Ukulele For Beginners | Start Playing the Uke Today! | Steve Burnside, MBA | Skillshare

Ukulele For Beginners | Start Playing the Uke Today!

Steve Burnside, MBA

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22 Lessons (1h 9m)
    • 1. Some Uke Excitement!

      0:36
    • 2. Get The Most out of the Course

      1:50
    • 3. Key Uke Terms

      2:08
    • 4. Strings Names and Tuning

      3:45
    • 5. Choosing a Uke

      3:59
    • 6. Strumming the Uke

      3:11
    • 7. Fretting

      3:12
    • 8. Your First Chord! The "C"

      1:48
    • 9. Second Chord Coming Up, The "Am"

      2:16
    • 10. Another First... Your First Chord Pregression

      1:34
    • 11. A Quick Strumming Overview

      3:11
    • 12. Quarter Note Strum

      3:13
    • 13. Eighth Note Strum

      2:50
    • 14. Combining Quarters and Eighths

      3:12
    • 15. Chukkas!

      2:02
    • 16. Reading Chord Charts

      1:30
    • 17. The "F" Chord

      2:21
    • 18. The "G" Chord

      3:31
    • 19. Chord Review and Song Overview

      1:23
    • 20. Play a Song! Blowing in the Wind

      5:35
    • 21. Let's Play Let It Be

      5:31
    • 22. Brown Eyed Girl (What Ever Did Happen?)

      10:47
12 students are watching this class

About This Class

Start Playing Ukulele Today!

I have one goal in this course, and that is to get you playing Ukulele fast. Even if you have never played an instrument in the past, you will find yourself strumming chords and playing music in no time.

By the end of this course, you will be playing 3 iconic songs including Let it Be, Brown Eyed Girl and Blowing in the Wind.

Throughout This Course You Will Learn:

  • How to choose a Ukulele

  • How to tune a Ukulele

  • The Different Types of Ukuleles

  • The Must-Know Beginner Chords

  • Strumming Patterns

  • How To Play a Chord Progression

  • How To Read Chord Charts

  • and so much more!

So don't wait, the joy of music is right on the other side of the sign-up button.

Transcripts

1. Some Uke Excitement!: it is time for you to learn how to play an instrument, and that instrument is ukulele. One. My favorite things about you clearly is how accessible it is from my six year old son to my 100 year old grandparent's. Everybody can play ukulele, and I am here to teach you the foundations so that you can start playing ukulele today. During this course, you're gonna learn everything you need to know to start playing ukulele from your foundational chords and strumming patterns, toe full songs like Let It Be, Brown Eyed Girl and Blowing in the Wind. I know once you take this course, you're gonna love playing ukulele. So what are you waiting for? Let's get started. 2. Get The Most out of the Course: Welcome to the ukulele crash course. I'm your instructor, Stevie B. The goal of this course is simple. Get you to play ukulele as quickly as possible. As part of the core curriculum, you're gonna learn three awesome songs, including Let It Be by the Beatles Brown That Girl by Van Morrison and Blowing in the Wind by Peter Paul and Mary made famous Bob Dylan. Right? So those songs you're gonna have in your pocket to play you are going to be playing ukulele . It's gonna be awesome. So a couple things to get the most out of this course one, it is helpful to have a ukulele. Obviously, if you need help choosing a ukulele, I would recommend you go to my resource is page at the ewg lounge dot com slash resource is there. I have links to all sorts of great beginner ukulele is while you're there, you can also sign up for my newsletter. So you get ukulele lessons straight to your inbox and make sure you check out my YouTube page where I'm always posting ukulele lessons. Those types of things are the things you're gonna want coming into your life so that you always are progressing on the ukulele, something else to keep in mind. As I always recommend keeping notes. It's always great to write down what you're learning, and something else is. When we get to the song section, I will always show you the cords before the song. So if you're looking ahead at the course list and you're worried that you're not gonna memorize all the cords, don't worry. I make it so you don't have to flip back and forth between the cord lesson and the song lesson. We put it all in one for you and finally, finally is make sure you make any comments. Let me know what other songs and lessons you would like me to go over, and we can add that to the bonus curriculum. In this course. I hope you found this course super helpful, Super useful. And hey, we'll see you in the first lesson 3. Key Uke Terms: So first thing we should do here is talk about the different parts of the ukulele. Now, if you've had any experience, plane and you just really taking this course to increase your knowledge, your feel free to skip over section one. But it's important we're all on the same page. So as I hold the ukulele, we're gonna go over a couple of the key terms that you're gonna hear throughout this course , and they're going to understand what they mean. So this is a ukulele. This is actually a tenor ukulele and in a couple courses or in a couple classes where I'm gonna tell you the difference between the different types of ukulele. Um, this section here is the body. So the body of the ukulele is comprised of the top, which is this piece of wood here. The sides, which is the piece of these pieces of wood and the back. So it makes sense, right? Top, back and sides connected to the body is the neck in action. This is the neck part of it. And then on top of the neck, you can actually see there's a different kind of atonality of the wood here. This is the fretboard. Now you'll see. There's little metal parts right there. Those are called frets. Those are going to be a sense, really, really important because we're talking about how to play chords. I'll say something like Play the First string and the string zehr numbered from from the one closest to the floor to the one closest to the ceiling. 123 and four. So I might say, Play the first room on the third fret. So what you're gonna do is count 123 and you're gonna play that right there. So the frets are markers that indicate where your fingers are supposed to go on top of the neck. Then we have the head stock, this little white pieces called the nut. And that's where the strings go through connected. The strings go through tuning keys, those air, those little guys. You turn these to make the string. You put the string in tune and they go down and they connect to the bridge. And that is the basic components of a ukulele 4. Strings Names and Tuning: So the next thing we want I want to do is make sure our ukulele is in tune. Now. The tuning of ukulele is G C E A. And that means G is the string closest to the ceiling C E. And then a Is that that first ring or the one closest to the floor? Now, with most ukulele you'll find, especially sitting in a music store, the G string is considered a high G, so we play this real quick. Eso that's G C. And you can hear the G is actually a high G so tonally it is higher then that see if you played guitar her guitar, you'll know that that is actually an uncommon thing. So if we go from the sea so normally goes higher or lower to higher tonality, so ukulele is a little bit different. That's how you get that great yuk sound. You will see ukulele out there that are called low gi ukulele is, and that's where that G string is. Actually a thicker strength and tonality wise will sound lower than the sea, so it'll sound more like a classic strained instrument, like a guitar or base, something like that. So then the question is, now that you know what the names of the strings are, how do you get them in tune? Well, there's a couple different ways, but I would recommend an electronic tuner, so there's a bunch of different tuners out there. You can actually download one on your phone. Just search the APP store, whether you have android or IOS for ukulele tuner and all their essentially going to do if you're gonna play the string and it's going to tell you if you're sharp or flat, so if you're flat, you need to tighten the string and you're gonna turn the tuning key to tighten it. And if you're sharp, you need to flatten the string or loosen the string. And what were essentially trying to do is make sure this strange that a certain tension to produce a certain sound that says that all tuning really is. There's also things like clip on tuners that you might buy that can clip onto the head stock of your ukulele, and we'll show you, uh, what string is into and out of tune. So now we've gone over that. Let me show you how to tune your ukulele. Okay, this might look a little awkward, but I've attached a tuner. This is ahead. Stock tuner made my snark. This is one my favorite ones. You can get links to. Everything we talked about as well as other resource is that I use at the resource guide at the ewg lounge dot com slash resource is. And once you clam Jack, com slash resource is And this tuner just attaches to the head sock of your ukulele, You're going to strum a string, and it's going to tell you if the string needs to be adjusted at all. Now, I have intentionally put these strings a little bit out of tune so you can see how it works . So let's go ahead and do the G. And you could see that those red lines are only going about 1/3 up. Some things I need to tighten it. You see that green line pop up when it's in tune? There we go. Perfect. What a scene e It needs a little sharp. You see that yellow? So we'll bring it back down. No. Yeah, way Go Nice and into Yeah, 5. Choosing a Uke: So if you're choosing your first ukulele the most one of the most important things to consider is the size of the ukulele. Uh, and there's really three really popular sizes, which is soprano concert tenor, and there is also baritone. Now, when you talk about soprano concert and tenor, those are all going to be in the same tuning, which is what we're doing this course. And so the sea six tuning the baritone can actually you'll see those tune to say G six. So most of the theory would apply. You just be playing different chords. Now most of you don't even need to remember what I just said. Let's get on to choosing here ukulele. So this is like I said, a tenner. So this is really the biggest size of kind of what you would call the traditional or the standard size. Ukulele is one of the things. One trick that I've always used in choosing the ukulele is when you hold it in your standing up. If you're not using a strap, when you put it against your arm, your arm comes over, you're you're gonna learn that we're gonna strum with our fingers right And so we want our fingers to hit the ukulele, right kind of above the sound hole. So this is that whole right there is called the Sound hole because that's what we're going to get really the biggest thickest tone. So I strum that. See, it sounds really, really fool right there. Now, if I started down here, you see, it gets really been. So if I'm playing the ukulele where my hand naturally falls back further back, I'm gonna get a thinner sound. So that's something to keep in mind when you're choosing a ukulele and literally just go size. Why Sopranos the smallest Okay, concert and then tenor. And so we have right here. Ah, concert. This is actually my son's ukulele. Um, and there's definitely a little bit of difference. Hopefully, you can see that we can see this one's a little bit smaller, and it's a little bit shorter. You see that kind of line? The next. Up there, you can see it kind of falls a little bit a little bit shorter than we have the next of the head socks lined up up top here of talk so you can see the little bit smaller. And even if I put this one down real fast, even as I hold it, you can tell it looks smaller on my body than the other one looks. And so that's, you know, for him, this is a better size ukulele. Now, something else to consider is that you do get a different sound out of the different types of ukulele. Is the smaller the body size. Typically, the mawr trouble in mid response. So the kind of the higher it's gonna sound, Um, and so you just might like that sound better and that's okay. I mean, I like playing this ukulele every once in a while. It's a fun little guy to play, and it does give me a little bit different sound than the tenor that tends to have a little bit more bass response in those low mids because there's more room for the air to move around in the body. So if you're going out there looking for a ukulele, especially as a starter ukulele, I would recommend sticking with either soprano concert or tenor. If you go to a guitar store, you pick him up, see which one feels the best of where your hands land on that. I'm 5 10 and you know, the tenor fits me really, really well. So it's something to keep in mind if you're gonna buy one online. What's gonna have links to all sorts of different ukulele is that you can check out at our resource is guy. The u clamp dot com slash resource is, but you can definitely, you know, hear the difference between the different ukulele is you'll see. I mean, if you watch ukulele videos on YouTube, these that's not a hard, fast rule about where your hand lands on the ukulele. You'll see much bigger guys than me playing much smaller ukulele is than this. So that's the general differences, and we'll go ahead and get onto next the next class. 6. Strumming the Uke: the next part here. We're gonna talk about learning how to strum your You go lately, and during this course, we're gonna talk about two basic methods. These are not the only two methods. These are just the two methods that we're going to talk about here. One of them is You're gonna take your ukulele, you're gonna hold it. You might be sitting down. You might be standing up once again, We're gonna put the ukulele kind of against our arm and Lena arm over. That's what's gonna hold it in place and we're going to. And right now, I'm just going what's called Mute the strings. I'm gonna lightly put my hand over the strings so you don't really get any sound there. And I just showed you what the first strum is going to be. So we're going to use our thumb. So in this strum, we're going to use our thumb. Teoh, brush the strings. Okay, so I just want you to practice that Grab a ukulele if you have one in, mute the strings and just practice gently and evenly brushing your thumb over the strings. Good. And you count 123 or and What we're looking for is an even nice clean strung across the street. Okay, let's get a little closer so you can see that. So I'm just evenly rushing the strings with my okay. Now the second thing or the second stronger Ronnie uses with our finger with our pointer finger specifically. Okay, now there's a couple different methods to this. Some people do just, like, kind of leave their pointer finger open and free. I do tend because of my guitar playing background. Teoh kind of pinch my my thumb in my pointer finger together. But either way, the goal is to get once again. That's nice, even strum. And we're really using the nail, you know, your pointer finger nail to strum across the strings. Case that one to you. 341 Teoh pre pork A little closer you can get that. So one to you. And so really that ever between those two strums I mean one. There's obviously mechanical differences, but to with the thumb you're using the flesh of your thumb to strum with the finger you're using the nail. So you're actually gonna get different tones with those two different types of strums the thumb is gonna be a more mellow tone because you're using the flesh of your finger. So we're going to get the and if I'm using my finger, I might get. You can hear it's a little more. There's a little more attack there. There's a little more high end. It's not a subdued. So practice those two strums and what you really just need to do is get used to strumming the instrument. OK, get usedto having your fingers hit those strings. We are going to do a combination of the two of those two strums at some point words, you know, down, up with the finger, things like that. But using your finger and your thumb to strum the ukulele is the goal of this lesson. So go ahead, grab. You clearly get used to that, and I'll see in the next lesson 7. Fretting: So now that you have strumming down, what we have to do next is work on fretting. So this is the front hand for me. I'm right handed. So my left hand is my friend hand and the goal here is to press down on a string as close to the fret which is that metal piece is possible. And what's essentially happening is if you look at the side of the ukulele, the string is a certain length, right? So this string at this length produces a certain tone, right? And so if we're gonna look at this the string closest to the ground, the first ring, that's an A Okay, now, if I can shorten this string, I'm going to produce a different tone. A different sound. Now, if I put my finger on the third fret right. So me, right there, Okay. And I pressed down on the string. It's going to produce a different sound, okay? And that see the difference in changing the string length by three frets on the a string is it produces a see. Now this goes into musical alphabet in some music theory which we're really not going to get into in this course. Once again, I would recommend if you go to the resource is paid, you can sign up for my newsletter on my YouTube channel. We go much more into that. Since this course is really a crash course and getting you to play ukulele. We don't go really deep into the music theory part of it. But that is why fretting works because you're essentially changing the length of the string to produce a different sound. So when you fret a string you wanted to sound nice and clean, you don't want to sound muted like this, okay, and so you're gonna have to work on. It's really because you clearly it's nylon string, and the strings aren't real long. It's not that difficult to press down on it, which is why it's great for all ages. But I want you to practice slowly, putting your finger down on the on the string and see how much pressure you need to put before you get that nice, clean sound. So we would. There it is right there. You can actually, if you press too hard, you can actually change the string a little bit. Mawr, Because if you think about impressed you are. You might even tighten the string a little bit extra, and you'll be what's called sharp. Um, but if you get that just right pressure and you'll, you'll hear it and feel it. And that is fretting. So if I said Let's play the third string first fret like we talked about. The strings are numbered one through four, so low closest to the ground to the ceiling, so you'd go to the third fret. So our third string 123 and the first fret right there. And then we would play that, and that is the basics of Freddie. 8. Your First Chord! The "C": Well, it is time for you to learn officially your first court on ukulele. I'm super excited. So here's what we're going to do. We're gonna take our ring finger of our friend in hand, or in a place that on the third fret of the first strength, that's it, that is, on ukulele, a C chord. So let's go ahead and strum that give you a close up look of that in. What we're doing is we're playing pressure on the back of the neck with our thumb and then and not a lot of pressure. You don't put a lot. You really should just. That should be just enough pressure for you to get enough strength on that string to fred it down and make sure it sounds good. So that's the See you now what I want you to do to practice that it's one thing to be able to put your finger on that front and play it over over again. It's another thing to build. Take your finger off the front and put it back on. So to practice this, what I want you to do is put your finger on that third fret for strength. Strum Teoh three and take your finger off and then just strum all the strings open with open where nothing's being fretted and then come back and keep doing that over and over again until you can get used to that finger coming on and off and making the C chord. And there you go, your first chord. The Sea Court on ukulele. 9. Second Chord Coming Up, The "Am": So now that you know one chord, what good is one chord without another? So let's learn a second chord. This court is the A minor court. So a minor chord. You're going to sound a little sadder in general. So a major court, what you just one was a c major on those are going to be happier, brighter cords. You would learn more about that if you dove into music theory. But this a minor quarter minor court is a little bit sad or sounding. And what we're gonna do is we're actually gonna be on the fourth string. So that's the stream closest to the ceiling. We're going to use our middle finger, and we're gonna put that on the second fret and all. That's it. That one note changes the strings to a minor. You hear that sound a little bit sadder. Here's the sea we just learned and I'm happy. A minor little sat. Let's get a close up of that. A minor real quick. There it is. So I've just taken my middle finger and we've placed it right on the second Fred on the fourth string. Once again, I'm pressing them hard enough to get a nice, clean tone there, okay? And that you're a minor. So now that you know a minor if you recall when we learned the sea, we went from sea to open strings. Now, I want you to go from the C to the A minor to practice. So when you go 13 just go back and forth and go as slow as you have to go until you get it right. This is a lot of finger dexterity, muscle memory in your hands. So if you've never played an instrument before, don't be frustrated. It can take a couple days. If you get frustrated, do five or 10 minutes on and take a break and then do another five minutes. That's actually going to get you further faster. And then if even if you just need to know, even if you used to go that slow, that is okay. So now in your pocket you have a C chord and an a minor chord 10. Another First... Your First Chord Pregression: So now that you know two chords, I wanted to introduce you to a term called a court progression. So when we play a single cord and then we put it together with other chords that's called the progression. And that would make sense, right? Cause cords progress from one to another and you put those chords together. You make court progressions, you make songs. Okay, so that is a chord progression. So really, that c t a minor that we've just learned We have a chord progression, which would be C a minor bond. That is our chord progression. So I would challenge you. You have now a court progression. Use those two quarts and just make up some words. Do something fun and creative with those two chords because you're now playing ukulele. Whether you realize it or not, you are now playing ukulele. You could walk into a guitar store pickup ukulele and go right. You make up a song, right? I'm learning good. But there you go. That is ah, core progression. So as we get on in this course, I'm gonna use the word progression a lot. I want to introduce that to you now. since you now know one and seriously do something fun because part of learning an instrument is having a good time. So whether you are young and just want to make up a fun song about your day or your A parent and you want to make up a fun song to sing to your kids, I would encourage you to do that with those two chords and we will see you in the next lesson. 11. A Quick Strumming Overview: the next part here. We're going to talk about learning how to strum your You go lately, and during this course, we're gonna talk about two basic methods. These are not the only two methods. These are just the two methods that we're going to talk about here. One of them is You're gonna take your ukulele, you're gonna hold it. You might be sitting down. You might be standing up once again, We're gonna put the ukulele kind of against our arm and Lena arm over. That's what's gonna hold it in place and we're going to. And right now, I'm just going what's called Mute the strings. I'm gonna lightly put my hand over the strings so you don't really get any sound there. And I just showed you what the first strum is going to be. So we're going to use our thumb. So in this strum, we're going to use our thumb. Teoh, brush the strings. Okay, so I just want you to practice that Grab a ukulele if you have one in, mute the strings and just practice gently and evenly brushing your thumb over the strings and you count 123 or and What we're looking for is an even nice clean strung across the street. Okay, let's get a little closer so you can see that. So I'm just evenly rushing the strings with my okay. Now the second thing or the second stronger Ronnie uses with our finger with our pointer finger specifically. Okay, now there's a couple different methods to this. Some people do just like 10 kind of leave their pointer finger open and free. I do tend because of my guitar playing background. Teoh kind of pinch my my thumb in my pointer finger together. But either way, the goal is to get once again That's nice, even strum. And we're really using the mail, you know, your pointer finger nail to strum across the strings. Case that one to you. 341 Teoh, three pork a little closer You can get that. So one to you. Really? That ever between those two strums I mean one that is obviously mechanical differences, but to with the thumb you're using the flesh of your thumb to strum with the finger You're using the nail. So you're actually gonna get different tones with those two different types of strums the thumb is gonna be a more mellow tone because you're using the flesh of your finger. So we're going to get the and if I'm using my finger, I might get you can hear It's a little more than a little more attack there. There's a little more high end. It's not a subdued so practice those two strums and what you really just need to do is get used to strumming the instrument. OK, get usedto having your fingers hit those strings. We are going to do a combination of the two of those two strums at some point words, you know, down, up with the finger, things like that. But using your finger and your thumb to strum the ukulele is the goal of this lesson. So go ahead, grab. You clearly get used to that, and I'll see in the next lesson 12. Quarter Note Strum: Okay, The first thing we're gonna talk about in the strumming section here is the basic quarter Note strung now. Quarter note. Most a lot of music. I don't say most. A lot of music is in what they call 44 timing. So if you're in the car and you're listening to a song and you can tap your hand 12341234 That is 44 Timing if it feels more like a waltz. 123123123 That's called 34 timing or potentially 68 We're not going to talk about that here , But I just want you to know if you're listening to a song and it feels more like that 123 you. 123 that you know what we're talking about today is the 44 Okay, so 44 is four beats what they call four beats per measure. Okay, Eso What we're really concerned about is 12341234 Ok, so the first strum you're going to learn is a simple quarter note strung So in that 1234 each one of those. Each one of those numbers 123 and four Each makes 1/4 note. I think about this. 1/4 plus 1/4 a quarter or the quarter is a whole Right? So you add all that together and you have one. So it actually makes sense. So you add all of those together in tow the number one and that is what a measure is a measure. All those notes together, equal one. Okay, So where were all we're going to Dio is we're going to take our c chord that we learned already and we're gonna do four strums and we're going to strum down K So 1234 Now thats we've done that four times, 4/4 notes. And then after that, we're going to switch to the A minor that we've learned. 1234 Then we switch back to the C 1234 a minor to do 34 c 23 for a minor 234 Now just see twic 23 four c 23 for a minor twice to three for a minor Teoh 34 And that is a basic quarter. Notes strum So there's the speed of music or the tempo. So 1234 we get to be that up. 1234 or slow down. 123 four. Either way, you would strong on the 123 and force if went slower. We'd sound like way. We're faster, we would sound like. But either way, those are all quarter notes from, so go ahead and practice that, and I'll see you in the next class. 13. Eighth Note Strum: So now that you have the quarter notes down, let's talk about eight notes. So remember in the corners we said that there's 123 and 1234 when we care about using that and and, you know in a second but one Teoh 34 In music, there's an end between each of those. So it's one and two and three and four. And if you play the number, so one and now you have eight notes. So we're taking those quarter notes. Remember, 1234 We're cutting them in half in making them eighth notes. So it's actually really that's really logical, right? We would take in quarter. You have 1/4 of a piece, you have 1/4 of the pie, you cut the pie in half and you have two eights, right? So now, instead of 1/4 we're gonna have to eighth. So what that means is the reason why I wanted you to be really careful about doing that just downstream on the quarter notes is we're gonna move to our fingers strong here, and we're going to go down and up so that down is going to be the number. So one and they were gonna hit the strings back up with our finger, actually coming back up and sliding across them for the end. Okay, so let me show you what I mean by that. So we're gonna do one and to And Green and four in the water. The a minor gone and three core in. Okay, so the quarter note would sound like this. 12348 points. One and two and three and four Dance. Okay, so an eighth note is just quarter notes split up, and then you're going to hit that. And also, in one sense, we're gonna go one and four and a minor. Let's do that on the A minus one and two and three and four. And so go ahead and practice that one and 2 a.m. Three and four and others. And after the four, then switch to the A minor one and two and three and four, and And when you switch to the court on this exercise the cord switch, it happened on the one right. So one in two. AM three and four and switch two and three and four and switch and switch into and greet and four in. And there you go. That's eight. No. So practice that. So you're comfortable with that, and we'll see in the next lesson. 14. Combining Quarters and Eighths: all right, So now you have quarter notes and you have eight notes. And if you're listening to songs, you'll recognize that it's rare that you just have a song that's just quarter notes or just eighth notes. There's actually normally a combination of them. So the next exercise we're gonna do is combining quarter notes and eighth notes. And what we're gonna do is we're gonna go one to Okay, so tell me. 123 and four, and 123 and four in. So it's quarter quarter 888 8/4 quarter 8888 Kang. So one to three and four end. 123 and four end. 123 and four end. And you could actually practice that with just having your hand over the strings to where your muted any meal one to you 123 and four and one to you. And now we're going to do that. So once you kind of have that flow down. 123 and four. And I do the same thing. Switching between the sea and the A minor, and we're gonna switch on the one just like we did previously, OK, So let's go ahead and try that in 12341223 Important 12 free in 40 and see 23 in 14 minor. Three gin for gin. See 23 and four Any minor 234 So what essentially we've done is we've taken those quarter notes and those eighth notes, and we combined them. And you can do that in any Siri's that you want. So remember, as long as everything adds upto one, you can subdivide it, but they call subdivided any way you want. So you could dio wanting to in 34 Right? That's another way to do it. One in two in 341 in two in 34 you could do one into 3412341234 Right. Those are always combined this quarter in the eighth minute, but get the 1st 1 down first and then go around and try your own. I would love to hear some of the combinations you have in the comments for the course, and remember, this course is an ongoing living things, so make sure you check out the common stay tuned to new videos coming out after done with this course. Andi, I'd love to see how you're progressing and what kind of progression you're coming up with. But there you go. Quarter notes, eighth notes and combining the two. It's those combining of the two that were really going to be able to make songs that you're going to start loving to play and recognizing, So with that, we will see in the next lesson. 15. Chukkas!: so whether you know it or not, I've already been hinting at something called the Chukka, which is really common in the world of ukulele. And the chukka is more of a rhythmic, uh, situation that you're using your strumming hand. So for me, that's my right hand. But as I've told you a couple times, you can mute the strings with your fretting hand and get a kind of muted tone that is the world of chuckas. And so you're you hear that a lot in ukulele because they adds a rhythmic elements, so you might have right? So I wanted to just introduce you to the chuckas and have you practiced them? So one thing about the chukka is you'll recognize, especially when you're playing with your thumb. They really don't have the ump that they need, right? That's really gonna be like a fingers fingers from you're gonna have to get a little more juice behind that to get enough sound to make it sound good. But that is what's called the Cheka. So if we have ah, cord like a C check, check, check, check. Okay. Okay. So that's what we're gonna do to practice this from the O. C. Chaka Chaka a minor chukka chukka see chukka chukka a minor. Okay, check. Okay, so you knew that back and forth just to get used to your hand muting the strings, that's really gonna be those difficult part of it is your right hand doesn't change or your strumming hand doesn't change. It's the fretting hand that changes. And so it's that that you have to get used to kind of ease quickly putting over the strings to make them mute. So that is the world of chuckas. We'll see in the next lesson. 16. Reading Chord Charts: you are so close to actually playing a couple of songs that I have planned for us. We just need to learn a couple mawr cords. And so I'm going to introduce you to the chord chart right now because I want to start putting some more chords in your vocabulary. So right up here, as we're going to talk about cords, we're gonna put up a chord charts. So what you can see is there It looks like the ukulele fretboard right is if the ukulele was sitting like that. And so the string on the far right or the line on the far right represents the first string or the string closest to the ground. The string over here to my left represents that G string, which is the one closest to the ceiling or the fourth string. And then you could see the frets, and then a dot represents where you should be putting your finger. So this is a chart for see, you know this court already and that you can see that there's one dot on the third fret on the first string, and that is if there's ever a time where I don't want you to play a string, they'll actually be an axe above that strength. I don't think we're in a really running into into any of that in this course, but if you continue on taking some other courses from me, you'll probably see that. So that is what that would represent. So this C quarters played just like this, and you could see that's open string, open string, open string. Third fret on the first string. So that's how you're going to read those chord charts. So let's go on to learn a couple chords. 17. The "F" Chord: are. The next chord we're going to learn is the F court and the F Courtis. Simply now, there's a reason I had you learn that a minor with your, uh, with your middle finger on that second fret. So go playing a minor again. Okay, Put your middle finger on the second fret of the fourth string room. That a minor You. Okay, now all you're gonna have to do now is take your pointer finger, OK? And put it on the first fret of the second string. You see how that changed to a totally different chord? That's the F chord. So it's really easy to play. You essentially almost already know, you know, half of it already, cause it's half the A minor court. So as you can see from the chart, it's just the first fret on the second string. And then that 3rd 1st right on the third string and second threat on the fourth string case . So up close, that's it. That is the F court. So now practice that one. Here's what I want you to do. So now we have C A minor and F in our pocket. So now we're going to use those quarter notes we've talked about before and we're going to switch between C. I want to go see f A minor, Okay? And the reason for that is because you already kind of have the A minor. I want to get used to just jumping to that F court. So see 234 F 234 a minor 234 c 234 So practice that go through the rotation. If you're feeling really good about your about your changes, your court changes. I want you to change on the three. Okay, so watch so C to F 412 green for so that would have your changes go twice as fast. And if you're feeling good with that core change, it's just going to help with your hand dexterity and getting that muscle memory and just helping you feel better and more confident and playing ukulele. So that's the F chord on with that. Let's go to the next lesson 18. The "G" Chord: all right. The next court we need to get down is the g chord. And admittedly, this court is going to probably be the one that gives you the most trouble of any of the chords we've learned so far. Now we put it up here real quick. Now you can see there's 33 strings you have to hold down. You have to hold down the second fret on the third string, the third fret on the second string and the second fret on the first string. Now, if you've played guitar, you'd recognize this shape. But if you've never played guitar and you've never played ukulele, that this is going to be very foreign to you and it's gonna look overly complicated. Well, I'm here to make it not so complicated, but I am going to tell you a front. It's gonna take a little bit of practice. It doesn't mean it's going to take weeks and weeks and months. It probably take a couple of days for your fingers to get used to it. So the court sounds like this, and the reality is, once you have this cord, you'll have C F A minor in G There are thousands of songs that air those four quarts that the songbook opens up to you immensely once you have this cord. So if you need some motivation, just know this cord will make it so you can play thousands and thousands of songs. So let's get a real up. Let me get up close and I'll show you what this court looks like. So to play this, how do we make it easier? Well, one of the things people do at the beginning when I recognised what students do if they try to get all their fingers on at the same time and it really makes accomplice, so we're going to do instead is gonna break it down. We're gonna look at our pointer and our middle finger those both those fingers are going on to the second fret. Right, So that is going to be the second fight on the third and first ring. So when you practice first just getting those two fingers on to the fretboard off, we're just practicing Freddie most to okay, then, once those air on you can take you rain finger and it's really easy just to get that third string down. So that would be the next way to practice. That too, on strong in the 3rd 1 And that's going to be the easier way for you to start learning the G chord on ukulele. Okay, practice it. Don't get frustrated. Don't let this court be the reason you stopped plane. It is, Yes. I admit it is the most difficult one we've done yet. But like I said, it's going to open up the possibilities of so many different songs. And really, once you have it, it's a piece of cake. You're gonna just be just like any of the other chords. You can choose any chord you want to flip back and forth between that one. Do four and then four. So four on C four on G for in a minor foreign. Gee, keep practicing. Once you have those four chords down, the next section of this class is actually teaching you some songs. You're already playing songs. This is so awesome on. And we will see you in that next action 19. Chord Review and Song Overview: Well, it is time for you to learn some songs. So let's go over a couple things. Let's go over the four chord you know we're gonna throw up here is we're going over them Once again, the four chords are gonna be see a minor G. Now, as we're learning these songs, I'm gonna put the cords up here for you, okay? And I do that on purpose, not to be overly redundant. And as I start each song, we're going to go over what each chord is. And so if you're just watching this course straight through, you're gonna feel like didn't we already talked about that in the last lesson, and we did. But what I want to create is a song library for you, so you don't have to go back and watch the other lessons. You can actually just go to a song you want to learn, and it's gonna have every component that you need in that song. So I don't think we're just trying to be redundant for the sake of being redundant and overly like. Here it is. Here it is. I really want you to be able to come back and even as we ADM or songs in the bonus curriculum area of this course, we're gonna do the same thing so that every time you come in, you can just go, okay? I don't have to go back and remember those cords. I could just see them all. And there they are. So those are the 4/4 Barney for every song we're learning in this section, Go over them, review them, and let's start playing some music. 20. Play a Song! Blowing in the Wind: well blowing in the wind. This is one of the most iconic songs in American pop history. Peter Paul and Mary Bob Dylan. I mean, it's been done by hundreds, if not thousands, of artists throughout American history, so we should probably learn. And the great thing is, it's only three chords, and those cords are and I'll put him up here for you See, F and G. Now we're gonna do this This super super simple way on DSO when you hear it with the record gather is going to be a little bit. There's some timing stuff they dio and stuff like that. But this gets 99% of the way there. It's an easy way to learn the song. So here's the progression for the verse Cam was going to give it to you can write these cords down and we can kind of go from there. But the progression for the verse is C F C C C F g G. Okay, so C F c c c f g g. So what we're gonna do is every one of those cord those cords I gave you were gonna count to two and then we're going to switch so see to bath to see to see Teoh See Thio Thio G Thio Thio. Okay, so that's going to be our progression. The reason I gave you all those cords even the doubles and triples that you could just count to each time of those courts once again CFC see c f g. And that's the verse. So you have How many foods must before you call? Give a man right on to Thio Thio. See Teoh, See Teoh See Teoh F to G two g d. One time. See Teoh have to see Teoh see Teoh to G to G two and that's every verse. Okay, so how many times Must can and uh Okay, there you go. It's that simple. So see app C c c F g two counts on each of those. So now let's go to the course and we'll do that this same way. We'll just give you the letter for every two counts. That way it'll make it super easy. So it's f g c f f g c c f g c f f g c c Right super easy, right? So write those down F G C f f g c c and that just sounds like this. The answer my friend is blowing The answer is blowing. See Teoh after two g Teoh See Teoh f k two cto See Teoh And that is blowing in the wind That is the whole song. Always feel free as you give as you feel like you're progressing in your ukulele plane to spice it up a little bit, you know, eight notes up, down, up, down strums things like that. Uh, the way Just adding notes way could go down Down, up, down up, down up, Down, up, down, down, down down Can be one way to spice it up So we did that Down, down, down Down There you go So where did you get more comfortable with those That chord progression You can practice that down, Down What would you down, down, up, down up, down Down Up, up, Down Up, Down, Up, Down, Up, Down Up And there you go blowing in the wind material You know, if you have any questions and we'll see you soon 21. Let's Play Let It Be: arguably one of those popular songs ever. Let it be by the Beatles Super easy on new Clearly and You Are Going toe. Learn it. Okay, let's go over the cords that are in this song. It's just and we'll throw up here. It's just see G A minor and F So we're gonna go over the really simplified version of this song on. And then as you progress in your ukulele, playing obviously can add more flavor and fun. Uh, we're going. I'm going to give you, uh, like I have in other videos, the cords. And this time we are going to count to each time there's a court that I give you. Okay, so it will be 1 to 1. Teoh 12 Okay, so let's go through the verse courts. The verse is C G a minor F c g f c. Okay, so C g a minor F c g f c. And they do that twice. So you do that two times for the worse kept O C G a minor F c g f seat. So that sounds like this. When and actually comes on when I find so that word find is where that c comes in. OK, so when I see myself in ge of trouble a minor they I see de thio Thio thio thio so C to G a minor Teoh have to see Thio Thio Thio have to see to Okay, now on the AF in the end The song you're used to the down, down, down, down So if you want it and you feel comfortable with you could dio down so one to be and green to kind of create that feel So let's do it again with on the f just on the second half So it's C g a minor f see e g f that f we could go 12 and see And let's see what that sounds like when I find myself a minor c g So that sounds pretty good. And that's an easy little one Teoh thing. You're just back. So just one act extra up, down, down, down. You just practice that little part f down down up scene, okay? And then you would just play that progression again for the rest of the verse, right? Uh and then we go into the chorus. Okay, So the great thing about so many classic songs, especially in the rock or pop genre, is they're very simple progressions. Okay, so there's no need to over complicate this, but sometimes it gets right. So that's the verse. If you can play that, you have the verse and then the chorus is a minor G f c c g f c. So it's going down with a minor G f c c g f I see. Okay, so we'd have, uh, to be half. Let it be to whisper words e g g f f c. That a minor G to F to see to C to G two. Do you do that? Down, Down, up on that F too, if you want. So should we try it again? Everybody ready? Stretching out a little bit. Okay, So let it be that it a minor g two f two c two c to G two af down. Obscene. That would be Will that be? And that is the beginner version of Let it be Go learn it and pressure friends and family will see you next time 22. Brown Eyed Girl (What Ever Did Happen?): Hey, brown eyed girl on ukulele Awesome! Awesome tune, Super easy cords. But it is taking us to another level when it comes to strumming and the number of chord changes. So this is a great beginner tuned toe learn because it's going to force you to play a little faster trying to force you to learn those chord changes And, uh, you're gonna love And everybody knows this song socially. The course right when we used to sing shall a lot on the whole place is going Every is dancing and having a good time Come on, brown eyed girl Let's get into it What are the courts for, brown eyed girl? They're actually simple. Just see g and a single a minor in there Now the next part we're gonna have to really get into is the the strumming pattern. So we're gonna mantra, make this as simple as possible and want to use essentially one strumming pattern throughout the whole song. So that pattern is when me down, down, down, up, down, up, down, down, down, down, down Do you three Okay, so it will be down Down, down, up, down, up, down, Down, Down, up, down up, and it's a pretty brisk pace. So you're gonna have to Really? You know what? Often? When I was back in the day when I was learning those strumming patterns, I would just mute the strings in. Just practice. Down. Down, down, down, down, up, down. Okay, so we will do that. Down, down, down, up, down Then let's go through the verse court progression. So just C f c g so c them seeing thing. Okay, that's the progression. It's done four times. Okay, The nice thing is that down, down, down, up, down, up. You just do that for every court. So you go dance on C Down, down, down, up, down, up F down, down, up, down, up See down Down a down to G Down, down, up, down, up Now, once you've done that, all those chords together and you've done that four times it's going to go into a turn Which for depend on what songs you've learned you may not have. I experienced a turn yet, but we'll get there when we get there. Get ahead of ourselves. Let's go through that chord progression. So just c f c g. So 23 and our hearts a thumpin and you write, and that's where we're going to get into the turn of the song. So turn is a piece in the music that takes you kind of from the verse to the chorus. Andi kind of has its own little feel, So the turn you want to write this down is F V C a minor f g c g. Okay, so F C f g c f g c. Let's start from the top. I'm confusing everybody. I could tell already. So f g c a minor. That's the first part. And then f g c. And then it's going to go to that G again. Now the one chord that's held longer. All of that is that final G. And there's a part of the song that you probably know says, Do you remember when we used to sing and that G gets held through that whole part? It's you remember when Wait. Okay, so everything else will be just that same progression. Down, down, down, up, down, up, All the way through isn't that g? We're gonna We're gonna see how that goes. OK, so let's do that turn. So f Thio more time. We're gonna go all the way to that, Helgi. Okay, uh, and we're gonna start with yet I'm with you, my right, my brown eyed girl. So there's not words over every chord. You'll just have toe play these through and put the words in, uh, either where they go or where you want them to go. Cause you know what? You could make the songs your own also. So we're gonna go f g c a minor F g c. Okay. And they want to get to that turn. So right, so minor. G g g g g g. So what I'm gonna do there? You want to do one of a couple different things on that last G? Okay, I'm gonna either just go to straight eight notes down, up, down, up Way. And I do like tobe roughly stop it there because it gives a good feel for the song. So or you could just go down. Wait so you know, whatever, whatever you feel good with. So let's go all the way from the turn into the courts. Now the chorus is simply cf cg Super super easy cf cg. Just hold it down, down, down, up, down, up on each one of those. That's it, that's that's the course. So let's do the turn where I start on the f Here we go, E g. Let's try that one more time. End chorus 1234 Do you remember when we used to sing Shall, uh, themed on the whole thing on the C. One little thing I did in there, You might have heard it on the G show you a little trick here on the G. If you take your pinkie finger and throw that on the on the first string on the third front , you can get this. So I did throw that in there a couple times. If you heard it here, I'll do. I'll do it one more time around and I'll play it with that. So that's a little trick. You need to add a little flavor to that. So there you go, brown eyed girl who I know. There's a lot of court progressions, a lot of changes there. You can always feel free to kind of just make it your own once again. You don't have Teoh. Uh, you kind of make up something if you want it. The turn is getting to be a little too much for you. You know, going from, um you go from the first tee. Do you remember when? Just hold the G. You could just hold the G and forget the whole rest of the turn. Nobody's gonna hate you for that. It's going. It'll be fun. Right? So used Teoh, do you remember? When way? Because all anybody cares about is the shot. La la la la part. Let's be honest. Even if you did nothing else but the Shah laws. Everybody's gonna love you. It's gonna be amazing. But there you go, brown eyed girl. Van Morrison. What a great song. Ah, great song for beginners and intermediates because it's really gonna help with those core changes Some of that strumming Let me know if you have any questions. We'll see you next time