of that opaque yellow running through that. And the buildings here, the great thing is that the role almost the same color, just any sort of yellowish color really works. And I like using a blend of the different yellows. Go to the top of the building. I'm going to use moles, hello, like that. Join that up with the sky that it's sort of blend, mixing, do its thing like that, and work its way down the back as well. To have a look around this section, we've got figures and all that jazz. So I'm just going to cut around some areas here and there on the back ends with a casa just getting that whole building so that it comes down. And just bringing this wash down here, connecting and also to this left-hand side buildings. So I'm going to just getting a lot wash of yellow. Again. Think of this part of the painting as with just putting in some base colors. Okay. All the light we're painting in, we're not painting in any detail. Nothing lot that we just want to get into some basic colors. And essentially go over the top of it, lighter to create the shadows and additional details. Okay, So that does the trick. Sometimes you might find maybe an air has to dock, just drop the paint brush in, lift up some of that paint as I'm doing here. And this will create also a little bit more variation in the area too. So it was near he is kind of just melted into the sky, but I'm not going to bother with it. Just let it do its thing. So I'm moving down the page. What I want to mix up here, I'm using a bit of ocher marine blue and a tiny bit of burnt umber to just get myself a gray color. Just a real basic gray. Okay. Probably a cooler gray. And let's have a trial is drop that in the bottom, looking. All right. So what I wanna do is just start blending, getting some of this stuff, the yellows in here as well. So kind of getting a bit of a blending also between the buildings. So you see here I'm just dying to merge little bit of the buildings up here with the ground. Because I don't want it to be to just sort of start all of a sudden an area mod have already drawn, which we can't do really all that much besides perhaps working a little bit of water into that area. But I just want to make sure that the ground is lightly, slightly darker than the buildings. So here we are. We're just popping in. Popping in that thank gray color. And I do want it to have a bit more warmth to it. I'm just picking up some little bit of this yellow ocher and I'm dropping it in a lot, sort of wash of that running through. Don't want too much of it. So notice here I'm actually mopping up the paint, lifting it off, and then drawing it off on my paper towel. And so another thing I like to do is stop putting in some bits of darkness here at the front. Just helps to create a sense of depth in your painting when you've got some sort of darker strokes at the front, that one's way too dark. What we sort of want something like kinda like this. Yeah. And the ages can draw, I can move it, it sort of perspective lines running down the page as well. And like that, kind of overdo it and testing. So leave this now. And while I've got an opportunity to do so, I'm going to drop in some colors for the cost. So let's pick up a bit of blue. And now firstly, we were to think with our light source coming from. And I, she wanted to come from the top-left. It's different from the reference photo, which is more kind of up here on the top right. Quarter catching some of these buildings above, overhead to the right-hand side. I want there to be shadows on this building and then shadows on these buildings as well. And for that to happen on, I have to put the light source here. If I want this building to cast shadow across the ground, some of the cars across the ground, the figures, the shadows. So that's what we're gonna do. So I'm going to start just putting in some colors and really light color on top of these cars like this. Okay? And if you get some blending into the ground, That's completely fine. Leave that one. Leave that one white background there. Even this van I think I might just add some little bit of blue to it like that, just to cool it down a little bit of coolness and the back of the van, uh, like using cool colors in front of warm colors, it just creates a lot more contrast. Makes it more interesting. So that's what I'm doing here, just using some different colors. It really doesn't matter all too much. And I can even put in the blue, the green, the degree for that, that causes a problem. Okay. Well, we're doing is just getting a little bit of I'm just a little bit of color in there. So lot wash like that or might leave this windscreen partially white like that. Again, we've got fingers so you can pop in a bit of blue for this one. Before this cool Apollo, Vermont grips and purple and, and purple in for that figure. Like these. Another bit of purple popping a bit more of this funny gray down collar troponin, which is putting in, we did a color on the body's essentially. So that's about it. So I'm gonna give this a quick dry off and then we'll go into the second layer, okay, so we can see everything's completely draw it off now. And when you use some opaque paint, this is what happens. It's sort of just Melos out that black and you can see an area where I haven't gone over it as they can. The black sort of pops out a lot more. So it's one of those things with opaque paints that just does that. And I don't know if it's good or bad thing. Just a, just a stylistic effect. So what we're gonna do now is we're going to start putting in all the dark areas. We engage in more details, things like that. Look at where we're going to put the lights on these buildings. So what I wanna do to start off with is I want to make sure firstly that we've got the light source sorted. So before I even look at anything down the bottom, we went to look at the beak shapes, which are basically these buildings as the first thing that really pop out. So we have to make sure that these shadows that we get on them, they the loop right to essentially. So the main bits we're going to start off with, we're going to start with this building here and left. And I'm going to mix up a few different types of docs are here. I've just got a neutral tint. It's sort of mixed in with some other paint. In the middle here, I'm going to grab a bit of ocher marine blue and mix that with a bit of burnt umber. And this is gonna make me another type of gray. Okay? And so we've got a bit of a cooler gray here. This one looks like a beetle warmer. And let's go ahead and give this a try. I think we've got a MAC here. It's just the yellows and stuff mixed together. But I recommend going over the top with some of the coolest stuff for us, but I want to change it up as we go along. So let's go ahead and drop in a bit of color here for this building. And I want to cut a little bit around some of the windows, shapes like that. Just leave some yellow in there. I don't want to completely obliterate all that yellow. So and notice what I'm doing here. Little bit of cutting around and there might be areas of our city join it on. Like this, for instance, here. And this bit here, I'm just leaving that sort of hatched and building this detail. I'm just bringing that down, but I'm also paying attention to just try to leave some of that yellow in there just to imply some detail. And you've got areas which have kind of partially draw it or a little bit damp, just dropping a little bit more paint in some areas. And that's just going to keep things interesting. So we didn't have that same and wash running all the way through. We've got some variation in here. Here we go. So this figure here, I'm just gonna do some maybe cutting around so that I don't sort of lead the heads out of the painting. And where it gets closer, you can also just adding some darker paint near the bottom like this. Just a bit of darkness there. And here if the ground here, I'm just going to put in the bit of the sidewalk. You at all. I want to do something like that. And coming over to this side, this is the important part. So we want to get a shadow running across. No imagining this building in the left-hand side runs all along the way. So we're going to have shapes, shadows cutting across all over the top of this building here. And this building here, we're going to have a bit of darkness on this side. And the light sort of heating the left-hand side. So I'm going to start off here with a very light wash, which is this gray color in here. We might go pick up some more neutral tint, bit more of the blue. I'm excited. Cooler, kind of gray color. And here I am just trying to get some darkness on the lower parts of the buildings and things like that here. So I'm going to start merging it on here. Let's try get on some sort of shadows, imaginary shadows. I'm just putting them on merging that with the darkness below like this. Cutting around the cause and the bottom two Like this. Yeah. Okay. Highlights, bit like that. I don't want the shadow to be too much, so just a soft in this soft in this side of it down a little bit like that. And keep it moving. And fluid, I suppose. Maybe there's another bit of shadow here. Like that. 20. Paris Street: Add the Shadows: Just a real basic shatter. If you find this a bit that's two shops and he just wet the brush, soften soften that edge nicely like that so that it just has a softer H2, but you want some sharp sides to it as well. So it's important to kinda have both. And then down below, that's where I'm adding extra darkness, extra definition to get those caused the POP app more essentially. So we've got just more of these juicy dogs. Here are some names, honestly, a lot of this stuff on just making up. As I go. I can't even remember what I've put in there. So that shadow is almost done. I think here it's too dark. And what we'll do is that I'm going to add in a very light shadow on this side of the building. Okay, just to imply that the lots sort of caught that left-hand side of the building. And then we've got a little bit of darkness and running down this right-hand side, like this. Okay? And here we go. We can even soften that edge a little bit just on the edges here. And I'd love to try to get as much of it as possible in the same Washington. Just look better if we pull in these small little shatters running across at the same time. So these are the kind of separate is under each floor and often what you get is a little bit of shattered running underneath each separator and you find that sometimes it may not work as well as you as you'd like and you have to go back into it again later on. But and I do fine. Just try to add a little bit of that to begin with. Really helps. So here I am just adding in a little bit more darkness and especially down the bottom here of Philip, I need to just define these bit at the bottom a little more here. Okay, here's a SAN or something like that on that side. And let's have a look. Think this reverse here. I'm going to just pop in a new light wash of that yellow running across and that building also in the far distance and not having a bit of a lighter blue gray beats running through. Not just it just blends and mixes a little bit more. Okay, So kinda happy with how that looks. Now we're going to work on this stuff on the right-hand side. So I'm going to use that same sort of blue-gray as before and we're going to make things out. We're going to just putting some shadows on this building here. And maybe here like that. Just a general shape running across the back of these buildings like this. And then we've got, of course, the side of the building which is in shadow, considering the perspective and the lot coming in. And I'm going to join that on to this little shadow there. And look at how I've left some nice little highlights and things in here. It's absolutely crucial to do this. So don't even need to know exactly what's him there. These are just little shades or something like that. And it will break up this shape and make it look like it's more detailed. Okay, So carrying this further down again and I'm darkening at the bottom as well. That letting some of these colors just mixing with each other. While you can, it's just a good idea. I think there's a bit of fluid output, a bit over here as well. Join this up more so that we've got more sort of darker shapes. So you notice the shadows here a lot sharper than the ones here in the left. So it's up to you. You can soft enough some of them just put a bit of water, some areas to soft enough. Parts of it. Not a 100 percent necessary as well. I like some of the sharp ones here, the back, especially that section there. I'm going to pick up a smaller brush. This is a number 6 brush, I think. And I'm going to be using some of these paint to start putting in again some of the flaws, little details. Not overdoing it, but just some little details here indicating areas of the roof, that kind of thing. Little shadows formed by the chimneys. What else have we got? We've just these little separate is of the flaws essentially. And while this area is still wet, That's why I like to do it. So it just melts into section and it looks more natural. But again, you can do this while the paint is wet and we'll draw it later on as well. So this is just another way to do it and you don't want to overdo it as well. So the shadows and things, details of the back, you're just making it lighter as you go. Because obviously with the details in the back, they do lighten up a bit. So we just have to keep that in mind. Fantastic. So I'm going to start working on the stuff here in the foreground now. And I'm going to pick up a little bit more of the ultramarine blue jumped down here. We're going to pop a bit of gray in there. And let's start getting some color into these cars and just some darker colors. And I'm going to put some in here. See for the back of this car, we're going to follow that perspective. And not the perspective, I mean, but the, the direction of light coming in from the left-hand side there. So this one here may have luck a bit of light on that left side of the costs I'm going to leave that lives are and drop that painting on that front side of the car. You might even want to put in a few little streaks and things in there just to connect it up better. This one, I'm going to drop some more darkness in here, especially down the bottom. What I'm doing is adding more neutral tint to a lot of this area. Because we've got, of course, the wheels and they need to merge and blend on to the ground, which is going to essentially anchor these cars. You don't have that line underneath them. They just just doesn't look right. So that's what I'm doing. Just putting a bit of that line underneath because like VCE and then we've got we've got a bit of shadow running to the right-hand side like that. Saying that this car, their darkness here following following that along. And also one thing I forgot to do is to put some of the shadow on the ground as well. For the buildings. You can barely tell. I don't think it's actually necessary here. Because when we stopped going through with the week is there'll be enough darkness the on the ground anyway. So let's go ahead and just start doing these causes. Well, I just I'm leaving the left-hand side of the cars and working our way down into the whims you like that would have darkness here. And lot in Washington. Other thing you want to be careful not to go too dark as well. You want some of this long work to show through which is a unique property of one and wash works. So don't go overboard. Okay, and Here we go. We've got these cards here and neutral tint at the bottom like that. And just bringing some of that across some of these shutters and things like that, moving across to that right-hand side. We've also got some figures here which I'm going to pop in with a bit of this nature tend just darkness in that section. And legs are pretty much just placed it on and you can soften off that area like that and stop popping in little bits of shadow like that. Joining these legs. The body's more, that's probably too much, but we'll make do with that. Uh, like that figure here, the back. You can make a decision here whether you want to just darken the heads or add some more color later on, I'm just going to add a tiny bit of color. There. There's a figure, a couple of figures he, so it's popping some legs. This one's kind of walking across the street or something like that. Then we can just money the spit up on top, blended in a bit better. And of course, join the legs up at the bottom like least to get that little shadow running across the car tires of just not he's in. Obvious enough, that's okay. Maybe another bit of darkness here for this pose we use that anchor them to the ground is so important to do that. And it has to be. So I'm happy with how those ones look. Let's work on the figures and things to the left. So we've got to figure here walking towards the front of the same song, just adding a bit of darkness here to those sections. And the legs in as well like that. And a bit more detail here for these figures here in the back. Again, let's go ahead and get some of these shadows running across like that. Joining on to the ground. Okay. Fantastic. Just trying to get this one to make a little more sense that we should be full width mole, couple of ties here as well. Excellent bit of touch-up work. If you think it's just too much, you know, draw that bit off and start again. So that's looking pretty good, familiar. The other thing I wanna do is add in a few sort of draw brushstrokes on the ground to get in just these perspective lines like that. Okay. This one here? Yeah. Okay. There is actually a pedestrian crossing here as well. I'm not going to bother too much with that. Just this section here, the back. And we are nearing the end of this one. The only thing that you have left to do is add on some little bits and pieces that you feel you want to bring out the color of hair on some of the figures. For instance, we want to look at things like the buildings if we want to pop in bit of color that have darkness in some areas to draw out. See what I'm doing here. Just some of these darkness in the Windows. And you don't want to overdo it as well. So there's little things that you can do in areas. Areas like these. Essentially just to further draw out these details and bits and pieces in here. And maybe there's some shadow or something like that. Here. You want to emphasize that lawn get fed bit strike bit more definition here in the roof. For instance, you can pick up a little rigger brush and start doing a little bit of this work. I just draw off the rigor. And for instance, say or the roof here, we've got maybe some lines running crossed indicate the tiles and things on the rooftops. Another thing is that we do have little bits of kind of areas of these balustrades and things like that with a balcony is so I'm not going to go over the whole thing again. But what you can do is just indicate some areas a little bit more than others. And you can already see essentially in the line drawing that they're already in the, sorry, it's just some bits and pieces that you emphasizing further. And they serve a purpose here to just bring out the yellow more that lie on there when you have suddenly DACA beats. They're just going to make the what, the lot of it's POP app a lot more. So five color, these windowing, for example, leave that a little bit darker. What else have we got? Maybe this one here a little bit there, just the edges of some of these windows. And it draws attention to that light that's hitting the window makes it look brighter. So it's just been a little trick and you pick things up as you go along as to where to do it. You know, you're not going to want to do it every single window. But notice what I'm doing is that in some areas, it's definitely a strategy that I'm employing site. And you kinda wanna skip a few windows, move down a few and then emphasize another, that kind of thing. You've got also the sort of bits and pieces in the background. We don't need to worry too much about those. Okay. There we go. Just a bit more detail and definition on some of these some of these buildings like that. Well, I actually like these buildings and the rod a lot more. You've got this gigantic building sort of lefts. And what I'll do is just adding some darker bits and pieces in here to further draw out some details because we've got all these extra detail on the right-hand side, all these other buildings. So we need to make sure that this one's balanced data, especially because it's so close to the front of the, of the painting in the foreground that we have to add more detail in the to make sure that it is interpreted as obviously being closer to the front. And bid more bit more darkness around here with the figure is so that I can just cut around the heads and the body more and draw out the detail on these figures. A little, maybe some more darkness here. Another thing we can do, we've got these lat pull things out as so I can just re, emphasize that, bring that down more and just add some more detail. Now, this is actually a French flag. And interesting really, really depends how much in detail you want to go with this. Let's give it a try. I'll get a little bit of blue. We would have blue paint, the top part. Like that. It's a little maybe more maybe more blue. Okay. It's kind of a mu 2 down, blue. And the bottom part of the flag, we've got some red, permanent red. Drop that in some gravity, more of that. And the bottom of the flag and just a little bit. And what I'm gonna do afterwards is that I'm going to get a bit of quash or maybe use my I've got a mock or a white and a ballpoint pen that I can just gain that sent a bit of it to make it water. But you can barely notice that it's just a very subtle sort of flag in there. There's a few other shapes in this section as well that I've drawn in, to be honest, I mean, there's actually this little sign or something here which I can just further reemphasize draw back in the day, taus is another traffic light or something like that. They're even here. We've got another poll that's going upwards. Like that. We can invent one over here. Just to keep things balanced. That and maybe I'll turn this into a pretend land or something like that. Okay, so I've got a white pen here. This is just the normal white ballpoint. You can pick these up in the shops and I'm going to do is firstly, as promised, I'm going to go straight in to the this area here, that flag and just getting some white on top here. Just given that y b to the French flag. Like that, look okay. To the bottom. Little bit more like that. Fantastic. And we'll leave that how it is and what we can do as well as just getting some little white highlights in areas outside of these these windows. Popping a little bit of these white onto the ages of as some of the window sills lot just catching and areas of law, that kind of thing. It's not necessarily a 100 percent necessary, but just adds a bit of sparkle onto the, the final finished product. So often you paint over a lot of, a lot of things and you lose those hot lots. So some of these really helps even going over the top of that car. For instance, maybe here the back of this van. Maybe want to get into a bit more watch on top here and join that onto the sod. Bit of sparkle. Running through in areas. Try not to do this too much. But this is just the middle strategy that you can employ. And it's the same thing as using white quash. Okay? This just a bit easier for me and more convenient. Tend to find that with the WACC wash. You can get definitely depends on the pen that you're using, but I can get a lot water sort of highlights. So this is, on the other hand, just a lot faster to do and more spontaneous. As you can see, I'm just sort of hoping you need in places not all too much because I want that and that other detail to show through the docs as well to come through. So that's about all I'm going to do with the pen. And you can also pick up a bit of paint and start putting in a few little builds up in the sky. So just make sure you've got enough and enough paint. There is trumping a little, sort of these little dots in these areas. And you'll be able to just get a few little birds and things like that in there helps to make the sky look a bit more interesting and varied. And just brings an extra bit of life into the, into the final product. With that said, I've done a lot of these without me, birds such as just like doing them, It's fine that the fonts tend to have too many birds in them. Okay, so we are all finished with this one. 21. Prague Scene: Painting Steps: Okay, I wanted to give this one a good Because there's some real obvious shadows you're running across the size of the building. And I just want to show you and I just wanted to do a a and I just wanted to do a video on how to put those in in a very quick way because you can only do them essentially once. And just the process that I follow. So firstly, what we'll do is just get in some colors for the sky. So I'm going to pick up just a bit of cerulean blue and maybe some cobalt. Well would be nice. And just go ahead and drop that into this area. This guy cut around the buildings and try to keep this just with enough saturation, but not too much color as well. Because we need the sky just to show it through nicely, but I'll want to make it a bit darker so that the building actually stands out more. So normally the skies and actually the stack draw that way once it's finished. So just pumping that in a little bit of cutting around. It's not a huge deal. Okay. So I just move it around the house down to here. You saw to the building here. Okay. So that's a pretty flat sort of wash. So now what I'm gonna do is popping some of the colors. Firstly, for these trees, I don't want to wait for that, Scott and draw off a little bit. Got some sap green and of mixed video that balloon as well. Coincidentally because it's so we're gonna go through like that and just color a bit of that in that side. And do the same with these tree here and the other side. Here we go. You know, basic stuff. Okay? And you can also drop in a bit of blue in the document town, in some areas, especially underneath like that. And you know, the tree trunks as well, which you can just pop in a bit of. A brown, went on to wait to see blending and then go into the tree. Okay. So what I'm gonna do now is essentially goes straight into the building and try to get in a lot of these warmer colors. Okay, I'm essentially we've got a favorite of Naples yellow, which is a creamy yellow. So let's go ahead and pop those in. Just dropping a bit of color, mixing with the sky slightly as well. Don't worry too much and bring that washed down. And the thing I want to do is also with the windows. He had just leave some of them watts so we can getting a bit of a blue reflection. Okay, So just go through maybe cutting around like that. Done the sod of the building to which wasn't in the reference photo, just wanted to change it up and they didn't get, make it look more three-dimensional. Come down here like that. Great. Right. And move that across. The crease. Down the back. Yeah. Okay. Fantastic. Building two to the left is pretty much wide, so I'm not going to touch it. Maybe just the roof, bit of warmth in a really nice same thing that the South had duty to the ride. Maybe a beef with a comma here, the rooftop, like that. I've been like this, just bent Sienna dropped me that to this side here as well. So it doesn't just begin all of a sudden that and what we can actually start doing is pumping in the shadows for peace-building. And I'm going to use just the cool color or just a gray essentially with a big blue mixed in with a very light wash. My car is just coming through. We're going to get into that here. Sort of stuff, kind of coming across the building like that. Some of the blending into the tree perhaps over here, further down. We've got these booting here. We've got just some little bit of color in there, like that. The rest of these wacky getting on this building afterwards. Okay, So that will do the trick for the two buildings on the sides. And now what I'm gonna do is start getting some colors in from the bottom side. I'm cutting around the trees and there's a couple of cars in there as well. All want to do for these is just getting a blue color for the ground. And I'm using a really warm color here as well. And I'm going to draw pain, maybe a bit of this gray as well. And I'm hoping the sort of mixes and B onto the baby could say what some of these stuff to combine and move downwards. And when the paper is slightly damp like that, you're going to get that nice effect. So it all just looks like it blends into 11 thing. Okay, So a bit of that. Just move that down the page. If you don't if you needed it will won't add some more in there like that. Carry that down and move it across. This guy. Maybe it isn't each retained at the bottom. And another thing I wanna do is getting a little bit of color for the cause. Firstly, I'll start off with the windscreen list. Try a light wash of blue here for some of these wind screens, okay, like that. And here as well. And you've got the bottom of the car which went to popping some color. This is just neutral tint kind of coloring here down the bottom. Same with this one. I'm trying to leave that left side of the car eliminated a bit. Okay. This one, we don't have to worry, battle too much and just call this one and actually, fine. I'm a bit of neutral tint and some dark and neutral tint. He's good. I'm just going to drop the scenes that we have bit more detail down the bottom. But actually, I really think we should let these dry off, just let, just have a few little bit of color in there. And what we'll do afterwards, we'll go back and getting the wheels so that it doesn't just melt into the ground. Okay, That's all. Draw it off now and taught put in all the finishing touches and bits and pieces. So let's go in and just do a bit of painting around this figure. I've forgotten to coloring that saw this figure actually fully tree. That's okay. We can the same time or putting a few little maybe branches or something going up like that. And what we'll do is we'll start actually putting in a bit of color for the windows. I wanted to leave these watts so that we could pop in some blue contrasts, just a really lot wash of blue in here, certainly. And that's something here. These windows as well at the top, what a beautiful woman would be nice. Sum here as well. And the bottom bit here. And I want to work on these cars as well, just getting in some of those shadows and joining them all up into one beak shape. So I've got myself a bit of nutrient tin here, which I've mixed up with some of the gray. And we'll start off with this tree here coming over from the side. And we're going to get these to join on the car like this. So the wheels here, the back there, underneath there, and a bit of a shadow coming to those and rot. And we've got this guy here and a bit of a shadow underneath the wheel here. Join that ONE like that. And that's going to gain just formed join onto these and chi here. So that it all just becomes an modes into 11 shape. That's my idea. And you've got a figure here at the same time which I'm going to again just drawing onto this hole and whole shape like that. Makes things a lot easier if you can do that. And this is a car, the back as well. Okay. So that's pretty much all your shadows covered the car as well. You might wanna do something like put a bit of a shadow up the top here. Because we've gone to tree, remember that's kind of coming in from that side. So it would make sense that there are some shadows on the left side of the sky. Document up a bit more like that. Okay. And we can go ahead and do the same thing for these buildings. So I'm going to go ahead and this is going to be important because that's going to bring out the building and go underneath here. There's a shadow underneath the center of the building. And then we've got some shadows being cast to the right-hand side here. Shutters and the right sides of these structures as well. Some of them just sort of cut cross like that. And it's coming off that side too. And they've got these sort of shadow that just comes with comes across that side of the building and got a bit that sort of comes in here like this here. And works its way down. And bits coming out and that sort of direction. Fatness underneath here, mid of darkness in here as well. That right-hand side and a large shape, shadow shape coming across. And essentially just cutting across here. Like that. We'll want to get this old in one go. Like that. Sort of cuts all across, even across these window. And essentially just forms this shape on the side of the building. If it doesn't go all the way to that side. But I'm trying to exaggerate. They said peat moss. And joining in on to some of these shadows up the top as well. So we've got a lot just sort of shape moving in the same direction. Bit of shadow to the right side at some of these windows. Again, let's have a look. In here. We go. And underneath these windows as well, we've gotta be suited. Lawn book, some shadows under there. Here to the right-hand side, perhaps like that. And, and not to forget the shadows to the right-hand side of the building. So just behind here of editing, Assad and beauty here that wasn't really there in the reference photo. Just so that I could get in a bit more of that sense of depth, perspective in the building. Okay. Great. Native color in areas. Extra details. Darkness on that right-hand side of the cars is one that we've got some breaks, things that I want to coloring some of them. Also the rooftop here just some lines as well. Little line would bits and pieces. And tops of the roof is like these. Maybe some chimneys and things that I wanted to, to emphasize a bit more. We can do that to some of these DACA brushstrokes. Coming in a pretty color for the figure. Going to use a warm color, some orange. That and I'll call that one finished. So you can now see all the shadows just going in one direction down the buildings. I think that's what it quite well. 22. Venice Scene: Paint the Light: So we've got this beautiful bridge, same over in Venice that we're going to do now it's more complicated. There's all kinds of detail in here, but it's the same principle is only other ones that we've painted so far. We're just looking at areas of light and errors of Doc. So we can look at the reference picture and we can see essential, a lot of light's coming in from that right-hand sides. It's hitting the right hand side of all these buildings. And we've got shadows cost and the left the bridge because the lights kinda coming in from the back, it's sort of hitting the back of that breach. So it's all kind of dark here in the front though they're awesome. Bits and pieces here as well. So let's go ahead and again, we'll work on the sky section first. And my first thing is just popping in a very light wash of color. Just water straight onto the top and this is actually a little bit gray should be more what? But I've used this paint before, so of course I'm painting the brush. I mean, so let's go ahead and get that in. Just around where the sky is cut around the buildings. And so we've just got these nice area here on the top. Okay, Now, Tom to dropping the cerulean blue, I'm just picking it up straight from the palette and changing up bits and pieces like that off, accidentally gone over that building. That's okay. But just dropping in some bits and pieces. And I've also got other colors here in the palette as well that I've mixed in tiny bit. Maybe if we go some purple, that's fine too. But just using a bit of a mixture of different colors, essentially, Kay, carry these down here, go around these rooftop like that. They're going to go and testing. This is just going to create a more interesting looking sky. And we'll have areas as well of the sky which are a little bit darker than the other beats. And remember this is all going to soft and down lot and up, lighter. So another reason why I'm making it, I'm trying to make the sky a little bit darker is just so that the warmth and the light areas of the houses that are going to pop out a little bit more. So I think I'm just dropping a bit more. These color he will maybe be neutral. Tint is well, in some spots up the top here, like that. Job, those colors in well, you can modify what you I want. Here. I'm just going again, I'm trying to create more darkness on that left-hand side that he and near with a lot heats the buildings. So I think extra color, that's your darkness. There is going to help be more at the top as well here. And I'm going to leave that to do its thing. I'm quite happy with that again. So moving down, I am going to pick up some yellow ocher and mix that up. Same brush I'm using, drop that straight in like that. And I'm actually going to connect a bit here where it connects onto the sky in just a moment because what? I want to give it a bit of time to dry first, here, I'm not going to mind too much. We can just pop that says trading like that. Leave a bit of the window as well. If you want to get into different color for the window, drop you drop these down here. Okay. The umbrellas have a kind of pink color to them. So I'm going to drop light wash of these pink. It's just a rose color in there. Rose Meta like that. Okay. I think that top bit is now we can go ahead and just dropping a bit of that color like that. And the great thing is allowing this to mixing the sky as well when you do it quickly. That's one of the advantages. So we get sort of soft fix and some of it bleeding into the sky looking quite magical. So I'm going to hear a bit of burnt sienna, which I'm going to drop in to the left-hand side, like that. Little bit too dark. So I'm just again, watering that down here. And getting these toppings. Well, I don't want any sharp edges where it connects on to the sky. Okay. Maybe you what highlights and here like that, That's all good. Okay. Drop this in, its carry this down. I'm, I'm kinda grinding it up a bit more, adding some more grays in here. Maybe it yellow, then we'll get rid of that darker gray. We all want to be quiet quick. Just getting the and quickly get out. Oops, cutting around things but not all too fast. Maybe more yellow at the bottom here we've missed out some of that yellow. Some of the some of the yellow here as well. Look, I'm not too worried, but at what color all the stuff is as long as it's warm color for now and we can go in and add in all the darkness and things lighter. Okay, so don't be too worried about yeah, about the details yet. Leave that full vita. Just going to get more of that in connect the South as well to the bridge. Okay? And what I'll do is just sort of and some connected beats on to the green sheen areas. Okay, I can add little bits of white coming through as well. That's really what you need. A bit more of the burnt sienna as well. It needs to come through for this bridge like that and move that yellow running down. The yellow as well. Like that. The side of the of the bridge is actually really live. I want to get rid of that. Just pulping some Naples yellow here. Really brought like that. Notice I'm also cutting around the boats. Okay. All right. Some of these breach trump anything like that, leaving some areas in as well for the for the fetus is some bit a lot and stuff going on in there. So here I am again just playing around with these yellows. And this section here. Getting that to mix in with the bridge is well just the bit of the yellow in there and it's another option lighter on. I can just dock and up that this whole area. But more importantly, the house beyond his building needs to be DACA and has to be a kind of a warm color as well. So I'm going ahead just doing that, getting them to do then getting into that world phi1. Okay. One of you that want joining an OH on, so that I'm not left with any hard edges. We've got to work quite quickly with these things. Even here, I'm going to draw pain that yellow straight away. Get that to mixing quickly and join onto the bottom as well, like these k and the top of these roof, it's pretty warm and brought as well. So that's drawing that on still with the stool bit of weight and width going on, on top. So that's an excellent strategy. Then popping a bit of gray at the bottom here. Gray that left-hand side down, and a bit of warmth as well, just some burnt sienna dropped into that side. Right? And decided the building is actually warm as well as quite a lot. And Sons catching off from that. So I'm going to join that on this, get that pretty broad color running through like that here. Then underneath to the left-hand side, we've just got this kind of bit of darkness coming through again so we can gray that down. Popping a bit of neutral tint like that as well. Bits and pieces here. These pose and things here I actually a lot, lot, but I don't want to miss out the feeling of this overall wash. Okay, so I'm going to put in a little bit of green, and this is a bit of sap green and mix it a little cerulean and day to dock in it. Just cutting around this boat and Essentially there's trees and things that I wanted to emphasize and letting it mix again with everything, okay. Coming down to the water as we just got to start mixing up a kind of turquoise color. So I've got a font, cerulean blue and a little bit of Naples yellow, just to know, Hansa yellow or something like that and mixed with some opaque white. It does the trick. Here, I'm just dropping in. Dropping in these color is quite opaque. And turquoise. Kyla linger around. Then. Where it connects on, you're going to get a sharp edge like that. That's okay. If it looks too we it afterwards I can always soften it. And having down like this. I just want to plot to this whole area with these we column and look at that. Some of that tree has already come down, started to make seem creating a little indication of a over a reflection of that tree. So that's one of the advantages when you're working wet into wet. Okay, so that's all sort of melted in nicely. Here's where I'm going to pick up another brush. So this is a number 10 round brush. And we are, we can pick up a bit of blue now and drop it in the blue. And then just the adding some darker bits of paint for the ripples and things in here. Oops, that's way too much. That's okay. Just try that. Now that looks she underneath the boat. And I'm here like that. Okay. Just a little strokes and things running through, doing its thing. All Winning Wit. And you have a nice pointy brush like this. It really gives you that control to be able to do this sort of work. In factories bridge has a bit of a shadow underneath which we are. We have to emphasize that later on. Well, maybe not keep that soft blended like that. And I'm not do the speed of that bridge at the same time as well since we've got a shadow underneath. So I'm going to try my best to getting breached just the darkness underneath it. What a shop area. So being very careful with it. Okay. I think that will better actually rather than having it all doing it Lego. So to shop shapes, I just wanted it to be more blended and look like it's all done in the same wash. So here I've just picked up the neutral tint. And here we go, just docking and beat underneath that bridge. Been under here as well. Okay. Two Trait, darkness there. And write and do the same for these boats like that. Okay, fantastic. Sec. Going to let the soul kind of start doing as well as putting a little color for the boats. So if I want some bright blue, for example, for this one, we're just going to get in and be that color and keep it lives as well. I wanted to also just see if I can get some of that blending to carry that weight and with blending so that it goes downwards into the water as well. We can change the color of this one can be kind of have some warmer time running through that. A bit more warmth. And it can be to walk through these 12 and just a light wash of smoothing in this one ruling anymore. And so the K is negative one work. I think I'll just do that we know as quickly as well. Dropping, dropping into columns and mixed downwards into the to the boat font. If you can paint anything went on to wet, it always is a good idea to if it's, you know, obviously looks like how you want it to look. Because it does create a different style. You have less control. But you have this fluidity in this unique quality you can only really get in watercolors. Say, why not? Use that? This boat here on the left-hand side throughly in stroke in this room and down the base. Yeah. I mean, you've got a bit of schooling years ago. Remembering to leave some white areas so important. Okay. All righty. And we'll leave this and give you the quick dry. Okay, this is all dry it off quite nicely. Now, the next step is really just starting to work on the shadows and joining everything onto each other, the shadows, even for the side of that bridge, we're going to need some detail there as well. So I'm going to mix up a bunch of grace for so I've got some sepia and let's drop in a bit of these kind of worn blue. This is a, I think it's ultramarine yet it's definitely ultramarine blue. And a bit of CPO, if you've got some burnt umber, you can drop that in as well. So we've got kind of a cooler blue on the other side. I'm going to drop in again a little bit of that sepia, maybe a bit of and the burnt sienna and a little bit of this blue as well. So we've got a more warmer gray here and be more blue in this one. I actually like that. So just cool it down a bit more. So you've got a cool gray. We've got a warm gray here. We've got bits of yellow and things like that over on that side, which is also important. So I'm going to drop in a bit of yellow into here. So we've got some warmth case, I need it. A lot of warmth. Okay, So I'm gonna start by going in to this area first. Let's drop in a bit of this gray. I'm going to go with that gray, actually, kind of a warmer gray. And start off here, it's actually DACA on this section. And then we've got to part of the roof that just sort of comes down like that in the shadow. So join that onto the shadow and start off putting a bit of detail for the rooftops like that. Don't have the color at all. We just leave some of it if you need. And coming down here like that. Detail their warehouse here. That just cutting around bits and pieces. Some of these, some just leaving with a bit of a highlight on the right-hand side, even though it's not really there in the reference photo. Okay? And at the same time, you can actually start putting in the little windows and things darker windows. And the reason why is so that you can get that same tone that you're using here on that right-hand side. So again, it's all about harmony, getting things to join it look like it's naturally. And mentor P there is lighter if you try to mix up the same bit of gray gain or if you go in light, it's just going to be a little bit harder. Also enjoins on little bit more in a fluid, sort of Nana as well. So this is a good option. Just putting in this dark B here, like that. Building some darkness there. Underneath. Okay. Great. Then just not in darkness here. The left side of the building. And remembering to do some of these cutting around as well. And if you're dropping a bit of warmth, if you feel like it's just getting too much joy. I felt kind of was I'm just dropped in a bit of that yellow bit of Naples yellow. We can put the yellow ocher as well. Okay. Here we go. These figures again, just cutting around some ears, fingers like that. Yeah. Bring this wash all the way down. We've got darkness here as well. So I'm just mixing more neutral tint into this section to get some maximum contrast like that here in the background. Okay? We'll also just start putting in bits of this building here in the background. Swapped to a smaller round brush. Gray in from the windows and bits and pieces here. And maybe gray here. That there's also just a kind of shadow, darkness around the sod there. Some hopping in a bit of doctors in that building. It's just kind of one of those, you know, it's caused by another building. Okay. So I didn't like that. It is shadowed whatever the structure is. Okay. But a lot for a lot of it, I just want to preserve that preserve that lovely yellow running through this. So not all too much overwhelming. And coming down as well for these bridge, this is a good time to start blending. And some of these areas above, down to the bridge as well. And I'm doing this very, very lightly to because I still want there to be a distinction between these background buildings and the bridge in France. So I just want it to flow on my crease and I think that does the trick. Up and add another layer of this is just a bit of burnt sienna underneath that bridge. Really feel it needs more warmth. And that kind of rich wolf underneath like that. 23. Venice Scene: Add the Shadows: I'm just going to mix that up and some more over the top there. Even on that left-hand side. Right. There we go. Join on to that again that reach the railing and things as well. We can just add some colors, a few little strokes up the top there. And again, start working on those buildings. We've got a bit of darkness here. Just go ahead and do that one. And then it's kind of a shadow being cast. And speaker two is, It's OK. Hey, darkness underneath here. There we go. That's one done. Too much soft and often areas. Then we can go this side here. So we've got a bit of darkness on this side of the building here and carry this alone and cut around the figures like that. And this goes all the way across to that left side. And just doing some cutting, jumping around these, these, uh, pillar as well. And we've also got these figures here in the foreground. To just hear that I want to leave in. Great. And of course we've got some on this side. Here. I've just picked up a little bit more of the brown sepia and Then Sienna. And we're going to go back and the speed of the side of the building that okay, It's gonna chicken which leads to chug around a little bit here that sticks out. So we'll leave that bit at the bottom, this little triangular area. Okay? And you know, cutting around like that. Then you can also start putting things in like this area here, the roof maybe just a tiny bit a colleague to join on to some areas. They even luke, What else can we do? Little things. They can offer, chimneys and stuff like that. We need to get some darkness in here as well. It'll be soft and K. And test stick. This building here in the front. I'm going to just dock and down a little bit, but you use more of a yellow base or it says something like luis. And trying to do this, receive just a few brushstrokes. And also to just emphasize these umbrella data by creating that darkness around it as well. Good option, always looks nicer that way. K coming further down here. And I'm going to draw in on some of these wash you previously. If we good and see if we can getting some steps and things. That's leaving a bit of that yellow thing that's always important to imply a shrewd the Tao and the son kind of catching off the steps. There's so many things in here and I'm not really pulled it to indicate what all that stuff is. Okay. We just want to essentially getting little gesture of what might be this. Again, I'm going to go over that a third time. But also dad here, I think I should landing this sort of walks and we've got a bit of darkness and ledge kind of illuminated like that to go leave, leave that bit. And this bit needs to be DACA. That okay. Darken up some of these trees here as well underneath emerald green or just a DACA, sort of green that you've used previously. To just gain some different variation colors, the foliage. Thinking also the bridge needs to be a little DACA, some more sienna in here. Because that doc underneath is really, really creating too much contrast. Okay, Let me go a little bit of color for the figures. I'm not jumping, jumping a bit of blues, yeah. And blue for this one. Then we might think about putting in some rate for that one and be more red there for that one, some pink in here for the other. Another figure. Just have a play around and adding some bits and pieces, just the papal potentially walking around in here. Change it around and then have some, have some fun. Okay, I'm keeping these quote, lot of gain. Wanted to overwhelm, drag these down like that. And soft enough, I just want to soften off some of these colors as well so they don't just stick out, but they still kind of blend into the Bridge. Little too. We can get the highlights in light of who these figures, but it's really just getting in some suggestions of shapes and bodies and toss those things. Are that people walking around here? I think that's important. Okay, great. All right. We'll leave that all to draw and finish it off in a final wash. Okay, The final bit of this painting we're going to put in all the darkest of dots, Oh, the finishing touches. So we're talking about things like Windows. We're going to put in the figures. We're going to put in these DACA pose bit of color through some of the windows. So really you can start anywhere you like. For me, I'm going to actually start putting in a bit of the color for the windows. Because I know this is a bit of time to dry and also want to add a shadow, the shadow underneath the window. So I think a little bit of coloring here would be nice to begin with. So just setting some cerulean blue, just a lot wash of that blew through here. Nothing out of the ordinary. For the sides. I'll just dropping a bit of a dark gray. Maybe some neutral tint actually would be better here. Neutral tint. And here's well, yeah. Sort of while the paint is still wet and I'm doing its thing. Little bits of indications on the top here as well for the roof. And let's move further down here. The umbrellas actually have a bit of darkness on the sum of these folds underneath like that. Just adding a bit of that darkness to emphasize and bring up a lot on the top of those on Brothers. Interestingly, once you put in a lot of these doc, beats and paces, the rest of the painting then starts to unfold before you. So that's what I'm doing. I'm just adding a few more lines, bits and pieces in here. Okay. Who knows what the stuff is really, I mean, I'm not really too fast Exactly. It's could be a little store here, for example. Anything. So tiny bit of this. This is just sepia putting that on to these holes because they need to be kind of wooden. Column is going to be to that through there. Hey, there anymore, There's a few more here. So we want to use a back here. Couple of years. Well, so just dropping in Libya that data. Okay. Now it comes time to just thought, going into the buildings in the dock, bits and pieces in here. So this is some neutral tint off picked up and going in here with a smaller brush to bring out some of the darkness within these windows and that kind of thing. I'm taking a bit of time here as well. I'm not spending a huge amount of time, but still keeping within those lines as well, but keeping the strokes, brushstrokes still pretty loose it too. And I kiss, match the style of the rest of the painting because you don't want an area that's too detailed and if you notice, I'm not even coloring in all the windows exactly. I'm just sort of picking bits and pieces in them and making sure at least the edges slightly more defined, still rectangular in shape, but not too dark. I want this to stay cat is enough in there. So the reads properly. Okay. These little bits and pieces on top here can just simplify them down like that. We got here, we've got a couple of sides like that. We've got this is actually a doc, a kind of shadow running towards the side here. Call it any more like that. Underneath the roof for maybe good to have a little shadow or something running, then they just share some of the separations and benefit. Do this now as well. We can write into light at once all of this stuff in the windows have dried. This side here. I just want to put in a little stroke like that. And it does help when you have a bit of a cooler Kala as well running in these sections. So there's no areas of balconies and things like that. And that you can also draw pin. Okay. To move these windows He just an doc and then Dan, a little mole, create more contrast. And the lot wash of color here. Just a shade like that. Chimney, chimney. Now the beat here on the side of that building. A little. Riga is also a good tool to use to just popping some small strokes kinda running across to indicate the tiles. This is going to, how well this is going to work, but we can just scoot these kind of thing, even turn the brush on the side to pulping, little kind of mocks. Running costs of the roof. This just show the direction of the toms, something like that. Okay. Very lot. Very, very light. Because you want to keep that warmth of that building as well. Let's just shows the direction of the tiles and implies a bit of texture. You can even do it on the side of the buildings to acquire some little texture. In this 10, the brush on the side and just sort of do this, usually with a darker paint as well. Just something like that in air so that it just looks a bit more weathered. The notice in some areas of the building, it is these pretty wet. So it's a quick way to to add a little bit of that in there and talk and down this area he had behind this building. Forgotten to just need to create a bit more contrast. Oh good. It's been a join that onto this area here. One-to-many hot edges, especially down the section. And then nicely. Any of the docs you want to dock and further, this is really your chance to do so. Some of this stuff down the front as well. I'm making it daka. Daka because it's closer to the front. So if we make the back to dock, a lot of this stuff here would be and we wouldn't be able to get it to the right raw sort of times. So sort of save the doc hist of old docs to be at the front. Oops, that's a bit too much. People kinda be the shadow, something like that on the sides of those pose and maybe bit more darkness here as well. On that left-hand side of the bridge. You, the names I sort of carries along there. K is work on some of this building now and darkness and the windows, it will resynthesis of that. And even bits and pieces sort of coming out in the background. I don't want to think I've got to be careful with that. And some texture here on this building. And this is one here as well. Little bit of line work running down. That's more interests to the roof areas. Hello, darkness in some of the windows here. And just try to add more data, how he ended up being more darkness. Some sections of the window underneath to the side. And we're matching. Just dock and ran an umbrella mole K. And it's full of figures. I'm just using a little quash to see if I can bring out highlights and things of people walking and around. That kind of thing. Just some white goulash. And we can mix that in some other colors as well to warm it down, to cool it up, that kind of thing. I just want to create various gestural figures in here. Sort of walking around. Maybe it makes a bit of red in it to that. And this bridge has some bits of white in it, but I'm not really going to put it completely wide. It's just going to be literal goulash, watered-down goulash. And this will draw it off to be pretty. I notice that whole hopes anyway. Just to provide a very slight variation, running through that branch coming down that right-hand side as well. I don't want it to pop too much. The great thing about using some of these wash, which is a kind of a, has a bluish tinge to it. It now adds a bit of an oppositional colors. So now we've got all these wolf everywhere in it and we just want to have something that's a bit lata and Coola. And here you can even use it to regain some little marks on the paper. Like this. Just some ripples or things on the water. Don't overdo it. Just a few hearing aid. Does the tree again helps to bring out in these nice bridge of it more as well. Okay? Wanting other bits, this 100 doc and down on these figures. But essentially we are almost done. I'll put a few little strokes for the roof here as well, just kinda coming up in that direction. And we'll matches and that it's up to you can pop up in some birds as well. And I think I'll call that one finished. 24. Venice Tower: Painting Steps: Okay, So I'm gonna talk a little bit about the sketch. And essentially what I've done, I've taken a really large reference photo was more landscape and I've chopped down into a more portrait style piece. And the reason why these, I just like the composition of it better. I could have brought in and out and had a whole load of other data here. But I wanted to focus more on this tau here in the center and just the beauty of this bridge, some of the water here. So I popped in the main details, the main focus points, I would say the buildings here on the left, you've got the towel here where there'll be a bit of contrast between the sky and the Tao. Also the shadows here on the right-hand side of the building. So you've kind of got the light source coming from the left to right. So really just put these details in my own time. I went over this with a bit of pencil beforehand and also just dock and the roots down a little bit with a tiny bit of hatching. Put some figures in here, the bottom as well. So I'm going to get started on painting it. First thing we'll do is we're gonna get in the sky. So I'm going to be picking up, Let's have a little woo, grab a mop brush and I'm going to pick up slowly and blue. So just mix this up on the palette here. Trump admitting to the sky. And I'm just going to move this around a bit. And we want it to be pretty light. Not too dark, but just have enough contrast essentially so that the buildings will stick out a little bit. Okay, so just moving my way down the page here and cutting around the areas of the buildings. Now, sometimes you might want to pick up something like a little flat brush to help you in certain areas if you feel that just gives you a bit more control. So maybe if you want to chop around the side of this tablet like that, that's sort of kits you crisp edge. What fasta really important, essentially just not to touch the buildings because we've got a lot more kind of warmer colors running through those beauties. And you want that contrast. So I'm going to go through that part first. We'll just shop around this section here to the left. Little bit of paint. Just dropping a little dark and paint running through the sky. Just cutting around some bits of the roof like this. Okay. I don't have to be careful, but I just wanted to leave enough that Watson that we can get some warmer colors on the tower. Okay. So urinate, it's going to be a lot easier. I'm just going to go through like this and bring that washed down the page. Flat brush is actually a lot easier with the flat brush to get a generally consistent wash your hands down and I'll do half the paper completely flat here as well. So this cutting around the rooftops like that. Remember the towel here as well. It's little bit harder as you come to the smallest sections, and it really depends on how small your bit of peccaries. Okay, so that is looking good to me. Now what I'm gonna do is we're going to just pop into some of the buildings and add in a bunch of colors and get them to kind of melting a little bit. So for that, I'm actually going to start with a couple of round brushes. I've got a number eight round brush here, which I'm going to use to pick up some Naples yellow. To begin with. It's just truck that bit of yellow here and the sun and needed to be pretty light. And let's just go into this building here first. Tiny bit of cutting around the windows as well, but we're not going to be too pedantic. We fed now. And what I wanna do is, well, it's just getting this right-hand side of the building and go over it with a bit of a cooler color, lighter on. But we just want to get a real basic wash of these Knight who was yellow in first, just a warmer color coming through. Just the pope some over here on the Lots of side of the building, you know, taking a bit of just cutting around the window frames as well. I've just got a beautiful leftover paints on this brush which I'm tronic, get rid off so that I can pick up some more. The snake was yellow. Really gotta be careful with Tom's, you mix up some paint and it stays on the brush for your next painting. So going through again and look, I think I'm going to go through the entire top section as well. So just the spot here. And there might be a tiny bit of blending the sky. And I'm not so concerned with that. We just going to want to get it in a really bright. So Washington Naples yellow in there. And you'll notice that it is also a bit of a it is a tiny bit. How would you say? And you will notice also the night with yellow is Naples. Yellow is a little bit opaque as well. Just going to put in a light wash of blue on the top of this tower, get that the blending like that. And he said The Kula up the top. Okay. You notice some areas of the paint sort of spreading into the sky. I'm going to bother. It's just leave it to do it's to do its thing. And another thing you could do, you can dropping a bit more blue into that section, that kind of thing in here. I'm not Foster. Just want to keep this nice and fresh. Some more yellow here. The top, this little rooftop liver. Here's Well, just looking for areas and we're giving it a really light wash. Okay. So any area that you think has this sort of yellowish color, just drop that in if you don't have Naples yellow, just mix a bit of white quash in with a lemon yellow and you should get a similar sort of color. So just a creamy yellow color, to be honest. So here we go. We're just working our way through this building here and the right to make that. And another thing I wanna do is just pop in a bit of this, a little bit of burnt sienna. Grab that off the pallet. Anybody burnt sienna? Drop that into the rooftops as well? In some areas. Yeah. Little bit at this towel that we can use to lift off some paint like that if it gets into the sky. So not a 100 percent necessary or of that comma. Just a just a little bit of burnt sienna keeping lot and loud to just blend, do its thing. There's a bit of mixing going on in areas. Just let it be. Okay. So here we got going down the page here. I'm just going to add in a tiny bit of this Naples yellow, and it's also dial down with some of the grays and stuff here on the palette. So it's just a little bit darker in some areas, I'm trying to vary the color in here, okay, so that it's not all the same. Yellow. And K. These little bits and pieces, these little bits of roofs on the top, the bottom here as well. I'm going to add a tiny bit of this brown. And you get a brown from here, just getting some color like that, even underneath that go in here as well. Okay. Fantastic. Darkness under there. And just get it a bit more yellow here. I like that. The idea is just tronic. Get some of these colors to blend. Blend a bit more with each other. It's just one big wash of colors and nothing overly complex. I'm going to put in some orange here as well, just some running through these building. And it's actually color that's coming through the left-hand side too. So another bit of orange here for these building. Okay? And then what we're gonna do is hold the rooftops. Just going to pick up a little bit of a brownish color. This is just some sienna with a bit of blue and yellow. Drop that in. I said it just mixes and notes in nicely like that. Maybe doesn't trick and just saying that these little buildings here on the right-hand side, maybe just more orange to orange color for these rooftops. That's just a lie. Wash running over the top like this. And maybe beautiful neutral tint on that right-hand side of these taus. A great grade down like that and indicate a bit of shadow. So I'm just going to go through the roof tops again. We're going to pick up more of these sort of burnt sienna. Trump that in to the rooftops, in just bits and pieces in areas really get that the Connect go together. Like that. Even this peak here that needs to be Doc and down. And I'll pick up the paint a little section of the tally here. Just confining or the Naples yellow. Drag that through. Great. What else we might need to do? The bridge, it's an interesting kind of car I think I'm just going to get it in with the night was yellow and maybe a little blue in there as well, just to cool it down on the ages and have it kind of note backing to yellowish color. I can pick up a bit of yellow ocher as well here. Think that would be good. Join that onto the cone is like that. Okay. Maybe guy and a bad. And what I'll do is stop putting in the colors for these building. And I'm going to just grab a bit of this brownish color, drop that in here. This is just some what would you call it a bit of burnt sienna as we use Good Fall and kinda just trumpet into the roof top. Simply like that. Okay. I think just to get some color through that and and we're going to do is just pick up some orange paints and pretty, pretty broad orange paint. And I'm just going to drop that straining so that it mixes with a rethink. And we got a bit of smooth blending here. That okay, So this will be pretty much one of the contrasting, the most contrasting areas of the painting, just with all these orange in here. And obviously we've got all these blue in the sky. And it's a very nice sort of complimentary sort of mix. You can also mix in a little bit of yellow ocher in a, if you'd like. I'm interested, go, go over these slides. So you have the shadows on top of the orange bit lighter. That okay. Maybe come through and take your time, cut around bit more orange coming down. And this wall down the bottom is actually in yellow, ocher sort of color. Slash Naples, yellow is so I'm going to yellow this. Would it be more yellow in there like that? Get that to mixing and blend with the bridge area like that. Despite adding some paint straight in there. And really letting it sort of mixing and do its thing. Okay. I'm fantastic. So little bit of gray here. This is just to put a bit of blue and he had really cool gray, which is essentially just the neutral tint with the Silurian, blue or ultramarine in here, like that, just really top part of these shade. We can also start putting in a lot Washington this color into the window areas. Just to get that started for the lighter, probably going to have to dock in it more anyway. Just getting a bit of that mixture running through there. These good idea. And then I can go over it a bit lighter. So they are more windows here in this song. I'm just going to drop that color through around here. I just want to get in a little bit of darkness as well. So I'm just picking up the same kind of gray color, dropping it in here. And underneath, especially the rooftops like that, that it do its thing. And you pick up a smaller round brush is well, yeah. And if you've got a bit of a shop age and areas and just, just dabbing the paper, pick up a bit of that paint. And it can think of some, some sap green here would be nice for the indication of these plants. Are things running through here. And just drop that in like that. And we're going to move down to the color as well. Sorry, we're going to move down to the foreground now. So I'm just going to pick up again this ruling in blue that we used earlier, but this is going to have to be really dark at the back, just like in the reference photo. So I'm just darkening down some areas like fat in the back. And some of these good to have another brush to just sort of spread out that paint as well. I'm just talking down that area. I've added in a couple of buds here too. And I'm going to get the water in first. And then I'm going to go on the boat, hafta, be some woman column. Hopefully. Just dropping that what I'm going to need it. I'm going to mix a bit of Naples yellow in here so that I can mix up a kinda turquoise color for the water with a greenish color to the chord AC motor across. Just know and I can use the smaller round brush to do this because the way we see this bit of paper, I'm using his enemy, its think it's about an A5 sized section here. Go ahead and poke it a bit of color. They're spread that across this entire section all the way down to the bottom. Okay? Once you've done the great little trick here, is to start adding in some darker strokes of paint. So I'm just picking up a bit of neutral tint. That's already got some blue on it. And I'm just dropping that in so that I can get beautiful texture at the bottom. These ripples in the wave suppose very, very lot repos going over the top and especially the bottom. Just DACA. Darken that up at the border than little bit. It doesn't have to be all the way through just areas, especially in the front and down the back as well, where we just wanted to indicate some more darkness out there. That's what I'm doing. So that's about the first wash done. So we'll leave this to dry and then get to the second one. Okay, moving on to the second step now we're going to just pop in some shadows over the top of the right-hand side of some of these buildings, going to add all the dark colors essentially. So I've got myself here, but you can use routines, and I'm mixing it with some ultramarine blue here in the palette. So I'm just going to get a kind of cool and you can shadow. And it's mainly consisting of just neutral, neutral tint. Any kind of dark a color will do the trick. I don't want to completely blue though. I wanted more to be grayish sort of color with a blue bias. So I can grab some of that paint in the moment. So that looks about the right consistency, sort of a midtone there. And let's just go for, so dropping that into that right-hand side of the building. And I'm using a small flat brush here to do this. And I'm going to smooth to cut around the top of the roof. And with this sides like vase, I'm just taking a bit of time to make sure that the just nice and crisp and I'm getting these and getting getting properly. And I always mix up some darker paint if you feel like it's not the right kind of consistency. And that's looking okay, good. And a bit here as well. That right-hand side and carrying out all the way down can always just get these with one single brushstroke like that. Running down the side of exaggerated this side of the building. And what more than in the actual reference photo. We can then go in and start doing things like some of these shadows on the rooftops being caused by these structures on the roofs of these little Adi carries a suppose. So just a bit of darkness running to the right-hand side, underneath me. Some sections of the buildings to Lima beans that color on these gonna do You good. Just a little bit of indication to have a look over in the side. Water that down mourns too strong. A bit of shadow like that. That was a bit too strong for these pots and that's okay. More water through here. It's kind of around these consistency on like I'm doing here. Just a very, very lot wash of it in some areas that you think would benefit from some kind of a shadow area. Okay. Good bit of color. And really we're just finding any areas of darkness. And we're putting in a bit of color in a bit of this darker, darker, cool color that's running over the top and having these cool color because we've got a lot of warm colors running through the painting. And by having a certain sense of coolness through here, it's going to contrast and create a lot more vibrancy than if you just went over with a warm gray, for instance. That's what I'm doing here. Just taking my time to darken up some of the areas, maybe some of the windows, perhaps we can go ahead and add in a little wash over the top. Like that. Hi. Doesn't have to be much at all. Okay, you just find areas of shadow. So even here, for instance, we can exaggerate this. It can be shown that this building here, we can think our dock in it down a little bit. The towel there. And you've got Windows and that sort of stuff here as well. So just having a bit of fun with some of these Kula Kala, running three areas. Even queue down the bottom. I'm going to add in a bit around these figures as well. And around the bridge. Because we've got these very warm colored bridge here. And you can just dry brush a little bit of the blue on as well in areas to imply some of the texture that bridge. I find that's always a good idea. Just dry brushing, using the Saudi of brush on enters that you want texture, say for instance in, so what I'm doing here with the rooftops. So it's probably one of the pika, warmer color, like a greenish color. And then just do this. A bit of texture on the roofs that I'm going to add some shop and looking waves here, the bottom to just a few little dry brush trucks running through over the top. You barely be able to see them once the paints dry. But I feel like I just needed to know. Bit more darkness down the bottom and some texture to the water as well. I'm going to keep on going as far as you want with these the boats. I haven't painted a color. So again, we can just go in and choose whatever you'd like for these boats. I think I'll go with a tiny bit of throughly in for this one. I'm using this one. Yeah. This one because it's next to the rate of the UN has been a blue, really light wash of blue. And this one on the rod, I think I'll go with purple. Go to dial that down to bid water it down. I mean, maybe go. And just a very light wash over the top. That does the trick. Is tau here doesn't look at be sticking out of it. So I'm just adding a bit of texture on there like that. And really all we have left to do is adding a little bit of detail for the windows, but even that's not a 100 percent necessary, just teeny bit like that. Texture on the bridge. In some areas, blending it with the water. A little bit more like that. And then if he's thinking this other kind of shadow areas, you might want to just adding more darkness on the here like that. And what else have we got some shadows sort of running over to that right-hand side, like that. Part of the window, to the shadow and something costs over that side as well. Let's think what else do we have? Maybe some shadows in here as well, because it is quite dark in this section. So just go with darkish shadow running across that rooftop in here. And I cool it down the bottom here. Doc. And as we get to the bottom, these figures and stuff, and the figures aren't always, you can't barely can see them here, but you can just add in specks of color and personality theory here. A bit of green to yellow, a bit kind of bluish color there. Just have some fun and pick up some colors that you feel make you happy. And just put them in to indicate some, some small figures and things, people just moving across the bridge. If you don't want it to be so broad, just again, pick up a bit of neutral tint or a bit of gray and just touch that in so that we can pull that color down in areas as well. So from that, I think we're just about finished dropping a few middle indications of some birds. And that in the sky. Especially near is where I've accidentally dripped a bit of paint. And it's always a good way to disguise. Paint drips. And this is also a great way to break up the skies will hang around the tau, which just have a few moral around the tower like that. And testing. And we are finished. 25. Class Project: For the class project referred to the pen sketching techniques, videos, and sketch to move the featured landscapes and pen. You can also refer to the drawing templates. We simplify the details to basic lines and elements, which you can then use the trace. If you want to improve your pen drawing skills, it's important to complete freehand sketch for each landscape same. This also provides you with an opportunity to practice composing, and planning your painting. If you finish the 12 minute scapes featured in this class, pick a royalty-free photographs or perhaps one of your own landscape photographs. And using the processes and techniques described in this class, create your own unique painting. Finally, upload your painting. If you have any questions or would like some feedback on your work, let me know and I'll get back to you.