Tips and tricks to create Webtoon backgrounds in CSP | Andy Drws | Skillshare

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Tips and tricks to create Webtoon backgrounds in CSP

teacher avatar Andy Drws, Webcomic artist

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

15 Lessons (59m)
    • 1. Introduction

      3:01
    • 2. Vector Layer

      6:21
    • 3. Drawing by hand

      4:07
    • 4. 3D models in CSP Ex

      5:53
    • 5. 3D models in CSP Pro

      2:39
    • 6. Sketchup 3D Warehouse

      4:14
    • 7. Sketchup Export to 2D

      3:19
    • 8. Sketchup free version

      1:53
    • 9. Sketchup Color models

      4:38
    • 10. Sketchup other resources

      3:32
    • 11. Colors Screentones and Patterns

      4:32
    • 12. Course Project

      4:52
    • 13. Example A

      2:31
    • 14. Example B

      4:40
    • 15. Outro

      2:23
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About This Class

This course is intended to help you use 3D models in CSP and Sketchup to create backgrounds that perfectly match the style of your art and webcomic.

It also covers tips and tricks to draw your own backgrounds, and to use colors, screentones and patterns to tell your story ^^ 

It's basically the course I wish I had when I first started making my own webcomic, I hope it will help you on your own journey~ 

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Meet Your Teacher

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Andy Drws

Webcomic artist

Teacher

 

Hello, I'm Andy, a published webcomic artist based in Australia.

I make fluffy queer webcomics in pastel colors :)

 

 

See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hi there and welcome. My name is Andy, and I am a published web comic artists. The main difference between drawing a comic and drawing an illustration for me is that with comics you have to learn how to be more efficient and to work faster. When I first started, I did a lot of research looking for these kind of tips to become more efficient, but couldn't really find a comprehensive course. So this is me making courses I wish I had when I started so that you can hit the ground running. I use Clip Studio Paint or CSP to draw my comic. And in this course, what I want to do is focus on the backgrounds. Because we all find it daunting. But backgrounds is actually very important. To give context for your story, set the mood for the scene. And they can help assist with the pacing of the story. What I focused on are tips and tricks to create backgrounds using 3D models that match with your drawing style and your color palette so that your comic looks cohesive. This is the course structure. We're not at the introduction video. Class 2 is about the vector layer and why I always recommend drawing your line art on the Vector Layer. Class 3 is for tips and tricks to draw backgrounds by hand. Class 4 and 5 are about 3D models in Clip Studio. I talk about CSP Ex and CSP Pro. From class 6 to class 10, they are all about SketchUp. It's actually my favorite resource for 3D backgrounds in my own comic. And I'll talk through why. Class 11 is about using colors, screen tones, and patterns instead of drawing backgrounds to supplement your comic. In class 12, I will give you your project and I'd love to see what you've got and give feedback where I can. And I'll also include some practical examples of how I applied the things that I talk about in this course. Class 13 is a recap. I'll create a cheat sheet for you to take forward as the reference into your future projects. I hope you'll have a lot of fun in this class, and lots and lots and lots of fun drawing your own comic. 2. Vector Layer: This lesson is called a love letter to the vector layer because I don't think I would have finished my comic if I didn't use the vector layer for my line art. You can create a raster layer by clicking this button here or next to it, You can create a vector layer, the one with the cube inside. I've already created two and made the raster layer red. With a raster layer, What you're doing is you're putting pixels down on a layer. And here with the vector layer, what you're doing is you're putting down a formula for pixels to follow. That sounds really abstract, but I'll show you what it actually means in practice. So going back to the raster layer here, if I want to enlarge this circle, you can see that it becomes really blurry because all the pixels you had that are just becoming bigger. Whereas with a VECTOR layer, there are actually two options for you when you want to change size. So the first option is where you are changing the size of the object, but you're not changing the vector width. You'll see here that this box is not checked. But your second option is you can check that box, change the width. And when you enlarge the object, the vector width will also change with it. But then the main difference is the lines remain very clean. Now I'll show you how this can actually make a difference in practice. We have two characters here, angel and devil Apollo. Let's say we want angel to come forward, so we want him to become bigger. We can select him if I have change vector width checked. You can see that when I make him bigger, the line art is also becoming bigger as well. So now even though he looks closer to ours, His lines are also a much thicker than devil in the back here. And it doesn't look like the same image. If I unclick this box, His line width remains exactly the same. And that's really handy because now he looks like he's in the same drawing as a devil Apollo in the back. So you can see how this is really handy when you have different objects within a panel and you want to change their size relative to each other. If you've drawn them on a vector layer, you can very easily adjust them. The other reason why I am a big fan of the vector layer is the vector eraser function. So if you go to the eraser here, you see that this is vector eraser function here. Make sure that it is ticked. When you go to raster layer, those functions are disabled. But when you're on a vector layer, you can choose between three options. One is erase touched areas. That's pretty easy to understand. It works as a normal eraser. But the second one is the one that I use the most. It's the erase up to intersection. What it means is that when you've got two lines, where they intersect or meet each other, you can actually just use the eraser and erase up to the point where the lines meet. Go back to our example and I'll show you why this is useful. You see this bit here where his hair meets his ear. You can just touch that bit with the eraser and it will clean up to that line for you. I'll do it again here. It is such a time saver. It will give you really neat lines, make it easier to color. And then the last option is erase whole line, which is pretty easy to understand as well. And then lastly, this function here, correct line is also another time saver. Some of them do work with the raster layer, but they don't work well. So I don't recommend using them with a raster layer. Play around and see what they can do to your line art into vector layer. There's a whole bunch of options and there are lots of tutorials talking about the different functions in this particular correct line box. So I won't talk about it too much. But I'll show you one that I use in almost every panel, my comic. And that is the adjust line width function. Now I've got to really quickly drawn eye here and I'll show you this example. When I draw eyes, I like to have the top line thicker. I think it just looks prettier. I have a couple of options. I can make my pen bigger or I can draw multiple lines on top of each other to make it look thicker. But it's really hard to adjust these lines if I do this. Because if I hold down Ctrl and click on the line, I can actually move the line. But now you see I've got multiple lines to move. What I do instead is draw only one line and then go to correct line. Go to adjust width, set to thicken, make sure that whole line process is turned off. And then just touch that middle of the eye a little bit to make that part thicker. You can see it looks really nice and it tapers down on either side. But when I hold down Ctrl and click on that line, it is just one single line for me to move around I can control and make it longer or shorter. And I can even rotate it. This makes adjustment after you've drawn something really quick, really easy. So I hope I've been able to convince you to use the vector layer whenever you draw your line art. And now let's get into drawing your backgrounds. 3. Drawing by hand: Hello. So if you are anything like me, you would find backgrounds really daunting in the beginning. I really did everything I could to avoid drawing backgrounds. But the more I did them, the more I grew to enjoy them, These are samples that I did in my comic. And they were all done using different methods. And in this course I'll talk through all of them with you. Option 1 is basically just drawing a background by hand. And in this example, what I'll talk through is finding a reference photo and basically tracing the parts that you want to keep. Obviously, you don't want to trace one-to-one. You want to keep what you like, exclude what you don't like, add things... Make it your own. And this example, I found a photo inside of a train make it black and white so it's not distracting. and turn the opacity down, and basically just traced on top of it on a vector layer. The thing I want to focus on here is how you draw straight lines. You have two options. You can use the straight line tool here. And it's pretty standard. It's just a straight line. You can adjust the width of the line. But what you will notice about these lines are that they're very uniform. They are the same width the whole way of the line. And depending on your art style, this can actually look very jarring. I prefer my lines to have a little bit of variance in the width. For me, it looks more natural and it suits my drawing better. So what I do, instead, is with the pen that I use to draw my line. I turn on post correction and turn it up to a 100, which is the maximum level. What it would do is Clip Studio would actually post correct. Your line and make it straight. But the difference is that the lines would have a little bit of variance in a width depending on the pen pressure you are applying. So it looks more, it feels a bit more natural and cohesive with my drawing style. What I do here is I draw two lines and then turn off the post correction to do the curved bit that joins them. Now, this is the completed line art and you have seen that I didn't include everything. As we go further in the background, I included less and less details. And then what I did was I drew in my characters. I have a little example in the appendices for you to see how I drew this. And then I colored the background and applied some screen time. Now, if you don't know where to find post correction, when you're on any pen, the tool properties is actually slightly different. But when you click on the little wrench down here, you would actually bring up all of the different properties on any tool. So the correction box down here. Post correction is in there. You can tick and untick that, and these little eye icons, if you turn them on, they will appear in the tool property box. If you turn them off, they will disappear. So they're basically a way for you to customize how the tool properly box looks for each pen. 4. 3D models in CSP Ex: We're now on to option two, which is using 3D models in Clip Studio Paint or CSP. The asset store is amazing. So do make use of it. Just put into the search bar what you're looking for. In my case, I'm looking for a train platform. Note that some of them are free and some of them are not. Some of them are 3D objects and others are just static images. The difference is that with the 3D objects, you can move the cameras around and get different angles. So the train platform I'm looking for is actually already in CSP. I'm just going to download it and drag and drop it into my Canvas. If you can't find it at first just scroll around and look for it, because depending on your canvas size, it may be placed somewhere a bit weird. Now, you will notice that there are three cameras on top here. The one on the right is a zoom in and out. The one in the middle is a panning. So up and down, left and right. And the one on the left is to change the angle of your camera. Play around to try and get the scene that you want. But down here, there are actually some presets already in there for you that might be useful. The other thing to check out is if you click on the wrench and look at the object, you can actually play around with the different settings. The thing that's cool about this one is you can actually dial this up and the train would appear. So this is the angle that I want. I wanted to have my character standing on a platform. Now I'll show you how I extract the line for this. So click on the wrench again and go to preference. Then, rendering settings. There's a whole bunch of settings in here that you can play with. But what I normally do is turn off the texture. It will look like this. And I'll also increase the width of the outline just to make it a little bit more prominent. So right now you can't see the train track. If I turn it all the way up, you can see it a little bit clearer. You can also change the color of the line. That doesn't look good, but gives you an idea of what you can do. Again, there are a lot of options you can play around with. But usually, the only thing I do are those two things. Turn off texture, increased linewidth. And then I get something like this. From here, I'll duplicate it just in case I want to change the angle later on, and then rasterize this layer. On the new layer. What I do is go to layer property, extract line. This is only available on CSP EX, but I'll show you how you can do it on CSP Pro in a roundabout way later. These arrows here, what they do is they tell you which shadows to pay attention to. And having all of them turn on, it can be a bit too dark or too detailed. So I'd like to turn a couple of them off. Just so match with my drawing style. I'll rasterize it again. Check that I'm happy with it. And then blur it a little, the reason why I do this is because the lines can be a bit too sharp for my liking. You don't have to do it. The last thing I do is change the line color to the same color that I use to draw my characters with. So it's this kind of desaturated gray blue, rather than black. Then I set it to multiply and then create layers underneath that and just color it in. I picked those two colors to go with the panel above it. And then I also like to apply this kind of screen toning look just to make it look a little bit more like a comic. Now, I'm gonna change the paper to pink just to show you something behind the model is actually transparent. So changing the paper back, and create a new layer underneath the model. And I can just put in a sky pretty easily using a gradient tool and then a cloud brush. So you can see that doesn't take me long at all. All of this is about five to ten minutes. 5. 3D models in CSP Pro: Hi, so continuing from the last class where we talked about extracting lines from CSP 3D models using CSP EX extract line function. Let's talk about how we can do this in CSP Pro, the cheaper version. First three minutes of the video in the last class still applies. But we'll get to a stage where we get something like this from the 3D model. Now, what you need to do next is go to the CSP Asset Store and download this particular auto action. Once it's downloaded, it will show up in your Download section here in your asset library. It looks like this. Go to Auto Action. Open the pop-up window, click add auto action set. And it should pop up here for you, but it doesn't for me because I've already added it. So click on that. And it will open up this particular set of actions for you. Make sure that you're selecting the layer where the model is on. Select the very first option and click Play. When this pops up just say no. And then you can close your auto action. What action did was created these layers for you. And you can go through and see what each layer does. But the one that we really care about is the outline layer. It's very similar to what CSP extract line function in CSP EX has done for you. So just go and change the color mode. Change it to the color that you use to line your art. And there you have it. Something very similar to what CSP Ex can do. Lastly, you can also go with the option that we spoke about in class number 3 which is just using the model as reference and drawing the lines yourself. 6. Sketchup 3D Warehouse: Hi, So who here finally at SketchUp! Sketchup is actually my favourite option for background because it is so flexible and it's actually a lot of fun. It's like the SIMS. So I'll talk through the different versions that you can use. You can use the web version, the SketchUp Make 2017. Both of these are free. Or you can use SketchUp Pro, which actually costs a lot of money. I'll show you how they all look in this course. Firstly, let's look at the 3D warehouse. It's an online resource that SketchUp has that actually has a lot of models people have built that you can use. Just make sure to check the licensing rules before you use them in your comic, because it might differ between model and model. Now let's do an example. I'm looking for a cafe. Instead of products, look for models so that you get a complete model. And I chose this one here. I'm using the SketchUp Pro version here, but I'll show you the free version in later videos. From here, go to Window 3D Warehouse. And this little pop-up window will show up for you. You can look through the 3D warehouse from here and find things like a coffee cup or extra chairs, a table. And you can actually download an item and load it directly into the model. You can see what I mean by his very similar to the SIMS right? So select that coffee cup. Control C, Control V. You can place a few around. Let's look at the bar over here. Now the magnifying glass is zoom in and zoom out. This button here allows you to pan the camera around. This arrow allows you to select an object. This one here allows you to move the object around. And then this one here allows you to rotate the object. So you have to first put the protractor down on a plane. In this case, I'm putting it on the table and then I'm rotating the cup around on that plane. Ignore that, I was able to edit it out. Now at this hand here, what it does is 7. Sketchup Export to 2D: So we've got a model that we're happy with. Let's now move on to exporting it into a 2D image that we can work with into a comic. So if you click on the trays around here, go to the style tray, and then photo modeling. the second option, it will give you something that looks like this. Go to Edit, underneath the styles and increase the width of the profile. Increase it as well for the depth cue. You can also change the color of that line to black. It looks really ugly right now. The lines look way too thick. But when you export it, it will look very different. To export. Go to Export, 2D. Click on the options and make sure that you've got this setting setup. Other wise it may be a little bit too small or too unclear to work with. So I've exported it and I'm going to Clip Studio Paint to open it up. And you can see that the lines are a lot cleaner and thinner in CSP. Now let's go back to SketchUp and go to the trays again. Scroll down to scenes, put the plus button and add, Create scene. What this does is it saves that particular angle for you. You don't have to worry about losing that camera angle. And now you can move around and create new ones. One thing which might be a little bit frustrating at first is that, let's say, I'm going to sit the character here. I turn the camera around. But all of a sudden, I get stuck in the wall and I can't see anything. What you can do in this case is you can actually hide the wall so that you can get the camera angle you want. Go to the arrow, select the wall, then go to the tray again and scroll down to find outliner. And you can see that group is highlighted. That's the wall. Click on the eye button and it would hide it. I'm doing the same thing for this painting here. Now, if you actually move the camera angle around, it will get you the angle that you want. I'm just going to hide this painting as well. Once you've got an angle that you want, don't forget to save the scene. And then go ahead and export it. 8. Sketchup free version: So let's talk quickly about SketchUp Make 2017, which is the free version. It pretty much works exactly the same way as SketchUp Pro for what we use it for. When you're downloading a model from the 3D warehouse, just make sure that we are possible choose to Sketchup 2017 version of the model. Now you can see that on the tray here, we have pretty much all of the options that we had on the Pro. If something is missing, go to Window, default tray, and find that particular tray that you're looking for. I've already edited the style for this model to show only to outline. But what I wanna do is talk through in more details, the options when you export. So I've gone to export here, and I'm choosing to export it as a PNG. Go to options, make sure that you have quite a high width pixel. At least 6 thousand, anti-alias checked and transparent background checked and then export it. And you can see the background here is transparent, which means it'll be easier to call it the sky. I'll see you in the next class for colored models. 9. Sketchup Color models: Hi, so, so far what we've been doing is extracting lines from SketchUp models. But of course, you can also use colored models as well. And it depends heavily on your comic style whether it will work or not. So here, under Styles, go to default styles and go to 3D printing. This is the color that came with this particular model. One reason why you might want to use colors that are in SketchUp is that it actually has shading already built in for you. You can play around with this shading or the shadows by going down to the shadows tab. You can use the sun for shading and you can play around with the sun basically. At the moment, the sunlight is coming from the top left. And you can increase the lightness or darkness of the shadow by playing with these bars here. And you can change the angle of the sunlight by changing the time of day. Now let's say you don't like the color that was chosen by whoever built this model and you want to change the color of this roof here, what you can do is select the arrow and click on the item you want to change the color. The first time you click you'll notice that it will select the whole group. But if you keep clicking on the particular roof, it will go down to the specific aspect. And then select the paint bucket. And under Materials, you can see that there're so many different options. There are different textures and different colors. I'm just going to try this one, and zoom in to show you that it has changed. There's another fun function in here, which is Fog. What it does is it blurs out things that are in the distance. Basically putting fog into the distance. I'm not sure how to explain that. You can increase or decrease the distance here. And you can actually choose the color of the fog as well. So I'm just going to go to some kind of orangey. And it looks like this. Personally, I prefer to just extract lines and color things myself in CSP because I find it quicker. But the other reason is that when you zoom in, you can see that the lines are really thin. And my comic style is very line heavy. So one way that I workaround is, is export two versions into CSP. One is the line version and the other is the colored version. And I would copy the line version and paste it on top of the colored version and make it multiply. Then reduce the opacity of the colored version. This way the lines become a lot more obvious and it's easier to match with my own style in my comic. Once in CSP, you can also play with a whole range of functions that CSP has. Correction layers would help a lot with matching the mood of your comic or the color palette of your comic. You can play around with hue, saturation, and lumosity, like I'm doing here. Or you can go to color balance under correction layer. And again, changing the color of this exported image. And just have! Fun play around! Find the thing that matches your comic and whatever the scene that you're working on. 10. Sketchup other resources: Hello. This is the last lesson on SketchUp. And I hope I've been able to demonstrate to you how useful SketchUp models can be in creating webtoon backgrounds. The number one source of webtoon backgrounds that I would recommend to you is actually this website. It's called a con 3D. and they're basically models that people have made specifically for webcomics. You can see that it's a very wide range of options. And if you click on Explore, there are different themes as well. There are few free ones. Like you can see the free s section at the bottom, but most of them cost money. The great thing though, is that when you buy a model, they are very detailed. You can see here this house or room has so many little intricate details. And... look at this. The little chess pieces you can move them individually. How cool is that? The other great thing about this website is that the models all have licensing use. So by purchasing the model, you are also purchasing the right to use it in your comic. If you're using SketchUp 2017, just check if the model will be compatible. A lot of them are, just some of them would not be. Of course, they are other websites with free SketchUp models as well. You can just look for this in Google. Just remember to check the rules around using them. I know it can be a trudge to read through all the rules. But the last thing you wanted to do is use something that you are not allowed to. If you recall, the very first lass I had about drawing lines and having a bit of variance in the width of the line. And you may be thinking: hey look at these models, the lines look really uniform and look really unorganic. And this a contradiction to what you were saying before. There is a bit of a cheat for that. And it's this particular tool that you can buy from Acon 3D is called One-click SketchUp style. It's actually created by another comic artist, and it is a style that you can install into SketchUp to make the lines look more organic. So that's the original version, and that's the version that you can get using this style. I've applied that style here onto this model. Just follow the instruction that comes with the model when you purchase it, It's pretty easy to use. I'm just going to increase the line width and export it here. And you can see when you zoom in that the lines have more variants to them and just look a little bit more natural. 11. Colors Screentones and Patterns: Hi, so we are at Option 4, which is the last option for backgrounds. And it is to use colors, screentones, patterns, decorations brushes to make your background. What I'd like to do is only use one or two establishing panels. This is where I have detailed drawings of the background to set up where characters are at. But then the rest of panels, where the characters are talking to each other for example, I don't draw in the backgrounds. There are two benefits to doing this. One is that it saves you a lot of time. You're not drawing the background over and over again. But the other benefit, and the more important benefit, is that colors and patterns can help you emphasize the mood and help you tell the story. So in this example, I've used the first two panels to set up that the characters are at a park. But here, his mood is dampening. So I'm using these lines and the color to make it more somber. And where they are just talking to each other I'm just emulating the colors that are in previous panels, the yellow and the blue, just to show that they're still in the same setting. Here, I've used a brush with some leaves on it, just to fill in the blank spaces. I have a couple of go-to tools that I use for backgrounds. The first one is the gradient tool. You can see that I've used it to put the yellow from the top-down and blue from the bottom-up in these panels. I've used consistently in those ones. I will also use the gradient tool to color the walls here instead of using just one block of color. And I do this because it helps create the 3D illusion, gives it a bit more depth. The second tool that I use a lot are these kind of screentoning effect. And here as well in the blue behind the character. As well as these little sparkles. There are a lot of these effect brushes on the Clip Studio Paint Asset Store. And they're very fun, so explore the store. Here are my four favourite brushes, and I'll put a link to them in the resource section of the course as well. The first one is the glitter sketch hatching It comes with four different options and is what they look like. It's pretty useful for the fluffy romantic scenes. The second one, scraping from beginning tone brush set. It's set a set of brushes that look like the screentoning. It just makes it look more like a comic in my opinion, so I use it a lot. The third one, now these glitter and they're just really key. And the last one, a set of brushes are just like background decorations. Circles, stars, bubbles, these little diamond shapes and random triangle shapes. Check out the resource section for the links. Last thing I want to talk about are patterns. So you may notice that there are patterns already in your library. You can also just download stuff from the asset store. I've just resized that one. Those are the color ones. And these ones are the monochromatic ones. 12. Course Project: Hi, you have gone through all of the course material. Now it's time for your project. The project I've set out here is for you to create at least four comic panels, using one or more of the background techniques that we've covered in this course. Please ask questions if you're looking for feedback when you submit your project, and I'll look to answer them. To help you get started. What I'm gonna do here is talk through three examples. from my comic and explain what techniques I use. This is example 1. The two characters are talking to each other. The blue hair character, Lucien, is entering the room. So I've drawn a door frame behind him I've used two different colors to differentiate the spaces between the rooms, outside of room and inside the room. From then on, I zoomed out a little bit to show exactly where they are talking. And this is meant to be an art room or photography room. I just found a reference on Pinterest that I liked and drew this in by hand. After I have established that they are in this room, I don't need to repeat the background again. So in the next panels, what I'm thinking about are colors to help convey the mood. I've chosen this kind of lilac color, it's kinda somber, but also kind of romantic at the same time. Now notice that there is a window on one side of the room. So there'll be light coming in and shining on the characters. And in the next panel, when the camera is facing the characters, what I've done is try to use the diagonal shape of the two tones in the background to convey the light coming in through the window. And it's just to tie in this setting, but without having to draw the whole background all over again. This is example 2. This is a kitchen that I found on SketchUp in the 3D warehouse. The kitchen model that was on the 3D warehouse was very bare. There was nothing on the table, was just the bench. And what I did was found objects in the 3D warehouse and then put it into the kitchen. Then after I extracted the lines, I colored it to match the mood of the scene, but also the color palette of my comic. You see here that in the next panels, I am not repeating the same background over and over again. And I'm using colors and patterns to emphasize the characters' feelings. In the top panel, Apollo, the pink hair character, is shocked. So there's this electricity wave going through And then in the third panel, he's registering what's happening and he's blushing, so the red is coming deep from underneath. And here, this is the same model. What I've done is turn the camera around to get a different angle in the same room. If your comic has the same setting repeatedly is very useful to use SketchUp models to get different angles in the same space. In this third example, what I've done is use a 3D model in Clip Studio Paint of the library. And you see that the first panel is quite detailed. It sets up that they're in the library. And in the second, third panel, there are just lines suggesting that it's the table and it's at a desk. That's not a lot of detail to them. And you don't need that detail because you've already set up where the characters are at. A trick that I use to keep the scene cohesive is using the same color in the same setting. So I'll use the same blue to make it clear that we're still in the library this whole time. When you submit your project. If you're looking for feedback for me, please put in a question. Please be specific about it, like what you're asking me to provide comments and feedback on. I will not be randomly giving feedback if I haven't been asked because I do not want to give unsolicited advice or anything like that. I've also included two speed draw work examples for you to see how I actually draw the characters into the background to make a whole scene. I am very, very excited to see your projects. Please submit it and have fun! 15. Outro: You have made it to the end of the course. Thank you so much for sticking around and I hope you've picked up some helpful things to apply in your own comic. This is a cheat sheet for you. It doesn't cover word for word everything we spoke about in the course. But it's meant to be a one-pager reference that you can refer back to in the future as you're working on your own comic. You will notice that in a course I focus on extracting lines or using references, but then coloring it or drawing it in a way that matches your own style. For readers, if your background and your characters don't match, if they don't go together. It's very jarring. It can really pull them away from the story and make it harder for them to engage. So if there's only one thing that you take away from the course, it's that: make sure that your characters and your background go together. Now what's next? I actually have a lot of things that I can pass on about making a comic. Too much to fit into one course. Things like planning and scheduling a comic, storyboarding and drawing and coloring your panel, or even posting and promoting your comic to your readers and how to find a platform and how do you get people to notice your comic? These are things that I could cover in a course in the future. But what I'd like to do is get feedback from you first about this course or anything that you particularly want me to cover in future courses. Reach out let me know, either here or on any of my social media. Speaking of my social media, I am on Patreon at andy_drws and on Instagram at the same handle. You can find me on tiktok or on Twitter at therighttwin. Or you can just scan the QR code here on the screen. And it'll take you to my Linktree. Again. Thank you so much for sticking with me and best of luck for your comic, reach out, give me a link. I would love to check it out.