The Ultimate AutoCAD Essential Training | Shaun Bryant | Skillshare

The Ultimate AutoCAD Essential Training

Shaun Bryant

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22 Lessons (7h 22m)
    • 1. The Ultimate AutoCAD Essential Training - Introduction

      1:01
    • 2. What you should know

      5:00
    • 3. The application menu

      20:40
    • 4. Osnap and otrack

      27:40
    • 5. Text styles

      31:03
    • 6. Creating a simple titleblock

      25:40
    • 7. Using workspace

      15:09
    • 8. Setting drawing units

      17:59
    • 9. Working with the viewcube

      15:39
    • 10. Rectangles and polygons

      20:19
    • 11. Selecting objects

      27:03
    • 12. Using trim and extended

      38:11
    • 13. Using grid and snap

      19:37
    • 14. Using the hatch command

      10:03
    • 15. Aligning text

      10:02
    • 16. Editing dimensions and dimension overrides

      16:01
    • 17. Working with object properties

      22:09
    • 18. Using groups

      25:49
    • 19. Creating a simple block with attributes

      27:22
    • 20. Working with xrefs

      18:53
    • 21. Locking Viewports

      24:45
    • 22. Plotting from the model and layout tabs

      21:30

About This Class

The Ultimate AutoCAD Essential Training

This course is a full-length AutoCAD learning package which contains almost all of the topics that you will ever need to work with this software. The course is designed for a beginner as well as seasoned users.

A beginner can start learning the software right from scratch by following the course along just from lecture one. A seasoned AutoCAD user will also find this course very comprehensive and they can choose the topics they want to learn about skipping the basics.

Project-oriented course

The course lessons are mostly project-oriented and most of the tools and commands are taught with their real-world applications. Each module ends with a practical question which is related to the course and students are encouraged to answer the questions before moving further.

Topics Include:

  • Editing and managing options
  • Drawing rectangles and polygons
  • Modifying objects
  • Editing polylines and splines
  • Using the Hatch and Gradient commands
  • Aligning text
  • Creating a dynamic block
  • Designing a table
  • Working with XREFs

Transcripts

1. The Ultimate AutoCAD Essential Training - Introduction: Welcome to this AutoCad Essential Training course. What we're going to be doing as we work through this course is getting you up to speed with auto CAD and making you a seasoned AutoCad user. The whole idea of this course is we'll teach you all the methodologies and naming philosophies that you need to know and how to drive AutoCad effectively. So as we worked through this course, will take you through a lot of exercise files teaching you how to drive AutoCad and how to make sure that you drive AutoCad productively and most importantly, profitably. The whole idea is, you don't want to waste time when you're using AutoCad. You want AutoCad to be your tool to allow you to work with that bottom line and make sure that you're effective at the same time as well. So let's get going now and get you working through Auto CAD and get you through your Essential Training. 2. What you should know: So what should you know before you start this AutoCad Essential Training Course? Well, the first thing you should know is that we are using the latest version of AutoCad, which is AutoCad 2019. Now you don't have to be running that latest versions. Take this particular course. It's obviously preferable. But if you're not running it, don't worry, we're gonna teach you is the core skills that you need to know to drive AutoCad effectively and productively. Now the whole idea is that it comes down to the bottom line, the quick EUR when you're drafting with AutoCad, the quickie, you are in the office and obviously your company is that little bit more profitable because you're good at what you do, because you've learned how to drive auto CAD effectively. That's the whole idea of these courses to make you better and empower you and to drive you forward using AutoCad. Now be aware as well that the version that we're using is AutoCad 2019 and that uses a file format called the DW G, the drawing file, that's the AutoCad native file formats. All of the DWI files that you need will be provided with this particular course as well. Now just be aware that the DW G file format is available in auto CAD all the time and there are various different DW DAG versions. Will cover that in the next video where we talk about using the exercise files. When you're working in this AutoCad Essential Training course, the exercise files are available for download from the website. As you work through each of the videos, I will guide you as to which exercise file you should use, which exercise files should be downloaded for that particular video as well. Now, as mentioned in the, what you should know about this particular course, we're using the D WAG file format. Now when you're using the exercise files, if you look at the top of the AutoCad screen in the title bar, you will see the name of the file. So you'll notice at the top of the screen right now the drawing name is Introduction dot d w j, using the DW G file format that I've mentioned previously. Now, you will be aware if you've used AutoCad before that you can save back to different formats of the D WG file type. Now, auto CAD 2019, the latest version, and AutoCad 2018, the previous version, 2018 DW G file format. But what that means is that only AutoCad 20182019 can read that file format. So what we've done with the exercise files for you with this particular course is they're all saved back to the DW G 2013 file format. So that means any version of AutoCad from 2013 up to 2019 can read those exercise files. So you can download them from the website, store them in a known location, and use them to follow along with the videos in this particular course. When you start working with auto CAD 2019, you will notice a subtle difference to the user interface. Autodesk have changed the icons ever so slightly. So if you go up to something like the drawer panel on the Home tab or the Modify panel on the Home tab, you'll notice the icons look similar but different to older versions of AutoCad. So you'll notice that you've got slightly different color and shaped icons. And they all look remarkably similar, but they're just that little bit different things like for example, here, the offset icon look a little bit different. The shape has changed slightly on the offset icon there also as well. If you go over along the tabs at the top of the ribbon, you'll notice now you've got a new collaborate tab in AutoCad 2019 only. And you'll see that it's got the shared views and the drawing compare commands in there. Now, drawing compare is a new feature in auto CAD 2019. And if you look at the AutoCad 2019 new features course, we go through that in more detail there. Also as well. I'll just jump back to the home tab there, so we've got a full ribbon. You'll notice on the Quick Access Toolbar there's a couple of new icons as well. You can now open from the web and from mobile. So you can open from the AutoCad web based version and the auto CAD mobile base version. You can also save to web and mobile as well. So there's just a couple of new little features in there that are quite cool and quite useful in AutoCad 2019. There very simple changes, very subtle changes, but you might not notice them otherwise. And I just thought I'd bring them to your attention before you start getting going through the auto CAD 2019 training courses. 3. The application menu: Welcome to another chapter in our AutoCad Essential Training course. In this particular chapter, we are going to be looking at guessing you started with the AutoCad user interface. And in this particular instance we're using a file called Interface dot DW EEG. You can see the name of the file at the top of the screen. And as usual, you can download it from the website and use it to follow along with the videos in this particular chapter. They exceed the drawing itself is a floor plan with stairs and grids and dimensions and so on. We won't actually be making many changes to the drawing in this particular chapter because we're getting you used to the user interface. Now the first element of the user interface that we're going to look at is the application menu. And you'll find that in the top left corner of your AutoCad screen. So you've opened up AutoCad and you've opened up a drawing, this particular drawing, the interface dot DW G file. And you've got the big red, a top-left corner. And if you click on the little flyer arrow, the little black triangle there, you'll see the application menu appear. Now it is a big menu. Don't be daunted by it. There's lots of information on there, but a lot of the time you might not be using that information, but you've got important things such as nu. So if I hover over nu there, see the right-hand pine highlights and shows you the new tools that you've got, a new drawing or a new sheet set, for example. We've also got open, we've got safe, we've got Save As import, export, and then we start moving into publishing and printing like so. And you've even got drawing utilities where you can work with the utilities to refine your drawing file, your DW G file. You'll also notice that you can close the current drawing or all drawings if you've got multiple drawings open, you'll also notice that you've got the options button here. So if you click on options, what you'll find is it opens up the options dialog box in AutoCad. Now there's a lot of information here and we'll cover that later on in the course. But the options are basically all of your AutoCad settings that you use on a day-to-day basis when you're working with AutoCad. I'll just click on cancel there so that no changes are made to the options. I'll go back up to the application menu and click on the flyer on small. Now your matrices, two icons here. We've got recent documents or open documents. If I click on open documents there, you'll notice there's our interface dot DW G. If I go back to recent documents, there's all the files I've opened recently using auto icon at the top here, I can search for anything I want to go and search AutoCad. If I type in line, for example, like that, it goes and finds all the incidences of the word line. So it goes to the help screens and looks for all the different incidences of that word lining. See there's a lot of them, especially in the help screens in AutoCad. I'll just delete that now. And that takes me back. You'll notice back to the application menu. Now what I'm looking at my recent documents, I've got ordered list. I can do it by access state when the drawings are accessed by file size or file type, if I need to as well. You'll also notice when I click away from it disappears and it takes me into that introduction drawing that I clicked on your notice. So I've now got the introduction drawing open that I used previously in the introduction to the course. Now I can close that using the File tab just there, and we're back to the interface drawing. That's how quick and easy is to move around using the application menu. So if I go back, they're like so I can also change how these files look in the list. I can have large icons like psi. I can even go for small images or perhaps large images that actually physically show me the drawings themselves. You'll also notice there's a little pin here as well. I can pin open the introduction drawing, all the interface drawing. And notice when I hover, I've reached one, I get a big preview screen as well. And it gives me all the location of the files and the version info and the date it was saved. So there's a lot of information there in the Application menu that allows you to work with your drawings in AutoCad at any given time. So we're staying in the interface dot DW G file. And what we're going to look at now in the AutoCad interface is the Ribbon interface at the top of the screen. And the panels that you have on the ribbon as well. Now you'll notice when you first start up AutoCad and open up a drawing, in this case the interface dot-dot EWG file that you've got the ribbon at the top of the screen and you can click on the ribbon tabs like site. So these ribbon tabs allow you to obviously access all the different commands available to you and AutoCad. So there's the Insert tab, the annotate tab. And as you work across, you've got parametric view manage output. A36. If you're using the Internet-based A36 drive. And you've also got the auto CAD express tools, which are all the specific little funky tools that you have to do lots of little niche things such as align, space, move, copy, rotate, and so on. Now I'm gonna go back to the home tab on the ribbon nail. And you'll notice that when you're in the ribbon, you've got these different panels. So in the home tab on the ribbon, you've got the drawer panel, the Modify panel, the annotation panel, and so on and so forth. Now you'll notice when you move over the title bars of these panels, some of them highlight and some of them don't. The reason I highlight is because they've got a little flyout menu. If you click on the triangle there and the drawer panel, you'll notice you've got extra draw commands. And if you click on the little pin there, that pins open that fly out menu so it doesn't fly back into the ribbon. If I unpin that Now, you'll notice it goes back into the ribbon again. So if you need to use those commands a lot more than just the once what you would do, fly out menu, Pinot open, and then it stays open for you to use. Now the other thing with the panels is sometimes you want to make sure that you're using information on one panel, but you're in a different tab on the ribbon. So you'll notice if I go to the Insert tab on the ribbon, I don't have the drawer panel, but I may need it. So that's where you can utilize a wonderful little thing called sticky panels. So I'll go back to the home tab and I'm going to click and drag on the drawer panel and you'll notice it comes out into the drawing area. If I release the mouse nail, that nail just sits there as what they call a sticky panel. It's a bit like a post-it note. You've kind of Post-it noted it into the drawing area. But the good thing is I can now go to the Insert tab, work in the Insert tab on the ribbon. But I've got all my Draw tools here on the sticky panel. Now one of the really weird things about this is I'm in the Insert tab on the ribbon. So finally I'll hover over my sticky panel, module panel and click on this little icon here. Return panels to ribbon. You would think it's going to now go into the Insert tab on the ribbon. It doesn't it disappears. If I go back to the home tab, there's my drawer panel, it's back where it should be. So sticky panels are a really useful tool. If you've got panels that you want to use on a regular basis that needs to be non tab specific on the AutoCad ribbon. We're staying in our interface dot-dot-dot EWG file. And what we're going to look at now in the auto CAD user interface is dialogue boxes. Now you'll be working with lots of different dialog boxes in AutoCad when you use lots of different commands, I'm actually going to utilize a command called Create block. Now, create block allows me to bring up the dialogue box where I select some objects that might become an auto camp block. Now we're not going to actually create an altar can't block. What I want to do is show you the dialog box when it pops up on the screen so that you kind of know the format of a dialogue box in AutoCad. So I'm gonna go to the Insert tab on the ribbon here, like so. And we're still in our interface dot-dot-dot EWG file as we have been for this particular chapter, that won't change. But you'll notice I've got the Create block command here on the block definition panel on the ribbon. So if I click on that little fly out there, I've got Create block and I've got right block. We're gonna select Create block. And there's the dialog box. Now you will get lots of different dialog boxes appear in AutoCad, as I said previously. So what we would do in this case is we give our blocker name and we'd set all of the settings in the dialog box. Now you've got lots of different buttons. In an autocrat dollar box. You've got things like the radio buttons here where you might want to retain the original information, converts a block, or delete the original information, you select whichever setting you want to use. You'll also notice that you've got a lot of tick boxes in the block definition dialog box as well that basically switch things on and off. That's the whole idea of the dialog boxes. You're switching on all the variables and the settings that you need. So we may go into the name here, and we might want to create a block of our staircase over here. So we might call this staircase. So we type in staircase i. We then need to specify a base point. So if I now go to pick points, it'll take me into the drawing, even though I've come out of the dollar, box it on now in the drawing and I'll pick a point where I want that staircase to be inserted. I might use the endpoint snap there. As you can see, there's no way I could have guessed the coordinates for that particular staircase. I would then select the objects again, R code into the drawing from the dialog box. And I'm not actually going to worry too much about the actual block I'm creating here. But what I might do is click there and drag. And notice there's the lasso option in AutoCad and it's selecting objects that I might not need. Hold down, shift on the keyboard and click on the objects. You don't want an i get de-selected like psi. So what I'll do now is I'll just press Enter. And these aren't the objects that I would set for staircase. I am just showing you the workflow in the process. And the whole idea is once you've got all the objects that you want, you would then go and click on OK. And it would create that block for you. But the whole idea is that these dialogue boxes are very different. This is just one particular dialog box in AutoCad. But the dialog boxes are there for a reason. You go in and you set all of your settings that way. Now something else that may happen is you may get a dialogue box that you need to expand a little if you hover over the corners. Also cans, you can make these boxes bigger and smaller if you need to. Especially when you've got information like long descriptions. Or there may be a little graphic in graphic box like that where you need to make it bigger. So if I click and drag, just get that little diagonal arrow on the corner there, you'll notice that that particular window there doesn't get any bigger and the graphic doesn't get any bigger. But when you're previewing drawings, for example, in dialog boxes, you can drag the dialog box and make it bigger. So little thumbnail image gets bigger so that it's just a little bit easier to see perhaps. And as you can see, they all have a minimum size. I've drag that to the left and upwards. That's the smallest size of the block definition dialog box will go to. Now I'm not going to save that block. I'm going to click on cancel. But as you can see, those dialog boxes are there for your use and for your information. You go in and you set all the settings that you need in the dialogue box for the particular command that you're using. Once again, we're staying in the interface dot wj file for this particular chapter. And as usual, you can download that if you haven't done so already from the website to follow along with the video. Now we're gonna start looking at the status bar in AutoCad, in the auto CAD interface, and it's in the bottom right corner of the AutoCad screen. It's all these little icons down here. So you've got things like grid mode, snap mode, and as you come across, you've got Ortho mode, you've got polar tracking. Some of the more important ones are things like objects in that tracking objects and apps and so on. Now those are all displayed on your AutoCad screen and then known as you're drafting settings. So things like your objects, snaps are always going to be on so that you can snap accurately to the objects in your AutoCad drawings. But you can switch on different elements of that status bar using this sort of burger type icon here. And it's, it looks, looks a bit like a Berg. You've got the top and the bottom of the bun and the meat in-between, click on those three lines. And you can see that you can customize your status bar by switching on which ever status and drafting settings you want to use. So something like dynamic input for example, you might want that to be able to be switched on and off on the status bar. So if I click on that, can you see you get a little tick next to it. I come back down to the little burger icon here to switch off the customization. And what you'll notice now is dynamic input is here and I can switch it on and off. So if I go to something like the line command, let's say Home tab, like so. And in the drawer panel on, I'll click online. Now you'll notice as I move around the screen now you can see that the Dynamic Input is prompting me for the first of my line. I'll just hit a Skype a couple of times and cancel that command. If I go down to my dynamic input now and I switched that off by clicking on it, you'll notice it goes gray. And that's part of the Status Bar. You switched these drafting settings on and off. If I now go back to the line command, you'll notice there's no prompt on the crosshair, no dynamic input because I've switched it off. And I can go into the middle of a command and do that, switch it on. And as you can see, the prompt is back on the crosshairs again, that's the whole idea of the status bar as you can go in and out of it anytime when you're working in a command, in an auto CAD drawing. So I'll just hit Escape there to cancel the line command. Another one that is always very useful on the status bar is coordinates, your coordinate readout. So we go back down here to the bottom right corner to the three lines, the customization. And what we need is coordinates. And it's right up there at the top of the list. There's coordinates right there. So I click there and it switches the coordinates on, click on the little three lines. And as you see, I've now customize the status bar. And as I move the cross hair around, can you see the coordinates are changing, given me the readout of where the crosshair is in the auto CAD model space. So that's your status bar, which is a very, very useful tool. Also, you'll notice on the status bar that you've got little fly our arrows as well. So if I come down to something like objects snaps, and click on the fly out there, it gives me the option to switch on and off my running objects snaps. So you'll notice there at the moment I've got endpoint, center, intersection and extension switched on as my running objects and apps that are on all the time. So if I click on mid point, I get a tech next to it, which means that midpoint is now one of my running objects, snaps as well. So it will always highlight midpoints snaps. If I need them. I click on the little fly out just to close it out again. And as you see, it closes the flyout menu. Now on those flyout menus as well, if we go back to Object Snap, you'll see that we've got Object Snap Settings. Now the settings bring up a dialogue box and as you can see, there's the tick boxes for the running objects and apps again. But you'll notice now that all of the settings on the status bar are available by y of tabs in the drafting settings dialog box as well. So you can go in there and switch things like snap and grid on and off there in the drafting settings dialog box, instead of using the status bar. So there's two ways of setting everything up. I will just click on Cancel to close the dialog box. And that's how you can utilize your status bar to make sure that all of your drafting settings are set up the way that you need them so that you can work effectively within your AutoCad drawings. Were staying in our interface dot-dot-dot EWG file as usual. And what we're going to look at now is logging into a 360 functionality within AutoCad itself. Now if you don't know what A36 is, it's basically working in the cloud. This cloud thing that everybody talks about when it comes to technology and computers and the internet. And Autodesk have taken advantage of that and have created a thing called a 360 drive, which is remarkably similar to things like Dropbox, Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive and so on. And the idea being is that you can store your drawings in the cloud and download them from the cloud to work on in Altay cat. Now in order to do that, you need an Autodesk ID and Autodesk account. And if you haven't got one of those already, simply type in Autodesk id and Google, it'll take you to the appropriate accounts page on the Autodesk website and you can set yourself up an Autodesk account. It normally is based around your email address and a password. And once you've set it up, they'll send you an email with a link just to click on to prove who you are. Now I've already gotten Autodesk ID. And the good thing about AutoCad is it's quick and easy to sign into because it gives you a sign-in login part of the AutoCad interface, which is up on the top right-hand corner of the screen. It's here where it says sign in. So I click on the little flyout menu and it asked me to sign into my Autodesk account. So I click there like so, and the sign-in screen pops up. Now the good thing is this is universal to all AutoDesk products, not just AutoCad. So I can be using lots of different AutoDesk products, things like AutoCad, ribbit inventor, and I've got this ability to get into A36 e in any of them. But also more importantly, it allows me to sign into other AutoDesk websites, such as The Support website, the knowledge base website and so on. So I can go on to something like the Autodesk forums and ask a question about AutoCad that I might need answering. Now I'm just going to type in my username here, which is cat FM consultants, like site. And I click on Next and it will ask me for my password. I put my password in there like site and just sign in. Now when I sign in, what'll happen is you can see there that it tells me now that my sign-in is complete. Welcome to Autodesk A3 60. And what I can do is I can update my profile or my preferences directly from AutoCad If I won't say, now the good thing is I can do it here from the A36 tab on the ribbon. And there's all my A36 tools there. And what I can also do is I can just right-click anywhere in the drawing area and go to options, that big dialogue box that I mentioned previously. And if I go to the online tab, you will notice here that I can go into my A36 account. I can synchronize my settings with the cloud and I can choose which settings, a sink as well. Things like options, customization files, printed support files and so on. Now I'm not gonna bore you with going through all of the settings and synchronizing everything. And you can sit there and watch me synchronize my particular account, because obviously my account may be different to yours. But the idea being is that all of these tools allow me to synchronize to the cloud. And then the best thing about that is, is the icon actually download those settings from the cloud at anytime. So I might go to a different remote office that isn't the same office that I might be working in normally. And I can download those settings on a different version of AutoCad on a different desktop, for example. So the idea being is that your A36 e account allows you to store your settings in the cloud. And also it's a storage repository for all of your drawings as well. And then if you are going to that remote office, you can download your files from the cloud and use them accordingly. So once you've got all those settings set up in your options, you would obviously okay, that and those settings will be saved, ready for use when ever you sign into your A36 account through AutoCad. 4. Osnap and otrack: We're starting a another chapter now in our AutoCad Essential Training course. And we're gonna be looking at getting you started with drawing simple geometry in all tie can. Now we've got a new drawing for you. It's called geometry dot DW G. And as usual, you can download that from the website to use to follow along with these particular videos in this particular chapter. Now the first thing we're going to look at when you're working with simple geometry in AutoCad is being able to draw accurately. Now, in order to draw accurately, you need to utilize your objects snaps and also your Object Snap tracking. Now, objects snaps are abbreviated to oh, snap and Object Snap tracking is abbreviated to outrank. They're fairly simple to remember. Oh, snap an aux track and you can find them on the status bar at the bottom of the auto can't screen. So if I just come down here, you see that my aux track is on there and my oh, snaps on there. Now I mentioned running objects snaps previously for Click on this flyout menu here. You can see there that I've got five running objects, snaps, which our end point, midpoint, center, intersection, and extension. Do not switch them all on at once. You will slowly go insane because it tries to snap to all of the snaps at any given time. Just use the optimum ones that you need. So they're all set up and your aux track is already on as well. So click on the fly out little arrow again, and that'll close down the menu. Now with, oh, snap an aux track, the whole idea is, is that you can draw and snap accurately two known points on objects. So if we go to the home tab on the ribbon, and first of all, just check the Layers panel and make sure that you're utilizing the objects layer. They're in the drop-down menu. And you can see that the rectangle on screen in the geometry drawing here is also on that objects layer. Now I'm gonna go to the droll panel and I'm going to click on the line command first of all, now I can specify first. And you're not just that's coming up on my cross hair there because my dynamic input is switched on. Try and have your Dynamic Input Switched on all the time. It's a lot easier to use or to Kant that way. Now if I hover over that corner, I get an endpoint snack. So I can draw my line from an end point Object Snap. If I hover there over the mid point, there's the midpoint snap. I can draw a line from there as well if I want say, and if I come down here, I can also draw a line from this end points nap as well. So I can snap accurately to any point on that particular rectangle. Now I did mention aux track as well, Object Snap tracking. Now Object Snap tracking allows me to hover over up to seven concurrent objects snaps and I can pick intersections between those snaps. So let's say that I wanted to draw that line exactly from the center of my rectangle. So what I might do there is hover over this midpoint here, but don't click on it. And then hover over this midpoint here and don't click on it again. And as I come into the Drawing Center here, can you say I start to get these polar tracking lines and now these are also tied in with my object snap tracking. So what I'll do is I'll hover over that midpoint again there. And as I come in this time, can you see that I get an intersection? Now by intersection is my object snap tracking, kicking in with my polar tracking as well. Now the polar tracking we'll discuss in a moment, but you can see there with polar tracking on which it is on the status bar. If I click on that intersection, That's where my line starts from, which is the dead center of my rectangle. So I can now come over, hey, horizontally, get that midpoint, snap there and click and enter to finish the line command. And you can see I've drawn a line from the center of the rectangle out to that right-hand midpoint without any need for construction lines tool. And that's the benefit of your object snap tracking that aux track. It basically reduces the need for construction lines virtually to nil because you can hover over objects, naps, and specify the construction lines, those green dashed lines that we saw without any need to draw physical lines to represent them. So it's a very, very useful tool. So let's go through that one more time. So I'll go to the line command again in the drawer panel. And this time I'm going to hover over this midpoint here, like site. And then I'm going to hover over this midpoint here, like site. As I come down, can you see the Intersect again or will they buy one at this time? Because I've got an endpoint snap there if the line that I've drawn previously, so that overrides the Object Snap tracking. So I can just use that endpoint that I can come out and I can draw that line sight to that corner there. Click again on the endpoint snap, enter to finish. And as you can see, it's very quick and easy. So your objects and apps allow you to work accurately snapping to exact points on objects and you're aux track your Object. Snap tracking allows you to pick a combination of those snaps to draw accurately between points. And for example, to find the center of the rectangle, as I showed you in this video. We're staying in the geometry dot-dot-dot EWG file. And this time we're going to look at our polar tracking and also a setting called ortho orthogonal. Now, basically, polar tracking, as I mentioned in the previous video, allows you to track Y of angles. Now, what that means is your pilot tracking allows you to set default angles that you can draw your lines along, for example. Now the idea being is, if I want to draw some lines or control them using polar, which allows me to specify the angle that they want to be at. Or I can use orthogonal which ties me to the X and Y axes in the modal space. So let me show you the difference of those two. Let's use polar tracking first. Now you'll find Paola tracking down the status bar. So this circular icon here, and again it's got its own little flyout menu, just like objects that pants. And as you can see there, I can specify the default angle. Now, it doesn't just go to 45 degrees, that's the angle increments. So what we're going to do is we're going to set our polar tracking angle increments there at 245 degrees. So every increment of 45 degrees, I can draw a line along that particular angle. So let's have a look at that. We stayed in the geometry drawing around the objects layer. And again, I'm gonna go to the drawer panel. I'm going to click on the line command. And based on the previous video, your snaps should already be set. So I should be able to snap to that end point there. Click. Now as I come down and drag the mouse like this, can you see when I get to that 45-degree angle, like So can you say the pilot tracking the green dashed line kicks in? And if you look at the rate out there on the dynamic input, you can see the angle that is at 45 degrees exactly. Now if I start utilizing my object snap tracking and I hover nail over that midpoint snap, they are like so don't click on it. And then I come out and when I hit that 45 degrees, Can you see I've got an exact 45-degree line that is halfway down the right-hand side of the rectangle. So if I click there like that, I know that when I come down to this point here, That's going to be 45 degrees that way because obviously it's symmetrical on that side of the rectangle. So I can go to that endpoint snapback and click, and then obviously Enter to finish the line command. And I know that both of those lines are exactly at 45 degrees and the snapped exactly to the two corners of the rectangle as well. So that's the benefit of your pilot. Tracking, allows you to draw lines at exact angles in AutoCad. Now, what about ortho orthogonal, orthogonal times you down to the X and Y axes in modal space. Now, also ICAD is a coordinate driven product. So it uses what they call vectors, which are lines and angles, and obviously x and y coordinates. It's not a raster based graphics product like Photoshop for example. So what you're doing is you're specifying coordinates for everything that you draw. What orthogonal does is it takes away the coordinates and ties you to the X and Y axis, those planes of direction. So let's have a look at how that works. So you'll notice down here on the status bar there's polar tracking. To the left of that is Ortho, ortho mode. It's called orthogonal and it restricts the cursor orthogonally. Now at the moment it's off, if I click on it and switch it on, notice that polar tracking gets switched off because you're basically tying yourself down to 90 degree increments as if you were using 90 degree increments in the polar tracking. But that's the only thing orthogonal does. It only does 90 degree increments, it doesn't do anything else. But the benefit you have now is if I draw a line by clicking on the line command, I can go from this midpoint, haha, but I cannot deviate. You'll notice when I move the mouse, it's always going to be either horizontal or vertical. So if I come across here to this midpoint here and click there, I can't go in any other direction. Can you say I can only go up and down and left and right. So I'll press enter to finish the line like site. Now let's do another line. And I'll go from this midpoint at the bottom here on the rectangle, snap to it and click on it like we've done previously. And as you can see, I can only go left and right or up and down. So when I got to that midpoint snap there and click there, I know that that's an exact vertical line. Enter to finish the line command. And that's how ortho works. Now you can see the orthogonal or ortho is not very flexible. But if you've only got vertical and horizontal lines to draw, it's useful because it restricts the cursor in those two directions. You'll find though that 90% of the time you will use your pilot tracking. So switch your pilot tracking back on and then just check your powder tracking angle, set it to the angle you need, and then close the menu like site. We're staying in the geometry dot-dot EWG file. And you'll notice I've left it in the previous state. It was at the end of the last video where we drew some lines using the polar tracking and the ortho settings. Now what we're going to look at now are actual objects that we might place on an auto CAD drawing, in this case, lines, arcs, and circles. Now in the previous video, you saw me drawing lines using the polar tracking and the ortho settings on the status bar. We're going to have a look now at the line command in more detail and oversee ox and circles as well in a little bit more detail so that you get used to some of the more common components or objects that you would add to your AutoCad drawing. So we're going to the Home tab on the ribbon. And in the drawer panel they see that we've got the line command. So I click on the line command and I'll come into the drawing area and I see that my dynamic input is on and it's prompting me for the first of my line. Now normally you would draw lines utilizing your objects snaps and your Object Snap tracking. So make sure that they are on as well. And what I'm going to do now is I'm going to utilize this midpoint, endpoints Snap pear. I click once and then I drag the line to where I want it to go. And I click again like so to that end point there, like that. I then press Enter to finish. And you can see there that I've drawn a line using accurate objects snaps in the drawing. Now it may be that I want to draw the line in a different way. I want to use coordinates, for example. Now if I want to use coordinates again, I can use my dynamic input to draw a line. So let's go back to that line command upon the drawer panel. Now remember you don't have to keep going back to the line command either you compress spice bar or insert to repeat the previous command. So if I hit spice volume, say it's prompting me for the first of my line. I don't have to keep going back to the line command. Now I'm going to use the same endpoint, midpoint snap here, like so. Now as you can see, when I move that line around using the mouse, can you see that I can specify an angle, I can specify a distance. Now, I can just type in a coordinate. So what I'm going to do is type 350 comma three 5-0. So that moves me 350 along to the right, along the X axis, and then 350 upwards in the y axis. And because it's relative From the start point of the line, it basically takes that start point of the line as the zero-zero point sites spake. So if I now press enter. You'll see that line goes up, 350 along and 350 up. And then as you see, AutoCad is prompting me now for another line segment. If I want to draw one. Now remember, you can use the right-hand shortcut menu. And if I undo here, I undo the last line segments that was drawn. So your notice I'm back now to the start point. Now, if I'd used undo either upon the Quick Access Toolbar top-left there, the undo and redo that would undo the whole commands refined, drawn eight line segments. It would undo all light instead of just that one. So that right-click and undo is very useful if you're drawing lots of line segments. I'm just going to hit escape there to cancel that line command like site. Now let's have a look ox very quickly. Let's jump into arcs and see how they work. Again there on the drawer panel on the home tab on the ribbon. So if I click here and go two arcs here, click on the fly out. There's lots and lots of different. Oh, now I'm not going to demonstrate all of them. I'm gonna demonstrate this one has Start, Center, an end. So basically it's asking for the start point of my OK. So I'm going to start here. And I'm going to then click there. And it now wants the center point of mile, which I'm going to use midpoint, endpoint. And then as I come around, can you see there's the end point if the OLC, they're like site. So what that's done is it's basically specified the three points of the AUC, the stop point, the center point, and the end point. Now we can repeat that up here as well. So let's do that arc again, start center end. So I'm going to start the arc here. Now. There's the same center and there's the same end there. Now, you'll notice when I'm creating those arcs, I'm going counter clockwise. That's the default setting in AutoCad. So when you drawing arcs, always draw them in a counter clockwise direction. Now Circles obviously are related to arcs and art is a part of a circle. And again, if I click on the circle flyer on the drawer panel, you can see that I've got various types of circle as well. I'm gonna go with center radius, the default one. And you specify the center point of the circle first. Always useful to use your objects snaps for this and I'm going to use that mid point where the two lines intersect. So that's my center of my circle. I click and I can drag out and draw a free hand circle. Or I can specify the radius there in the box where it's highlighted in blue. So I'm going to put 250 as the radius and press enter. And there's my circle. Now most circles, you specify centre point and either a radius or diameter or utilize other objects snaps to place the circle. But that's basically lines, arcs and circles. In auto camp. We're staying in the same chapter now where we're looking at getting you started with simple drawing geometry, but we've got a new drawing for you. It's called. Polylines dot d WCAG. And basically it's a blank drawing. It's all set up ready for you to go, and there's nothing on it right now, apart from the liars. Now the line is a setup because we're going to be looking at three different object types in AutoCad, which are polylines, polygons, and splines. Now you'll notice if I go to the Layers panel in the home tab on the ribbon and click on the drop down. We've got different liars for each of those objects. I'd like to make sure that you are in the polylines layer first of all, so that you've got that as the current drafting layer. We then going to go to the Home tab on the ribbon which you should already be in anyway, into the drawer panel. And we're going to click on polyline there. Now you can just type PL or type P line if you want to for polyline, but it said it click on in the panel as well. And the start point, we're gonna put in coordinates this time using our dynamic input. So it's 300 comma 300 like site. So that's 300 along the X axis and 300 up in the y-axis. Press Enter, and you'll see that starts at a point sort of bottom-left. Make sure that you've got your objects snaps on and your pilot tracking. And we're going to drag the mouse up the powder tracking line like site. And you can see that we're at 90 degrees there. And in the little black box there, we're gonna type 500 as the length of that side of the polyline. So you can see that we've basically formed the first side of our polyline there. And you'll think to yourself, well that's very much like the line command. Will. You'll see where it's different in a moment. I'm going to drag across to the right now, and I'm gonna type in 1200 there and enter again on the keyboard, and that draws that side there. Now the benefit of polylines is you can add different shaped segments. So if I now right-click for the next segment and select OK. You'll notice now that as I drag vertically downwards using the pilot tracking, I can put an arc on the end of my polyline. And again, I'll type in 500 making sure that we are going vertically downwards with the pilot tracking and enter. And as you can see, it's trying to draw another OK now, but I want to draw a line. So I right-click again and select line on the shortcut menu. And I shouldn't say that line can now go horizontally to the left or I can just right-click and close my polyline. Now if I hover over that, you will see that it's all one element. It's a polyline on the polylines layer. That's the benefit of polylines. It's a lot of segments join together to form the one object. If I draw that using three lines and an arc, it will be four objects. Now if you've got thousands and thousands of these in a drawing, you can see that polylines make the file size smaller because there's less objects in the drawing. Now we're gonna go to the land dropped in, and we're going to select polygons this time. And the good thing is because I've gone arc here, and that means that I've got a center point around here somewhere and we're going to need the center point to draw a polygon. So we come up to the drawer panel, click on the flyout menu, and select polygon. Now the default number of sides on a polygon and olds carries four. I'm gonna change it to six and press enter. And that means I can draw a hexagon. Now as you can see, it's prompting me for the center of the polygon. Now, go down to your objects snaps, Click on the flyout menu, and just make sure that center is ticked and it's one of your running objects snaps, as you can see it is in my case, I'm going to click on the triangle that's close to the menu. I can touch on the edge of the arc like so. Or I can come in here like this to get the center snap. It depends on which snaps are overriding at the time if I go there. So it's trying to get an endpoint there or an end point there are a midpoint there for come closer to the center, that is the center snap. So I click there, that's the center of my polygon, the center of the arm. Now, I can have an inscribed in circle polygon or circumscribed about circle polygon. Inscribed means it follows the inside of the imaginary circle. Circumscribed means it goes around the circumference of the imaginary circle based on the centre point we've just set up. I'm gonna go for inscribed inCircle because then it will be inside my OK. And can you see I've got a co-owner of my hexagon there. A vertex is called, and I can come out to the midpoint, snap there on the circle, on the arc and I click there. And as you can see, it's place that nice and neatly for me. And that's a polygon. If you hover over it though, it will tell you it's actually a polyline. And it is, it's a closed polyline with six segments, but the polygon command allows you to specify center and obviously the orientation of the polygon based on whether it's inscribed OR circumscribed. Now, last but not least, we're going to have a look at splines. So I click on the layer drop-down and set it to splines. Now splines are basically irregular curves that follow a group of control points. And they use a thing called nerves and new RBS, non uniform rational B spline is the actual mathematical algorithm that AutoCad uses to draw one of these. Now the spline command itself is on the drawer panel, but you need to hit fly out here and just pin it open. So click on the little triangle, click on the pin. And what you'll find is splines are here. So you've got a spline fit that fits the points already on the drawing. Or you've got a spline with control vertices. I am going to use the spline C v with the control vertices like site. And I come in and it's asking for the first of my spline. I'm going to use that midpoint snap there on the end of the polyline. And I'm just going to come in and as I click you'll see those control vertices kicking. And even though they're like regular triangular shapes, can you say it's fitting the curve to those control points. So as I come in, I'm gonna come down, and then I come up to this end point here on the polygon and click their ends to finish. And there's my spline, it's an irregular curve. And when I click on it, there's those control vertices, the CV's, they are like site. Now when I select it, you can see there. I can click there. I'm, I can fit it. So if I click on fits now, can you see? It changes it to a spline with fit points with grips. The I can now click on and drag and change the curve of the spline like site. If I click there again, I can change that to control vertices again. And can you see the control vertices can also be clicked on and dragged and the curve will change again in conjunction with those CV so much control vertices. So I can see why something like a spline might be used for contour lines on a map, for example, where a line is all at the same elevation on a map, but you've got points that represents the elevation on the map. So it's a bit like a dot to dot kind of idea. So that your polylines, polygons and Splines when you're working in AutoCad. We're staying in the polylines dot-dot-dot EWG file. And what we're going to have a look at now is zooming and panning In order to navigate inside your auto CAD drawing. Now you'll notice I've left the polygon, the polyline and the spline as they were at the end of the last video. But it gives us a point of reference to use because we've got some objects in the drawing and we can see how far we're zooming in and out and how far we're planning in the AutoCad drawing. Now the quickest way to do this is to use what they call a human interface device and HIV, which is commonly known as a mouse. And you should have a wheel on your mouse. Now the wheel will allow you to zoom and pan. So if I roll up on the wheel, each notch, Can you say I'm zooming in closer. And then if I wrote back on the whale H naught on zooming out. So those increments on the little clicks on your mouse will allow you to be accurate in your viewing of your AutoCad drawing. Now also as well, you can hold down the male swale and a little hand will appear, Kp, the mouse wheel held down and move the mouse. And you can see that you can pan around. Now the benefit you've got there is you can zoom in real close, how damn the whale. And then pan real close as well so that you can see the detail of your Auto CAD drawing. Now when I look at that drawing now, I kind of feel a little bit lost. I don't know where I am in the drawing. Another thing you can do is you can double-click on the wheel of the mouse as a button. If I double-click that does a zoom extents, which zooms to the extents of the visible drawn objects in your AutoCad drawing firewall back a few notches you can see, I can zoom out and see overall all of the objects immoral to CAD drawing. Now that she using the mouse itself, if I right-click on the mouse, I've also got real-time pan and zoom here as well. So let's select pan on the shortcut menu, you'll see the hand a pair. And if I click and hold on the left-hand mouse button, can you see the hand kind of grips the drawing. And then when I move the mouse on panning again, locker was previously, but when I release the mouse button, I'm still in pen. So I need to right-click and perhaps change that to zoom and go to realtime zoom. I now have a magnifying glass. Again, left-hand mouse button, hold it down, move up. You zoom in, move down, you zoom out. Note to the little positive and minus symbols that can you see positive and negative showing you a zooming in and zooming out again. Now if I release the mouse button, I'm still in real-time zoom. So I need to right-click the shortcut menu and then exit real-time pan and zoom. And then I'm back with my Crosshair. Now, there are lots of different zoom commands available to you, which I won't go into here. But if you go and see a navigation bar here and just click on this little sort of fly out menu here. There's all these different zoom commands available. Now, zoom extents, I've mentioned, that's the one where if you double-click on the mouse wheel, it zooms to the extents of the objects in the drawing. Zoom window is one that I will quickly cover here now. And that allows you to pick a window. So specify first corner, click, drag the window around the area you want to zoom into. Click again. And it zooms you into the extents of that window you just specified. If I were to double-click on the wheel of the males, that takes me back and does assume extends to the visible objects in the drawing, the extents of the visible objects in the drawing. I wrote back on the whale a couple of notches and we're back to the view that we had previously. So you're not just as lots of different ways of navigating in your AutoCad drawing. You can use the navigation bar with the zoom commands. You can right-click and use the zoom pan on the shortcut menu, or you can just utilize your mouse effectively to zoom and pan in your alter kept drawing. 5. Text styles: We're starting a new chapter now in our AutoCad essential course. And what we're going to look at now is getting you started with annotating some simple AutoCad designs. Now you'll notice we've got a new drawing for you. It's called annotation dot DW G. And as usual, you can download that from the website to follow along with the videos in this chapter. Now this particular drawing, the annotation dot-dot EWG drawing is showing a little bolting plate with three holes in it. And what we're going to do is we're going to annotate that with some text and some dimensions to make it into a simple design where we're communicating our design intent by way of providing the appropriate annotation. People need to know how big the holes are, how big the plate is, and so on. Now the first thing you need when you're setting up annotation, especially text in AutoCad is you need to look at your text styles. Now you'll notice in the layers panel there in the home tab on the ribbon where already in the text layer. So if you're not in the text layer, make sure you select it from the dropdown like site. Now we're not going to place any texture. What we're going to do is we're going to set up an appropriate text style. Now you can get to this in two ways. You can use the Home tab on the ribbon. Click on the fly out here on the annotation panel. And there's your text style icon there. Or you can go to the annotate tab on the ribbon into the text panel here and see this little diagonal arrow here. If you click there, that also opens up the text style dialogue box. So I'll just cancel that. Now. I'm going to go back to the home tab. That's my preference because I've then got things like draw and modify available as well. If I need them, I'm going to click on the fly out here and select my Text style icon. And that opens up the textile dialog box. Now, you'll notice you've got some default textiles in there already. You've got standard an annotated. Now, don't worry about unassertive will cover annotated scaling later on in the course where you're going to utilize the standard textile For the moment, which currently uses the font Arial. Now you'll notice the little t, t next to it. That means it's a true type fonts. So you've got things like Arial, Times, New Roman, basically anything. You've got a Windows which is obviously your operating system. You should be able to get an auto cat as well, although true type fonts, now, the font name that I'm going to select is going to be the Doner. Now when I click on that pull-down menu there, can you see it lists all of the fonts. Now if i walk for Donna, That's right down near the bottom of the alphabet, if I just type V on the keyboard, can you say that it takes me to the first font that begins with v. If i press V again, can you say it's going down the list so I can pick whichever one. I'm going to select Vedanta, which has got me there nice and quickly. And my font style, I'm gonna change it to it's italic. And you'll notice that changes in the little preview bottom-left. Now I don't want it to be annotated because I'm placing the text in the Model tab in AutoCad. So I don't need that to be annotated if and I'm going to leave the height at 0. So AutoCad will always prompt me for the height of my texts that I place in the drawing. Now I've got some really cool effects with text as well, especially in my textiles. I can make the text upside down. I can have it backwards. I can change the width factor to psi naught 0.5. And you'll not just that everything changes. I can flip that back the other way. And oblique angle I can change at, say 45 degrees and I, Blake's over at 45 degrees. Now the width factor there, I'm going to set that back to one. And the oblique angle, I'm going to set it back to 0 so that I've got my regular Madonna. It's italic font again. Now i'm going to apply that as a new style. I don't want to change the standard one because what I'm doing at the moment is I'm changing the standard one. So just click on cancel there. So make sure that you don't change one of your default textiles. And then go back to annotation and click on textile again. What you want to do if you want to change a textile, set up a new one, click on new like that. And then we'll call it something like let's say training for example. And I'll click on OK. Then we go back to the vagina. Like so. Change it to it's italic. And then we've got a separate text. Style. Doesn't ever change your default ones cause you never know when you might need them. So again, height 0 annotated on ticked. I'm not going to worry about any of the effects, and I am going to apply that. Then I can select it from the list set as the current textile, like so and then close the dialog box. Notice there's no okay. You close it. And then if I go to the fly out here, can you see now that I'm using training as my current textile? Click on the fly out there. I've also got annotated and standard but I won't training. The nice thing is you get a nice little preview. If you want to manage a textiles click there takes you back to the textile dialog box. I'll just click on cancel, close that. So we've now set up our default textile. We're now ready to start thinking about placing text in or AutoCad drawing was staying in our annotation dot-dot-dot EWG file. And in the previous video, we set up our text style. So just make sure that you're utilizing your new textile. You can do that in the home tab on the ribbon, click on the annotation flyer and just make sure that you're textile that is set to training like site. Also makes sure that the appropriate layer is being used. Make sure that you're using your text layer to place text on your AutoCad drawing. Now what we're going to do is we're going to place a little label underneath our boating plight and we're gonna use single line text. Now, single line text differs from the other type of text in AutoCad multiline text. And you'll see the differences. They become very apparent visually on the drawing in a moment when I show you how to place each one. So we're gonna go to the annotation panel on the home tab on the ribbon. Click on the fly out here and select single line text. You can also do this from the annotate tab on the ribbon if you wish. So a single line that it's asking for a stop point. If the text I'm just going to pick a point just under here, underneath our little bolting plate. And as you can see, it's now prompting me for the height. If you move the mouse around, can you see there it's asking me to specify the height if you get close to the points. Can you say it's just things like polar tracking an object snaps, just move away a little bit. There's the height there. I'm gonna give it 5050 units in this particular drawing and enter. And then it will ask for the rotation angle. Do you want it at 0, which is horizontal, or coming round at 45 degrees or 90 degrees and so on. Make sure you just press enter to accept 0 so that its horizontal. Now, little flashing personnel for your single line text. So I'm going to type in now the name of my object in the drawing, which is the bolting plight. And as you can see that it's red because it's on the text layer and it's utilizing my training textile. Now a single line text when I press Enter, takes me down to the next line of single line text. And each line of text is an individual object. So if I put boating plight and then I put plan, let's say, and then n. So once again, to take me to the next line down, if i press enter without any text, it closes out the single line text command. And if I hover over each of these, can you see that one object? That's another object. So what we'll do as well is will now put some little notes next to our boating plight, but we'll use multiline tanks. So again, annotation panel, click on the fly outs multiline text. Now you'll notice I've got an ABC on the crosshair. Just So I've got an indication of what the text will look like in my multiline text area. So it's now asking me to specify first corner. I'm going to go over here to the right, click once and drag a window that my text is going to occupy and click again. Now as soon as I do that, you'll notice some quite dramatic changes in the actual screen layout. You'll notice now that we have a text editor and textual tab in the ribbon with all of my different settings for my multiline text. So I've got things like style, formatting, paragraphs, settings, Bullets and Numbering, inserts, spellcheck and so on. You can see that multiline text is very much like Microsoft Word for example. And that's the whole idea of it's meant to give you almost like a word processor built into auto CAD. One little helpful point though, can you see the flashing cursor in the area where you're going to place the text. Always, always, always just click inside that editor space before you start typing. Then AutoCad knows that you're ready to add the text. So I'm gonna use the sign textile and you'll notice it's adopted the 50 height over in the style panel of the text editor tab, you can just say they're above the word mosque, there's 50 there. So that's remembered the height 50 from the single line text. So I'm just gonna put notes like that. Maybe put a colon there and then press enter. This time it takes me to the next line down, but it's all one object. Each of these lines of multiline text form one multiline text object. So I might want to put some bullets and numbering in there. So I got to the paragraph panel, click on the fly out and say numbered and it puts one. Can you see that there? And I'm just gonna put all dimensions in millimeters now started typing, but nothing's coming up on the screen. Again. Click in the Editing area first and then it remembers that you meant to be typing. So I'll put all dims in millimeters. Now you'll notice there can you say it's gone to the, the spice that I've recommended the, I've kind of created there in the drawing. I'm going to put a full stop there and press Enter, takes me down to the next numbered point. So we've got all dimensions in millimeters and we'll leave it at that. But what I can do is I can highlight notes, for example, make that bold and underline it using the formatting panel. And then when I click away from my text, you see there that the text is all on object when I hover over it. Now if I click on it once, can you see there I've got some arrows and what I can do is I can click on this arrow here and it changes the width like psi. I can make that all very narrow and look very weird. Or I can stretch it out. I'm going to hit a Skype a couple of times and just pan across a little bit. And then without the view cube here being in the way, I can click, click and drag. And that just looks a bit neater like that. All dimensions in millimeters, all on one line. I had escaped to the Select. And that is my multiline text in place for my notes. And the boxing plight plan title is all set up in single line text at the bottom there. So we're staying in our annotation dot-dot EWG file and say I've left it in the same state as it was at the end of the last video, where we've got the single line text saying boating, plight and plan. And the multi-line text is on notes column to the right of the boating plate. Now, obviously what we're going to need to do as well is make sure that we add dimensions to our drawing. Otherwise, nobody's going to know how big the bolting plate actually needs to be. So in the same way that we did with textiles, we need to set up a dimension style. Now, my preference is to stay in the home tab on the ribbon and go to the annotation fly out here and select dimensions style there like sine or you can do it that way if you want to. Or you can go to the annotate tab on the ribbon and click on the little arrow here like so. And that will also allow you to go to your dimension style there as well. So they should dimension style manager there like so. I'm just gonna close that and I'm gonna go back to the home tab. And I learnt my little annotation flyer here. And then click on dimension style there. Now, dimension styles, a quite complex. Now for this particular drawing, I'm going to be creating a metric dimension styles. So it will be in millimeters, not inches. For those of you that might use imperial units, for example. Now we've got ISO 25, we've got standard, we've got annotated. I'm going to use ISO 25 as my templates, so make sure that that is the current dimensions style. So there's ISO 25 there. Click on Set Current and exceeds the current style at the top. Then when I select New. It'll actually cites a copy of ISO 25. I'm just gonna call it training so that obviously we can distinguish it from the other dimension styles. I'm going to start with eyesight 25, and I am going to use it for all dimensions. And it's not going to be unassertive. We'll cover that later. Now the good thing is I can set up dimension families if I want C sub styles. So I can have a particular style but only applies to linear dimensions or diameters or perhaps radius for example. I'm going to use it for all dimensions. And I'm going to click on continue. Now as soon as I do that, it opens up this great big complex dialog box. Now, make sure that when you are placing your dimensions, all of your settings are set to buy layer, then it adopts the properties of the layer that you are using for your dimensions. Now if you just look past the dimension style dollar books, you can see that I've left the current layer on text. Don't worry about that. It's not a problem as long as you make sure that you place your dimensions on the dimensions layer in the drawing. Later when we place the dimensions, you'll be fine. Now we are going to work across the dialog box. We've got lines, symbols and arrows, text fit, primary units, ultimate units and tolerances. We'll cover each of these terms as we go, but just bear in mind, everything will be a metric, millimeters. So loins tab first, the dimension lines are the lines that go between the arrow hedging. See that in the preview there. So I'm going to set everything to buy layer because then it adopts the properties of the layer that you place in the dimensions on. So everything goes to buy layer, baseline spicing. I'm going to set that to ten millimeters. Extension lines are these vertical lines here that basically form the reference lines, so to speak, of the dimension. So again, all set to bi layer. And again, you're going to work through all of these settings. And the good thing is once you've created a one-dimension style, you can copy them and obviously create other dimension styles from them. Extend beyond dimension lines. I'm going to set that to 2.5 millimeters. And the offset from the origin is that little gap there that you can see coming off the extension lines going to set that to four millimeters. So as I keep hitting Tab when I change the setting, can you see the preview is updating each time. So that's our lines or set up. Let's go to symbols and arrows. And you can see there that we using close filled arrowheads fraud dimensions. Now I could use architectural ticks, for example. And you see that gives me that little slanted tick thing going on. Now bearing in mind that this is a mechanical kind of drawing, you'd probably use close filled arrowheads, not architectural tics. Now leaders, if you using the key leader command, I might change that to something like, let's say an open dot or perhaps a box or something like that. So I'm gonna change that to open dot and the arrow size, I'm gonna update that to 3.5 millimeters. And again, if I press tab, can you see the arrowheads change in the preview? Sense remarks apply to things like circles and arcs where you can have a mock. If I press tab and see that 3.5, the MOC should appear in the sense and other previews. Obviously not got that much magnification, let's say can't really see it, but you can also go and set its aligns as well if you want. See personally, I leave that set to none because those marks in lines just create more objects that you'll probably have to delete at some point when you move the circle or change the circle or whatever. So I set that to none because the dimension will still pick up on the circle of the arc anyway. When you're breaking dimensions using the dim bright command, the brake size is 3.75 millimeters. I'm not going to change them. You can also create an arc length dimension with a little arc lengths symbol. So that can be preceding the dimension text or above it. I tend to use proceeding or you can set it to none. If you creating jogged radii, for example, the angle is 45 degrees by default. And the joke height factor for linear jog on linear dimensions is 1.5 times the text type. I'm going to leave those as they. Oh, I'm now gonna go to the Text tab. Now, the textile at the moment is using standard. I don't want to use that. I'm going to set it to training like so. And that gives us that nice of a donna Italica that we set up previously. Again, though, by layer, you can have a fill color behind the text. So let's say yellow, for example. I don't tend to use that unless I'm highlighting dimensions, so I'm going to set that back to none. And the text type 2.5 is quite reasonable already. I can't draw a frame around my text if I want. So you'll notice as well, I'll on tick that and leave it switched off. Text placement vertically is above the dimension line, horizontally centered on the dimension line, and the view direction is left to right. If I change that right to left, I can change that. And can you see it goes upside down for different types of elevations and drawing styles. I'm going to leave that back to left to right. And the offset from the dim line, I'm going to go for 1.5 millimeters. When a tab that now can you see it changes quite dramatically in the preview. Text alignment. You can have everything horizontal if you wish, or you can have an aligned with the dimension line, or you can have the ISO standard, which is a metric standard where anything that is radius or diameter related has a cranked dimension line, as you can see there with that radius. Let's go to the FEC tab now. Now Fit options. I don't tend to change these. So all of these I leave as default settings. Now, we're going to use an overall scale of one in this case. And can you see that I'm not making it annotated either at the moment. I'm leaving it as it is. I'm not gonna make it annotated at all. And then I'm going to place the text manually. When I'm fine tuning, I'm, I'm going to draw a dim line between the extension lines. Now when I tick that place text-mining, then that means every time I place it I mentioned I've got a manually placed the dimension text. Do I want? Probably not really. Let's let all tie. Can't do that automatically. Primary units, I can override any units settings I may have with my dimensions. Because at the moment, you can see that my units, I've got things after the decimal place. So the unit format will be decimal precision. I'm not gonna have any decimal places and see their decimal separator is a comma. Now, we'd normally use what is known as a decimal place. It's called a period in auto cat. So if I went to something like one decimal place, can you say it's adding a dot now instead of a comma. And I can switch on 0 suppression. So if I switch that off and on, you'll see that anything that might have a 0, I can switch the trailing 0 off by ticking it. It's the same with the decimal degrees. If I set the precision there to two decimal places, can you say I've got 60 degrees in the preview? If I switch the trailing suppression on, it loses those zeros on the 60 degrees like site. And ultimate units. If I want to display any alternate units, I might set it to architectural. Can you see that? I've got 14.1 millimeters and half an inch, for example. Now, normally you don't tend to despots and at units unless you're using multiple units settings. So you might do that if you're working on an international project where you're working in the UK and the US where you need metric and imperial, i'm going to switch that off just purely for clarity. And then tolerances. If you're working same metalworking or product design, you might need a method where you've got a deviation of plus or minus ten millimeters. So if I set that to a deviation, can you see I've got the plus and minus is appearing on the dimensions. I'm going to set the tolerance to none as well purely for clarity and click on ok. So that's my dimension style, all set up, nice and neat and ready to go. So make sure you select it, set it as the current style, and then click on close. And that is now your current dimensions style. Four-year-olds can't drawing. We're staying in our annotation dot-dot-dot EWG file. And you can see that we've got our notes and our boating plate plan text there. And what we did in the previous video was set up a dimension style to allow us to start adding dimensions to our boating plate to communicate our design intent. Now there's a couple of little settings that I want you to set up first before you start by mentioning. So in your Layers panel in the home tab on the ribbon, makes sure that you place your dimensions on the dimensions layer. So always good to make sure that the relevant objects or on the relevant layer. Now, have a look at the status bar at the bottom of the screen. Can you see it says once a one there. And if you click on that little fly, our arrow, there's all these different scales available to me. Now this particular scale that we're looking at is your annotation scale in the model space. I want you to leave it set as one to one. Now, there's a reason for that, and you'll find out more about that in the next chapter. That chapter that talks about setting up things like title blocks and scaled viewports and so on. Now the reason that I'm deliberately leaving the annotation scale at one-to-one is so that you can see why that annotation scale is there. So lets start dimensioning now. Now you can dimension off of the annotation panel here on the home tab on the ribbon. Or you can go to the annotate tab on the ribbon like so. And there's our dimensions panel there. Now, I prefer to dimension off of the annotate tab on the ribbon. The reason being this is a really nice little layer override. Can you say it says Use current layer. So if you've forgotten in the home tab to go to dimensions here and the annotate tab, you can go, hey, I want the dimensions layer. So you can override the current layer even if it isn't the dimensions layer, very useful. Also, you can select your style which is training like so as well. Now, dimensioning is very simple. Off of the Annotate tabs, you've got all your dimensions here on this fly out here. So you've got linear aligned angular, arclength, radius, diameter, job than ordinate. And if I just hit a Skype, pledged to lose that menu. I've also got this thing here. Code automatic dimensioning is just called the dim command, the dimension command. And that allows me to automatically dimension objects in autocrat. We do cover that a little bit later in the course though. So we're just going to use this little flyer here. Now I'm gonna go for a linear dimension. Initially, make sure that your objects snaps are on, otherwise you will not dimension accurately. So I'm gonna go endpoints snap there as an origin. Endpoints snap there as an origin. When I drag up what's now you'll see the dimension a pair. Drag it up a little bit to about there, and click. Now, you'll notice everything looks remarkably small. But if you zoom in real close, you'll see there that there's my one for O2, 0.1. so it's 1402 millimeters, 0.1. Now you can see that, that 0.1 if you work in, in millimeters, kind of inconsequential. So what we can do there is actually edit our dimension style on the fly or click on the arrow here. There's training there. I'll go to modify. I'll go to fit or units. Either one will work. I'm going to change the precision there too. That one. If I go to fit what I could've done is placed the texts manually or could've rounded up the style, or could a scale the dimensions to the layout? There's lots different settings there as well. Allow me to tidy up the dimensions so I'll okay that. And then I'll close it and you'll see the updates to just 1402 like site. So if I now zoom out, you'll see that the arrow heads there as well. They're right on the end, but they're all just very, very small. And the reason they're very small is our annotations scale here is set to one to one, which means that these arrowheads and the text and the lines are all one-to-one, their full size in the Model tab down here. Now, don't worry about that at the moment. That will become a lot more apparent in the next chapter. What I'd like you to do now is place a radius or diameter and an angular dimensions. So let's do that. Let's go here, will go radius, will select the left-hand circle, drag the radius up to about there, and click will then do a diameter. Let the middle circle, drag that up. And now you can line and with that one if you want see or you can bring it to a different position. It's entirely up to you, like psi. And then we'll do Angular, which is just here. And we'll pick two lines. I'll go for that line and that line. And just drag the angle outlet that say Ixy we've done mentioned up the drawing, but we've done mentioned it in a way where our annotation scale is left at that one-to-one down on the status bar. Staying in our annotation dot-dot-dot EWG file. And what we're going to look at this time is adding a simple table to our auto CAD drawing. Now sometimes you have to do that because you want to annotate in a tabular format. So you might want to list hold diameters or you might want to list on mentions angles. Materials at the boating plate is made from. Now we're just going to go into the Layers panel here on the home tab on the ribbon. And you'll notice that we don't have a Tables layer. So we're gonna go to layer properties, opened up the layer properties manager. Click on this icon here for new layer. New layer will be tables. Just type it in like site, and just make sure you put a capsule letter in there just to keep it consistent. And you'll see it's adopted the red color of the current layer, which has dimensions. If you double-click on the little sheets of paper next to the word tables, that makes it the current drafting layer. So when I close the layer properties manager, you see in the last panel that tables is now the current lab. Now you can draw a table from the Home tab on the ribbon, it's in the annotation panel here. There's the table command there. You can also do it from the annotate tab and see there's the tables panel there. I need to just expand that out. That's purely due to the resolution of the recording of the videos. They kind of squish up a little bit on the ribbon there, but there's the table command. If I need it. Again, mark preferences the home tab because I think about things like draw a modified panels available. So I click on the table command. And what this does is it allows me to add a table. I'm just going to stick with the standard table style, which is there. It's the only table style right now I haven't set up any new ones. I'm going to start from an empty table. I can work from data links, you'll notice as well, and from object data in the drawing, if I use the data extraction command, we're just gonna create an empty table. So I start from empty table. The insertion behavior, I can either specify an insertion point, specify a window that I want the table to fit into. We're going to use specify insertion point. And we're going to go for five columns with a column width. Oh, let's change that to a nice round number of size 75 for example. And that's millimeters in this drawing. And we've got one data row at the moment with the row height of one line. So I'm going to go in there and change that to three. Now, when you're creating tables in order to catch every title, headers and data. So the first row cell style is title as the title of our table. Second rice sell style is the header. So that's the names of each of the bits of data in each column, and then all other row cells, cells will be data obviously. So when I click on OK. Now there's my table and again, it's all full size in millimeters in modal spice at the moment. So I'm just going to place that over here to the left. Click once and you'll see that you get the text editor tab on the ribbon. And a big editing failed for the title of the table. Now, you can't really see the table because we need to be zoomed in more suggested a Skype a couple of times. And the table is they're just using pan and zoom, getting nice and tight on the table so that you can see what you're doing. And then double-click in the title box. And now you can see with the text editor how you can edit this. So we might put in here, so this might be Dimensions table, like sign, and then we might just press Tab. And as you can see, it takes us to the next cell just like it would in Microsoft Excel. So that's a header. So we might put something like part number or part name, like psi, tap that across and then we might have diameter, and then we might have radius, and so on. And again, just make sure that you put the capital letters in, unlike me there. And just make sure it's neat and tidy. So you've got part name, diameter, radius, you might have part number, and so on, so forth. Now I'm not going to fill out that particular header there and then I tap that, there's part name. So we might have bolt hole, hole number one, let say the diameter and the radius and so on. I can then just click away from the table. And all of that information is gone in it's on the tables, liar, just in case I need to switch that layer on and off at any point to hide the title. So if we zoom out now, say I've got a table in tabular format on my drawing ready to go as well. So we've got to a point now where we have got our boating plight in plan. We've got some notes, we've got some dimensions, we've got a table. As we move into the next chapter, we'll start making this into a more professional type drawing so that we can communicate our design intent even further. 6. Creating a simple titleblock: We're starting another chapter now in AutoCad essential core. So and what we're going to be looking at is getting you started with communicating your design intent. Now you may recognize the drawing. We've got few, it's got a different nine though it's cooled design intent or dw JJ. And it's the finished drawing from the previous chapter where we added the annotation, the techs, the dimension styles, the textiles and so on. So what we're going to do now is communicate the design intent by way of creating a more professional drawing with a title block and some scaled viewports and so on. So the first step towards doing this is creating a sensible cycle block and getting it into one of the layout amps. Now the layout tabs are down here, bottom left. And they are what is known as the pipa space in AutoCad at the moment, we're working in model space in the Model tab, and you'll see the paper space in a moment. Let's quickly create a very simple title block. Now in order to do that, we need a couple of new layers. So in the home tab on the ribbon will go to layer properties. Click on New Layer. And the first new layer will be talking block like site. Now what you might want to do is also creates a title text layer so that all the text in the title block goes on to that layer as well. So that's our first new layer title block. You might want to give it a different color. So click on the color there. I'm going to use color 30, which is like this orangey color here. And then click on OK. Like site. I'm also going to make it the current layer. So I'll just double-click there on the little sheets of paper. It's Mike title block the current layer, and then going to create another new layer. And I'll call it title text. Like so. And that adopts the color of the current lie of the 30, the color 30 as well. So a close the layer properties manager. Now I'm going to create a really quick and simple title block and then put it into the layout one tab for you. So let's do that first. And what we'll do is we'll get that setup quickly into layout one. So I'm gonna go to the drawer panel. I'm going to go to the rectangle command here. And over here on the left in this little bit of space, I'm going to click once for the corner of the rectangle and drag upwards to the rights and the other corner point, the rectangle, I'm going to make it four to 0, comma two, 97. Now you're probably thinking, where has he got those numbers from? They've just kind of appeared out of thin air that actually in millimeters, 420 millimeters by 297 millimeters. And they make for a particular size of PIPA in metric millimeters, which is an, a three sheets ice. So when I press Enter in the rectangle command, that's the outside edge, A3 sheet of paper. I'm then going to go to the Modify panel and use the Offset command here. Select offset, come into the drawing area and I'm going to specify an offset distance of 15, 1-5 like so. And press enter. And then I'm gonna zoom in a bit closer to my title block and just pan so that you can see what's going on. I'm going to slit the edge of the rectangle like that. Come inside the rectangle for my drawing board or coming in from the edge of the paper. And then click on that side of the edge of the paper. Make sure you come inside and don't go outside the original rectangle. And then press Enter to finish. There's our simple title block. Now we're going to copy these to the Windows clipboard. So select one rectangle and the other rectangle just by clicking on them. And then right-click. And on the shortcut menu you'll see clipboard. You want copy with base point. And then the base point hover over this bottom left corner, you'll see it go green and just click once, that's it, and then hit escape to the select a couple of times. What you've done there is you've copied that to the Windows clipboard with a base point from all type cat. We're now going to go to the layout one tab. Click on it here, and you'll see that there's a default viewport there. Now we don't need that viewport, so select it and delete it. Hit the delete key. We don't need that. We're going to create our own viewports later. And then right-click and you want to clipboard it like so, and then go to paste. And there's our title block as per the Windows Clipboard. Insertion point will be 0 comma 0, and then enter. And you'll notice that it goes to the edge of those bashed lines. Those dashed lines are on a sheet of paper. But it's a default sheets of paper and it's not the size that we need. If you roll back on the wheel of the males, you'll notice that our title block doesn't fit on our sheet of paper. Now what we'll do in the next video is we'll actually make that work. But that sheet of paper right now it's just using a default setting. But those dashed lines are really important. There are printer limits. So basically anything outside of those dashed lines won't plot when we plot our drawing. So we need to make sure that we've got a page setup. That one encompasses our title block and to a page setup that allows us to plot, making sure that all of our information is on our drawing and doesn't go outside those printer limits. And what we'll do is we'll look at that in the next video. In the previous video, what we did was created a simple title block, and we copied and pasted it across into our layout one tab. Now I've left the drawing in the same state as it was at the end of the last video where our title block does not fit our sheet in the Layout tab. Now in order to make that work, what we need to do is make sure that we have set up a title block and a sheet that sit on top of each other and they're not quite right at them. And you can see that on the screen. So I'm in the layout one tab, what I need to do is right click on that layout one tab. And what we're going to do that is go to the page setup manager. Now you'll notice when you open this up that the current layout is layout one. And that's the layout one that's highlighted down here in the bottom left corner. And you'll notice that you've got asterisks in the page setups list. Now what that means is that all we've got is the default setting for the layout one tab, which as you can see, doesn't tally up with our 420 by two 97. In fact, it's the next sheet size down, it's an A4 sheet. So what we need to do is create a page setup that works with our title block. So I click on new. And we're gonna call this A3. And then it's going to be in a landscape orientation. So we'll just call it A3 dash landscape. Now what you might want to do is also specify the file type that you might output from this. So it might be an altered SWF, it might be a PDF, and so on and so forth. Or you might put the printer nine there or something like that. I'm actually going to call it dw f, like psi, which is the Autodesk dw f file format. I'm gonna click on OK there. And as you can see, it now takes me into a dialog box that looks remarkably like the standard AutoCad print or plot dialog box. But we're setting up a page setup so that we can use these settings over and over again. Now I've said dw f in the name of the page setup. So printer plotter, I might use something like the DW F6, a plot printer configuration file. So let's do that first. Now the paper size, we don't want a four, we want a three that for 20 by two, 97. So if I scroll up a bit, there's all my isometric i1, i2, i3. There's A3 for 20 or two, 97. So there is there in the little preview. We're gonna set it to extent they're like so. And we're going to center the plots over the A3 sheet of paper. Now don't worry about these red lines on the Preview. That's because we haven't set everything up. Yeah, it's kind of telling you that it won't fit at the moment, but it will. Now the plot scale is going to be one-to-one because our sheet is going to be 420 by 207 and our title block will also be 420 by 207. Now, plot style table, I'm just gonna go with monochrome, black and white. For the moment. Don't worry too much about colors. And we wanna make sure that our drawing orientation is set to landscape. Now we can preview what this is going to look like. So click on preview. And as you can see there, the lines look a bit weird and wonderful moment. Just right-click and exit that for the moment. And then click on, okay. Because we haven't actually applied the Page Setup to the layout yet, we need to apply it. So there's our A3 landscape dw f, select it. And if you double-click on it, it will apply it to the Layout tab. Now what do you notice in the background? Can you say are orange lines there? Don't actually fit. Can you see that there? So what we've gotta do is we've got to change that slightly and it's really, really easy to do. So just click on close there on the page setup manager. Now you'll remember when we copy and pasted these, these were just rectangles. So what I can do is I can delete this particular polyline. It's still on the title block layer like site. I'm going to delete that one. And what I'm gonna do is I'm going to offset, and I'm going to change the offset distance System to 20 instead of 15. And this is a little bit of trial and error, but it's a good way of making sure that it's hard to block works. So you select the outside edge, come inside and click again and ends to finish. And now when you offset by 20, Can you say our drawing board or sits nicely inside those dashed printer limits. So what we've done now is we've defined a page setup that works. So that's our page setup, our A3 sheet and our A3 title block. All ready to go. We're staying in our design intent dot-dot EWG file. And you'll notice I've left it in the same state as it was. At the end of the last video where we basically set up the Page Setup, making sure that our white sheet with our bashed printer limits and our title block all tallied up nicely. So basically our border of our title block now sits nicely inside those prints limits in the layout one tab. Now what we're going to look at is creating a new layout. Instead of calling it a layout one, we're going to make it more descriptive. What we're also going to do is add a scaled viewport so that we can start scaling modal space information so that it appears in the layout tabs. Now let's do the layout. But first I'm going to right click on layout one. And I'm going to rename it. And we're going to call it a three dash landscape. Now, as a rule of thumb, what I tend to do is rename the layout tabs with the same name as obviously the page setup. Now just make sure you spell it correctly, unlike me. So they go A3 landscape, press Enter, and you see that tab now says A3 landscape. Now you can remove as many layouts as you want from a drawing. We don't need layout too. So I can right-click on that and I can delete it. You'll get a little prompt. They're saying the selected layer will be permanently deleted, so I'll just OK. That and it's gone. So our A3 landscape tab has a page setup called a3 landscape. You check that by right-clicking Page Setup manager like we did in the previous video. There's our A3 landscape dw f, which is being used by the A3 landscape tab. So we can close that again nail. Now what we need to do is create a viewport so that we can display what is in the model space in our layout tab. So Home tab on the ribbon layer properties in the layers panel. We're going to create another new layer and we're going to call it viewports. And we're going to create a scaled viewport in our A3 landscape tab. So there's our view ports like give it a different color as well. So I'll change that to something like a nice blue that stands out on the white background in the Layout tab. And what you also want to make sure of is that it doesn't plot as well. So I'm going to expand the liar prophecies manager or a little bit like site. And what you'll notice, there's a plot here. Can you see it here? There's a plot column and the viewports layer, you click on the little plotter and can you see there's a little no entry symbol. That means that when you actually physically plots or print the drawing, the viewports layer will not plot and you don't want viewports everywhere, especially if you've got multiple view ports plotting all of your drawing because they're just going to be rectangles around all of the views that you've got on your drawing. So double-click connects to view ports to make it the current layer like site. And then what we'll do is we'll close the layer properties manager. Now, you'll notice up at the top of the screen on the Ribbon, just to add a little bit of confusion, we now have a layout tab on the ribbon, as well as a layout tab called a3 landscape at the bottom of the screen. Autodesk could have possibly nine those slightly differently. But if I click on the Layout tab on the ribbon now you'll notice I can create layout viewports. So I want a rectangular layout viewport. So I click on rectangular there on the drop down. And I'm gonna use my object snap. So I'm going to click once here and drag my view port. And come down here to get this corner here as well, like site. Now you'll notice things kind of go a bit crazy on the screen there's a grid and there's some information there. You can see our boating plate, you can see on notes and everything else. Now, basically what's happened there is when you create that particular viewport, what it's done is it's switched the grid on. Now I don't want the grid on in that view port. So what I want to do is I want to be able to switch that grid off. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to come down here to my little customization icon. And as you see, I've got various tools available to me here, coordinates, Piper space and so on. I can't see grid anywhere on this or how do I turn this grid off? Or what I do is I am going to close the customization there and double-click inside the viewport. As soon as I do that, do you notice the status bar changes and it gives me all of the modal space settings. There's grids, there's objects and apps, and so on a switch the grid off, and suddenly everything's a lot clearer because I've activated the viewport. Now. Because I've activated the viewport, you'll also notice I've got a really weird style No.1, 143 to change that to one to five. And you'll notice everything sizes accordingly. And you can use Pan. Don't use Zoom because that would change the scale. A companion to centralize that a little bit on the drawing. Now you might want to take it just a little bit up to the left, like so, because you've got some dimensions there and you want to place some text and possibly also your table as well in a different viewpoint in a moment. So what we'll do now is we'll double-click outside the viewport like so to deactivate. And you say now how we're bringing in our model space information through the new viewport there in the A3 landscape tab. We're staying in the design intent dot-dot EWG file. And what we're going to look at now is using annotated scaling to get our dimensions to display more accurately. And what we'll also do as well is just make sure that we re-size the boating plight plan text and the notes text to fit nicely into the A3 landscape layout as well. So you'll notice that the dimensions aren't displaying very well at all at the moment. They're very small and tiny. If you select that viewport that we place previously, you'll notice down on the status bar at the viewport scale is set to one to five. Hit escape to de-select that and then jump back into the Model tab down here bottom-left. If you zoom out a bit, you'll see that there's all our information in our model space. We don't need the title block that we created previously that can be selected and deleted. We've already copied and pasted that into the A3 landscape tab. Now the dimensions themselves need to become annotated. Now in order to do that, we need to make sure that our dimensions style is also unassertive. So in our home tab on the ribbon go to the annotation fly out there. Go to dimension style like we did previously. And you'll notice our training dimension style doesn't have the little annotated logo next to it. So we click on modify. We go to the FEC tab on the ribbon and we just take annotated right there like so, and we click on OK. And then we close that particular dialog box. Just quit a checking that training now has the annotated logo next to it. Now the dimensions that we've already placed will not be annotated. So that's just one of the ways the AutoCad works. So we've gotta select these dimensions that we've already placed. So I'll select them like site. And then we right-click and we go to Properties. Now you'll notice they are not annotated in the properties pallet there. So we select, click on the down arrow, MEK them unassertive. We then need to apply the same annotation style is of equal, which is one to five. So if I click there and click on that little box there, you'll see that we've only got one to one, which was the annotation schema that we place when we originally place the dimensions. I'll click on Add. I want once a five in there and all I kinda, so there's my one-to-five there. We don't actually need the one-to-one anymore because we're not going to use that. So I can actually delete that if I want see, click on OK. And the dimensions of now updated to an annotation scale of one to five. Close the properties pallet, and a quick sanity check. Now if I go to the A3 landscape tab, you'll notice there the dimensions of all updated in the viewport. So if I zoom in now, can you see there were readable. They're all nice and neat and tidy. And our one-to-five viewport. However, the text is all looking a bit. The boating plight plan and the notes don't fit in the viewport. Ideally, texts like that should be placed in the layouts have anyway. So if I go back to the Model tab now, what I'll do is I'll select boating plight and plan First. Let's just select those first. Right-click and using the clipboard again, we'll just copy them. We don't need to copy with base point. And then just hit escape to the select and delete those ones there. And you're thinking Hang on. Iss. Deleting them. Yeah, but we've got them on the clipboard as well, so don't panic. We then go back to the I3 landscape tab. And what I'm going to do is zoom out a bit and then right-click clipboard paste. And there's the text right there, and now it's white, too big. So I'm going to select it. Right-click. Properties. Change the height of the text nail to five millimeters instead of 50. And press enter and then close the prophecies palette and there's the texts there. What I'm going to do is just hit escape a couple of times that they select and select just the topic of the text. And click on the grip. And I'll just hover over that corner then strike that down a bit using a bit of Object Snap tracking and polar tracking their hit escape to the Select File, zoom in a bit. There's the boating plight text I, namely the plan text. Again, select it, click on the grip, hover over that corner there and just drag vertically down a little bit with the polar tracking, place it about there, hit escape to the select. So I say now that I've deleted the text from the modal space and you can see it's gone in the viewport as well, but it's now in the Layout tab at an appropriate height. Now we need to do the same with the notes. So we go back to model like so. And we select the notes multiline text now. And again, it's a right-click clipboard copy. And then with that text selected, we delete it. We then go back to the A3 layout tab. And what we'll do is we'll right-click. Clipboard and paste again. And there it is, there, it's quite large. You'll notice just click About there to the right of the drawing this time. And again, selected right-click and properties and will change the height this time to 3.5 and the properties pallet. And press Enter and you see it gets very, very small thing. Sit there like site, close the Properties palette. Click on the grip there and just bring it in to the top right corner. Zoom in a bit, 100k, say lining in neatly there, click there, like so. Hit escape to the select. Now it's multi-line text, so it will have that column drank thing that I showed you previously. And we'll zoom in, select it. And you can see that it's y over here. So just click and drag, bring that in so it fits nicely into the layout to about there. And you can see that all sits nice and neatly hit escape to the select. And you've now got your notes and your title sitting in the a three landscape tab with a viewport that scaled and the annotated scaling is set up nicely for the dimensions as well. We're staying in the design intent dot-dot-dot EWG file. And what we're gonna do now is the final stages to prepare our little drawing here, ready for printing and plotting. One thing that we're missing in our A3 landscape tab, the Layout tab is our table that we created in the Model tab previously. Now, the Model tab itself, everything is drawn full size. So jump bang kids, the Model tab. And you'll notice there's our table there. If you zoom out slightly, there's all our dimensions or circles and so on. And you'll notice that there's no other text now, apart from the table itself, that's the only bit of textual annotation you've got. The rest of it is all dimensions. Now the table itself is very small, again, because it was in millimeters, full size in the modal space. Now I'm just going to resize that so that I know it will fit into the A3 landscape time. So zooming on the table. And one of the neat things about AutoCad tables is when you select them, you're not sure if you've got these grips here, which means I can resize the columns. So I'm gonna click and drag a Mi'kmaq column a bit smaller. And it's just a click, drag click. So it's click, drag, click, click, drag, click. Now making each of the columns smaller, click, drag again and click. And then last but not least, click, drag and click. So I've now got a much smaller table. He does Skype to de-select the table, and then just select it again just to make sure that you haven't got any settings up and running. Then it's a right-click. And again, clipboard and copy. Don't worry about copying or base point. He does Skype to de-select, but don't delete it just in case. Go to the A3 landscape tab. And what we'll do is we'll do a right-click, clipboard and paste. And there's our little table that fits nicely just underneath our little boating plight plan and click there like so. Now you can edit that Dimensions table anytime just by double-clicking in any of the cells. I'm not going to worry about putting any values in there because you can do that at a later date if you want to. Make sure you go back to the Model tab and just delete that table that you don't need it anymore so that can be deleted. So when you double-click on the wheel of the mail snail to zoom extents, all you've got is the little boating plight and the dimension. So zoom back, maybe just one notch on the wheel so that that will sits nicely centrally there in the modal space. So I printing and plotting, we go to the A3 landscape tab, the Layout tab. Everything's ready now to plot. Now, we've got a page setup already set up, so I should be able to just right-click now on the A3 landscape tab. Go to plot here. And we're using our page setup there is there, it's gonna plot to a dW F6 plot. What I can do now is do a Preview. And as you can see now, everything looks nice and neat and tidy using that monochrome color setup that I set up in the page that's up. All I would need to do now is right-click and plot that drawing. Now, I'm not going to sit there and make you watch a drawing plot that's somewhat mundane, but basically you can click on plot now. And that would go to an electronic dw f file format. Or if your page setup was pointing towards a hardcopy printer that would print out nice and neatly on the printer for you. So I'll just click on Exit and I'll cancel the dialog box. And you're drawing is now ready for printing and plotting. 7. Using workspace: We're starting another chapter now in our auto CAD essential core. So we're gonna be looking at exploring the AutoCad interface a little further. So we've got a new drawing for you. It's exploring dot-dot EWG. As usual, you can download that from the website and use it to follow along with the videos in this particular chapter. You may recognize the drawing from the introductory videos for this particular course. It's the same drawing, just renamed, ready for use in this particular chapter. What we're going to look at first is utilizing our auto CAD workspaces. Now, up until now, I haven't mentioned these, but basically what you can do is customize the user interface that you're using and save it so that you can move things around and save them so that you're happy with your AutoCad interface. Now if we go up to a thing called the Quick Access Toolbar top left of the screen. There's the application menu right there. And just above that you've got these icons here, that's your Quick Access toolbar. So I'll just hit escaped close the application menu. You'll notice what looks like an eject symbol if you've used an old DVD player or a CD player before, click on it. And you can see there that you can customize the Quick Access Toolbar. And you'll notice there that there's a workspace option in the list that isn't ticked. So select workspace and hashing. See, it adds the drafting an annotation workspace to the Quick Access Toolbar. Now that's the workspace that we're in right now. You can also use the little coke symbol down here on the status bar and use the flyout. And as you can see, there's drafting an annotation there as well. Now these particular workspaces are all set by default in AutoCad when you install it. So if I change my workspace to 3D modelling, for example, you'll see the ribbon changes quite dramatically and goes into the 3D ribbon that you might use if you were working in 3D and AutoCad, make sure you go back to the drafting an annotation workspace like so. Now another thing with the ribbon as well, talking of workspaces. There's this little button here. Now, if you click on this by mistake, you will see the ribbon change. Just keep clicking. And you'll find that if you keep clicking, you go back to the original ribbons settings. That's the same in every workspace in AutoCad. It's just different kind of settings for the Ribbon, different layouts and interfaces that you might prefer. Now, what you can do as well is save a workspace setting. Now you'll remember sticky panels that we covered previously. I'm gonna click and drag the drawer panel off the home tab into the drawing area like psi. I'm then going to go up to my fly out here on the Quick Access Toolbar, I could use the cog down on the status bar. If I want to say it's got the same commands, I'm going to put save current as. And this is going to be my AutoCad 2D workspace and I'm going to call it sure. So I know it's mine. So I'll click on save. So that's my new workspace. And you can see it puts the name of the workspace in the workspace pull-down. Now here's the thing. If I now go back to drafting an annotation, you'll find that the drawer panel is back in the ribbon. It's not a sticky panel anymore. There it is right there. But if I now go here. To my auto CAD 2D shown workspace, check out where the drawer panel ends up. So that's how you can utilize those sticky panels even further by generating your own workspace with your own sticky panels in the drawing area like site. We're staying in our exploring dot-dot-dot EWG file. And you'll notice I'm still in the workspace that I set up in the previous video. So make sure in your workspace is now you go to the dropdown and he set it back to the default, drafting an annotation workspace. Now what we're going to have a look at in this particular video are the file tabs. Now they're these tabs here. Can you see we've got a start tag and the name VAR drawing are exploring tab. Now if I hover over our exploring tab, can you see that I can jump into model layer one, layout to layout three. So if I go to Layout one, Can you say I can click on it and I haven't even had to go down to the tabs in the bottom left-hand corner. If I hover over it again and go back to model in say there that I can go back to model as well. Now these file tabs are extremely useful because I can jump back to the start screen if I want, say there's the start screen is if I just opened up AutoCad or I can go into my current drawing like so as well. So it's quite a useful tool now these file tabs are there by default. You can actually turn them off in your AutoCad options, but I don't recommend it. Because what I can do here as well as I can click here New Drawing. And it'll create a nice New Blank Drawing for me as well from the default templates available to you in AutoCad. So I'll just close that blank drawing down. We don't actually need that one. Now, the other thing you might notice when you work on with the file tabs is there is a little asterisk and you see that next to the word exploring. What that means is that some changes have been made to the drawing and you haven't saved them yet. So if I go up to the Quick Access Toolbar and hit the quick save icon just there. Or I can go to the Application menu and click on save there. You'll notice that that little asterisk disappears. And it means that the drawing has been saved and all the current changes have been saved as well. So utilize those file tabs. The good thing is you can have a number of drawings opening your AutoCad session and all of the tabs will appear at the top of the screen there. And you can jump between drawings if you need to. Know. In this particular case, obviously I've only got the exploring drawing open. But if I had four or five drawings open, I could jump in and out of them very quickly and easily, just by clicking on the tabs here at the top of the AutoCad screen. So again, like I said, I can go into something like layout one. Now as soon as I do that, notice the asterisk appears again next to the word exploring in the tab. If I go back to model and I click on Save again, I've saved it. The asterisk disappears. Very useful for multiple drawings in your art can't session, but also for navigating in and out of the modal space, in the paper space and the layout tabs for each of the drawings, you do have open. We're staying in the Exploring DW G file and what we're going to have a look at now in the AutoCad user interface is the navigation bar or nav bar. Now we did touch on it a little bit in previous videos when we talked about the Zoom commands available in auto CAD. And what you'll find is the navbar is normally by default over here on the right-hand side of the screen. And there's lots of different commands available to you in the nav bar. Now, before we get started with the navbar though, what happens if it's not there on the right-hand side of the screen. Well, if you type navbar, NAV BAR like site, now you've got your dynamic input on, so that will appear directly on the screen next to the crosshair. If I type nav bar and press Enter, I've got the option of having it on or off. Let's select off. As you can see, it disappears from the right-hand side of the screen. If I type nav bar again and press Enter, click on, on, and it comes back again. So if your nav bar isn't there, type nav bar and make sure it's switched on. Now there's lots of different commands available. You have these things here, which are navigation wheels. So there's lots of different types. You can see you've got full navigation whale and many, many view object whale and so on. Now what I'm going to do is just use the Full Navigation Wheel setting, the default one. So I'll just say the Skype that's released, that menu, and I'll click on the wheel icon. Now since I do that, it brings this weird and wonderful whale into the screen. If I click on zoom and hold and move in, or can pivot in and out like that. And you'll notice some of the graphics kind of disappear a little bit. That's purely for speed so that you can zoom in and out real quick. I can also do an orbit. So if I click and hold on orbit, you're not just Sarah can orbit my flat 2D drawing even though I'm using orbit as if I was in 3D that like so I'll get that view back properly in a moment. I can also pan click and hold and pan like site. Now what you'll notice there is that the navbar works in conjunction with the view cube. I'm just going to close the Navigation Wheel by clicking on the cross there like psi. And you see the drawing goes back to normal. But now we're in a 3D view and you'll notice that the crosshairs are looking a bit weird. And also the UCS icon, Sco X1, z on it, bottom-left corner as well. Not just the view cube you can see is looking a bit strange to if I select the top view, there's the nice flat top view. Again, I'm, I can zoom in and it all looks nice and neat and tidy like site. So just be aware of that when you're working in AutoCad, even if you're in 2D, you can still orbits of the navbar. Now you've also got pants. So if I click on pan, that brings me into real time pan like we did in previous videos. Click and hold on the left-hand mouse button and I can drag and pan around. And the drawing, you're not just I'm in real-time pans, so I need to right-click and exit the real time pan, like we did in previous videos. We've also got the zoom commands there as well. So there's the zoom commands. I've got zoom windows in previous. So if I did a zoom window, for example, select it, and I click, and I drag the window and I click again. It zooms mean to the extent of the window. If I go back to zoom here and say zoom previous, takes me back to the previous zoomed VA. So there's all my zoom commands there as well. Talking of orbits. If I click on the fly out there, I've got albeit free orbit and continuous orbit. You would tend to use those when you're working in 3D. Not two D like this drawing. Last but not least on the navbar. You've also got this tool here which is called showing motion, which as it says, provides an on-screen display for creating and playing back cinematic camera animations for design review. Now we haven't got any of those, but if we had a nice 3D model, for example, of this building, we could perhaps do a show motion where we've got different views, different elevations, different 3D views. And as you select each of those, you can make it into almost like a movie sequence. And it's great for displaying information to a customer who might want to see a 3D view of a building, for example. It's not as much worth US, perhaps in a 2D drawing what we've got here. But if you had a 3D modelling AutoCad, it would be very, very useful. So that's your navigation bar. And it should always be there on the right-hand side of the screen. As I said, if isn't just type navbar and make sure that you select on, to make sure that it's actually on, on the right-hand side of the screen in AutoCad. Once again, we're staying in the Exploring dot-dot EWG fall. And what we're going to do now is have a look at the shortcut menu or is its full name is the right-hand mouse button context-sensitive shortcut menu. So you see why we will call it shortcut menu for shorter. Now, what we're going to do is zoom in on this top left area of the floor plan. Now the reason I'm doing that, so that we can actually utilize the shortcut menu a bit more and it's in a bit more context. We're actually working on the design of this particular floor plan. Now, the shortcut menu is context sensitive, so it depends on what you're doing. If I'm not doing anything and I right-click, there's the shortcut menu and that's just the default shortcoming you saw. I can repeat the last command. I can repeat any recent input of clipboard, of isolates. I've got Undo pan and zoom. There's my pan and zoom real time. There's my steering wheels like on my navbar. I have got the action recorder which allows me to record things should I need to. And we've got things like quick select, Quick calc, find, and also our good old options dialog box as well. So there's a lot of information. They're just on the default shortcut menu. But what happens if I start drawing things? Let's say I draw a line up on the home tab on the ribbon drawer panel, click on the line command and I start drawing. Now I'm just going to start drawing very randomly. I'm not going to worry about whether it's exact or not. So as you can see, how group aligned segments there, if I right-click now, you can say that the shortcut menu looks very different. So I've got Enter to finish the line command, I've got cancel to cancel the line Kemal, I can use recent input, which in this case is coordinates for the line command. I can close the line segments to go back to the start point logo would a polyline. But what about undo? If I undo, it only undoes the last segment. So if I keep right-clicking and undoing, Can you say I'm undoing? Each segment is AI guy. Now one of the benefits I do have as well on the right-click is snap overrides. So that means I can override my running objects, naps and perhaps use an object snap that isn't on my snap settings such as perpendicular. So if I now take that to there, can you see there's my perpendicular snap. And I can snap exactly at right angles to that wall there. Nice horizontal line for example. And then I can then right-click and enter to finish the line command. Now you'll notice if I go up to the Quick Access Toolbar now and click on Undo, it undoes all of the lines segments like I mentioned previously. Whereas if I right-click and undo, only undoes the last line segment that I've drawn. Now this shortcut menu is extremely useful. It allows me to work in context with any command that I might be using. So the right-click is always very, very handy if I went to polyline, for example, and started drawing a random polyline like so. If I then right-click, can you see again context sensitive shortcut menu. It gives me all of the other tools available to me with the polyline commands such as art. And I can start drawing an arc, take it to that point, their head ends to finish. And there's my polyline with an OC segment for example. And again, I can undo that up on the Quick Access Toolbar. So that's how the shortcut menu can be very, very useful. It's that little right-click. You've got things like your snap overrides. You've got your context-sensitive commands, depending on which command you're working in at the time. 8. Setting drawing units: We're starting another chapter now in AutoCad, Essential Training. And we're going to start looking at using units. And also the options dialog box in or to cat as well to change some of the settings will also move into looking at drawing template files as well, the dW t file format. So we've got a new drawing for you and it's called managing files doc DW G. And what we're going to look at is setting our drawing units now, right now this particular drawing is a metric millimeters drawing. You can see that from the coordinate readout down on the status bar, as you move around in context, you can see that those distances as we move are obviously in millimeters there not in meters because that would make for a very large floor plan. Now the idea of being with your units issue can go in and set the units at any time. You can just type units like so it comes up there on the Dynamic Input. And as you can see on the suggestion menu there you've got units right at the top of the list. So I'll just press enter and that brings up the drawing units dialog box. And as you can see, you can set different length settings. So you've got decimal architectural engineering fractional and so on. You would normally use architectural engineering or fractional if you're working in imperial units and the decimal setting, if you're working in things such as meters, millimeters, and kilometers, there is nothing to stop you though, having decimal inches as well. It's all contextual and basically is set by yourself when you're working in a particular drawing environment depends on standards. And obviously the country you're in as well. If you're in America, you might use inches. If you're in the UK, like myself, who would use metric millimeters. Now, also as well, you can set the precision that you want the units to be read in. So you can see the AutoCad their works to eight decimal places. Now that's just visually on the screen and the background. Auto CAD actually works to 20 decimal places, but you won't ever say that the maximum you can go to is eight, but your computer's CPU will go to 20 decimal places. So AutoCad is pretty accurate at most times. Now normally if you're working with, let's say metric millimeters, you'd probably only ever go to one decimal place. Maybe no decimal places. But as a good rule of thumb, regardless of what units you're using, I tend to go to two decimal places when you're working with lengths of lines and polylines and so on. Now the angle, the role of thumb there, I'm using decimal degrees obviously, but you can use degrees, minutes and seconds, gradients or radians, which are mathematical methods of measurement. Or you can use survivors units such as North, South, East, and West. Again, decimal degrees, you can see that you've got a precision setting. I normally make that twice as much as the length setting. I've got two decimal places over here, four decimal places over here. So that's your drawing units. Now normally your angles are measured counterclockwise, but you can sentence a clockwise if you wish. Normally though, 99.9% of the time they will be counter-clockwise or anti-clockwise direction as well. Normally, east is 0 with North 90 degrees and so on, going counterclockwise. But you might set that differently. It depends on the environment in which you're working, the standards and so on. So I'll just okay that. And I'll okay my units. And I've now set up my drawing units for this particular drawing. New drawing for you now in this chapter it's called converting units dot DW G. And as usual, you can download it from the website and use it accordingly to follow along with the videos. Now, when you open up this drawing converting units dot DW G, Take a look at the units that you've got in the coordinates down on the status bar, you'll notice that it's all in imperial units. And if I type units, what you'll find is that it's all set to architectural. And you can see that the precision there in the length is set to a quarter of an inch. You'll notice that the angle is set to decimal degrees with a precision of no decimal places. Now, this is all set to work with imperial inches. But what happens if you need to convert the drawing units? Let me just cancel the drawing units dialog box first of all. And what you can do is if you ever need to measure anything in context and check the length of a line or the width of a door opening or a window opening. You can use the measure tool, which is in the home tab on the ribbon in the Utilities panel here. So if I expand it and you see there, you've got measure. So if I click on measure now and come into the drawing area, so asking me to specify the first. So with my objects snaps OK, I from here, click to here, click and you can see that that is four feet, 0 inches. That distance there. If I select distance again and go endpoints when point here, that's two feet, six inches. So let me just hit a Skype a couple of times to come out of the measure command there. So you can see that this is all in feet and inches. What happens if I want to convert that to millimeters? Well, what we need to do is first of all, we need to scale it using a particular conversion factor, and then we need to reset our units. So if I want to convert this to, Let's say for example, metric millimeters. I know that we're using feet and inches at the moment. So what that means is that I need to convert this by a factor of 25.4, which is 25.4 millimeters per inch. So I need to scale the rectangle in my converting units, dot-dot-dot EWG file. So I select the rectangle. I can right-click and on the shortcut menu there, scale. So I select scale, and I'm going to use the bottom left corner as my base point. And then it'll ask me for a scale factor which I'm going to type in is 25.4 and enter like site. Now I'll just zoom out and you can see this is a much, much bigger rectangle. And you're gonna use the measure command again. So back to the Utilities panel and click on measure there and use endpoint to endpoint. So you might want to zoom in a bit and get that end points snap there. And then again, come across here to that endpoint snap there. Now you see now that it's a 101 feet and seven and a quarter inches, which is completely nonsensical in the Imperial measurements of units. So I'm just going to exit the measure command, zoom out Tibet. And what I will do now is change my unit settings. So if I go two units, just taught units and press enter. Now I need to set these two decimal, Go to my two decimal places, decimal degrees again, and maybe four decimal places like we mentioned previously, units to scale inserted content will change that to millimeters. If I okay that now and then measure, we will get a much, much more sensible measurement. So forgot endpoint. To endpoint. You see now that it's 1219.2 millimeters, which when you think about it for feats, normally 300 millimeters to afoot roughly, that works out with the 25, 0.4 millimeters to an inch. So basically what I've done there is that it's the same size objects. But what I've done is I've converted it to millimeters units and decimal units instead. And that's how you can convert your units using known scale factors. So those scale factors you can go and find on something like Google, you can type in conversion factors from feet and inches to millimeters, and it will normally find you a list of those on Google. And you can perhaps make a table of them and print them out and have them available to you on your desk as you work in AutoCad. We're staying in the converting units dot d EWG file. And what I've done is I've left the drawing in the same state as it was at the end of the last video. So what we've done there is we've converted our units to the metric millimeters using the scale factor of 25.4. And I've left the rectangle in that metric setting. Now summing, you will notice down at the bottom of the screen the Status Bar is we've still got an annotation scale that is imperial. If I click on the flyout menu there, you'll notice that I've got all of my metric scales, as well as obviously my Imperial scales. Now if you only want metric scales, slide down the scale bar here, go to Custom. And you'll see there that you can reset everything if you need say. So you can actually remove scales if you want to, you can select delete or you can reset. So if I click on reset, it prompts me, do I just want metric scales, imperial scales or metric and imperial. I'm now in metric, so I might only want metric scales. And as you can see, there's only metric scales in the list snail. So when I go here like so, I can pick something like one-to-one and it changes accordingly. So just be aware of that with the scaling and the annotation SCO. Now what we want to look at is also our options and our settings. Because what we've done is we've converted a drawing from imperial units to metric units. So what we're going to do now is just right-click anywhere in the drawing area and open up the options dialog box by clicking on options in the shortcut menu. Now you'll notice that it's prompting me, do I want to sign into my 360 because it's Auto CAD is remembered that I was in the online tab last time. I'm not too worried about that right now. I'm gonna go to the files tab and you can see that there's all the locations of the files, AutoCad users. There's my Display tab. I can sell my display settings, my Open and Save Settings. You're not just there. I'm saving automatically back to a 2013 DW G file format. As I mentioned at the beginning of the course, the exercise files are all safe back to that 2013 DW G file format in case you're not using the latest version of AutoCad plotting and publishing there. You'll notice that I can set all the settings in there as well. The system settings, a coin important things like hardware acceleration. Are you using the right graphics card? You can set up things like the current system pointing device, which is your mouse, user preferences as well. Right-click customization. Do you wanna use a different right-click setting? So I can go in there. I'm, I can sit on my right clicks settings for my mouse, for example. Now, this is the important bit. Remember we've converted our drawing so our Source Content Units nail should really be millimetres. And also our target drawing units should also be millimeters, not inches anymore, because we've converted it to a different unit setting. And when I'm drafting as well, also settings for auto snap or tau track, things like your aperture size, which is the little square on your crosshairs. And he auto snap marker sizes. So these are the markers when you're using your objects snaps. There's lots and lots of different settings. You've got 3D modelling settings. If you're working in 3D, you've got selection settings depending on how you select the objects in AutoCad as well. Things like Do you want to show the grips when you're selecting objects? Do you want to show the grips within blocks? When you select a block? You can also specify your own profiles as well. Now this is something that I don't recommend doing if you've only just started using AutoCad. But you can set up profiles that might work with different ribbon settings and different workspaces, like we mentioned previously, when we change the workspaces in AutoCad. So you can have a profile that is set up with a particular workspace, for example. And the online tab obviously works with your A36 account when you're logged in. At the moment, I'm not logged in. So it's prompting me to sign in and then I can set my E36 settings. So there's a lot of information there in the options. And if i just cancel that to go back into the drawing, all those options define on how you use AutoCad. So it's up to you how those options are set when you're working in AutoCad, and also depends on the environment in which you work. Your CAD manager might have all your options set a particular way and he doesn't want them change because everybody uses AutoCad In the same way. And you might have 25 to a 100 people using auto CAD. And the CAD manager doesn't want all the interface changed and the options changed. So he might set them the way that he wants to me might look them down so that only he has permissions to change them as well. Options are there to control how you use AutoCad, but more importantly, how Auto CAD is set up for you to use as well. In the previous videos, in this particular chapter, we looked at converting the units of this particular drawing, which is are converting units dot DW G file. Now what you might want to do is once you've converted the units and set everything up the way that you want it to be. You might want to save this drawing as a template file, a dW t far. Now the reason you might use a template file is purely because you then standardize on all the settings. You don't actually have any content in a template file, apart from perhaps a title block or proprietary toggle block, that might be company-specific or project-specific. So what you might do with the converting units dot DW G file is you might actually delete this rectangle. You don't actually need it anymore. So this rectangle might be deleted so that you can save back to a dW file. So what I'm going to do there is I'm actually going to remove that rectangle. I'm going to delete it like so. And then you might just do a zoom extents. So I'll just double-click on the wheel and the mouse. And that puts the UCS icon, the YX there in the bottom left corner of the screen. Now if I want to save this as a template file, what I would do is normally go up here to the Application menu or the save as they're on the Quick Access Toolbar, Save As tends to be quicker. So we click there like so. Now you'll notice at the moment is trying to save back to a DW G file. So I've got all my settings in there, my units, my liars, you might have a proprietary title block in the layout tabs as well. So I'm gonna go here and you'll notice there, there's the dW t. Soon as I select that, it tries to save it back to the default file folder the AutoCad uses for templates. Now, I'm gonna save it back there. You could save it anyway, you like it doesn't have to be in the template folder. You could save it to a folder on your laptop or your computer, for example. Now the reason I'm going to save it into the template folder is because that's where AutoCad automatically looks for templates. So I'm going to call this my, let's say iso metric template, like site. And you see there's a dW t fall like all these other dw is there in the template folder. So I'll click on save. Soon as I do that, the template gets offered a description. So we'll call it a metric ISO template. And we might also put there for training purposes, let's say. So I get that all typed in nice and neatly. So it's a metric ISO template for training purposes. The measurement it says though is English, we need to change that to metric. So the AutoCad knows it's a metric template as well. Now, the new layer nitrification you don't need to worry about. We're not gonna cover that in this particular course. But what it does is if you bring in a template into a new drawing, sometimes you might find that any unread, consoled liars might pop up and come up in the layer properties manager at a later date. And you get a little prompt come up on the screen about that. But you don't need to worry about and that in this particular course. So if I click on OK. Now, you'll see that that file has changed. Can you say up there it's now our template file. I'll just click on the save icon just to shorten that so that all we can see is the file name. Now that's all being safe. So what I can do is I can close that nail and it takes me back to the Auto CAD start screen. Now when you're in the AutoCad start screen, if I click here templates, it takes me to a list of templates in that template folder. If I scroll down the list, there's my ISO metric template. I click there like so starts a new drawing. There's my layers, as you can see from the drawing, but it's a new drawing, a new DW G file that I've created from the template. And you'll also notice, can you see that it's metric coordinates as I move the mouse around as well. There's no inches in there anywhere where are converted the drawing previously as well. So that's how quick and easy. It is. Just a set-up, a template file from an existing AutoCad drawing. 9. Working with the viewcube: Once again, we're starting another chapter now in our AutoCad essential training, we've got a new drawing for you. It's called navigating drawings, 3D dot-dot EWG. And as you can see from the name of the file, we're gonna be looking a little bit at navigating in 3D. And also today. The first thing we're going to look at with navigating drawings is working with our view cube. Now this is this funny little gizmo over here. It looks a bit weird. It looks like a compass. And you've got the north, south, east, and west indicated there. And by default, you're normally in a top view, which is there on the view cube. And you'll notice when you hover over the view cube, different view settings, pre-set views are available to you there as you can see. So if I went and clicked on say that corner there, what it'll do is it'll give me an isometric view. And you'll notice now why this is a 3D drawing. Because some of the walls of being extruded upwards there as you can see and be made into 3D objects. So if I hover over these, you can see there that's a 3D solid. So the whole idea is if you're working in 3D, you'll view cube gives you a load of preset 3D views that you can work with. Now, the view cube is fantastic because what it allows you to do is it allows you to work with all of these pre-set views. Now these pre-set views are also available here in the View list. Cyril says Southwest isometric. If I click there, I'm currently in the southwest isometric view. If I went back to the top few notes that we're looking back from the top. And the view cube is now set to the top again. Now the nice thing is, is if you hover over the view Q, Can you say there's a little home symbol there? If I click on that home symbol, that'll open up the home view that is preset. So this view here that I've got the top view, if I now right-click over the view cube, I can set the current view as the home view, which is my top view of the vQ. And then what I can do is I can go back to that isometric view on the corner there, click on it. There's the isometric view. If I want to go back to the home view, it takes me back to that top view again, I pray saved as the home view. Now, another thing you can do is with the mail. She can hold down the Shift key. And you can also hold down the mouse wheel. And that will allow you to do a manual orbit. You'll notice, and as I'm moving the mouse, I'm orbiting around in that drawing and you can see the 3D walls appear in quite happily. Now, that's a weird view there and it's not a preset view, but the view cube has aligned to it. So if I go back to the home icon and click on it, takes me back to that top VA saying, say how useful that view cube is. It's a really, really useful view and a viewing tool as well. So I can pick up any view I want, say I can go the other way. Different isometric view the other side. And then go back to the home view. So that's how you can utilize your view cube, both in 2D, but more importantly in 3D. It allows you to work with preset 3D views when you're working with 3D models in AutoCad. We're staying in our Navigating drawings 3D dot dot EWG file. And what we're going to have a look at now is modal space and PIPA space and how we navigate between the two. Now, I've already mentioned modal space and PIPA space as we've worked through some of the other chapters in the course. And modal space is an environment that you work in where you do all of your design work in AutoCad. So you'll notice this particular drawing right now we're looking at the floor plan with the grids, the dimensions, the walls, the doors, the windows, and we are in the Model tab. What that means is that we are in modal space where everything is drawn full size. So this particular drawing is a metric millimeters. So if I zoom in on that top left corner so that we can see the dimensions there. You'll notice that all of those dimensions are real size. So you can see at that door opening there is 1830 millimeters wide, which is 1830 millimeters over 1.83 meters. So you can see there in the model space that we draw everything full size. We never, ever scale in the modal space. And the whole idea is, is then we can go into the Piper space, which is the layout tabs see layer one layout. So you lay out three in the bottom left corner where we can create scaled viewports and scale are real size design from the modal space. Now what you'll also notice is down on the status bar, we have a model button. Keep an eye on that. When I jump into layout one here, you'll notice that that button now becomes Piper. And I've got a choice of model or Piper space there. If I click on paper, you'll see there that it now opens up the viewport in layout one. So what it's done is it's activated the viewport for me. And in the viewport Now I'm looking through a hole in layout one into the model space. So I could actually edit the drawing in here if I wanted to. It's not ideal because if I start zooming are then mess up what could be a preset viewport scale. So if I now click back there and click on Model on the status bar, but deactivates the viewport and takes me back into paper space. The space where the layout is, where I'm gonna communicate my design intent with a nice title block and skyward viewports. So what I jump back into the Model tab here, like so on back into where everything is full size and I'm drawing everything in my design. Now, I did mention in the file tabs previously as well that if you hover over a file tab, you can navigate between the Model tab and the layouts like so. So I can navigate that way as well. So you can see there's a number of different ways where I can get in and out. Modal space, empty space in my AutoCad drawings were staying in our Navigating drawings 3D dot-dot-dot EWG file. And we've already had a look at the view cube and model space and paper space. What we're going to look at now is saving and restoring views in our AutoCad drawings. Now up until now, we haven't actually had any light named views sets up in this particular drawing. If you're working in a large drawing, let's say that this drawing was much bigger than the building was much, much bigger and it had a north, south, east and west wing and an atrium and lots of other different areas that you needed to navigate to. It would be a good idea to have nine views that you could just click on and go to rather than have to zoom, pan or mess around with the view cube or any isometric views. Now you can do that in all to cat, and it's very quick and easy to do, but you've got to know where to find it. And the quickest way to find it is over here in this drop-down where the named views are the pre-set views. Now we did touch on this previously in this particular chapter. So there's the top view and it relates back to the view cube. And there is the top view over there in the view cube. If he come down that list, pass the pre-set views though you have a thing called View Manager. Now if you click on that, what will happen is it will open up the View Manager dialog box. And you'll notice that there's our model views right there and we don't have any saved at the moment. Let's go to New. Let's click on New and see what happens that opens up this dialogue box that says New View or shocked properties. You can ignore the shot properties that's for 3D work, where you're saving different 3D views for use in a 3D environment. We're just gonna take some standard 2D flat views in the top view of the drawing. So our view name is going to be staircase. So let's put that in there, like site. And then the view category, we haven't got one, so let's call it a plan view. So that's going to be a plan view in this case. And the view type will be still, it won't be cinematic or a recorded walk, as you might do in 3D, which do still 2D views. Now, if I expand this dialogue box by clicking on the more options are, you can see there's lots of different settings. So I've got View properties there where I've got the ECS, the Live section, the visual style, all of this can be changed. Now, I'd rather you left at all as it is right now. Because all U1 is a view that you want to go to in the top view, the 2D view of the drawing. So we're gonna click on this button here where we're going to define the view window. And you'll notice that there's a big gray area around the drawing right now. The black area is where your named view is. So if I click around staircase, I hear click once, drag the window around the staircase, click again. You'll see now that that black area indicates the view that I'm going to save. Read the command line at the bottom of the screen. It says specify first corner. We've done that. We're going to press Enter now to accept that V takes us back to the dialog box and we've got View nine staircase i. It's a plan view and its view type still click on OK. and you'll see that staircase has now been added to our modal views in the list. Now, I'm not going to set it as the current view. I'm just going to apply and I'm going to click on OK. Now, if I now go to my top here and click and go to custom model views and go to Stack ice. It zooms me straight into that view that I've set up. Isn't that wonderful? I can have a big list of named views that allow me to move around my large drawing in auto care. Now I'm just gonna go to the View tab on the ribbon. And what you've got there as well is the View Manager here in the views panel. So there's my view manager again, same dialogue box if I need it. And what you've also got here is my views in the drop-down lists, there's on my preset ones. If I come up to the top though, there's my staircase, a VA. Now you see there that it's got a little black icon with some lines on it that indicates that it's a model view. Just so you know, so many little black icon views like that, our model space views. But it can go to the View Manager anytime. And I can set up any view I want to. And I'm saving that view and on restoring that view. By viewing that view, if you see what I mean. So there's staircase i set current and OK, and that'll be my view. If I double-click on the wheel to zoom extents and then go back to view manager and then go stack. I say set current, okay, it was zooming into that view that way as well. So I can save any number of views like that and restore them anytime by going and navigating to them either in the View Manager or using the View drop down in the drawing area. So we're staying in on navigating drawings, 3D dot-dot-dot EWG file. And that particular file is, as I've stated, 3D, with a little bit of extruded walls as per the beginning of the chapter. But primarily we're looking at it from the top view on the view cube in plan. Now the benefit that you have when you're working in altar CAD is you have a fantastic human interface device. It's called a mouse. And that males can be set up to your advantage with particular mouse settings so that you can work in AutoCad quickly and efficiently. Now you've got your default settings that automatically kicking When you install AutoCad. So if you roll up and down on the whale, you can zoom in, rollback on the wheel. You zoom out. If you hold down the whale and move the mouse, you can pan around in your AutoCad drawing. Now that's very quick and easy because I can zoom in nice and tight into a view like that. And then pan a little bit and get to the place where I want to be in my AutoCad drawing. What about 3D though? If I hold down the Shift key and I hold down the wheel on the mouse, I can manually orbit. And as you can see, as I orbit now you can start seeing the 3D elements of the drawing. Now at the moment we are in 2D wireframe is a visual style. If I change that here on the dropdown in the drawing area and went something like conceptual, those walls become solid. And you will sometimes get this 3D display performance notification come up. All that's telling you is that 3D performance, the enhanced 3D performance in AutoCad is not available for that current visual style. And you can go in and you can change visual styles if you want. Say, I'm just gonna close that for the moment. You can investigate that later at your leisure if you wish. Now the benefit of God is if I hold down that Shift key and hold down the whale, I can orbit as much as I like, manually, like site. And that's basically another mouse function that is very useful. Now if I want to go back to the top view again, I can use the view cube here. Or if I want to, I can use the drop down here and go back to the top view like site. Now it does look a little bit weird. That's because of visual style is set to conceptual for change that back to 2D wireframe, you'll see it changes again. And sometimes you'll find that text displays a little bit differently depending on which visual style you're using. So what about the males though, the mouse so far we've just used default settings. How do we do, for example, right-click customization on our mouse? Well, if I right-click and go to the shortcut menu without any command open or any object selected like so. And go to the user preferences tab in the dialog box, you can see here that we've got some windows standard behavior top-left, double-click editing, shortcut menus in the drawing area. So when I right-click it brings up a shortcut menu. I can also go to right-click customization. And this allows me to customize what the right-hand mouse button does when I'm working in auto CAD. So default mode, if I right-click, it'll bring up the shortcut menu. When I'm editing. If I right-click, it'll bring up the shortcut menu, but I can set it if I want to, to repeat the last command as if I hit the space bar or the enter key. For example, when I'm in command mode, you can see there if a command is in progress, right-click means either enter shortcut menu always enabled, or shortcut menu enabled when command options are present. So there's all these different mouse settings I can set up. Also, You've got a time sensitive right-click. I don't use this, but you might want to wear, you've got just a quick click for inter, where it's as if you've hit the Enter key on the keyboard and you're completing a command, or you can set it for a longer clip duration. So it brings up the shortcut menu as well. And you'll notice that so accurate, it goes two milliseconds. So that 250 milliseconds is quarter of a second, basically. So 500 milliseconds would be 2.5th. So you can set a longer right-click duration to bring up the shortcut menu. And just a quick click is the equivalent of hitting the Enter key on the keyboard. It's up to you how you set those and then you hit apply and close and make those changes in your AutoCad options. I like the default settings, so I'm gonna click on cancel because I haven't made any changes at all. And I'm going to cancel again on the options dialog box. But those are your mouse, a mouse settings that you can utilize to your advantage when you work in, in both 2D and 3D in AutoCad. 10. Rectangles and polygons: We're starting another chapter now in our AutoCad Essentials course. And we've already looked at drawing some of them more basic objects in AutoCad, we're now going to investigate some of the more detailed methods of drafting objects in our AutoCad drawings. And the first elements that we're going to look at, our rectangles and polygons. But before we do that, just make a note of the drawing title at the top of the screen. It's called drawing more objects dot wj. And as usual, you can download that from the website to use in conjunction with the videos. Now, the good thing is this particular drawing has some named views in it, so allow us to navigate in the drawing itself. So the first thing we're going to look at is drawing a rectangle. And what we're going to do is we're going to utilize a nine to view and go to our entrance of the building in this particular drawing. So if you go here to where it says top in the drop-down and hover over custom model views. You can see that we've got entrance, external patio, resection, reception to, and staircase. Select the entrance nine view, and it will take you to where the front doors of the building are. Now you'll notice in the layers panel in the home tab on the ribbon that we've got the eye wall layer current, we're going to just draw a rectangle that's going to represent the edges of the internal walls in our entrance area. Now I'm not going to adhere to the grid lines or the columns or anything here. I'm just going to show you how to quickly draw a rectangle utilizing your objects snaps. So that's on the drawer panel on the home tab on the ribbon. Click on the fly out here and there's rectangle there. Click on rectangle. And what we'll do, we'll utilize the grid line intersections. There's an intersection there. Make sure your intersection snap is on. And as I drag the rectangle, I'll go to this intersection here, like so. And there's our rectangle just representing some internal wolves there that might start to be drawn for the entrance hall of our project. Now, the other thing that we're going to look at is polygons in this particular video. So let's go back to our ninth views again here. So I've got entrance At the moment I click on the word entrance, got accustom modal views. And I'm gonna go to external patio like site. Now that takes me to the top right view and we're just outside the building where the grid lines are there. Just zoom in a little bit more. And what we're going to do, we're going to place a little hexagonal patio area just here. Now, you'll notice that the liar has changed. Now sometimes it does change depending on the view that you're using. So we've got AI floor there. I need to change the liar. And you'll notice that we've got lots of different liars available. And you've got hair, some architectural flaws, architectural doors and so on. And you'll notice that we don't really have a layer for outside. We don't have anything for landscaping or anything like that. So let's create a new layer. I'll just hit a Skype there. Go to layer properties. And we'll click on new layer and we'll put the a in front, which is for architecture, I dash and we'll call it landscaping. So there's our liar, press Enter like so. And what you can do is you can expand these columns so you can see the layer names a bit vector. Now we don't really want white, we want something that's either brown or green for landscaping. So I pick a nice green color. I'm gonna go for colour 82. They like site. I'll click on OK. And then I'll double-click here on the little sheet of paper just to make it the current drafting layer. I'll close the layer properties manager and we're back into the drawing. I'll go back up to the drawer panel, click on the fly out, and select polygon, come into the drawing area and we want a hexagon. So I'm gonna go for six sides like that and just press enter. Now the center of the polygon, I'm going to put it inside this grid square here. And I'm not going to worry too much about size, but I'm going to click there for the center. And I'm gonna go circumscribed about circle. So it's going to be on the outside of the imaginary circle. And as I come up, can you see that the point there is on the middle, the midpoint of the side of the polygon. And as I come up, I can rotate that using the mouse if I wish. I'm just going to specify the radius of the circle is, are coming out. And as I come up, I want that radius to be one fails and so I just type 100. As you can see, the Dynamic Input picks up that I'm typing and allows me to put the radius of the circle in there. I press enter to finish. And there's my polygonal garden areas. So that might be a patio area or a planting area for this particular floor plan. We're staying in our drawing. More objects dot DW, G file. And as you see, I've left the drawing in the same state as it was at the end of the last video, when we looked at the rectangles in the polygons, what we're going to do now is just do a zoom extent. So you can just double-click on the wheel of your mouse and that'll zoom you out to the extensive, the visible drawn objects. So you can now clearly see the rectangle and the hexagon that you've drawn for the rectangles and polygons part of this chapter. What we're going to look at now are points and Donuts. Now, when I say doughnuts, that doesn't refer to any of these well-known coffee brands out there and things. Its actually geometrical shapes that you can draw within AutoCad itself. And donuts are fantastic for setting out points on drawing plans. And you'll see that in a moment. Now, just before we do that, what we need to do is create a new layer. So we're gonna go back to our layer properties in the layers panel in the home tab on the ribbon. And we're going to click on new layer again. And this is going to be a for architecture and then a dash and then setting out. Now you'll notice there is already an a serve setting outlier. Ignore that for the moment. That one is actually switched off at the moment. And we're going to ignore it. We're gonna cry our own new layer and we're just going to call it a dash, setting out. Like psi. And we're gonna give it a good color. We want it to be nice and bright to stand out on the drawing itself. So click on the color box and maybe going for something like a pinky magenta color. So it's different from everything else on the drawing. So I'm going to go for colour to 11 there and click on OK. And as usual, double-click next to it to make it the current drafting layer and then close the layer properties manager. Now when you're working in auto CAD, you can actually draw a physical points and use them as points of reference. And the Object Snap for them is called node n ODE. Now what we're going to do with our points, we're going to create a nice curve line coming off the corner here if the reception area, and we're gonna take out here and it's going to form part of the refectory area of this particular building in the plan view. So we're gonna draw those points on the a setting outlier that we've just created. Now before we do that, we need to set a point style. So in your home tab on the ribbon, go to your Utilities panel and you'll see their point style dot, dot, dot. When you click on it, it'll open up the point style dialog box. Now, by default, the point style is highlighted in black there and it's a tiny little dot. And you won't see that if you place on a line or an existing object will always do is you use this one. Now the reason I use this one, it looks the same as the node object snap. So it's a good little memory aid. It reminds you of what they use. Objects are in your auto, can't drawing. Now, points, songs. How does that work? Well, at the moment I've got it 5% of the size relative to the screen. So no matter how much I zoom in or out, it'll always be 5% of the screen size. If you set your size in absolute units like that, when you zoom in and zoom out, they're gonna get bigger and smaller. And sometimes you won't be able to see them if you're zoomed out along y. So it's always better to use set size relative to screen. So our K that now my style is now sent. So what I'm going to do is zoom in on this area here. Now I could zoom in on the reception. We do have a view there, so I can click on top their custom views. There's reception there and it zooms me in to that reception area. And I want to come off this corner here to draw the points there on the drawer panel. So I'll click on the fly out and just pin it open. And you'll notice that there's all these different elements here that I can use. So I've got Ri, multiple points, I've got divide and so on. Which one is it? Well, it's gonna be this one, multiple points. It's the point command that you want. Now, the point command is a bit of a weird one, and I'll show you in a moment, click on it first, and come into the drawing area and it prompts you to specify point. So utilizing your objects snaps, I'm gonna go to the corner there. There's the endpoints, snap my click, and there's my point there. And what I'm going to do now is I'm just going to create some sort of control points which I might use for spline lighter. So if I come out to there and then I've got a nice kind of curved wall like so that closes off the refectory areas so that when people come into the building, but I have to go round it to kind of get into the refectory air. It's like separating wall. Now, you would have thought that if I press Enter. That would close the command. It doesn't. So one of the only commands in AutoCad where you've gotta press is Skype to actually close out a command. So we've now got our Noyce wall there ready to go. And what I can do now is I can utilize the spline command and the nodes snap to create a nice curved wall. So go to ensure objects snaps and just make sure that your node snap is on that one there. And then obviously click on the little arrow there to close the menu. And I'm gonna use a spline here. That is the fit points that one there spline fit. And now when I hover over each of these, can you see the notes snap kicks in and that's those points like psi. So I'll just come in like psi gets to that point there, click there, and I'll do an entity Finish. And there we are all done. There's my nice curved wall. Now that's on the setting out layer at the moment. So I'll select that. And what I'll do is I'll put that on the internal wall layer, the eye wall layer like site, and just hit escape to the select. And the best thing I can do now is set the eye wall layer to the current layer and then go back to the layer drop-down. And my setting out points my ice setting out. I can phrase that now. And you'll notice that the points disappear. And I've got my nice curved wall separating the refectory area from the main reception area. And that's how quick and easy those points are to use. Now what I am going to do is put my setting outlier back on. So I'm going to come to a setting out and just click here and thought that our again like site. Now you will be able to see a points, but what I'm also going to do is hit escape to lose the layer drop-down. So mounts a little bit and pan across to the end of this grid line here, makes sure that a setting out is your current layer. So I'll set that up like so. And then I'm gonna type the word donut, and it is the American spelling, which is d rho, n, beauty, not the English spelling which is d, o, u, g, h, and UT. So donut like that and press enter. It asks for the inside diameter of the donor. The default there is 250 because I've drawn a donut previously. So just make sure you put 250 and if it's not that and press enter outside diameter of my donut, I want it to be 500. So again, put 500 just to make sure it is 500 and press Enter. There's my donor. I'm gonna put it on the end point of the grid line as a setting out point ends to finish. And you can see there that highlights that setting out point nice and brightly in that nice pinky purple color of the a setting outlier. So you can see those donuts are really useful for highlighting points that you might need to work with when you're setting out your AutoCad drawings. So once again, we're staying in our drawing. More objects dot d WAG file. And you can say I've left it in the same state as it was at the end of the previous video where we created the setting out point from the doughnut. You'll also notice that I've still got the draw flyout Pin Diaper and so you can unpin that now and that will go back into the Ribbon and double-click on the whale just to zoom extents like site. Now you'll notice that all of the setting out the points and the donor a kind of standing out a little bit with that pink color. So what we're going to do is we're going to create a new layer. And the new layer is going to be i furniture, so capital I and then a dash is in the same layer naming philosophy. And we're going to create some ellipsoidal furniture. Now that might sound a bit strange, but it isn't. So there's our eye furniture layer. And I'm going to make that a brownish, orangey kind of color. So I'm gonna go for that one there. Color 32, like site. I'll make it the current layer by double-clicking next to it on the little sheet of paper there. And I'm going to close the layer properties manager. And then on the liar drop-down, freeze your setting out liar that one there like psi. So a phrase that just so the setting out points don't stand out and the drawing hit escape to lose your layer drop-down menu. Now what we're going to do is we're going to use the ellipse command to create an ellipsoidal table in the refectory area just here. So I'm going to zoom in like site. Now you can do this in two ways. You can create an ellipse or you can create an ellipsoidal, OK as well. We're going to use ellipse for this one. And you'll see why in a moment. Now, the ellipse command is on the draw panel on the home tab on the ribbon, such just here, this one here. So if I click on the down arrow, you can see there that I've got centre axis ends an elliptical arc. So we're gonna use the center option first. So I click on center. I'm going to come into this area here in the refectory area. And I'm just gonna click roughly where the center of the table will be. Doesn't have to be exact. And then as I come out now using my polar tracking, can you say a contract a long, what will be the first axis of the ellipse? So I'm going to take it to the right along the zero-degree line, make sure your pilot tracking is on. And I'm gonna make that 1250. I'm going to type in 1250 for the distance and press enter. So that's going 1250 to the right from the center of the ellipse. So I'll press Enter. And then, as you can see now that's fixed. And as I come up and down vertically Now I can specify the distance from the center along the axis of the other side of the ellipse. And I'm going to make that 1750. So I'm gonna make sure that my pilot tracking is kicking in vertically. Type in 750. Press enter. And there's my ellipsoidal table like site. So there's my nice, funky architectural table sitting in the refectory area in my ground floor plan with my building. Now, you can also create another ellipse in a different way. So let's do that as well. So I'm going to click hey, like so on the ellipse fly out and I'm going to go access end point this time. So this will create an ellipse or an elliptical arc. So I'm going to click on axis end. Now asked me for an axis end point of the ellipse this time, so I'm specifying two ends of an axis. So I'm going to click here once and I'm going to come diagonally down to there. And I'm going to click there like psi. So there's my axis. Can you see? And as I move the opposite way, the perpendicular, why perpendicularly opposite, I can pick another point and I'm just doing this one freehand. I kinda long. I can go short. And as you can see when I click, it creates a freehand ellipse that y, using the axes of the ellipse. Now, both of these methods, you can also create an elliptical arc. Now, elliptical arcs are very useful for creating isometric views, and we're going to cover that in the next video. We've got a new drawing for you nail called Isometric views dot DW G. And that's exactly what we're going to look at now is creating a simple isometric view. But we're going to utilize a command that we covered in the previous video, which is the ellipsoidal arc command. When you create an ellipse, it create an ellipse using two axes, a major and a minor axis to give it my ellipsoidal shape. When you're working in isometric views, you tend to work with a 30 degree or 60 degree rotation so that it looks like it's 3D, but it's not, it's a 2D interpretation of a 3D view. That's what isometric views are all about. And also you can work with perspective and things like that as well. Now you'll notice in this particular drawing we have two vertical lines opposite each other, left and right. What we're going to do is we're going to create an isometric view of a little dump the cylinder using the ellipse command and the ellipsoidal arc command. And you'll see what I mean when we actually finish the drawing, how it creates a very simple isometric view. So making sure you're using the isometric layer, which is there in the layers panel in the home tab on the ribbon. Go to the drawer panel and click on the fly out for ellipses and select axis nd, that one there. Now we're gonna use our snap points, so make sure your objects snaps are on. And when we go from Endpoints, snap their click. Two end points, snap their click. So that starts our ellipse. Now we're not gonna specify the other axis. You'll notice on the command line in the brackets there we've got rotation. I can right-click that brings that up on the shortcut menu. Select rotation. So now I'm going to specify the rotation around that major axis. And this is going to be 60 degrees, which is one of our isometric angles to create an isometric view. So I'll type in 60 degrees. So basically that's a circle rotated 60 degrees about its major axis. And what you'll find when you press Enter is there as our ellipse in a nice isometric rotation angle. So you can now see the top of our little dumping cylinder and our isometric VA. We go back now to the ellipse command in the drawer panel. And I select axis end again and come into the drawing area. Notice on the command line at the bottom of the screen I've got arc or center right-click. You can select those on the shortcut menu. Select OK. Now, drawing an ellipsoid lock is exactly the same workflow and process is drawing just a regular ellipse. So I'm going to specify endpoint there. And endpoint there, like so. And there's our ellipse. Then again, I right-click again and select rotation like I did with the ellipse on the top of the cylinder. So let rotation and type in 60 again and press enter. Now this time it doesn't finish the command because it's asking you now for the start angle. Well, you're going to start and then finish your ellipsoidal. Ok. Now we're going to utilize our objects snaps for this, make sure you go counter clockwise, it's an arc. So by default, auto cad does arcs in a counterclockwise direction. So I'm going to go from here, this endpoint snap, Click. And as I draw an ale, can you see the arc coming around? I got to this end point snap and I click, and there's my ellipsoidal, OK. But more importantly, there's my nice little isometric view of my dumping cylinder that I've created using just two vertical lines. And the ellipse. And the ellipse, OK, come on. 11. Selecting objects: We're starting a new chapter now in our AutoCad Essentials course. And we're gonna have a little look now at modifying objects. Now there's lots of videos to cover in this particular chapter and lots of different commands and you will use them on a regular basis to modify an edit your auto CAD drawings. So we've got a new drawing for you. It's called modifying objects dot wj. And as usual, you can download it from the website and use it to follow along with all of the videos in this chapter. Now the first thing we're going to look at is selecting objects in auto CAD. Now the good thing is we've got a nice named view that we can go to. So I'm gonna go to top here, like so. And I'm gonna go to custom model views and I'm gonna select furniture. And that zooms me in to where the furniture is in the center of the floor plan there. Now, you can go and click on any object you want to in an auto CAD drawing. So if I click on my grand piano, he say I can select it, it's a block. It's got the one grip. I can click on the grip and I can then move it around using the grip. If I want, say, I had a Skype a couple of times, wants to obviously cancel any command and then hit escape a second time to de-select it like site. Now if I select a group of objects and click on psi three or four objects, like so, just put in the crosshair on each one. I can also do if I want to deselect one of those objects is hold down the Shift key and click on the object I want to deselect from the selection set. I hit escape to de-select all the objects. Now there are some other methods of selecting objects as well. You can use a window crossing selection and just a crossing selection. So if I use a window selection, I click, drag the window over the objects i want to select. Now you'll notice that that table there only selects when the window is going all the way around it. So a window selection from left to right has to have a boundary around all of the objects you want to select. So when I click on that second of the window selection, it selects the objects. If I'd only cross that table, it would not have selected the table. I'll hit escape now to de-select. If I go the opposite way, right to left, if I click now and drag the window like so can you see everything I cross gets selected, but everything inside the window gets selected as well. So when I click on that second, you'll notice that the grid line, though I've crossed as well, is also selected. I might not want to select let, so hold down Shift, Click on the grid line and that day selects it from the selection set as well. So I'll just hit Escape there today. Select. Now, there are two other quick methods that I just want to go through with you here. I'm just going to pan and zoom a little bit on this little group of furniture here. So you can see I've got a chair, a desk. Nice little rubber plant and also what looks like a table and chairs. Now I'm gonna use the erase command, which is up on the Modify panel on the home tab on the ribbon. And I am going to use the icon in the Modify panel heroines Click on the command first, because then it gives me the select objects prompt. Now, there's two other quick methods that you can utilize for selection. And one of them is a window polygon and the other one is a crossing polygon. So if I type WP for window polygon and enter, it asks for the first polygon point or pick or drag the cursor. So what I can do now is I can now be a lot more accurate and go around the objects. And if I'm working in a really busy drawing, this is really useful because I can pick as many points as I like to create the boundary of that polygon. Now, I don't want the chair selected, so I press Enter. It selects the objects inside the window polygon and they have to be inside the boundary, like the window crossing selection. And i press enter again, and it erases them. Luck sign. I go up to undo Homer Quick Access Toolbar just to bring them back. Let's do that again. Let's do a rise. And this time we'll type CP for crossing polygon and ends up now this time, all I've gotta do is cross them. I don't have to have them enclosed by the window polygon itself. So window polygon, you go around and everything has to be inside the boundary, a crossing window polygon, you can do this kind of thing. So as I just go through the objects like that, they're selected. They don't have to be inside the crossing selection. So I press Enter to confirm the selection, enter again to finish the arrays and job done exactly the same end result, but two different methods of doing it. So I'll just undo that to bring the furniture back. Okay, back to the top view here and custom model views and furniture again, like site. So that's selecting your objects using various methods, either by clicking on them or using crossing or Windows selections or the crossing polygon or the window polygon selection. We're staying in modifying objects dot-dot EWG file. And we're going to have a little look now at the move and copy commands available to you in auto cat. Now move and copy are available on the Modify panel on the home tab on the ribbon there up here. So there's move and there's copy. The benefit that you do have though is you can select objects and then right-click and move and copy are also available on the shortcut menu, which is a little bit quicker if you want to go down that route. Now, we've got a desk here, and we've got a chair. And we've also got a nice little rubber plant there as well. What I'm going to do is I'm going to move the desk and the chair and the rubber plant into this office over here. I'm then going to copy them into this office here. So let's move the desk first. So I select the desk like so it's a block, so it's got the one grip. And now I might not want to move it using the grip. I might want to use a different point. So with it's selected, I can right-click. I can go move on the shortcut menu and it asks for a base point. Now, I'm going to use this midpoint here on the side, like site. And I'm gonna move that over here and it asks for the second. I'm I'm going to place that. Hovering over that midpoint there and then just dragging it up the wall. Now I can do it that way if I want. So you can say I can drag it up the pilot tracking using objects snap tracking and place it, say they're white back. Now that's a fairly random place in the office. But what I can do then is move that around later if I want say I can do the same with the chair. I can select the chair like site. And again, it's a block with the single grip. I can use the grip if I want C. So I could if I wanted to move it, just click on the grip and move it. But I might want to move it using a different price point. So again, it's a Right-click move on the shortcut menu. Pick a points ie the midpoint on the front of the chair. And I might just drag that up to say, they're like site. Now the chair itself is obviously the wrong way round. Don't worry about that. You will see how to do that with the rotate command, lighter. Now last but not least, I want to move my little rubber plant hair so I select it, Right-click, move, pick a point on it. And I'm gonna put that over here near the chair on the desk like site. Now what I am going to do is I'm just going to pan and zoom a little bit now and zoom in because I can see what I'm doing better that way. And what I want to do now is I want to copy all three of these objects in that orientation into this office EIA. So I'm gonna select 123. All three objects can be copied at the same time. Right-click and I use copy selection. Don't use clipboard copy, that's using the Windows Clipboard. You want copy selection. And it ask for a base point. Now I am going to use that midpoint again on the desk there. Now you'll notice the original stay where they are. I can now pick, say a midpoint there. And then using the Object Snap tracking and the pilot tracking type that up a little sets not clashing with any walls. And that's my copy there. You'll notice it saying, oh, you want to copy some more? Now? I don't, but I can copy ad infinitum there because it obviously has a repeat option on the copy command. I'll just press enter to finish. And there's my copied objects with my original objects left behind in the office to the right. We're staying in the same drawing are modifying objects, dot-dot-dot EWG file. And I've left it in the same state as it was at the end of the previous video, where we did the moving and the copying of the desk, the chair, and the rubber plants go into our offices there in our floor plan. Now what we're going to have a look at this time is Rotate and Scale. Now you'll notice obviously the chairs of facing the wrong way then not facing the desk. So we're going to use rotates to basically make sure that they're facing the right way. And this two little methods that you can use there that I'm going to show you are also going to scale our rubber plants. So it's half the size it is now. So we're going to zoom in on the left hand desk and check it in nice and close so that you can see what you're doing. Now, what we're going to do is we're going to click on the chair. And you'll notice that the grip for the blog is exactly on the mid-point of the back of the chair. Click on the grip, and then hover so that you get the midpoint of the desk and then just vertically moved down a tad like that. Just so you know, it's lined up exactly with the midpoint on the desk. Then just hit escape to the selected. Now we're going to select the chair. Right-click. And you'll notice that rotate is available on the shortcut menu. It's also available on the Modify panel on the home tab on the ribbon, there's the icon just there. So I'm going to select right tights. And it's going to ask me now for a base point on the chair. Now we've already moved the chair so it lines in vertically with the desk. I'm just gonna pick any point i one in the middle of that chair, doesn't matter where it is. And then as you can see, I can move it around using the males like so. But I don't want to do it. I want to give it an exact angle. So I'm gonna give it an exact angle of 180. And that rotates it perfectly to face the desk like sign. Now, what about that mouse movement? How do we do that? Well, the trick there is you've got your polar tracking switched on. So you'll notice my pilot tracking is set to 45 there. Let's set it to 90, like sine. And then I'm gonna zoom out slightly, pan across, and zoom in on the other chair and desk here. Now again, select the chair, Click on the grep, hover over the midpoint on the desk and just come vertically down using the pilot tracking a little and click Like site just so you know, it's lined in vertically on that midpoint of the desk. Hit escape to de-select. Now the reason I'm getting you to de-select before you go and do the rotate command is purely that you might have more than one objects selected. And then if you rotate, it's gonna obviously rotate the chair and any other object you might have selected. Just so you don't mess up your drawing them, make an error perhaps on another object selected elsewhere. So I select the chair and again, right-click and rotates on the shortcut money. Now it's also going to specify a base point again. So here's the trick. What we're gonna do is we're gonna select the midpoint there on the back of the seat of the chair. So we're using an exact midpoint snap. Now, instead of specifying the angle this time, well, I can do is can you say as I come round, my pilot tracking kicks in on each of those 90 degree increments. So as I move around each Tom, can you see moving the mouse? I can just keep rotating as much as I liked. So when I get to that point there, can you see I've rotated it but it's sitting on top of the desk. Just click to confirm that rotation. Select your chair, select your grip, and just drag vertically down the polar tracking along with the Apollo tracking on so that it's not sitting on top of the desk. It is Skype to de-select and you've quite happily rotated the chair again. So now if you zoom out both of your chairs or facing the right direction, we're now going to select our rubber plant. And I'm going to right-click style is also available on the shortcut menu. Style is there on the Modify panel as well if you want to go down that route. So I select scale, I pick a point on my rubber plant, and I give it a scale factor of naught, 0.55 the size. And you can see it's smaller. And then obviously we can do the same with this one. We select it right-click style, pick a point, and then scale factor of 0.5. And we've scaled those down so they're a little bit smaller. What we can do now is we can select them, click on the grip and they can go on the desk like site. So there's one there. It is. Skype. Select that one, click on the grip, pop it on the desk like so it is Skype. Now everybody's got a nice, accurate, neat, and tidy working environment at their desks in their chance. We're staying in modifying objects dot DW G file. And what we're going to have a look at now is the array command, which is pretty much the copy selection command. But on steroids really, the idea being is that it's a much bulkier, more advanced version of copying objects. You can have rectangular arrays which follow the row and column scenario. And you can also have polar arrays which have a center point and you copy the objects around the center point of the polar array. Now you'll notice in the floor plan, I've zoomed out to the extents using a double-click on the wheel of the males. And you can see the cipher there, roughly Central in the middle of the floor plan using your mouse wheel and a little bit of padding as well, getting nice and close so that you can see the cipher. And maybe just pan upwards a little bit as well, just so it's sort of to the middle, but to the left a little bit on the screen there. Now the array command is on the Modify panel. On the home tab on the ribbon. It's this one here. So click on the fly out and we're going to select rectangular array first. So we click on it like so, and you get the pick box. So we select the cipher, click on it and press Enter to confirm. Now as soon as you do that, you'll notice it automatically arise the cipher. And you'll notice that it's all Ribbon driven. So you've now got the contextual array creation tab up there in the ribbon. Now, there's lots of different settings here, but the most important ones are the columns and the rows. So if you just row back on your wheel a little bit on your mouse, you'll notice that you've got four columns and three rows there. Now I can change those values at any time. So if I now double-clicking the columns value there and say I only want to columns and I press Enter when I move into the drawing area or even quicker, Can you say updates that for me? Now if I change the number of rows that too as well and press Enter and move into the drawing area that will update as well. Now you will notice that there is an associative option here highlighted in blue and it's switched on. So basically if I now close the array and select the earache and you say it's a group of objects. So they owe all associated in the array group. If I want to break them down back to individual ciphers rather than that group, I need to jump to the Home tab there and click on explode like site. And now they're all individual ciphers again, like psi. So that's how you can do a rectangular array. So what I'm going to do now, I'm going to select three that were left over in the array. And I'm going to leave the original one nom selected, and I'm just going to delete those ones so it back to where we were before using pan and zoom. Now I'm going to just put the sulfur up there. And I want this column here and the intersection of the grids to be the center of my polar array. So we're gonna go back to the Modify panel, click on the fly out and select pilot array. Again, select the sofa, click on it and to confirm. And now for the center point, if the array just make sure that you do get the intersection of the two gridlines. You might want to zoom in a bit. And just make sure that that's what you get. That intersection there like psi and then roll back on the male submit and you'll see that the ciphers are looking a little bit weird right now. That's because we've got six of them there and they're kind of all touching on each other. So the idea being is we go back to the contextual array creation tab on the ribbon, change the number of items to four and press Enter. And ageing say updates nicely now. And you've got four sofas all around that column. So you've got a great viewing perspective there. If you sit in any sofa, you can sit in gaze at that column if you want to, which is kind of not good. But the idea being is that you can see how that array command works. Now what you've also got there is the associative is switched on again, but you've got rotate items now, the items rotate in the array going around the center point. If I switched that off, you'll see sofas maintain their original position of the original cipher selected, which obviously stops you all having to look at that column unless you're on the original cipher. So if I now close the array again, clicking on it in the ribbon there. Again, if I select it now, it's a group of ciphers. And I need to go back to the home tab. And if I want to lose the group there, I can either do that in the array here where I can edit it and reset the array. But you'll notice there's no way of switching the associative off now, that's only when you create the array. So the only way that you can get them back to the original objects is now Home Tab and explode. And then now just single ciphers again. So what I can do that as I can select the three, the IRAs we'd like so and delete them. And on back to my original cipher in my drawing, like I was before. Once again, we're staying in the modifying objects dot-dot-dot EWG file. And we're going to have a look now at the offset and mirror commands. And what we're going to do is we're going to jump to that reception area view that we had before. So you'll notice that the drawing has been zoomed to its extents. Again, I'm gonna go to the View drop-down here in the drawing area, custom model views. And I'm gonna go to reception here on the custom model views in the drawing like sign. Now this, this office here that I want to have a look at. So I might just want to pan and zoom in even closer perhaps, but it just gets me close to that area on the drawing. If I use the name views, it's a little bit quicker. Now, you'll notice that we've got a single line representing the internal wall at the moment. And what we're going to do, we're going to use that as a centre line and we're going to utilize it so that we can offset either side to give the wall some thickness. So let's do that first. We're gonna go over here to the Modify panel, and the offset command is right here. So if I select offset now and come into the drawing area, also CAD prompts me for a distance i want to offset through. In this case it's going to be 70 millimeters, which is half of the wall thickness. I want the total internal wall thickness to be a 140 millimeters. And you say how that works in a moment. So let's put 70 in there like so, and press enter. Now the object that I want to offset this single line here, so I click on it. I moved to the left of it and you'll notice the AutoCad highlights the original object and the yellow line there is the offset ID line from the original line. So if I click, I've now created a line to the left of the original line. So if I go for the right-hand line, which was the original line, I'm still in the Offset command and I move to the right now and click again. I've offset 70 either side of the original line and I now press enter to finish. So that leaves the original line in the middle, which I don't need. So I can select that one, make sure you don't click on the wrong one. Perhaps zoom in a bit closer. It is Skype to the select and then select that one there. That's the one that needs to be deleted, the central one. Now, if I just zoom in panel Italy, you'll notice that my desk is now residing quite happily in the middle of my internal wall. Now, all we've got to do then is do a little crossing selection, click, drag, and across like that. So that's selects everything and I need to move and exact distance. If you zoom in real close on that left-hand edge of the desk, the base point you're going to use is going to be the midpoint snap on the desk. So what we need to do is make sure that we go to the move command here. Or I can right-click and select Move On the shortcut menu. That's the base point, the midpoint snap there and I just drag horizontally. And if you've got Object Snap tracking on it, we'll find the intersection with the right-hand edge of the wall. And I should say that now moves nice and neatly and it sits nicely against the new internal wall you've created. Now, that's the Offset command covered. What we need is also an internal wall over here in this office. So what I'm going to do now is I'm going to mirror this wall I've created over here. So I'll select the two lines like so. Now the mirror command is not on the shortcut menu, but the trick is auto camp by default is set to noun, verb selection. Noun being an object, that being a doing word, which means you can select the object first and then the command. So I've selected the two lines that represent the wall. I go up to the Modify panel on the home tab on the ribbon, there's the mirror command. I select mirror like so. Now my mirror line is going to be that red grid line where the door is. So the trick is now pick a point on the grid line. So I'm gonna go there, perhaps a midpoint, or you might want to pick an intersection, let's say anywhere along that grid line, that vertical red line will work. You could perhaps go for the intersection of the two grids there and then drag vertically downwards, making sure that your pilot tracking kicks in and you're not going off at an angle because otherwise your wall is going to be something weird like that. So come down this way and there's actually a midpoint snap there, which is perfect. And I just left-click again for the second of the mirror line. Then AutoCad will prompt me notice at the bottom of the screen there, do I want to erase the source objects in this case? No, I don't. And the default is normally know. So I'm gonna select No there. And you say I've now got a wall over here as well. So I've mirrored that about that grid line there. So that's how you would utilize your offset and your mirror to obviously add more elements to your auto CAD drawing. We're staying in the modifying objects dot-dot-dot wj file. And we're going to look now at another two commands that are very useful when you're modifying your auto can't drawings. And they are the stretch command and the lengthen command. Now you'll notice I have left the drawing this time in the same state as it was at the end of the last video. That's because we're going to work on these walls here that we've created previously in the previous video. Just pan up with slightly by holding down the whale on the males and moving up with slightly with the mails. You want to be able to see these lines here that form the wall. And what we're going to do is we're going to stretch and lengthen our internal walls here. The two that we've created by about a meter and a half in order to create a new corridor that runs along this bottom wall here. So let's have a look at how that works. Let's use the stretch command first. Now, the stretch command is up on the Modify panel on the home tab on the ribbon. It's this one here. So select stretch and come into the drawing area. Now, normally, when you select the objects for stretching, you need to use a crossing window or a crossing polygon. So we're gonna go from right to left, click here, and drag the crossing window up to there and click there. Now you will notice that we've also selected the horizontal lines. Mike up the horizontal wall, just hold down shift and they select those two lines like so we don't need them. Now, you press Enter to confirm your selection and now allows you for a base point. So I'm going to select a corner here of the internal wall we created. And I'm going to drag vertically downwards, makes sure is vertical using the pilot tracking by 1.5 meters, so that's 1500 and press Enter. And you'll see that that particular wall is extended down from that corner there by 1.5 meters, 1500 millimeters. Let's have a look at the lengthen commands now, that's on the modify flyout menu here. So you click on the arrow Pinot open so that you've got all the extra commands there. And you'll find that lengthen is just here. There's the lengthen command there. So I click on lengthen, and now it says select an object to measure. Now, before you do that, have a look at the command line there you've got various different methods of lengthening align. So right-click first and you want to use the dynamic option. And we're going to select this end of the wall here and drag vertically down. And again, you can type in a distance which is 1500 again, and press Enter and extends that line down by the 1500. The good thing is it keeps you in the lengthen command so I can select this line as well. And as I drag vertically down again, I type in 1500 and press enter. And there's my two lines extended down in a similar fashion to the stretch command, but done individually and dynamically using the lengthen command. So I'll just press N to the N L to finish the lengthen command. And you can see now that we've got those lines down ready, showing the width of the new corridor or as we start working on our altar CAD drawing. 12. Using trim and extended: Once again, we're staying in the modifying objects dot d WG file. And I've left it in exactly the same state as it was at the end of the last video. In fact, I've even left the modified flyout menu Pin Diaper and up here at the top of the screen. So click on the little pin there just to make sure that that returns back into the ribbon like site. Now, we're gonna look at the trim and extend commands available to you in AutoCad. But before we do that, we need to do a quick little bit of copying first. So we're going to select this line here, this line here, and this line here, and we're going to copy them. So you can just do a right-click and copy selection. Now make sure you get the right base point. When you copy. It's this intersection right here on the lower edge of the horizontal wall lines. So click on that intersection. And then you're going to come down here to the end point snap of the lines that we worked on previously. So click there. And that gives us some horizontal lines there. Enter to finish the copy command and we're done. Then just pan upwards a little bit. And you might even want to zoom in on just a notch there just so you can see what you're doing. Now you'll notice these lines and L looking quite untidy. And you'll also notice that the wall here needs to extend to that grid line there as well. In fact, you might want to extend it all the way back to that edge of the column, perhaps who knows? But what we're going to do, we're going to utilize trim and extend to tidy all of these lines and walls up. Now what we're going to do first of all is used the trim command. Now we don't want these internal walls going all the way through our chord or they'll block the corridor. So that's the first thing that we need to trim and that's very quick and easy to do. And what we're going to do, we're going to use our cutting edges method over here first. So we're gonna go to the trim command. Again. It's on the Modify panel. Up at the top here, click on the fly out and select trim. Then what you do is you select the lines that make up your cutting edges. So the trick here were Baidu a crossing selection, click, drag across all those sort of intersections of walls there and click there. And then insert to finish. And then basically all of these lines where they intersect are cutting edges. So what I can do now is tidy up. So if I click here, you'll see that those two lines disappear. And then I need to zoom in a bit just to make sure I'm tidying up the right bit. So I'm gonna go 123, like site. You can see that's now nice and neat and tidy. Now down here, I can't actually remove these two lines because they don't intersect anything anymore where I've trimmed these lines here. So what I can do is now just press enter to close the trim command. And these two little short stubby lines here can just be selected and you can hit the delete key. So you'll notice that our corridor is now starting to take shape. Now one command that you can use here just to make sure that this is tidy is the join command. So we'll just quickly jump in and do that. So on the modify fly out here and join is this one here. So I select join and all I've gotta do is click on this line, this line, and press Enter. And because they're in the same plane, i just joined together nice and quick and neatly. Now, we need to make sure that we do some more trimming over here as well to tidy this up. So let's zoom in here and just pan across a little bit. And we want to tidy up in the same way as we did with the previous wall. How would we do that? And can we do it quicker? Well, we can. Let's go back to the trim command. Come into the drawing area. Can you see that there is a select all prompt in the brackets there on the dynamic input. Basically, if I press Enter, that means that it selects every object in the drawing and all the intersections as cutting edges and it prompts me to trim. Now you gotta be careful with this one because you can literally trim anything and everything. But it can be quite quick. Because if I go, hey, a lot, I can get rid of that one and that one. And I now don't have to worry about cutting edges. If I now just press enter to finish the trim. These two lines here can obviously be removed like sign. And we've done the trimming much, much quicker than doing all the cutting edges. But be careful, cause sometimes without the cutting edges, you can miss bits as well. Now, the polar opposite of trim is extend, and you can alternate between the two. When you're trimming, you can hold down shift and extend. When you're extending, you can hold down shift and trim. Now, all I need to do here is over here on this wall here, I want to make sure that I'm extending out to the grid lines psi. I'll go to the Modify panel, click on the flyer and select extend. Use my grid line as my boundary edge and then Enter to confirm. And I can just click here on these two lines here and extend that out to there if I want to. Now, don't forget, I can also extend further, but I would need boundary edges to do so, which I haven't got right now. I could extend all the way across to here, but it won't let me, because that's not been selected as a boundary edge at the moment. So I press Enter to finish. If I zoom out slightly now and pan across, the last bit that we need to tidy is here at the end. We need to tidy this wall end here. So we've got a little bit of extending and trimming and tidying todo. Now what we can do here is extend again and use this as the boundary edge and then Enter to confirm. And what I'll do is I'll extend that to there like that. And then what I can do again is press enter to finish the extent I'll go back to extend again, use this as the boundary edge. Enter to confirm and extend that to they're like site. Now, if I hold down shift and go to trim there, will it let me trim? No, because it's not intersecting. It's just vertically coming downwards. So what I would need to do there is press enter, go back to the trim command, and I'll use that line there. And that line there is my cutting edges Enter to confirm. And this time I can remove that for the entrance to the corridor and answer to finish the command. And I've now got some nice tidy walls all set up for my corridor, ready to access these offices here just above. We're staying in the modifying objects dot-dot-dot EWG file. And what we're going to have a look at now are the brake and joined commands that are available to you in AutoCad when you're working and editing your auto CAD drawing. Now, you'll notice that we've got two offices there with some nice desks and chairs and so on. But there's no way of getting from one office to the other. So we need an adjoining door. Now the good thing is we've got some doors already and they're also cat block, so we can copy one of these very quickly. So I am going to select this door here, Right-click copy selection. And I'm going to pick this point here. And if you want to zoom in and get a bit closer, you can see it's where the door touches the corner of the door opening like site, and you can see there it is ready to copy. Zoom out again in panel a little. And we're going to just place it somewhere along this wall here. Now, you're not just when I hover on the wall there, I'm getting the endpoint and that's because the nearest snap is not switched on. I can use my override snaps though, so I can right-click. Go to snap overrides and select nearest there on the override snap menu. And now I can pick any point along the wall. So just come down towards the bottom of the wall. It doesn't have to be an exact distance and click there like so, and then insert to finish the copy command. Now, we need to break our wall line to fit the door so that we can create a door opening just before we do that, make sure that we're on the right layer, which is going to be the eye wall layer, like sine. And then zoom in nice and close so you can see what you're doing. Now, the bright commands or on the modify flyout menu. So click on the flyer on the Modify panel. And Penny open like we've done before. And we want this command here, break between two points. And as you can see with the little fly out there, it shows you that it will leave a gap. So I click on break between two points like so. And it prompts me to select the object, so I select the line, but then don't just go picking the second breakpoint. Can you see it's going to break it where you selected the line. You need to right-click and go 1.1st, which will be this point a where you've placed the door, which you'll notice is the center snap of the arc that makes up the door. And then the second breakpoint is at the end of the arc there. So you click there like site. And can you see formed a nice door opening there like so by using the break command. Now what you want to do is just draw a couple of short lines. So using the line command now you go from this end point, drag it across using your tracking there, and click and enter to finish. And again, you do the line command again from this point here to the sign Price size to the intersection there, and click there and enter to finish. Now the quickest way to tidy that up is to go to trim and use the Select All option by pressing enter and just click there. And can you say you get rid of that line there as well? And it's to finish. And you've now got a door opening, nice and neat and tidy going between the two offices. So that's utilizing the break command. Now we also want to utilize the join command. So leaving the Modify flyer open because Join is right there and we have used it previously very quickly. I'm going to pan across. And what I want to do is I want to draw two lines on the eye wall layer from this endpoint here, keeping it horizontal, take it all the way across. You might need to zoom in just to get there on the intersection. Click there like so. An entity finish panel would slightly same again, another line using this endpoint going across when you get the intersection there, click again and ends to finish. Now if I zoom out a bit, you'll notice that I've got a line there and a line there and the sign below, line in line. I need to join those two together so the eye can form one continuous line forming that wool. So there's the join command. I click on it, I select that line and that line and enter. And you'll see that that is now one-line sign with the line below. Join command again, that line and that line. And enter to finish, and then now complete lines. And you can see that that will goes nicely around the liftoff. They now well, I have done is I have actually blocks the opening there to the liftoff. And you can tidy that up, obviously using bright and join again when you work in your auto CAD drawing. Once again, we're staying in our modifying objects dot d WAG file. And we're going to have a look now at grips and grip editing. Now, we can actually use grips to edit lines when we draw lines on a plan like we've got here and are modifying objects dot WAG file. I've left the drawing in the same state as it was at the end of the last video. In fact, light before I've left them modify flyout menu pinned open. Now we don't actually need that open at the moment, so I can unpin that. And you'll see that the flyout menu quite happily jumps back into the ribbon there. Now in the previous video, what we did was we joined some lines together, didn't weigh these lines here forming the lower wall of the corridor, which is the access corridor for this group of offices. Now, in creating that wall, we've blocked the opening here to the left shaft. So we're gonna zoom in, getting nice and close this time so that we can see the edges of the doors. And more importantly, you need to be able to see these lines here as well. Now what we're going to do is we're going to draw some lines, but we're going to use grips only to edit the lengths of the lines. And it's a very quick and easy process and it's actually very accurate, providing you've got your polar tracking on your object snap tracking on, and obviously your objects snaps. So let's have a look at how that works. I'm gonna go up to the line command in the drawer panel on the home tab on the ribbon. And use him objects snaps. I'm gonna snap to the opening on the lift shaft, click there, and come vertically down using my pilot tracking, it doesn't matter how far you come down as long as it cuts through that yellow internal wall, click their ads to finish. Do the same on the other side of the lift doors as well. Line command again. And we're going to come into here, endpoints snap there, click and drag vertically down using the pilot tracking and just click again. Enter to finish. Now, you can now see the edges of the opening that we need to create in our internal walls so that we can access the left shaft. Now the lovely thing is, is I can select the line and it's got three grips. So m points and the midpoint. If I click on this grip here and just take it down to the intersection with the internal wall and then just hit escape a couple of times. I've tidied up that particular end of the line. If I click on the line again and do the same again using the endpoint grip, not the midpoint grip. Take it up to the intersection with the wall again and hit escape. You can see now that I've now tidied up that line exactly and it fits the width of the internal. We'll do the same with the other one. So I click on the grip, Take it down there like so. Click on the grip, take it up like so. And you've tidied those up nice and neatly. Make sure you hit escape to de-select the line, line. And then we utilize our quick trim again. We go up to the Modify panel, click on the fly out there, select trim, just press Enter for the Select All option. And we're just gonna go 12 trimming away so that we've got the opening there to the left shaft and we just press enter to finish the dream command. And if we zoom out now, our internal wall does not block the opening to get in and out of the lift in the building anymore. So that's how quick and easy it is to utilize your grips and your grip editing for a very simple task in AutoCad. Once again, we're staying in the modifying objects dot DW G file. And we're going to have a look now, the boundary commands. Now the boundary command is very useful when you want to specify boundaries of an area and you don't want to have to draw all the way around the intricacies of that boundary. A very typical example of this is highlighting a room and going around the edges of columns and things like that. The boundary command is very useful because you pick an area inside the boundary and it finds the boundary for you. Let's have a look at how that works. So we're gonna go to the liar drop down first in the layers panel in the home tab on the ribbon. And you'll notice we've got an AI floor layer that is frozen at the moment. Flick on the snowflake to thawed out, and then click on that layer to make it the current drafting layer. Then what we'll do is we'll go to the top here where it says top, click on it. And we'll go to the dropdown, their custom model views. And you want to go to your entrance nine to view zooms you in nice and neat and tidily. Now we want a boundary between the grid lines, but we want it go and around the edges of the columns. Now the nice thing is boundary will find those edges for us very quickly and easily. But we want to make sure that we're on the right layer. Now you'll notice that when we went to the nine to view the liar change because it remember the liar settings of that named view. So just make sure that you go back to I flaw there and thought out again and make it the current layer. Always check that when you're using nine views because the nine views do remember the liar settings of the drawing when the view was created. So we're in our little area here in the entrance hall and we want to go up to the drawer panel on the home tab on the ribbon. Click on the fly out there and select a boundary, not hatcher gradient but boundary. And as you say there, it creates a region or a polyline from an enclosed area. So click on boundary and the dialog box will pop up. Now we're going to use pick points in a moment, but we want island detection because we wanted to find anything inside the area as well. And the object type will be polyline. Now, the boundary set is in the current viewport and basically what we're going to do is create a new boundary. So all we've got to do is go pick points, hovering in this area here and click and it finds the boundary for you and puts it on the AI floor layer. So what we've got to do now is press enter and there's my boundary in place. You can just about see if you hover over it like so. And there it is. It's a polyline on the floor layer. Now keeping the floor liar current. What I want to do now is highlight by way of hacking that particular area of floor because it's going to be made into a nice marble floor for the entrance to the building. So we now go back up to the drawer panel, click on the fly again and select hatch. And the hatch pattern you want is the NC3, T1 in the pattern panel in the Hatch Creation tab there like site. Now if I come in hover over here, you can see it becomes a very bright purple. We need to change our hatch style because we're working in metric millimeters. And at the moment, our hatch lines are one millimeter apart. So I'm going to change that to say, 50 millimeters apart and press enter. And then when I come in here Now, can you see they're nice and easily seen. I click once and I'm done, can you say, And it hasn't hatched over the columns because it's using the boundary I've created. So I can close the hatch creation there. And the hatches done hit escape to deselect anything that might be selected. And I've used my boundary there to accurately hatch the entrance area of the building. Once again, we're staying in the modifying objects dot-dot-dot EWG file. And you'll notice what I've done this time is zoomed the extents of the drawing by double-clicking on the wheel of the males. We're going to go up to the layers panel in the home tab on the ribbon. And we're going to change the layer that we're working on. We want the i layer, the furniture layer. And then using the mouse, just zoom in in the area where you can see the piano just there. And you want to be able to just have a little bit of space in the middle there. And what we're going to do, we're going to draw two rectangles. So we're gonna go to the federal panel, and we're going to click on the fly out here and select Rectangle and just put one over here and one over here. So I'm going to click here and drag. And the coordinates of the other corner point of the rectangle are going to be 1250 and then comma 650. Like that. And then press Enter and you'll see there's a little rectangle there. And then the quick way is to select that rectangle, right-click Copy selection, pick a point and put one over here as well and then ends to finish like that. Now what we're going to look at with these two rectangles are the Philips and shrimp for commands. So we'll zoom in on the left-hand rectangle first and just pan a little bit so it's central on the screen like that. Now fill it and shampoo for allowing you to add Philip radii and basically beveled edges to objects in your CAD drawings. So we're gonna use the Philip command first and that some noise curved corners to this little coffee table rectangle that we've created on the furniture layer. I'm gonna go up to the Modify panel on the home tab on the ribbon. Click on the fly out here and select Fill it like site. Now, when you first go into the Philip command, the Philip radius will default to 0. So the first thing you should do before you select any objects is right-click and go to radius and make sure that you give it a radius, otherwise you're not going to get one. You can see there that we've got specify, fill it radius on the dynamic input. I'm going to set that to a 150 millimeters and press Enter. I'm then going to select my first object, nail, that will be one of the lines on the rectangle. Now, there's ways that I can do this. And one of the ways I can do it is to right-click and select multiple. Then I can just work my way around each corner of the rectangle. So now if I go 12, there's one corner. And because I've selected multiple, I can just keep going and select each line that forms a corner like that and work my way around like that and then ends to finish. Now that's one way of doing it. Let's do an undo on that and take that back to the original rectangle. If I go back to the Phillip command, like psi and then right-click and select radius. It's going back to 0 because I didn't undo. So let's put that back as 150 and enter. And then I'll just right-click and select polyline because it's a rectangle. Does all four corners at once much quicker, much easier. So let's zoom out now and pan across. Zoom in on the right hand rectangle that we place, the one that we copied. And we'll have a look now at the shameful command again on the Modify panel, click on the fly at where facilities and select shameful. Now we're going to select our first-line or make sure that you right-click and select distance. And we're gonna specify our first shrimp for distance, which is going to be 150. Enter. And then our second shrimp for distance will also be 150 because it's remembered the first one. So just press Enter to confirm. Then, like with Philip, we right-click and we go to multiple on the shortcut menu. And I can go 1234 and work my way around on each corner. Like so just selecting the lines that form the corners, like site ends to finish. Now just like we can with the Philip command, I can undo that. And I can come back to the shampoo for command. Right-click and select distance. Put in 150 is the first distance. Press enter to accept 150 is the second distance. And then I can right-click and I can go to polyline again on the shortcut menu. And it does all four corners at once for me. Now, there is another method of shampoo suffering though as well. So I'm going to undo what I've just done on the Quick Access Toolbar there. Go back to shampoo for again like site. And I'm going to right-click and select the angle method. Now you notice I can toggle between methods. I can toggle between angle or distance method, but let's select the angle method. Now the shameful length on the first line will be 150 again, like so, and press enter. But I'm gonna specify a shampoo for angle of 60 degrees and then Enter to confirm. I'm then going to right-click and go to multiple. Now this is where you've gotta be careful because you've now got an angle and you've got to remember which way you're selecting lines to chump for. So if I select this line first and then this line, can you say the 60 degrees goes that way. You have to do the same on this one. So b, this line first, and then this way, and the same again, this line first, this y, and this line first. And this way just make sure you get the order of the lines correct. So if I now just press ends to finishing, See now that I've got an angle and a distance instead, if I undo that life, am I then go back to Shambhala? And I right-click and I go to angle again. I put in 150 like psi and the angle 60 degrees again, like we did previously. And then I right-click and I use the polyline option. This is where things can go drastically wrong, as you can see, because it's just working its way around each corner, just going 15060 degrees. 15060 degrees. It's not actually taken into account which lines you're actually working to on each corner. So if you are using the angle method, it's best to do it manually with a polyline rather than use that polyline option on the shortcut menu. Once again, we're back in our modifying objects dot-dot EWG file. And you'll notice that I've zoomed to the extents of the drawing once more by double-clicking on the wheel of the males. Now what we're going to look at are the divide and measure commands in auto CAD. But before we do that, there's a couple of little settings that we need to sort out first. The first one is that we need to go to a named view in our drawing. So let's do that first. Go to where it says taught here in the drawing area and click and you'll get your pre-set views come up hover over custom model views and select reception. That one there that will take you in towards the reception office here. Like so. And we're gonna be working on this wall that we created previously. Now, we're gonna change the layer that we're gonna be using. So go to the liar dropped down in the layers panel in the home tab on the ribbon. Thor out the a server setting out layer by clicking on this knife-like and then click on it to make it the current drafting layer. Then we're gonna go over to our Utilities panel here, again on the home tab on the ribbon, and go to point style. And you wanna make sure that you're using this point style here. If it's set to the default, that one there, you want to change it to that one there, and then make sure that all the other settings stay the same. So point size 5%, set relative size to screen and click on. Okay. Now the divide a measure commands are actually in the draw handler on the home tab on the ribbon, but they're on the flyout menu. So click on the fly out and just click on the pins opinion open. And you'll see there here. So you've got Divide and you've got measure there. Now what you can do with divide a measure in also CAD is create points. Those points that use the notes snap by dividing or measuring along lines or objects in AutoCad. Now I'm just going to pan and zoom a little bit to get that nice long wall central on the screen like that. Now I'm gonna use this 1 first, I'm going to use divide. And it creates evenly spaced point objects or blocks along the length or perimeter of an object. So if I select divine now it prompts me to select the object or want to divide, which is this line here. And it says, how many segments do you want that divided into? Now I'm going to say eight and put it in the box there and press Enter. Notice on the command line at the bottom of the screen though, I could actually place blocks evenly along the wall as well. I don't want to I want points because those points are going to help me form the windows inside that internal wall. So if I now press Enter to confirm eight segments, can you see it is divided into eight segments using these points, it's still one line, but I've got 12345678 equal segments going along that line. So what I could do now is change my life, my internal wall layer, and draw some lines along that particular wall. And it could create window openings. If I put a little vertical line of, of each of those notes snaps, I could place windows going along the wall if I wanted to. Now, what I'm going to do though is I'm going to undo that. So I'm going to go up to undo and just undo that divide because what I can do also is measure. So if I go to measure here, what I can do now is select the same line. But now it asks me to specify the length of segment. Now if I only know that I want to divide this line into known lens. Let's say 2.5 meters H, for examples that we to 500, each segment now will be 2.5 meters long. So if I press Enter, can you see there that each of these segments here now 1.52342 meters long with a bit left over on the end. So I could do it that way as well. So I'll just undo that like site. Now those segment lengths were a little bit too long. So let's go back to that command there, the measure command. And this time I'll select the line and the length of the segment. I'll make it 1500 this time. And I'll press enter and it puts the points along like site. Now I haven't actually physically measured this, but you'll notice now I've got 123 points there where I could potentially have a window and possibly another window there. So let's have a look at that and see how that works. I'll utilize my note snap. I'm gonna change the layer now to internal wall. So I'll go to the wall layer. And then what I want to do now is zoom in a bit and draw lines using my notes snap, makes sure that he's on in your running objects snaps here, so there's no switch it on like so. And then click on the flyout menu arrow, it's close to the menu. If I zoom in now what I can do is I can draw lines going from that node snap, they're vertically downwards. And I can create the window openings. So if I now just press Enter there. And then again I do another line command now, coming off of this point here and coming down to here, you'll notice that I'm not selecting the line command. I'm selecting the space bar for ease of use to repeat the line command. And as I pan across, I'm just using the node snap and coming vertically down each time to the intersection and then pressing Enter. So Space-bar again, note snap, intersection into, and as I go along panning along, I can do each of these very quickly and easily, like site. And then enter again. And then coming down to here, we want to repeat the line command again to there. And then last but not least, we want another one coming off of that node coming down C, They're like psi and then its to finish. So if we zoom out a bit now, see those lines are in there, but I've got the note snaps, those points are still there. So I'll just unpin the drawer panel then I can go back into the Ribbon. And what I'll do now is I'll come down here on the lead, drop them, and I'll fall out the a serve setting outlier. Now it's already thought. So I don't actually need to thaw out. It's not frozen anymore, but the points are on that layer. So what I need to do is actually freeze it, not thorugh, I don't want to see them anymore. So you can see there that when I hit Skype now I've got the lines that provide the demarcation for the window openings along the wall. So we're staying in modifying objects dot-dot-dot EWG fall once more. And you'll notice that I've zoomed out again. I've double-clicked on the wheel to zoom extents on the drawing so that we can see everything that's going on. And we're going to have a look now at polylines and splines and editing them. Now, you will notice that the moment that we don't actually have any what I would call proper splines on the drawing at the moment. We're going to zoom in on this furniture area in the middle. Now there is a named view for that. So I'm going to go click on the top here, custom views. And as you see, there's a furniture view and it takes us straight into the middle there where we need to be. Now what you'll notice as well, can you see that the setting out layers switched on again? That's all to do with those named views. We are going to change our layer anyway. So we're going to come here and just make sure that that survey setting out layer is frozen again so that we don't have to see those little points on the wall there and just hit Escape. And just make sure that a firm is the current layer at the moment. Now you'll notice there that we've got that weird and wonderful polyline that we drew earlier. It was a rectangle. And then we did some weird things with the shampoo for command that can actually be deleted now, so we'll delete that. And what I'm going to do is zoom in on that area a little bit more. And with the iPhone layer as the current layer, I'm going to draw a polyline and then I'm going to edit that polylines as well. So draw panel on the home tab on the ribbon. I'm gonna go to polyline like site, and it creates a 2D polyline. Now I'm gonna just start about here and I'm gonna click and drag to the right horizontally using the pilot tracking. And I'm gonna try pain at 2 thousand millimeters. Enter. And then I'm going to come vertically up here, like so. And then I'm going to come up by 100 and enter like psi as I come across to the left horizontally again using the powder tracking, see thousand again there. And then I'm going to right-click and select arc on the shortcut menu and just take it down to that end point snapped layer and click ends to finish and enter one more time. And you'll see that that is now trying to draw another OK. It won't let me finish until I actually right-click and go back to line, and then right-click again and then enter. So just be aware of that on your polyline command, you can't stay in an arc and exit the command. You've got a right-click, go back to the line setting, and then right-click again and select Enter or press the Enter key. But we've now drawn our table there, as you can see on the iPhone layer. And I want to be able to edit that particular polyline. So if I now just select that and go up to the explode command here on the Modify panel. But I'll explode it back to all its original objects. So what I can do here now is I can click here and I can remove that line so I'll delete it. And what I want to do is I want to add another arc there onto the end to give it a curve each end. Now it's a real simple trick used the mirror command. Select that you want to mirror that particular arc there. Enter or right-click to confirm. And then just use the midpoint snap hair down to the midpoint snap pair for the mirror line and erase source objects know a doubt 1c. Now that gives me two ox and two lines. How do I get that back to a polyline? Well, that's simple PE, polyline at it. Press enter. And I can select any arc or line. So I'm going to select the OLC. They're like So do you want to turn it into one? Yes, I do want it to become a polyline, but I also want to select join on the menu there and join all of these other segments, the two lines and the arc there as well. Enter to finish, and then enter one more time. And you'll see that that is now a closed polyline wants more. So you can see that it's very quick and easy to edit polylines when you create them in your AutoCad drawings. Now, the last thing that we're going to do is edit a spline. Now what I want to do is create a spline coming off of the corner of this wall here. So what I'm going to do is change the layer to the eye wall layer and it's beyond the internal wall layer. And I'm just gonna do a single line, spline just to show the curve of the wall coming out between this table and this cipher. So I'm going to come up to the drawer panel, click on the fly out, and I'm just going to select the spline fit with the fit points. They're like site. And I'm just going to use the endpoint snap layer. And then I'm gonna go 123, maybe four, maybe five. And then I'll just do ends to finish. Now, that is a nice curvy spline. And as you can see, I've deliberately exaggerated a little bit. But to edit spline is very quick and easy. I can select it and I can use this little arrow here, like so. And I can change it to a C V spline, a control vertices spline like that. Or I can click on it again and change it to a fit spline. Now, if I've got a fit spline, I can just click on the grips and drag and you can see that I can recur the spline very quickly and easily giving it a more gentler curve like that. And then if I click on the arrow here, change that to control vertices. Again, I can click on the vertices and convert it even more just to give it an even more gentler curve if I want, say like psi, that gives it a nice gentle curve there. Hit escape to the select and you see I've got a nice gentle curved line there separating the table and the sofa, perhaps creating a more sort of cafeteria like effect with a curved wall. And you can see there how quick and easy it is to edit your polylines and your splines when you're working in your AutoCad drawings. 13. Using grid and snap: We're starting another chapter now in our AutoCad Essentials course, and we're gonna be looking at drawing accurately. Now, drawing accurately is a prerequisite for any AutoCad drawing, but there are many different tools to allow you to draw accurately in all takeout as well. So we've got a new drawing for you. It's called drawing accurately, dot WAG, surprise, surprise. And as you can see there, we've got some objects on the drawing that you can work with, and you can download the drawing from the website as usual and use it to follow along with the videos. Now, we're going to look at various methods of accuracy in Auto CAD. And it's really important that you use these tools because your accuracy in your drawings could affect the construction of a building, the manufacturing of a product, and so on and so forth. So it's mega important that you keep your accuracy to the absolute accuracy if you'll pardon the pun. So we're gonna look at grid and snap first. Now these are down on the status bar in AutoCad. They're down here, so there's grids and their snap there. Now you'll notice that snap is already on, but Grid isn't. So click on the grid icon and you see your grid appear in auto CAD drawing. Make sure you're using the new layer as well in the layers drop-down there. That way you can distinguish from existing, which is red and new, which is green. Now we've got the grid switched on, but there are settings that you can set for the grid and the Snap, come down to the status bar again and click on the little arrow here for the flyout menu. And you can see you've got Polar Snap and grid snap, grid snap is on, go to snap settings. And you'll see that snap His own and grid is on in the drafting settings dialog box. Your snap x and y spicing is set to ten. And your grid spacing x and y is also set to ten with a major line every five saying, See that's that dark line there on the grid on the black background. Click on OK. Come into the drawing area and zoom in on these two lines here. And as you come in closer, Can you see the grid updates? And the closer you get, the more of that grid updates so that you can see what you're doing. So that's where you've now got this major line every five increments. So it's really rather useful now the thing is you can actually switch off all of your objects snap settings. So switch off Object, Snap, switch off objects snap tracking, and switch off pilot tracking as well. You don't need any of them if you're using Grid and snap. Let me show you what I mean. If I go to the line command now in the drawer panel and I come over here, can you say I can snap to any grid point? And these lines are conveniently set up on the grid Fourier. So I can go from that point there, click. And as I come along, I follow the grid. And when I get to that grid point there, I click again and I get to that grid point there. And because I'm snapping to the grid each time, you'll see that I'm drawing completely accurately but without any object snap so I press ends to finish and I've drawn completely accurately there as if always use an object snap. Using the grid and the snap instead. Now, if I didn't want to use the grid and the snap, I would need obviously to have my objects snaps on. But if you're drawing lots of regular shapes that you know are going to follow horizontal and vertical lines. It's sometimes more beneficial to use Grid and snap, like we have just done in an auto CAD drawing. We're staying in the drawing accurately dot-dot EWG file. And I've left it in exactly the same state as it was at the end of the last video. Now, what we're going to look at this time is working with coordinates in our AutoCad drawings. Now obviously these grids do represent coordinates, but your coordinates can be much, much more accurate and you don't actually need a grid and snap on to use them. So what we're going to do now is we're going to switch off grid and snap down here on the status bar. And we're going to switch polar tracking back on and Object Snap tracking, and obviously our objects snaps. And then what we're going to do, we're going to roll back on the wheel so that we can see the other objects in the drawing. And just a little bit of planning there to get them Central on the screen. Now we've got a rectangle here, like so now I haven't got the grid switched on, all the snap switched on. So how do I work out what coordinates I'm using? Well, there's a lovely command in auto CAD and it's called ID points. And it allows you to basically pick up any point on an object and work out what the coordinates of that particular 0. So let's look at the bottom left corner of our red rectangle here. If I go to the Home tab on the ribbon and go to the Utilities panel. Can you see there I've got Id point there on the Utilities panel and it displays the UCS coordinates of a specified location. So if I click on that and use my endpoints and that there and click, you can see there's my coordinates there. So I've got x is to 750, y is 1700, Zed is obviously 0 because it's a flat 2D drawing. And those are my coordinates from 00 where x and y intersect. So all the way down here somewhere x and y intersect. And as you can see, that little square there indicates where 00 is. So I should be able to work with that particular coordinate. Now, I can find a coordinate, no problem. I can use Id point to do that. But what happens if I want to draw something unknown distance from a known point? Well, that's where things like relative and absolute coordinates come in. Zooming on the center rectangle a bit more so that you've got a bit more scope to see what you're doing. What we're going to do is make sure that we're on the new layer, like site in the layers panel on the home tab on the ribbon. And we're going to go to the line command like site. Now it prompts us for the first of our line. I don't have to actually physically specify a coordinate there. What I can do is utilize my objects snaps some objects. Naps will be the bottom-left corner. Endpoints snap there. Now as soon as I start drawing that line, can you see with the dynamic input, I can specify an angle. I can specify a distance. But what happens if I want that line to be exactly a certain distance along the x axis and a certain distance along the y-axis. Well, the good thing is, because I've picked that first with an object snap. It's going to automatically place the end of that line relative to the first. So if I talk to in say 500 comma 500 and pressed enter, that line, should be 500 by 500, along which it is. So what it's done there, can you say it's gone 500 along the x axis to the right because it was a positive value. And 500 up the y axis again because it was a positive value. If I now press Enter to confirm that line, the line itself is 500 along this way and 500 up. But the actual coordinate is an absolute coordinate. So if I go back now to my Utilities panel and click on ID point here and specify that endpoint there. It will be 500 on top of the original x and y coordinates. If the bottom left corner that we looked at previously with Id point. That's how you can work with your coordinates. Now that's great because it's relative from a point selected. What happens if I want to draw a line to an exact coordinate that is absolute and relative to 00 where x and y into st. Well, what I need to use there is the hashtag symbol. Now let's see how that works. So what I'm going to do now is go back to the line command. And I'm gonna utilize this point here, specify the first. Now I could use a known endpoints snap like that if I wanted to. So I click there and I'll come away. And I know that that next point, if I specify a coordinate will be relative. But what happens if I want to draw from 1 to another point using coordinates only? Well, let's say the Skype, Skype back to that line command. And at the specify first I'm going to type 500 comma 500, like I did when I created that angled green line in the middle there. Watch where the line starts from a press Enter. And I actually stops all the way over here to the left somewhere. If I pan a bit, what you'll find is 500 comma 500 is all the way down here. So why is that? That's because it's an absolute coordinate based on where x and y intersect. So if I now do 500 comma 500 again relative to the first of the line and Enter to confirm, can you see that line there looks the same as that line there? They are the same because they are both going 500 along the x axis and 500 up the y-axis. But this one started at the actual absolute coordinate, 500 comma 500. So if I do the id command, I can just type ID and Enter. And use the endpoint snap on there. You can see that that's at 500 comma 500 and absolute coordinate. Now what I can do as well is if I want to draw a line to another absolute coordinate, what I could do is actually go back to the line command. And I'll specify the 1.500th comma 500 like sign. And that's starting again there. I didn't even snap to the end of the line. It knows where it is because I've typed in the absolute coordinate. Now I want this next endpoint of my lines co-twin absolute coordinate. So if I now put hashtag, luck, so can you see the hashtag appears there? And it's now asking me for a coordinate. So what I'm going to do now is type 750 comma 250. And enter. And you'll see that that's drawing that line to a different coordinate five press ends to finish. It's gone down here to this point here. So if I now Id that point and use the endpoint snap there, it's seven hundred fifty, two hundred fifty and absolute coordinate based on where x and y intersect at 00. So that's how you can work with coordinates in your auto CAD drawing, choosing absolute coordinates and relative coordinates. We're staying in our drawing accurately dot-dot EWG file. And what we're going to have a look at now is how we use dynamic input in our auto CAD drawings. Up until now, I've mentioned dynamic input, but I haven't mentioned any Dynamic Input settings or how you switch dynamic input on or off, because dynamic input by default, when you start up, AutoCad is always on. Now Dynamic Input is basically the ability to type a command or enter a coordinate value on the screen next to the crosshairs. So if I start typing line, for example, you'll notice it appears next to the crosshairs there. And you see that the suggestion menu is suggesting the line command. So if I now press Enter, I've gone into the line command and it's asking me to specify the first of my line. I'll just press enter to cancel that. I don't want to draw a line right now. What we're going to do, we're going to zoom in on these areas here. So we've got our rectangle, our line, and our rectangle on our circle. So let's get nice and close on those and get them nicely zoomed in, panned in the center of the screen. Ignore the lines that we drew further down to the left previously. Make sure you're on the new layer as well. You can see that at the top of the screen there in the layers panel. Now, dynamic input, as I said, is always on by default and it stay on here on the status bar. It's this one here, dynamic input. Now I can right-click on dynamic input. And it will suggest Dynamic Input Settings and bring up the drafting settings dialog box with the Dynamic Input tab current, just click on cancel there if you've done that, because you might not have the Dynamic Input icon here on your status bar. If you haven't click on the little three lines here, the customization and dynamic input is up near the top there. Select it and make sure it's ticked. And it will then appear down here. In your status bar, click on the three lines to close the menu, and then it's there and you can switch it on. And obviously off when it's grey, it's off. Click on it again. When it's blue, it's on. Now. Like I said, right-click on Dynamic Input and go to Dynamic Input Settings and click on it. And there's lots of different settings for dynamic input. You can enable points or input. You can enable dimension input where possible. There's different settings for that as well, polar relative visibility, and so on. Now aren't going to be perfectly honest with the hair. I never ever change any of these settings. It's entirely up to you if you do 1T. But my recommendation is that you leave all of the settings exactly as they are, because they all work really well. If you want to investigate the settings, that's fine, but try not to change them. Because sometimes these can make your life a little bit more difficult if they're not set to default settings. So they should Dynamic Input Settings. Once you're happy with those, click on OK and the drafting settings dialog box will close. Now, if I start drawing a line, if I go to the line command in the drawer panel in the home tab, it prompts me for the first, as you can see there with the dynamic input. And the benefit you've got sits right next to the crosshair and you're not having to look down at the command line all the time. And it's a bit like watching a foreign movie was subtitles. Obviously you're looking at the subtitles, will the time down at the bottom of the screen instead of looking at the screen to see where the action is. So the whole idea there is, is that it's heads up design. You're looking at the crosshair as you're designing, instead of looking at the command line all the time. So you can see there that I can specify my first. So I might use that object snap there, the endpoint snap and come down here to that endpoint snap. And there's my line. And answer to finish like so, quick and easy. Now, let's have a look at that without dynamic input, let's see how that works. Just undo that last step by clicking on Undo on the Quick Access Toolbar there. Come down to Dynamic Input and switch it off. And now go up to the line command, come into the drawing area. There's nothing to prompt you. So you don't quite know what you're gonna do next, you have to look down at the command line, is snap will appear no problem at all. And then that snap will appear then no problem at all. But there's nothing to prompt you. It's only the objects and apps that appear and then ends to finish. So you can see how useful that dynamic input is. So always make sure that Dynamic Input is on. Don't turn it off. And as I recommended, don't change the settings either. We're studying in our drawing accurately dot DW G file. And in the previous video we looked at Dynamic Input. Now one of the tools that you will use to draw accurately in AutoCad ties him beautifully with dynamic input. And it's a thing called Direct. The distance entry, which I normally abbreviate to D, D, E. And what it allows you to do is enter direct distance is just by typing them in. And the benefit you've got is if you've got the Dynamic Input upon the screen, you can see those being typed in nice and easily because the dynamic input is sitting there right next year Crosshair in your drawing area. So if you want to draw a line using Dynamic Input and direct distance century, it's very quick and easy to do. Make sure that your Dynamic Input is on, which is down here. There we go, it's on, it's blue. And make sure you're using the new layer as well, like we have done for previous videos in this particular chapter. And again, I'm gonna utilize the line command, but I'm gonna utilize the circle on the right-hand side. So if you want to pan and perhaps zoom in a little bit so that you can see the circle a little bit more clearly. That's entirely up to you. So I'm gonna go to the drawer panel on the Home tab, line commands. And the first of my line is going to be the center snap of my circle. Now the good thing about the sense of snap is I can touch on the edge of the circle and there's the center snap appearing or I can come all the way in and hover over it like site. I'll click on it. And now as you can see, my line is coming off the center of the circle. Now, you'll notice direct distance entries automatically there. If you've got dynamic input on, because you can see it, they're highlighted in blue. That distance is, the length of that line is going to be, if I click on the males and specify where the cross areas is the next point of the line. Or I can specify a distance there. Let's say I want that to be 300 long. If I now press the Tab key on the keyboard, that will lock that line at 300 long. That's my direct distance entry. And then I can specify the angle I want to at say 30 degrees in that box there. Again, direct distance or direct angle entry press tab again. And that is all locks now at 300 long at 30 degrees. If I just left-click on the males, that line is done at 300 long, at 30 degrees. And now what I can do using my object snap semi Object Snap tracking is I can be a little bit devious. I can hover over that center snap or end point of the line and don't click on it. And that's our Come up here. Now I'll hover over this end point. And as I come down because of my object snap tracking, there's my intersection. So I can click and I don't even have to enter a distance there because my object snap tracking is taken over for me. Now what I can do this time is I can come along this way and I can just go to the endpoint, snap there and click. And I don't even have to specify a distance again and press enter to finish. So you see how that direct distance entry with the Dynamic Input Switched on is extremely useful. It allows you not only to specify distances but angles as well. And it's just a case of tabbing between the distance and the angle when you're drawing your lines or your polylines in your auto CAD drawings. 14. Using the hatch command: We're starting a new chapter now in AutoCad Essential Training course. And we're gonna be looking at hatching and gradient fills. So we've got a new drawing for you and surprise, surprise. It's called hatching gradients dot DW G. As usual, you can download that from the website to follow along with the videos. Now the drawing itself might look remarkably familiar to you. It's the floor plan that we've used previously in other chapters in this particular course. Now what we're going to do is we're going to put some hatching and gradient fills in the offices in the top right corner of the floor plan. Now that is the reception area. And now you may remember that we've got nine to views available to us in this particular drawing. So I go to where it says top click their custom model views. And I'm gonna go to reception here like so. And that zooms me in nice and close so I can see those offices in the top right corner of the floor plan. If you want to, you can pan a little bit and maybe zoom in a little bit more like site. Now we're gonna create a new layer. So Home tab on the ribbon Layers panel, click on layer properties and new layer like we've done in previous chapters. And we're just going to call it to hatch like site. If you now press the coma k though, create another new layer as well. And we're going to call that gradients. So we've got a separate layer for hatching and gradients. So just press enter after gradients. So you've got those two new layers there. Now the gradient slider, it doesn't matter which colour it is because you select the colors for the gradient fills anyway. But the hatch layer here, what I'd like you to do is pick a color by clicking on the color box. Just make a nice bright color that stands out on the drawing. Maybe a purpley pink like that color to ten for example. So I'll click on OK there. Now we're gonna look at hatching first. So double-click next to the hatch layer on the little sheet of paper, I get the current layer. And then on the layer properties manager click on the cross to close it. Now, what we're going to do is we're going to hatch this little left-hand office here. So just make sure that you're hatch layer is your current layer. And the Hatch command is found on the drawer panel on the home tab on the ribbon, and the flyout is here. So I select hatch. As soon as you do that, you will see the ribbon change to the Hatch Creation tab, which is contextual based on the fact that you selected the Hatch command. And you'll notice where I'm hovering over an internal point. Now can you say that every time I hover over an internal point, I can hatch with that particular color of the layer. Now, it looks like solid fill. It isn't it's purely because my hatch style is very small. So what we're going to do, we're going to go to the pattern panel on the Hatch Creation tab and select NC 31. They have that's the pattern that we want. There's lots of other patterns you'll notice that just come up to the top and you want NC3 one there. And then you want to click in your scale here and change that to 50 and press Enter, and you'll see that update to 50 dots 00. Now when you hover, can you see that the hatches now because they're using a different scale and much, much more obvious. So I'm going to select that internal area there. And you'll notice obviously where the door is. It hasn't hatched that particular area because that is part of the hatch boundary. That's fine. That's no problem. It's always so we've got that hatch. They're like so. And then you close Hatch Creation there. And you've put a hatch pattern into that particular office like so. Now what happens if I want to use a different hash patents psi on this office? A, a, well, again, I go to the Hatch command and I'll pick a different patents. So let's find a different pattern this time. Let's go down a little bit and we'll go for, let's say a IRB 16, that one there. Now you'll notice my hatch scale in the Properties panel on the Hatch Creation tab is still at 50. So when I come into here, it's now too big. So what I need to do now is change that down a bit. Let's change it to say five and press enter. And then when I come in now you can see my brickwork catch is still a little bit big. So let's perhaps consider making that one again like it was before. And there's a nice brickwork catch there as well. Now you wouldn't normally used that implant. You'd probably he's on an ice Elevation view. And as you can see as I hover around, I can pick any points of fill with that brickwork. So I'll click on Close Hatch Creation And there's my second hatch pattern applied to the other office in the drawing like sign. Now, the other thing that we can look at is gradient fills. And what we're going to do in the next video is perform a similar workflow and process. But we'll just be using gradient fills which utilized different colors to highlight different areas. Were staying in our hatching gradients dot-dot-dot EWG file. And in the previous video we looked at hatching and how we change the hatch scale and change the hatch pattern. What we're going to look at in this particular video is gradient fills and how you can utilize colors and gradients to highlight areas instead of the hatch patterns as you can see on the drawing. Now at the moment we're in the hatch layer, in the layers panel, click on the layer dropped down there and change that to gradients there like site, make sure that you distinguish between the two, put them on separate layers. So why is useful to have different types of objects on different layers in year-olds CAD drawings. Now, the gradient fill command is in the sign places the Hatch command, it's on the droll panel in the home tab on the ribbon, click on the fly out here and there's gradient there, like site. So now you'll notice that we've got Hatch Creation come up at the top on the ribbon again. And you'll see that we're using instead now gradients, now you can swap to hatch patents. There's patterns there that will take me back to my hatch pounds. If I click on the dropdown again, I'll go back to gradient and I can slit my gradient fills so I can't toggle between the two. I don't have to keep coming out of the Hatch Creation tab if I don't want say. Now we've got a select some colors. So I'm gonna select some colors here. I'm gonna go for a dark grey, like so, and then maybe go for something like a nice red that works quite well. And you'll notice you get some different patents settings here. And then it goes down to things like the hatch. Patton's again, you'll notice as well. So what we want is a reasonable linear pattern for our gradient fills or perhaps go for g are linear, that one there. And again, I'm using picked points rather than select an object to fill with gradient fill. And when I hover, hey, you see that nice gradient fill appearing like sign. I click once and that fills the area with the gradient fill. So you see why the gradient layer itself doesn't actually need a colour. Because all you're doing is you're putting a colored gradient fill on to that layer. And it doesn't actually affect the colors of the gradient because you set those in the Hatch Creation tab. So there's our gradient fill in place. I gotta close Hatch Creation on the ribbon. And it's all done. That's how a gradient fill can be used to highlight an area in one of your auto CAD drawings. So we're staying in our hatching gradients dot-dot EWG file. And in the previous couple of videos, what we've done is we've created some hatch patterns and we've created a gradient fill layer, the red one in the drawing area. How do you edit them though? Well, it's actually very, very easy if you hover over them, they highlight, you click on them like so. And you'll notice that the ribbon changes to the hatch editor now instead of the Hatch Creation tab. So again, it's another contextual tab, but you're now editing an existing hatch pattern. So if I now go up to the patent panel here and change the hatch pattern, you can see there how quick and easy it is to change it. And if I perhaps change the patch scale there to say 25, for example, and press enter. So it becomes a denser hatch with smaller gaps between the crosshatching there on that particular Japan. And then what I might want to do is just close the hatch editor there and that's done. I then select the next hatch pattern and I change that to say NC 38. And you see there that that looks for a dense. So I need to change the hatch scale, perhaps to say 25. For that one. Press Enter and you see it hatches that quite nicely as well. Again, close the hatch editor, job done. I've edited that hatch pattern as well. What about what gradient fills? Now these you gotta be careful with because ageing say when I move over that sometimes the highlight is not that obvious. In this case it is because I've used a red. And as you see, it kinda goes or Pilar pink color. And I click on it and you can see the grip in the center of the gradient fill. So if I want to change the color, let's change the color to say a blue, for example, that makes even more obvious on the screen. What changed the patent, the gradient fill pattern. Let's go for that cylinder pattern there. Can you see it changes and there's an inverse cylinder pattern there, for example as well. Now I can change any of this. I can change the angle if I want to. Let's change that to say 45 degrees and press Enter. And you say that that cylindrical pattern changes and it's at an angle now instead. And then again, just like with the hatch patterns are closed, the hatch editor, I'm a gradient fill is being edited as well. It's that quick and it's that easy to edit. Things like your Hatch patterns in your gradient fills on your auto CAD drawings. 15. Aligning text: We're starting another chapter now in our AutoCad Essential Training course. And we're gonna look at some additional text techniques that are available to you in AutoCad. We've got a new drawing for you. It's using text dot d wj. And as usual, you can download it from the website to follow along with the videos. Now, you'll also notice as well that we've got the text layer current in the layers panel in the home tab on the ribbon. So just make sure that if you haven't got that text layer current, that you select it from the layer drop-down like site. Now what we're going to do is we're gonna look at aligning text and getting it to either aligned to the left hand side or the right-hand side. Now you'll notice in the top right corner in the office is there of the floor plan that we've got some text describing the usage of each of the offices. So just using your mouse, GET across her over the office's role upon the whale, and then do a little bit as zooming and panning so that you can see each of the offices. Now, these offices here, 12 are single line text. Now what I want is I want Office one to align it to the left-hand side. An office to, to align to the right-hand side. It's very quick and easy to do. Just select the text with a little crossing window like that. Right-click and go to properties. And the properties pallet. See the justification at the moment is middle center. If you click on it and click on the down arrow and select middle left, and then close your properties pallet. You'll see that they have obviously justified to the left. What you can do now is another right-click, select Move. Pick a point on the text somewhere. Perhaps just move it over near the door. And you can see then nicely aligned to the left hand side. Let's do the same with Office RM. Select both bits of single line text. And then we'll just right-click and go to Properties. Again, you see the justification is middle center. So just click on the down arrow there and set that to middle, right this time. And then close the Properties palettes and you'll see that they've aligned to the right. Right-click again with them still selected, select Move, pick a point near the text. And we'll just drag that over near the door and click there. And then just make sure you hit escape a couple of times just to make sure that nothing is remaining selected in the selection set. So you can see we've aligned the texts, they're to the left and to the right. Now, Office RM 003 is multi-line text. So how do you justify that to either the left or the right? Well, I would avoid this text to go to the left. So I select the text, double-click on it and you'll see the text editor kicks in on the ribbon at the top of the screen. So we're now in the text editor, the multi-line text editor. And what I want to do is select all of the texts by highlighting it. I go to the paragraph panel here on the text editor tab, and there's my justification. So I am going to select middle left. As you can see, it all justifies across. I get a little preview of that are close to the text, that it's a job done. I can select the text, right-click, use Move On the shortcut menu. Pick a point near the text, and I'll move that, let's say up near the door here, like so. So you see that you can alter the justification of your text and a line each bit of text so that it oh, justifies to the left or the right. If you want to do that in your AutoCad drawings. We're staying in or using text dot-dot-dot EWG file. And in the previous video, we aligned our text2 either left or right, using the justifications of our different types of texts on our drawing. I've left the drawing in the same state as it was at the end of the last video. So just double-click on the wheel to zoom extents. And you can see the whole drawing there like sign. What we're gonna look at now is a framing text in a title block. Now you'll notice if you look at the tabs bottom left, we have a G, a plan layout tab. Click on that for me. And you'll see there that we've got a nice view port and a nice simple title block available to us. Now it's actually an N1 ISO title block, which is metric using millimeters. But we've got a notes column over here on the right. And we've also got a nice line here that allows us to align our text on our title block. So what I'm going to do is make sure that I'm on the right layer in the layers panel first of all. So Home tab on the ribbon Layers panel. Click on the little drop down there and you see that we've got title text. Make sure you're on the title text layer. Now, we need to make sure that we're using the appropriate text style. Staying on the home tab on the ribbon, if you click on the annotation fly out here, you can see when you click on the fly out there for the styles. We've got various styles available to us. You want to select this one here, Tikal layout ten. And that will make sure that that particular textile is used. And also more importantly, your text will be ten millimeters high on your title block. So make sure that you use the right textile and the right layer for your title text. Now what we're going to do is zoom in on this bottom left corner, first of all, so pan and zoom using your mouse like so. We're then going to apply some single line text here, basically to say that this is the general arrangement plan of this particular drawing. So we can do that going to the annotation panel on the home tab on the ribbon, click on the fly out there and select single line text. Now because we've already selected a text style, some of these settings might be preset, but you'll notice it's asking for the middle point of the text. We don't want that. We need to right-click and justify. And we want to justify our text to the left because we're on the left hand end, left-hand corner title block. Now it's asking for the start point at the text. Utilize your objects, snaps and snap to this end point, hail like site. And as soon as you do that, you'll notice it doesn't ask for the height of the text. That's because the height is specified in that textile. But it does ask for the rotation angle, which will keep it 0. So just press enter to accept that. There is our little cursor there flushing away. And we're just going to type in their general arrangement plan. So general arrangement, again, make sure you spell it right and then space, dash space, and then perhaps put a plan in capital letters and to once and twice. And there's your single line text. Now you'll notice that's aligned nicely along that line and that line was left there for a reason. So make sure that you could place that text neatly. So if you don't need that line anymore, it can actually be deleted like that. And you can see you frame some nice texts there on your title block. Double-click on the wheel to zoom extents. Now you've got your notes column here, and you don't want to actually have your notes touching the lines that form the edges of the notes column. So just pan and zoom again. And just make sure that you can actually see the top of the notes column there. Make sure you're on your title text layer like psi. And we're gonna change the text style. So annotation fly out here on the home tab on the ribbon. Click on the little drop down menu, and this time you want this one here. Notes layout 3.5. click on that to make sure you're using the right textile. Now we're gonna place multiline text, but we're going to place it inside on notes column. Now you could place some lines here offset from these lines on the title block to get it exact. I'm not gonna worry about that too much, but make sure that you switch off object snap and Object Snap tracking. You don't need those. We're gonna go to the annotation panel on the home tab on the ribbon, click on the fly out and select a multi-line text and then come inside like so to about there with the crosshair click and drag. Now you might obviously place this exactly by placing some construction lines and some intersections. I'm not gonna do that, but I'm gonna make sure that I don't snap to anything by making sure that my object snap is off when I click there like that, there's my text editor ready to go. I can now switch the objects snapback on if I want to. But what I can do now is just click in the editor and type notes in capitals like that, perhaps with a colon, and then press Enter for the next line down. Then I can go to my paragraph panel in my text editor tab and select Bullets and Numbering. Let's make them numbered. There's my nights there, or we might say all dimensions in millimeters. Now I've started typing away. And remember, we covered this previously. You need to click in the text editor before it will allow you to type. And then can you say all dimensions in millimeters? Make sure you spell it correctly. So milli, meters, like site full stop. And then you might say, do not scale from this drawing. And you should never scale from any drawing unless you know exactly what the dimensions are on site as well. So there's our notes and I might highlight the notes there and perhaps make that bold using the formatting panel there in the text editor tab. I'll close the text editor now. And you can see now that we've got a nice notes column o frames there in the title block. If I double-click on the wheel to zoom extents, you can see that's now looking like a proper toggle block or professional title block on our auto CAD drawing. 16. Editing dimensions and dimension overrides: Once again, we're starting another chaps and now in our AutoCad Essential Training course. And we're going to look at some more dimensioning techniques that you can utilize when you're annotating your auto CAD drawings. Now we've got a nice new drawing for you to use. It's called more dimensioning dot-dot EWG. And you can see it there on the screen. As usual, you can download it from the website, follow along with the videos. Once you've got the drawing loaded up, make sure that you're using the anode, dims a liar that one there, because that a stands for architecture and o is annotation and demes, obviously dimensions. And then what you want to do is we're going to zoom in on the top left corner of the drawing where the j and the i gridlines are so that we can see the dimensions more clearly like site. So a little bit as zooming and panning so that you can see the 3-0, 5-0 dimension and the 5250 dimension. And what we're going to look at is editing dimensions and also dimension overrides. Now you'll notice that the moment that the 3050 dimension there is a nice and neatly in the middle of the dimension based on the dimensions style. So like that dimension and you'll see it's all one object. If you hover over that central grid, you can see there that you can actually edit the dimension using all the tools available. So if I move text only, for example, that will allow me to move the text of the dimension wherever I want it to go. So I might want to shift a little bit to the left using my polar tracking, hit escape to de-select. And that allows me to obviously perhaps have some objects here to the right of the dimension text. Very quick and easy. What about dimension overrides? Now, dimension overrides are in the properties of the dimension. So what I'll do is I'll select the 5.2.5 0 dimension here, like so. And what I'll do is I'll right-click and go to properties on the shortcut menu. Now there's a lot of information on dimensions in the properties pallet. But if you scroll down all the way down to the text panel here, you can see there's a text override just at the bottom. So if I click in there like so, I can actually put some text in there instead of the actual dimension texts, the 5.2.5 0. Now if I do want to keep that five to 50 in there, I need to put the greater than and less than brackets. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to type overall like so. And then greater than and less than those two little sort of arrow markers tell auto cat, keep the dimension text in place. So it's an overall 5-2, 5-0 dimension. I'll press enter now and you can see that update in the drawing. So what I can do now is I can close the properties pallet, hit escape to the Select and that nail says overall dimension five to 50. You can see what a difference that makes when you're editing dimensions in your auto CAD drawings. So not only can you edit the dimension text and move it around, but you can also override the dimension text if you want to as well. Once again, we're staying in our more dimensioning dot-dot EWG file. And we're going to have a look now at breaking and spacing are dimensions in our AutoCad drawings. Now you'll notice in the drawing, I've zoomed extents by double-clicking on the wheel of the mouse just to take stock of the drawing so that we can see where we are and what we're doing. I'm going to zoom in on that sign top-left corner though. So let's zoom in again, get the crossfire over the corner. Just roll up on the wheel of a mouse and pan across. Now you see there's our overall 5.2.5 0 that we created in the previous video. And there's our three 0.5.0 where we actually move the dimension text. What I am going to do is I'm going to spice my three 0.5.0 dimension a bit further up the 3.5.3 two-dimension here. So let's have a look and see how that works. Go to the annotate tab on the ribbon. And in the dimensions panel, select this command here, which is adjust spaces, also DEM space. You can type dim space instead of clicking on the icon if you wish. You need to select your based I mentioned which will be the three 5.3.2 dimension, then you're prompted to select your dimensions to spice. Now I could have five or six different dimensions above that, 3.5.3 too. I've only got the three, 0.5.0, so I'm gonna select that one there. So I'll just select it and click on it, Enter to confirm, and then it prompts you for a value or you can select an automatic setting. My suggestion is don't use the automatic. It can deal with things sometimes with your dimensions. So always good to specify a distance. So I'm gonna type in to 500 and press Enter. And you'll see that that's moves my three 0.5.0 dimension, 2500 millimeters in the modal space. Full size above my 3.5.3 two-dimension allows me to move dimensions in space dimensions around the drawing. Just zoom out a little bit by rolling back on the wheel. And if you pan across the top floor plan and go to grid line F, you'll see there's a 1400 dimension. Zoom in nice and close on it. Now you'll notice that there's some gaps there in the grid line for the 1400 dimension. But it all just looks a bit messy. So what we can do is we can break that 1400 dimension line using the grid line and it just tidy up the drawing and you could do it on this 1840 dimension here and also here if you wish as well. Now the break command is again on the dimensions panel on the annotate tab on the ribbon. It's in fact right next door to the dim spice command. So there's break their dim break if you want to type it. So I'll select break, and now it prompts me to select the dimension to add or remove the break from. So I'll select the 1400, like so. It then says select the object to break the dimension, which will be my grid line here. And as you can see, it breaks nicely and it just looks a little bit neater. I then press ends to finish. What happens though, if I want to remove that break while I go back to the dim bright command here, I select the dimension again, like so. And I then can remove that. Can you see on the command line there I've got all-time manual or remove. If I right-click and select remove, it removes the break from the dimension. So I can remove any breaks if I want to as well. So that's how you can space and break your dimensions in your auto CAD drawings were staying in our more dimensioning dot-dot-dot EWG file. And we're going to have a look now at using continue and baseline when we're dimensioning in our AutoCad drawings. Notice again, I've done a zoom extents on the drawing. That's just a double-click on the wheel to zoom out and take stock of the auto CAD drawing that you're working in. Now, what I'm going to do is utilize all named views. So I'm gonna go to top hair in the drawing area, hover over custom model views and goto reception. Now be aware that sometimes this does change the liar that you're using and that you're on. But the good thing is if you go to the annotate tab on the ribbon, you'll notice in the dimensions panel, you've got a dimension layer override. So make sure you're using a demes that one there. Okay? And what we're going to do is we're going to look at continue first. And that allows us to create a continuous string of dimensions in our AutoCad drawing. But you need to place a linear dimension first site in the dimensions panel on the annotate tab. Click on the fly out here and select linear. Now what I'm going to do is I'm going to dimension from the grid line on this office here. They're like So that intersection there to the end of this line here, which separates the two offices. If I click there and just drag down, that'll give me a T6, T5 dimension there, like site. Zoom out again a little bit and just pan across a little bit. And then come into the dimensions panel again and click on this fly out here and select Continue. It'll automatically start continuing dimensions from the last linear dimension placed, which was our T6, T5, which is great. I can now go to this intersection here, like so. I can then perhaps go to a midpoint somewhere there. Let's go there. And as you see, I'm placing a continuous line of dimensions. I'll press enter to finish, and then it prompts me to select another dimension or might want to continue from, I don't want to, so I'll just press enter to finish again. So there's always two enters at the end of the continue command like so. Now that's I, continue dimensions setting. What about the baseline dimensions setting? Well, let's undo what we've just done. So if I click on Undo on the Quick Access Toolbar so that we've just got the 265 leftover. I'm gonna utilize that dimension as my baseline dimension. So what I'm going to do now is go back up to the dimension panel, click on the flyer and select Baseline. And what I need to do is select the base dimensions. So I'm gonna go over here to this extension line here, the left-hand one. So if I click there, as I move around, can you see? It's given me baseline dimensions based on the extension line. So as I come along here, I'll go to say that intersection there. And then if I go to that midpoint again there and click Enter wants to finish again, it's prompting me for another base dimension, just like the continue. Press Enter again and we're finished. So you'll notice that that particular dimension styles, so to speak, is creating dimensions from a baseline based on the extension line here of the T6, T5 dimension. So you can see that I've got two different methods of dimensioning utilizing continuum baseline, which are useful both in their own right in your AutoCad drawings. Once again, we're staying in our more dimensioning dot-dot EWG file. What we are going to look at now is a thing called automatic dimensioning that's available in later versions of auto CAD. And you can find it using this dimension command here in the dimensions panel in the annotate tab on the AutoCad ribbon. Now, it's very, very simple and all you've gotta do is hover over the objects that you want to dimension. So we're going to zoom in on the bottom left corner of the floor plan. Just zoom and pan like that. And what I'm going to do, I'm going to use the automatic dimension commands dimension, this wall here. So all I've got to do is go to the dimension command like so. And it's just D i m. If you want to type it in D i m and enter. And it creates multiple types of dimensions within a single command session. So if I click there, what I can do is I can just hover and can you see it picks out the actual line, I click and it places the dimension. I then drag the dimensions where he wants it to go. And it's done like so, it's that quick and it's that easy. If I zoom out a little bit now and just pan across a little bit, I've got this big long line here. If I hover over that one, click and just drag downwards on complex a dimension there as well. And then if I hover over this one here, you can see there I've got another linear dimension. And what I can do is as I come across, I can zoom in and line them with the midpoint there and click on. Those two dimensions are tallied up as well, which is even better. I can then press Enter to finish. And I've placed three dimensions very accurately without even having to worry about objects snaps on the ends of each of the walls there. So that all somatic dimensioning is very quick and easy and you can utilize it for pretty much most objects in your auto CAD drawings. Once again, we're staying in our more dimensioning dot-dot EWG fall. We're going to have a little look now at using multi leaders in our auto CAD drawings. Now multi leaders are available on the annotate tab on the ribbon. And you can see we've got a leader's panel. And again, you can set up a style for these. So click on the little arrow here and that will take you into the multi leader style manager. Now in this particular drawing, you've got a training multilayered style already setup for you. It's right there like so. Make sure you set it as the current style and close the dialog box. Now, you'll notice we don't have a leader's liar override, so you need to go back to your home tab and just make sure that you're using your a dim light, which is up at the top of the list. I anode dims their utilize that for now. You could create a multi leader layer if you wish, and use that instead. Then I'm gonna go back to the annotate tab on the ribbon. Now, multi leaders can have a particular style. They can have text, they can have bubbles. And there are some preset bubbles when you create your multilayer stars. And we're going to use one of those. So what I'm going to do now is I'm going to zoom in on this top right area where the offices are. And I'm just going to place a multi-layer that goes into this office here. And then what we're going to do is we're going to add some multilayers to it that points these two offices here. So I go into the latest panel on the annotate tab on the ribbon and I click on multi later making sure I'm using the training multilayer style. So multi-layer they're like so the leader arrowhead location will be in the middle of the office. I click there. And as I drag out, can you say it's dragging out a nice spline based leader line. And I'm going to come out to here and click there like psi. Now because it's using a little block with a tag on it. It's asking for a tag number. So I'm gonna put in there three, that's room number three. And I'm going to click on OK, like sign. And as you see there, there is room number three like that. Now what I could do is add some more multi leaders to say that these are room type three, for example, there are different types of rooms. So you'll notice that I can use the Add tool. So I add a leader. It says select a multi-layer, which is that one there. And I can now drag and other ones are here. And click there like so. And then drag another one to here and click there like so to finish. And that's how you can utilize your multi leaders in your auto CAD drawings. Now the other thing you can do is if you click on it and click on that grip there and just drag can you see can alter the position of the little tag bubble and also alter the multi leaders at the same time. Now I know they are starting to cross dimensions if I move up like that, but you can see that they alter even if I go to the other side like that, which is really rather clever, a multi leaders like that are extremely useful. So I'll just hit Escape there so that I don't make any changes. And that's how you utilize multi leaders in your AutoCad drawings. 17. Working with object properties: We're starting a new chapter now in our AutoCad Essential Training course. And we're going to be looking at object and layer properties within objects, within our Alltech CAD drawings. And we've got a new drawing for you. It's called object layer properties dot DW G. And as usual, you can download that from the website to use to follow along with these particular videos. Now the first thing we're going to look at is actually working with our object properties. And in order to do that, you want to make sure that you are in the Home tab on the ribbon. And you'll notice you have a Properties panel. And we've got some objects in the drawing. We've got a hinge on the left in the yellow. We've got a nut and boat in the middle, in the green, and we've got a keyhole in the orange color to the rights. Now all of these objects are made up of individual lines, arcs, circles, et cetera. But all of the objects that make up the components, the keyhole, the boat, and the hinge, all have their own individual properties. Now those properties are defined by the liar that they are on, or they can be defined individually. So let's have a look at that and look at how the properties panel works and also more importantly how the properties, how it works as well. So for example, let's look at the hinge on the left. If I hover over, let's say the top line there and select it. What will happen is obviously it highlights and you can see the grips. But in the Properties panel on the Home tab there, can you see that the color is bi-layer? And if I hover over each of these, the line weight is bi layer and the line type is bi-layer. The liar itself comes up in the layers panel here and tells me that it's on the hinge line. Now if I just hit Escape to de-select that line and select one of the bashed lines that makes up the hinge. Let's have a look at the properties again in the Properties panel. Now, you can see that the color is by layer. You can see that the line White is by layer, but this time the line type is dashed. And it is an individual lines height that is individual to that particular line. So it's not adopting the actual line type that the liar specifies, that the hinge line specifies. And that's how your object properties work in AutoCad. Now, that's based on the properties panel. The other way of checking out your object properties is to select an object. So we'll stay with the bashed hinge line and I can right-click and I can select properties here on the shortcut menu. And what that'll do is it'll bring up the properties pallet, which I'll just move over here so that we can see the line on the hinge. And it's telling me that the layer is hinge. The line type is dashed there, for example, the line type scale is one and it's given me all the geometry as well, all the stock XYZ values and the end XYZ values and so on. Now, the benefit I have here is I can go into, let's say line type here. Click on the down arrow and I'll change that to buy liar. And you'll notice when I hit escape now that that line is now continuous. And the reason it's continuous is that the hinge line, line type is continuous. So let's just close the properties. Pallet. And we'll go into liar properties now in the Layers panel. And you'll notice that there's the hinge line and you can see it's using a continuous wild-type. So that's why that line is now changed to continuous. So if I close the layer properties manager and I select that line again, and I go here to the properties and give it an individual line sight which is dashed. It changes back to the dashed format that you can see on the screen. So overall, with your object properties and July of properties in AutoCad, you can have individual properties per object. Or you can specify globally that a particular layer has properties. And you can make the objects on that layer adhere to those layer properties as well. We're staying in our object layer properties dot-dot EWG file. And in the previous video, we looked at object and layer properties and how they work within your AutoCad drawings. Now, you'll notice on this particular drawing that we do have some dashed line types. You'll notice on the hinge on the left, the horizontal lines or dashed. You'll also notice on the nuts and bolts that the hidden thread line there is also dashed on that arc there as well. Now what you can do is you can make those dashes bigger and smaller. This would not affect the continuous line type because it's continuous. But anything dashed or dashed and dotted can be affected by what is known as the line type scale or L T scale. Now the line type scale, it can be changed globally in the whole drawing. Or like in the previous video, you can do it individually for individual objects as well. So let's have a look at doing it globally first. And the quickest way to do this is just taught LT style, line type scale like that. And you can see it comes up on the suggestion menu on the dynamic input. So just select LT scale. And you'll see at the moment that our line type scale factor is a default of one. It always is in any auto CAD drawing if it hasn't been changed. So that one is a 100% or one, and so on. So basically it means in its entirety at the moment, it's a 100% soloist. So what happens if I change that to 50% by changing the value to 0.5, if I press Enter now keep an eye on the bashed lines in the drawing. You will notice that the dashes and the spaces become half their original size. So now our LT scale is at nought 0.5. So if I went to one of these lines here on the hinge, did a right-click and whence properties, what would the LT Skiles psi, it would psi one. Now that's the individual line type scale for that particular line in the drawing. So why does that say one? And yet the global LT scale is at No.5, and that's because they are two different values. So let's close the properties pallet had escaped to the select Matt line. And what I'm going to do is I'm going to change the LT scale back to one. So LT scale type it in like we did before. Press enter and change that back to one in the box and press enter again. And you can see the dashes returned back to their original state. Now let's select just one dashed line. I'm going to go for that one there again on the hinge. I'm gonna right-click and I'm gonna go to properties. And now I'm gonna change the line type scale just if that individual line to nought 0.5, press enter to finish, close the properties pallet and hit escape. And can you see where the dashes and the spices and they are smaller than the original ones. So what we've done there is we've changed the individual line type scale of one particular line. So if I go to this one here now and I right-click and go to Properties. You'll see that that's nought 0.5. If I close the properties pallet, hit escape, revisit the next line down, and then right-click and go to Properties again. You'll see that that is still set to one. So it is an individual line type scale per object in this case, not a global LT scale change, where you just type LT scale and change it globally within the drawing. So what I will do quickly is I'll just hit Escape. Select this line here. And it's a right-click properties. And we'll just change that back to one and press Enter so that it's back to its original settings, close proxies palette, and hit escape there. So you can see that everything now has been returned back to normal. So all the individual LT scales are sets of one and the global LT scale is set to one also. But when you're working with your AutoCad objects in a drawing, in this case, our object layer properties dot DW G file that we're staying in. You will find that sometimes you need to hide or isolate objects on a really busy drawing. Now the good thing is you have a height and an isolate command available to you in AutoCad. Now you'll notice that this is not a particularly busy drawing. In fact, it's a very simple drawing. But the idea being is I'm taking you through the workflow and the process of how to hide and isolate elements in your drawing so that when it is really busy, you've got the ability to utilize those commands and just be that little bit more productive when you're working in AutoCad site. How do hide an isolate work? Well, let's say that I only want to work on the keyhole over here on the right-hand side. And I want to hide the hinge and the boat here on the left. I can select the objects. So let's do a little crossing window there. So I've selected all the objects and then I right-click. And you'll notice you've got an isolate option on the shortcut menu. And on the sub-menu there I can either isolate those objects I've selected or hide them. So if I click on hide objects, they disappear. Now you have not deleted them. All you've done is you've hidden those objects so that you can concentrate on working on the keyhole there on the right hand side. Once you finish working on the keyhole, it's just a case of right-clicking in the drawing area, going back to isolate an ending, the object isolation. And that comes straight back. So the tool there is that you're hiding elements that you don't need to see in order to provide a little bit of clarity on a busy drawing. Now it also works the other way you can isolate objects that you want to concentrate on and hide everything else. So if I just select the hinge this time and I right-click, hover over isolate. And this time I want to isolate the hin jointly. So I select isolate objects. Everything else disappears. So I can just work on the one element. That's really, really useful on a busy drawing because you might just want one particular elements work on an hide everything else. So what you've done is you've isolated the hinge and hidden everything else. So it's the opposite of what we did previously when we wanted to work on the keyhole. So I do my work on the hinge or right-click, I go to isolate an end to the object isolation, and everything else comes back. And it's that quick and easy. It's a couple of clicks on your mouse, so it's a right-click. Go to isolate, and you can decide on whether you hide or isolate objects in your auto CAD drawings. Were staying in our object layer properties dot-dot-dot EWG file. And as you can see, we've still got the hinge, we've still got the nut and the bolt, and we've still got the keyhole as well. Now at the moment, we've been working with the layers that we've been given in the drawing. What we're going to look at now is new layers and the layers drop-down menu and how that works. Site. Make sure you go to the home tab on the ribbon. We're going to go into the Layers panel and we're going to select layer properties, and that'll bring up the layer properties manager. Now, you can drag this around, it's a palette, click on the title bar, drag it around like so. And you can obviously drag and make the columns bigger and smaller, and so on and so forth. So you can see that there's now own freeze lock plot, color line type. I'll expand the line Y a little bit. And you've got new layer VP for 0s there and so on. Now, what we've got is an entire group of settings for all of our layers in here it's our overall Manager for all of the layer controlling our drawing. So if I want to create a new layer, let's say I want a new layer for the hidden detail on the hinge. We've already got the hinge layer there, which is a yellow color 50, and it uses a continuous line type. Now we looked at this previously where when we made the bashed lines on the hinge, the hidden lines on the hinge, uh, by the bi layer for line type, they became that continuous line. So let's create a new layer. And we'll call it hinge, underscore, hidden, like site, and just press Enter because we're any credit and the one layer name, if you want to create an entire list of layers, by the way, it's actually quicker to tight a layer name and press the key on the keyboard. It will then create the next new layer and so on. And you just keep doing that until you've created your list of layers that you need. So actually quicker to create your list of layers and then settle their settings rather than create each individual layer and then do all the settings per layer. It's actually quicker to create the list and then go in and edit them. And that's just a statistical item there for you, but it does work quicker. Just make sure that a little bit quicker and AutoCad, if you are creating. Long live lists. So we've got our hinge hidden layer on new lines. Now, ideally you want it to be the same color as the hinge layer, so it's all consistent in the drawing. But the line type needs to change. So I'm going to select continuous there. And you'll notice we've got some dashed lines there. So I'm gonna change that to a dashed line type. Now I can load up any other line top of 1c by clicking on load there. And there's a big long list of line types that I can use if I want, say, I'll cancel that for the moment because we've already got a nice dashed line type that we can use. So I select that in the line type dialog box, or click on OK. and you can say now that the hinge hidden layer now uses a dashed line type, still assign color, but it's using a different line type. So if I close the layer properties manager, like site, well I'm going to do now is I'm gonna select the three hidden data aligns, hey, like site. Now, those are using their own line type up here in the Properties panel in the home tab on the ribbon. So if I now go by layer, you'll see that they become continuous because they're on the hinge layer here. That's now telling me in that dropdown that those three lines or using the hinge line. So if I now go to the liar drop-down and select hinge hidden. You'll see when I hit a Skype that they are now hidden detail lies there dashed, but they're using the bi layer property. So if I select that, say everything now by layer by layer by layer, because I've created a specific layer for the hidden detail on the hinge. Now at the benefit you've got is once you create these new layers, it's very quick and easy just to select an object, let's say that arc there. And at the moment that's on the keyhole layer. But if I put that on the hinge hidden layer, can you see how it changes? And I can select any number of objects. Like site, doesn't matter whether they're on the same layer or not, I can change all of them to a given layer, like psi. So I select the objects, go to the land dropped down, pick the layer that I want them to be on. So if I now select all of those again and say right, I want those on the keyhole, arrogant. They will go back to the key hola. So that's how you can create new layers in your AutoCad drawing, change the settings of your layers, but more importantly, change the layer that your objects are on. So you can globally select group of objects, go to the layer drop-down and say, right, I want that layer and all of your objects will go onto that layer that you selected in the drop-down menu. So once again, we're staying in the object layer properties dot DW G file. And what we're going to have a look at now is some of the liar tools that are available. Now, obviously most of the time you'll just be changing liars or adding new layers to your auto CAD drawing. But if you look in the layers panel here, you'll notice there's lots and lots of little commands here that you can utilize that are often useful when you're working in your AutoCad drawings. So if we start hovering over some of these, let's have a look at what they do so you can turn the light off of a selected object. So if I selected, say that one there, which is the polyline and it's on the bolt. So if I click on the command. And I select the object on the layer to be turned off. Let's do that like that. It turns everything off because that entire bolt is on the bolt layer. So I press Enter like site, and you'll see that that has disappeared. You haven't deleted it. All you've done is turn the layer off. So if I go to the layer drop-down now, you'll see that the light bulb is blue, indicate that the bolt layer is off. For Click on the light bulb, it goes yellow. I turn it on again, everything comes back. I'll hit escape now to lose the lead dropped down. So you can see that these global tools that you've got on the Layers panel are extremely useful. So I've got this one here which is fantastically useful. It sets the current layer to that of a selected object. So if I just move away from that for a moment, you'll notice that the current drafting layer at the moment on the Layers panel is keyhole. If I now click on that command there and I click on the hinge, watch what happens to the current layer? It changes to hinge, which is great because sometimes I might be working in a drawing and I don't know what the layer name is of the layer I want to be on. I know which objects i want to work on, but I don't know what their layer is. Rather than full around going to the properties pallet or clicking on it and working out what the layer is, I can just click on that command there and say right, I want to work on that layer that that object is on. It's very quick and easy. Now, there are some other layer tools available to you as well. If you go to your express Tools tab. There's various tools here as well that can be utilized with your layers as well. Now, I'm not gonna go into all of your express tools or anything like that because there is an actual course on the website for AutoCad express tools as well. But some of the tools in here do affect your layers as well. So check out your express tools when you have a moment, check out the course as well. And there's some nice liar tools and layout tools and drawing tools that work really well as well. In the meantime, let's jump back to the home tab. Ready for the next video. We're staying in our object layer properties dot d WAG file. And what we're going to have a look at now is working with states. Sometimes you need to change your leg colors, you layer properties in order to highlight particular elements on a drawing that might need to be changed, might need to be revised, and so on. So at the moment we've got everything on its appropriate layers. We've got the hinge on the hinge layers, we've got the nuts and bolts. On the bolts layer, we've got the keyhole on the keyhole layer. So at the moment, that will become in essence an existing list state, for example. Now you can get to your liar states in two ways. Let's go via the layer properties manager first. So Layers panel on the home tab on the ribbon and layer properties. And it's this little icon here, the liar states manager. This will open up the liar states manager like so I click on new and the new less state name will be existing. So this is all my existing layers and you might want to give it a description, liars as existing, for example. So make sure you spell it right. Unlike me, as usual, my fantastically large thumbs get in the way. So liars as existing, there we go, and we click on OK. So you can see there that that's in the model space and it's been saved. It saying yes, it's been saved. So if I restore that now, even though I haven't made any changes, I can then go back into the drawing, closing the layer properties manager, and I've got an existing Laius state. Now if I go to the liar flyout menu here and pin it open, you'll notice there's my last state their existing. If I click on the little dropdown, I can manage my last states there as well on the dropdown menu, which is very useful. Um, I can also just click here like so and select an existing last state. Or I can click there and get a new list state. So let's just hit escape a couple of times just to lose the drop-down menu, but I will keep this pinned open. So what I'm going to do now is I'm going to click on the hinge here. I'm going to select these lines here, like psi. Now, if I change the properties of those lines, will it affect the layer? It won't because their individual property. So I could change that and I could put them on a different layer and that would change it. But ideally what I want to do now is go to my Layer Properties manager. So I'm going to hit escape and deselect those lines. I'm going to make a liar change, not a properties change. So I won't my hinge layer to change color. So there's my hinge layer there on the liar dropped down or click on the box. I want that to be red and i OK. And you can see that changes in the drawing. Now you'll notice I'm in an unsaved liar state. I'm not in the existing layer stay anymore because the color of the hinge layer has changed. So I go New Layer states and I'll call this hinge read. Very self-explanatory. And we'll say there that the hinge layer is right. And I'll okay that. So now I've got two different lattice sites. I've got hinge read. If I click on the drop-down, I've also got existing. So if I now click on existing, It takes me back to the yellow of the hinge. If I go to hinge, red changes the color. So it allows me to create different last states to highlight different elements in my auto CAD drawings. 18. Using groups: We're starting a another chapter now in our auto CAD essential training. And we're going to be looking at reusing content in our AutoCad drawings. So we've got a new drawing for you. It's called reusing contents dot DW, EEG, Surprise, Surprise. And you can obviously download that from the website and use it to follow along with the videos in this chapter. The first thing we're going to look at is grouping objects together so that they can be moved around as a group, or perhaps even be re-used as a group. The group can be copied and be placed elsewhere in the drawing. So the group command is available on the group's panel, on the home tab on the ribbon. So there's our group's panel there. And what I'm going to do as well is click on the fly out and just pin the flyout menu open because we'll need the great manager shortly as well. Now, in order to select your objects for grouping, it's always better to click on the group command first in the panel, and then select your objects like so. Now the reason I do it that way is I've then got the ability to right-click and I can name the group straight away. Otherwise, you create an unnamed group and it can be a little bit niggly when you're in the Greek manager. So I'll click on nine. And I'm going to enter a group name and I'm going to call it household because their household objects, a hinge, a bolt, and a keyhole. So there's the group name. I then press enter, and that is now a group of objects. So if I select that now, can you say it's a group of objects and I can click on the grip and I can move them all as a group. I'll just hit Escape there to de-select it. Now because I've created that group, I can now go into my group manager and there's my household group. They're like site. Now, if it was an unnamed group and this was untyped, I would not be able to see that unnamed groups. So it's always go to group command and select the objects to group. It's quicker and easier that way. So there's my household group. I can give it a description as well. We might call it something like household objects, like so. And I can highlight it. I can make it selectable if I make it unselected, or it could be objects that I don't want people to select in the drawing. And you'll also notice there that I can rename it. I can add objects to it. I can explode the group as well. So if I select household and I exploded, and I click on OK. You'll notice now that they're not agree anymore, they're back to their original objects. Again. That's how you group objects together and obviously reuse those groups in your auto. Cad drawings were staying in the reusing content dot d WAG file. And at the moment, what we've got is our hinge, our boat and RK hall. And you'll notice that none of them are groups. They're just individual lines, arcs, circles, et cetera. And what we're going to look at is we're going to look at creating and inserting a block into our auto CAD drawing. Now, the first thing we're going to do is we're going to put all of our objects on the screen onto the layer 0. So let's do that first. Select all of them. Go to the layer drop-down and put them all on the default layer, layer 0, and then hit escape to the select. Now, you're probably thinking to yourself, why has he done that? Well, when you create blocks in AutoCad, if you create them on layer 0, when you then insert them as blocks into your drawing, they automatically adopt the current drafting layer. So what I'm going to do now is make the current drafting layer hinge that one there, like site. Now the reason I'm making that hinge is because then what I can do is use these objects here on layer 0 to create a hinge block. Now, I can use the block panel here on the home tab on the ribbon, or you've also got on the Insert tab on the ribbon create block here as well. It's up to you which one you use. I personally prefer the home tab because then I've got things like draw and modify and annotation available if I need them. So I'm gonna go to the block panel on the home tab on the ribbon. And it's this little icon here, Create block. Now, the name of the block obviously is going to be hinge self-explanatory. And I need to pick a point on the block where I want it to be inserted in the drawing. So I go pick point, and I'm going to use that midpoint on the right-hand side because the hinge normally goes against the edge of something. So I'm going to use that midpoint snap there and ageing say there's no way I could a guess those x and y values. I'm now going to select the objects. So I click select objects and I select all of the hinge like that and just press Enter and you see you get a little preview. Now you'll notice there can you see that those dashed lines look like solid lines at the moment that might just be the magnification of the preview. But sometimes it depends on what layer going on C and the properties of that layer. Remember our layer properties previously. Now we've got some options here for our objects. You can retain the original objects and make a block separately. You can convert the original objects to a block or you can just delete. Now, I'm going to convert to block and you'll see how that block appears in the drawing. Now, we don't want it to be an annotated block, but we do want to scale uniformly in the x and y direction when we make it bigger or smaller. And also, my rule of thumb is always allow exploding because you never know when you need to explode the block makes some slight changes and create a slightly different, similar block. Now, the block units in this case I'll millimeters. The drawing is a metric millimeters drawing and we do not need to open in the block editor. So when I click on OK. Now watch what happens on the screen. It's now yellow because it's adopted the hinge, the current layer. But if I click on it, it's now a block. It's all one object and the grip there is the base point that I selected so far. Just hit Escape nail and hover over that alter can't tells me it's a block reference on the liar hinge. So let's do the same with the bolt. Now, let's go to here on the layer drop-down, change that to the boat layer. And again, I'm going to create a new block using the create Block command. And I'm gonna pick a point on the screen this time I want the center there, so we use the center snap. So let the objects select all of them for the boat like so, right-click or Enter to confirm. I'm gonna change it to convert to block again, scale uniformly allow exploding. Click on OK. And that the name must be at least one character long. Notice I didn't put the name in. Always put the name in for block cannot be blank. So that will be bolt like site. Click on OK. And there's our boat block. Click on it. There's the grip for the insertion point of the block. If I just de-select it by hitting escape and hover over it, you'll see it's a block reference on the lifeboat. Let's do the same with the keyhole. So we'll go through the keyhole, IANA, and we'll just go create block. And this time we'll call it keyhole. Remembering to put the name in this time and we'll pick a point. And I'll go for, say, the center snap there on the keyhole and select the objects. So we'll select everything, Right-click or Enter to confirm. Make sure that we've got scale uniformly allow exploding ticked. Everything looks good. Click on OK. And when I select that now you say that that is now a block as well with a single insertion point grip. So that's how quick and easy it is to reuse content. Now the trickiest as well, if I go to Insert a block nail using the block panel, there's my hinge boat or keyhole. So if I select keyhole now, I can add a new key hole to the drawing. And it's another incidence of that particular block reference in my alter category. So I'm now reusing content over and over again. And it saves me having to draw that keyhole all over again. We're staying in the reusing content dot-dot WAG file. And I've left it in the same state as it was at the end of the last video. So our hinges a block, our boat is a block, or keyhole is a block. And we've also inserted another incidence of that keyhole block reference. So what happens now if I need to redefine a block definition? How do I do that? How do I redefine a block? Well, the good thing about blocks as you can exploit them. So if I now hover over this Keyhole here and sits a block reference, and I can go to the explode command on the Modify panel on the home tab on the ribbon. If I explode that, it goes back to the 0 layer. You'll notice this is still block, this block reference still exists. This is now a group of arcs on the layer 0. Now what I'm going to do is I'm going to redefine my keyhole block. What I'm going to do is I'm going to delete that arc there. And I'm going to draw a line. And it's going to make for a weird shape keyhole I have to say, and I'm going to press Enter like site. Make sure though that your line here is also on the layer 0, needs to be on the line 0. I'll just hit a Skype now to the select. Now I want to redefine my blocks. So what I do is I now go up here to create block again on the block panel. And I select my keyhole block. And the thing is now, I can go in and redefine it. So I can pick a point again over here, like so, use the same center snap. I can select the objects like I did previously. Again. And so or right-click to confirm. Notice there's the preview, scale uniformly and allow exploding. I won't open it in the block editor, and I'm converting it to a block again. Now I'm deliberately using converts a block because then you can see what happens next when I click on OK, I now get told that keyhole is already defined as a block in the drawing. Would you like to redefine it? Yes, I do want to redefine it. So if I redefine that block, note what happens to the other block. It goes to the shape of the newly redefined block here on the left-hand side. And that's how you can redefine block definitions in a drawing very quickly and easily. I might have 650 key holes on this drawing. I can explode one of the blocks, redefine it, and I can update all of them in one go, just like I've done there. It saves a lot of time and it makes you a lot more productive. We're staying in our reusing content, dot DW, G, Fall and ageing. Say I've left it in the same state as it was at the end of the last video where we redefined our key block. Now, you'll notice in the previous video, I used the explode commands to explode the block back to its original information. So if I go here again to my keyhole and I use explode here on the Modify panel. It explodes it back to all its original objects, it's component objects because a block is a complex object made up of a number of component objects. So what I can do now is I could redefine all of that again and create another keyhole block if I wanted, say. However, sometimes you might want to explode a block and change it slightly but not make it into another block again. So you can explode any block you want to in auto cat. It will still retain all the other definitions of the block reference saying, say it there, I've still got that keyhole block there. However, this one isn't a block anymore. It's a group of arcsin lines on the layer 0. So if I went to my hinge block here, for example, if I go to explode, select the hinge, right-click rents to confirm. It's now a group of lines. Again, it's not a hinge block anymore. However, the trick is that these blocks are still in your auto CAD drawing. They get saved into the drawing database behind the drawing. So if I now selected, say, the hinge line, and I decided to insert a block using the block panel. Let say i one another, hinge. The hinge. You'll come in and you'll notice if I just use a little bit of Object Snap tracking there, I've got a hinge and it's on the right layer, and it's still a block. I can explode any block I want to and reuse that data in any way, but the block references still remain in the drawing. Now the one thing I will say about the explode command is don't explode all the blocks in your drawing as soon as you get psi, a new drawing from a third party. Because those blocks might be useful later on. And don't forget, with blocks as well, you'll reusing content, it's saving you having to redraw things. So always if you need to redefine a block, explode it, convert it to a block of a different name, perhaps slightly different, and then you can reuse it over and over again. So for example, the bolt here. It's a fantastic blog because I might want to exploit that skylight to half its size. I've then got two boats of two different sizes that I can reuse on the drawing. That's a typical example of exploding and then reusing the content so that you've got two different block references of the bolt in your AutoCad drawing. We're staying on the theme of reusing content in our alter CAD drawings, but we've got a different drawing for you to use this time. It's called dynamic block dot-dot EWG. And you'll notice on the screen we've got a very simple representation of a door. You'll also notice that the current drafting layer is. And what we're going to do is create a very, very simple dynamic block. Now, dynamic blocks differ from your regular auto camp blocks. You can apply actions to your actual blocks themselves. So for example, when you bring this block into the drawing as a door, you will normally as a normal block have to rotate it, scale it, copy it, and so on. What you can do is add parameters and actions to a dynamic block that save you having to do that. For example, this door, my open on the right-hand side or the left-hand side or the right-hand side. You can apply something like a flip action to the door itself so that when you bring the dynamic block in, you can just apply that flip action and flip the door whichever side it needs to be. So let's have a look at how that works. Well, normally you create a block, a simple block. That's the easiest way to do it first of all. So make sure that all of your elements for your door or on the layer 0, so the arc is there and the little rectangle is they're there on layer 0. And we're gonna go to Create blocks, and that's in the block panel on the Home tab. There's Create block there. So the name of this will be door. And while I tend to do is then put a dash and then put something like d n, indicating that it's dynamic. Now, the base point of the door, I'm gonna pick using picked point. I'm going to use that little corner just there, the bottom-left corner. And I'm going to select the objects that make up the block as well, like site. So that's the rectangle in the OLC. And so I'll right-click to confirm. Now, the behavior doesn't need to be unassertive, but make sure that you scale uniformly and allow exploding. Now this time, take open in block editor and then click on okay. So what you'll find is everything changes on the screen. It goes a bit weird. It's not weird. You're now in the AutoCad block Editor. And this palette here, the block altering palette is really important. Because what we're going to do is we're going to add some information to the door itself. Now we need a base point. So there's the base point there on the Parameters tab. So base point is there, and we're going to put that on that bottom left corner. So there's our base point of our door when we bring the dynamic block into the drawing. Now, we need to add a flip parameter that's there. There's the flip perimeter adds a flip parameter to the block definition. So I come in and it's asking for the base point of the reflection line. Now I want to be able to flip this side of the door over to here to the right hand side. So the base point of our reflection line is going to be the midpoint between here and here. So shifting right-click brings up your override snaps. You want mid between two points. And you're going to pick this point down here, the endpoint where we put the base point. And then we're also going to pick this end point down here the second. And then you can bring this up vertically using your pilot tracking like so, and click there, and there's your flip parameter. Now, it gives you a ninth of that, which is flip state one. So I'm just going to click there and put the label there like site. Now I can rename these flips, state ones and so on. I'm not going to worry too much in this case. Let's zoom out a bit like so I need to be able to see everything. Now you've got an exclamation mark here because you've got a parameter without an action. So we need to go to the actions tab now on the block authoring palette, and there's our flip action. So we select flip action, come into the drawing area and we select flip state one because that's the perimeter. We're applying the action to. Selecting the objects is easy. You select everything, so click and drag a crossing window of everything. You've flipped state parameter, everything. Once you've got everything selected, press Enter to confirm, and that applies the action to the Flip state, one parameter like sign. Now the nice thing is when you're in the block editor, you can test the block. So I click on Test block up here, which is in the open safe panel. And are now in what is in essence a drawing environment, but it's a textbook window. Can you see the template? So I select the door. There's my little flip action and it allows me, can you say to flip model either side, so that's working. So I go up here to close, close the textblock and on back in the block editor. So what I can do now is I can now say if the block up here and open the safe, and then I'll close the block editor. Now you'll notice back in our AutoCad drawing, our dynamic block dot DW J, the block has changed. It's adopted the door layer, and it's now a dynamic block. One thing, if I go to Insert block here, can you see door dynamic? It doesn't look any different. It just looks like a block. So that's why I've named it door d y. And so I know that it's a dynamic block. Now, let me just hit Escape there to de-select that menu. If I select the door, can you see there's our base point. So I can click and I can move that around anywhere. I want it to go using the base point. But with it's selected, I can flip that dynamic block to either side. Size me having to mirror it or move around or copy it in a different way in the drawing so I can place that block in any door opening and flip the door opening to right or left at anytime. I'll just hit escape now to de-select. And that's your simple dynamic block created. Once again, we're staying on the theme of reusing content in AutoCad in this chapter. But we've got another drawing for you to use. And this drawing is cold, W block dot DW G. Now there is a command in auto CAD called W block, and it stands for right block, WR IITE, right block. What it means is you can write a block definition from an existing drawing into its own separate dW JPG file. So at the moment we've got w block dot DW G open. And as you can see, we have a door block sitting there in the drawing itself. So that means that there's a block reference in this drawing for the door. Now, the best way to get to the W Bloch command is to actually just type it type w block. Or you can go to the Insert tab, click on the Create block, fly out there and there's right block there, there's our W block come on there as well. So either white type W Bloch and press Enter or go to it via the Insert tab. Now I'm in the right block dialogue box. And what this allows me to do is select a block that already exists in the drawing. So if I go to block their Tacoma down arrow, there's my door block. So make sure you select door, puts it in the list. That means that I don't have to worry about base point or objects because also cab knows all that information from the existing block. Now what I'm going to do is I'm going to add this to a known location on my computer. So I'm going to basically extract the block as a DW G. Now it's in millimeters, so they insert units I need to worry about. So if I click on this little button here, what I'm going to do now is jump into my pictures folder here. And you say There's all my different files and things in their gonna go to exercise files in there. And there's my reusing content folder. I'm gonna go in there and I'm gonna save it in this folder as double dot d wj. And I'm saving it back as an auto CAD, 2013 wj. So make sure that all different versions of Altay cat can read the file. So I'll click on safe. So that's in there. There's my location or click on OK. And you'll see little flash top-left corner indicating that that block information has been written to the DW G phone. Now here's the best spin. I can now give that door DW G file to somebody else to edit. They can let me have that edit and I can bring it in to this drawing, my W Bloch drawing. So what I'm going to do now is we're going to act as if I'm a, a separate cat person somewhere else. So I'm gonna go to open there's my door file and I'm going to open up. So I've opened that up as a separate drawing now, I'm just going to double-click on the wheel to zoom extents. And there's my door there, and I've got all of my little component objects, can you say so is a separate drawing, but it's broken the block down into separate elements. Now these are all on layer 0. So what I'm going to do, I'm going to go back to the Home tab. And I'm going to go to 0, I make it the current drafting layer. And what I'm going to do, I'm going to draw a line from the end points, snap their down, say that endpoint, snap their luck site and press Enter. And I'm going to remove the arc like that. So that's my new door block. So I've got an angled line representing the door swing instead of an arc. So I will now save that file. So if I save that now, that's all saved. And I can now close that. So that door has now been site to its own separate dW JPG file. But what you've got to remember now is this block here is also called Dole. And you can check that by checking the property. So if I select the block, right-click and go to Properties, you'll see the name of the block there is dl, which is the same as the D wj fall that we'd W blocked out of the drawing initially. So let me just hit a Skype to de-select. So here's the interesting thing. I can insert a blog if I want to, from a known drawing rather than the block itself. So if I now go up to Insert block and go more options, it takes me to the insert dollar books. I can browse for my door. So what I'll do, I'll jump back in and find that folder which is nice and easy. So there's my reusing content folder. I'll go back now to the door drawing here in the reusing content folder. And you can say it previews what I've got in that door, DW EGFR, remember I removed the art and put the straight line. So if I now go open, can you say it's taken me to the path where the door DW G Fall is insertion point. I will specify on the screen, I will leave everything else as it is. I want the scouts P1, the rotation to be 0. I don't need to explode it so I won't take the box. Watch what happens when I click on OK. I redefine the block because there's already a door block in the drawing. But I'm redefining the door block from the W blocked DW JJ file this time, instead of a block reference that already exists in the W Bloch DW G phi. So if I redefine that block, you can see that the existing block takes on board the straight line. And I've got a new block that obviously has the straight-line as well. And that's how you can doubly block out, block information from a drawing, put it into its own separate dW J file, make the changes, and then bring the drawing back in. It's a really useful tool if you want somebody else to work on a block, change the block, and then give it back to you so that your w block command for reusing content in your AutoCad drawings. 19. Creating a simple block with attributes: Starting another chapter now in our AutoCad, Essential Training. And we're going to be looking at attributes within AutoCad blocks and also AutoCad tables and how you can add information and annotation to them. And we've got a new drawing to start you off with, which is attributes dot DW j. As usual, you can download that from the website to follow along with the videos in the chapter. Now we're going to be looking at creating a simple block with attributes. You'll not just as some lines and a circle on the screen. We're going to be utilizing those to create a little setting out point block on a survey drawing. Now you'll notice in the drawing we have the layer 0 and also the SOP metric layer are setting out point metric layer. We'll use that later when we bring the block into the auto CAD drawing. In the meantime, make sure that your current drafting layer is set to 0. And select everything that's in the drawing. And just make sure on the pull down that you select layer 0 and make sure that everything on the drawing is on that layer 0. So we'll just hit a Skype there now to de-select everything. What we're going to do is we're gonna add a couple of attributes into this drawing. And then we're going to make everything into our setting out point block site. We're gonna go to the Insert tab on the ribbon here. And we're going to use the define attributes command, which is on the block definition panel. Now when you click on define attributes, it brings up the attribute definition, dollar books. And I'm gonna move this over to the left a bit because we're going to be placing the attributes over here on the ends of these lines. Now, some of these lines of sacrificial, and we'll delete the ones that we don't need in a moment. First things first though, we need to create attribute definition for our setting out point number. Now you've got different modes of attribute. The only one you need to worry about is locked position at the moment. Insertion point ticket will specify on the screen using our objects snaps, make sure your objects snaps are on. And the tag name is going to be SOP underscore n, like that. You are not allowed spaces in tag names. Just be aware of that. And the prompt will be setting out point, dash and then number. So that'll be the number for the setting out point. And the default might be something like S O P dash 1.1.1. Just a default value that you can change it anytime. Now, the text settings, we're going to make sure that our text settings work. So we want our SIP number up here, so we need bottom right on the end of that line. So our justification will be bottom right. Textile, just stick with the standard textile that's in the drawing and the text height itself. We're gonna make that 200 millimeters high because it's all metric millimeters. When we're creating this block in this drawing, rotation will be 0, which is horizontal. Click on OK. And there's your SIP number attribute. Now you'll notice that the start point is I run the left-hand side. Don't worry about that. As soon as you snap to the end of the top horizontal line there can see the right end, end. It automatically justifies it for you. So we've already placed on SIP number so we can remove that sacrificial line there and delete it. And you can see it just takes it up above that horizontal line there. We're gonna go back now to define attributes. And this time we're going to create an invisible attribute that will be applied to the block, but it won't show on the screen when the blood comes into the drawing. And this will be our SOP tight. So again, we'll just do an underscore there. Sip type like that prompt will be SOP dash type like psi. And then we'll have something like SOP dash. And this time it's a circle. You might use a square, you might use a rectangle. But as you see, we are using a circle, in this case, insertion point we will specify on the screen, we will not align it below the previous attribute, because we're gonna snap to the end of the lower line this time. So justification this time will be top right, and the height will be 200 textile standard rotation 0, like previously. Click on OK. Again, it's on the left-hand side. Don't worry about that. And we're gonna snap to the lower line on the end point there. And it places it nice and neatly underneath. Justification kicks in after you've placed the attribute. So I'll select that line there, delete that one. You can now see the attributes sit nicely 50 millimeters above and below the line that goes through the center of the circle that forms the setting out point. So we've got everything ready to go now to create our block. So we can go back to the home tab on the ribbon. And now we can change our liar. So our current drafting layer now will become the SIP metric layer. And we can now create our block. And if we make sure that everything's online 0, it looked up the current drafting layer. So I'm going to go into the block panel on the hind tab on the ribbon here. And then I'm gonna come up here and create Block. Sorry, the name of the block will be SOPA and we'll possibly put underscore and circle, let's say. So that's an SIP circle this time. Pick point. I'll use, let's say the intersection of the two lines there, the center of the circle. As you see, no way you can calculate those x and y values in a hurry. We'll select the objects and you select everything including your attributes and then press Enter or right-click. There's the little preview like site. And there's five objects selected. Make sure you scale uniformly and allow exploding. And make sure you've got it set to convert to block, untick open in block editor. If it is ticked, you don't want to open it in the block editor. Now when I click on OK, because I've got converts a block selected, it will become a block straightaway. But at low side prompts me now for the attributes that go in the block itself. There's the SOP type, which is the invisible attribute. And there's the SOP number, which is SIP 1.1.1. Let's change that to 999. Click on OK and the attributes update. But you'll notice the invisible attribute doesn't appear when you bring the block into the AutoCad drawing. We're staying in the attributes dot d WAG file. And as you can see, I've left it in the same state as it was at the end of the last video where we'd created our little setting out point block. It had obviously converted to block, and it's now a block on the SOP metric layer. So if I hover over that, you can see it's a block and it's SIP 999 is what we said in the previous video. Now, there's a really nice feature available to you in auto CAD and it's called the enhanced attribute editor. And what it allows you to do is it allows you to basically enhance your attributes on your blocks in your drawing without having to go in and edit them using the block at its exploding them and then redefining them as blocks. So if I hover over this block and double-click on it, you'll see that the enhanced attribute editor kicks in. Now the nice thing about this is that it allows me to look at not only visible attributes, bots, invisible attributes as well. Because you'll notice there's the SOP circle invisible attribute that we placed in the previous video. There's the SIP number there, like sign. Now in the enhanced attribute editor, after you've double-clicked on the block, select SIP number that one there. Now you can change the value in the Value box. So let's change that to say 1-2-3. And you'll see that actually update on the screen as you do. So don't click on apply or okay, just jet-lagged. Because what you can also do is look at your text options for that attribute. Ches in the textile standard justification bottom right, the height is 200 and so on. So what I can do here is I can perhaps say that I want it upside down. I can perhaps say that I want it backwards, which I don't, but you can change those settings. What I can also do though, is go to the properties. And I might want it to be a different color on the drawing. So let's change it to say red. So that attribute now is red. I apply that and i a k that I've changed not only the value of the attribute, but I've changed the color of the attribute as well. That's a really, really nice feature. So let's double-click on the block again and go back to SIP number and go back to properties. So that's the properties there. I can change the color of the line type, the liar. What about at least text options? Can I actually change the text style? Well, yes, I can. Now, obviously I've only got standard and annotated available in this particular drawing. But if there were other textiles available, I can just go and select one and it will update. So I might have a talent textile that I could change to perhaps, for example. So there's lots of ways and means of making your attributes enhanced Once you've already placed the blocks in your auto CAD drawings. So we're staying in our chapter where we're looking at attributes and tables, but we're now moving onto the AutoCad tables side of things. So we have another new drawing for you. It's called table styles dot DW G. And what you've got on the screen in front of you is a typical table, as you can see there in the title of the table on the screen. And what we're going to have a look at initially is just working with table styles. So how did table styles work? Well, when I hover over this table, you'll see it's all one object. And when I click on it, you'll see that there's lots of information there. There's lots of grips and information on the actual table itself. But more importantly, if I double-click in the cells, you can see there that I can edit the cells of the table. And you can see that the text editor kicks in up there on the ribbon. So I'll just hit escape a couple of times to cancel all of that. What we need to know is, where are these table styles and how do we work with them? Well, tables are annotation. So you go to the annotate tab on the ribbon, like so. And because of the resolution on recording at my tables panel is a little bit squished. It's just there. And if you come to the table is title bar, there's a little arrow there, click on it, and that will open up the table style dialogue box. So it's very much like textiles and dimension styles. You create a table style. Now, what I'm going to do here is just work with the standard table style initially. And then in the next video we'll design a table and bring it all into the drawing and make it look very cool and funky. So let's have a look at the table style itself. I'm just going to select modify. And this is all the information in the table style that you'll be working with. So you'll have different cell styles. So there's our preview of our table bottom-left, and you've got a title, cell style, a header, cell style, and ageing seat data as well. So you select the cell style that you want to work with. So let's look at title, for example. And what we can do that is we can change the fill color. So let's make that red and you can say that updates on the preview. So then we might go to, let's say our header. And we might want the fill color for our header to be yellow, like site. And then we might go just to the data nail. And we want the fill color to be say, science. And you can see there that you can update your table style very quickly and very easily. I'm just going to cancel with them, not gonna make any of the changes. And there's our standard table style, set it as current, and I'll click on close. Now, the benefit I've got is when I want to bring a table in to AutoCad, all I've gotta do is click on the table command and use the Table Style I want. So if I zoom out slightly now and just pan down and leave some space above the typical table. I'll go back to the tables panel and click on the table command. That now brings up the insert table dialogue box. The only table style of God's standard, which is what we looked at a moment ago. And I'm going to start from an empty table. But what I can do now is either specify the insertion point or specify a window that I want the table to fit into. Its normally better to specify an insertion point rather than a window. Because if you've got long pieces of text in the cells that can get a bit squished and sometimes a bit illegible. So let's have a look at some column and row settings. Let's say that we want for columns where the column width of say, 150 millimeters in this drawing, symmetric millimeters. And I want, let's say eight data rows. Each row height is one line. And we want to make sure that our first row is the title. I'll second row is the header, and any other cell styles or data. So I'll click on OK. You'll see that this table, even though I'm using the same style, looks totally different. And as soon as I bring it in, it opens up the text editor. I'll just hit escape a couple of times, they're just cancel that. But that table now looks totally different to this table below. And the reason being is what I've done is I've used the same table style, but with different table settings. We're staying in our table styles dot DW, G file. And you'll notice I've left it in the same state as it was at the end of the previous video, where we brought in that larger table just using the standard table style. What I'd like you to do is actually select that larger table and just deleted. We don't actually need it anymore. And what we're going to do is we're now going to design a table. We're going to create our own table style and then bring in a new super-duper table into our table styles dot DW, G file. So we go back to the annotate tab on the ribbon. If you haven't done so already. Back to the tables panel. Hover over the tables title bar and click on the little arrow to open up our table style books. Now, what I'm going to do is utilize the standard style, but I'm gonna click on new and the new style name. I'll just call it training for now. So there's our training style name and we're going to start with the standard style. Click on continue. And that takes us into our new table style dollar box, like we looked at in the previous video. But this time we're going to make it look really cool. We're gonna add some colors. We're going to change the alignment of the data and the headers and things just to make it look a bit different. So we'll start with the title cell. So select that from the dropdown. So we'll go to title. And you've got three tabs. You've got general text and borders like psi. So let's go to general first. So fill color, what we'll do there is will utilize a nice pile color so we can go Select Color. And we want something like, let's say a nice pile, pink, something like that. So highlight the title. So that's colored to 11. I'll click on okay, and that adds that nice and neatly to the title cell. Now the alignment is middle center, that's absolutely perfect. What formats is that text? Well, that's going to be general, but you can specify the type of table cell format. It might just be general, it might be a percentage, it might be currency. And that will then formatted appropriately Fourier. I'm going to leave that as general and click on OK. What type is it? Well, it's obviously a label, it's not data, so we'll make sure that's a label. The margins themselves looking at the preview are pretty good at the moment, so we'll leave those at 1.5 h. Now, let's go to the text and the text style there is standard. Do we have any other textiles? We don't. So I'll select Standard, but I can, if I want to go to my textile dollar box and perhaps create a new text style. So at the moment we're using the standard textile. Let's click on New. And we'll call this the table title textile. So title, title, well, OK, that, and we'll select it. And we'll change the font to say, vagina, like psi, but we'll make it a nice bold italic. We won't worry about height. We'll leave that at 0 and we will now apply that. And we will also close the textile dialog box. It's now table title. Can you see it change to Madonna? It's italic there. Nice bold italic. Text height is six. That's great. We can specify a text color. So we want to cover that stands out on our nice pink there. So let's go for blue. And that stands out nicely on the table. Now I'm gonna go to Borders now. All of the borders here, I would purely just make sure that these are bi-layer if you've got a last set for your tables. So just make sure that they adopt the bi-layer settings. So that's our title, sorted. Let's now go to our headers. And what we're going to do is go back to the general tab, the fill color there, I'm gonna make it yellow like sight alignment, middle center is great, general and label and the margins are all good. Let's go to text. I'm going to use the table title. Again. Textile is 4.5 this time. And this time I'm going to make it blue again. So it stands out nice and neatly on the yellow like sign text angle, obviously zeroing for horizontal borders just leave them exactly as they are. Bots just might show, I adopt the bi-layer settings just in case you've got a layer specifically for tables. We then go to data, which is the last self-styled go, the General tab, fill color, none. Alignment often goes to top center. Let's make that middle center. And the format is general, but the type is data. Margins are good at 1.5 h The text. We're gonna leave it using standard and 4.5. Hi, you might wanna change the text color. Let's make it red so it stands out. And then the borders again, just make sure they adopt that bi-layer setting just in case that. So your lines on your table, by the way, these borders. So I've got a new table style. I'll click on OK. Now and that's all done. There's the new table style. I'll click on training set is the current style. Click on close. I'm just going to pan across a little bit now. Go back to the tables panel on the on-site tab on the ribbon, click on the table command and there's my training table style or can use standard or training. Now, I'm going to start from an empty table. I'm going to specify an insertion 0.4 columns, column width 158 data rows, Row Height 19 h, first row is title, second row is header. All other cells, cells that data. Well, I'll click on okay. And I bring that in. It's the same size as it was last time. But when I click and insert it, you'll notice that I've got a flashing cursor there. So I'll put a title in the top one. And then when I tab down that these are going to be headers. So that'll be, for example, had a one tab across, header two and so on. So I can now just close the text editor and there's my table. If I double-click in one of the data cells and add some information, let's say 100, like so can you see there that it's adding the 100 in the red. So I'll just click away from the table now, zoom in a bit and you say how much different that table looks, because I've designs that table style in AutoCad, ready to use tables in my drawing. We're starting with the theme of attributes and tables. And what we're going to look at in this particular video is how to add fields, text fields into your AutoCad tables by extracting data from objects on the drawing. So we've got a new drawing for you. It's table styles, underscore fields, dot wj. And what you've got in the drawing is a polylines Areas table with a couple of green polylines over there to the right of the table. What we're going to do is we're going to extract the layer that the polylines are on and the area of the polylines as well. And then we're gonna sum those up in the total area box bottom right in the table. It's actually very quick and easy to do. And it's actually really useful because then if you do change those polylines and you update the areas of the polylines or change the liars because you're using text fields, it will update in the table as well. So it makes sure that you are in the drawing and you can see the table. And you can also see the polylines. So you can download this drone from the website. But just make sure that you zoom in nice and close saying see what's going on. Now. I'm gonna go into the table here and you see we've got polyline number one and there's polyline layout, polyline area. I'm going to double-click in polyline layer first. So I double-click in that cell. Cursor starts flashing and the text editor tab, the contextual tab appears at the top in the ribbon. So we now need to add a field to this particular cell. So I go to insert and select field. Now as soon as I do that, what will happen is I get this field dialog box. Now your field dialog box, if you've never used it before, will look like this. So it's basically saying failed category or you don't need all of them, you just need to select this field category and select objects we're working with objects. So the field names that we need are related to an object. So you select object again. And then here you can use select object. And you can select the objects that you want to extract the data from. We're going to use the rectangle first. And as you can see now. It's a polyline and we've got all the properties of that polyline available to us. We need layer and the layer that its own is polylines. And you can suggest none. Upper case, lower case, first capital, title case. Let's go with first capital. I like that one. So that's all good. All I do now is click on OK. And there's my polyline layer, which is polylines. I'm now going to double-click in the polyline area. So I double-click here like site. And again, it opens up. I go to failed again in the Insert Panel. And you'll notice that the field dialogue box has remembered our field names object. So all I've gotta do is select the object again here. So I select the rectangle again, gives me all the information about the rectangle. And there's area right at the top and there's the preview of the area. Now we don't really need 0.8505 square millimeters. So what we can do is we can change the precision to no decimal places and it rounds it up to 1534. So what I'll do now is I will just click on OK. And there's the 1534 value, which is great. So I can click away from the table. I've nailed got the polyline layer of the rectangular polyline and the polyline area, the rectangular polyline going to double-click nail in this cell for polyline number t. So I'm going to come in here and again, we go to Insert and field. But this time, when we click on select objects, we select the hexagon. So there's the area and so on. We won't liar, There's polylines, it's even remembered first capital. So I click on OK and there's polylines again, click away from the table and that de-select everything. Double-clicking the polyline area cell here. And again, failed. Objects has been remembered. We go and select the object again. Select the hexagon, Make sure you get the right polyline. And there's our preview and it's remembered area, decimal, precision, no decimal places. So I click on OK. And there's the area of that one click away from the table again. So what I've got now is polyline liars and areas. So what happens now if I change the actual layers that these polylines around? What happens if I go to the home tab on the ribbon and click on the down arrow here. Can you see I've got a different lay. They've got a Tables layer for example. So what I'll do is I'll select both of my polylines and I'll put them on the tables layer by changing the drawing like so. But they don't uptake in the table just yet now, I can either save the drawing all or can regenerate the drawing by typing region. Notice the polyline layer changes in the table because we using text fields psi. If I changed the shape of one of these, let's say I click on that midpoint grip there and just drag that up a bit like that. That's obviously changed the area of that particular polyline. So if I hit escape to the select it and type region again, or I can cite the drawing. You'll notice that the polyline area has updated because the polyline is obviously bigger. Now the other benefit you have with tables is you can add formulas. So if I now just click in this cell once, don't double-click just once. Can you see you get this funny little sort of pinky yellow kind of border around the cell. But if you go to the Insert Panel this time on the table cell tab on the ribbon, I can add a formula which is going to be some, I want to add up my polyline areas. And then I'll just click and drag over the cells that I want to add up, like sign. And there's the sum, it looks just like it does in Microsoft Excel equals some of those cells. So when I now press enzyme or close the text editor, it gives me particular value there. Now, you would have thought that we could round that up and lose those decimal places. Well, you can, so if I click once in there like so, I can go to data format up here. And can you say I can go Customer table cell format and I can change the precision there to no decimal places. Click on OK. And it rounds it up. Click away obviously from the cell or hit escape. And I've got a total of my polyline areas as well. So that's those text fields. They're really useful and you can extract data from the objects on your drawing and bring them into your auto CAD tables. 20. Working with xrefs: Once again, we're starting another new chapter now in AutoCad Essential Training course. What we're going to be looking at now are external reference files, sometimes abbreviated to X-rays. Basically, what you can do with an auto CAD drawing is paperclip, virtually other drawings to that house drawing. So you'll reference in reference drawings into your house drawing and utilize the information from them. The major benefit of that is that any reference drawing will only basically take up about 10% of its actual original file size when it's x-ray shift into a house drawing. So you'll notice we've got a new drawing available for you at the top of the screen there it's x refs dot wj. Now it does actually have a reference drawing in it. So x refs the drawing is the host drawing and there is a reference fall and it's that dashed line going around the building, which is the property line. So if I click on that like so, you'll notice that the external reference tab kicks in on the ribbon and you've got various tools available to you to work with that particular reference file. So you can see there that you can create boundaries, you can open the reference, you can edit the reference in place. Now we will work through those particular tools as we worked through the chapter. But what you need to do is make sure that you download to drawings from the website. Let me show you what I mean. I'll just hit a Skype to de-select the reference file. That takes me back to my usual AutoCad ribbon. Go to the Insert tab on the ribbon, and you'll see the reference panel. If you click here on the little arrow that actually shows you in the external references palette, not only the drawing that you've got open, the host drawing, which is the x refs drawing. But you can see there's another DW j there that's highlighted cold property line. And that particular DW G file is actually sitting in the same folder as the X-rays file. And that's known as a relative file path. Hence, the little dot here. That dot indicates that it's a relative X-RAY units in the same folder. That's where AutoCad will look for your reference files coming into the x refs how drawing. So that's how you work with these reference files or X-rays is basically in essence paper clipped to your house drawing. You will notice on the little icon there for the reference drawing in the external references pilots, there's a DW G and there's a little blue Piper clip just above it. And the whole idea is that it goes back to the days of drawing boards where you had acetate drawings in new, overlaid them on top of each other to actually gain information from different drawings. So as we work through this particular chapter, we're gonna be working through how to basically attach a reference file to a drawing. But more importantly, how to work with those reference files once they're attached to your house drawing. So what we'll do is we'll close the external references pallets. We're back into the drawing and let's start looking at those external reference files. Were staying in our x-ray, f dot d WAG, fall and ageing say I've left it in the same state as it was at the end of the last video. So you can see there that the dashed line, the x ref, is attached to the host drawing the X-ray f-stop DW G file because it's still there. Now there's ways that you can check whether you've got x refs attached to your house drawing bottom-right corner, you'll see a little orange sheet of paper with a paperclip. If I hover over that and click on it, it opens up the external references palettes. And that allows me to say that the property line drawing is my reference drawing, my x-ray. I'll just close that nail. The other way to check is to go to the Insert tab on the ribbon, go to the reference panel, click on this little arrow here and again, that opens up the external references pallets. Now with the external references palette, open, select the property line, drawing the reference, drawing the x ref. And you'll say it highlights in the house drawing behind. Right-click. And we're going to detach it completely like sign, going to remove it as a reference drawing so it's gone and then close the external references palate. So it back just to our host drawing on x-ray destroying. What we're going to look at now is how we attach and overlay X refs to our host drawing. So in the Insert tab on the ribbon in the reference panel, you can see there that I've got attach. So I select attach, makes sure that the file type is set to the appropriate file type. There's lots of different ones. So you can use things like Navisworks files, point clouds, things like image files can be used as underlies as well. You want to make sure that you're looking for DW EEGs. And as you say, there's our property line drawing in the same folder as our x refs drawing. So I select property line and I click on Open. That'll open up the attach external reference dialog box. Now there are two different external reference types. You have attachment, overlay. What is the difference? If you use an attachment, it will always appear even if you reference a reference file. So for example, if I attach the property line drawing to my x-rays drawing as an attachment, and I then x ref both of those, the house drawing and the reference during into another drawing. The poverty line drawing will actually still show up. If I use overlay. If I decide to x-ray in both the x restoring and the property line drawing, the property line drawing will not show up. So basically you've got two different ways of applying references to your alter CAD drawings. And there's lots of different applications there for X roughing in, in those two ways. I'm going to use the attachment setting, that reference type there. So make sure it's selected. And you've got the usual things. It's a bit like bringing a block into an auto CAD drawing. You've got the scale. In this case, obviously the scale will be one in all directions. So you could take uniform scale there. So make sure that all set to one. The insertion point, I don't want to specify on the screen. I want my x-ray f-stop DW G file and my property line reference file. To basically share the insertion point of x, y and z are 000 the origin in the modal space. Now this different path types available to you, you can use relative path, no path or full path. Relative path means that the reference drawing is in the same folder as the house drawing. Full path means that you might be looking in a different location to the host. Drawing. A no path basically means the AutoCad won't look for a path site spake. So you could have it in the same folder. So there's y is a means of setting the path type. The preferred method is relative path because then the drawings are in the same place. Rotation, self-explanatory angle 0 indicates that it's horizontal. You might want to rotate it by a certain angle though, depending on the location geographically, on a survey grid, for example. And in this case we're using millimeters, again metric millimetres, and the scale factor is one. So when I click on OK. Now you'll see that the property line comes in and it's sharing the same origin, the sign 0-0 as the drawing itself, the x-rays drawing saying See that it's all attached nice and neatly. And I've got my little orange icon bottom-right indicating that I've got x refs that I need to manage. So when I click there, see that property line is now an attached X href or reference file to the XOR f dot d WAG. Drawing. Once again, we're staying in the x-ray F dot DW G file, which is the host drawing for the reference files. And you can see that the property line x-ray if the reference file is attached and loaded because you can see it there on the screen. You can also see the little orange icon down in the bottom right corner, which if you click on it, you can see it's in there in the external references pallet. So I'll just close the external references palette for now. Now we're gonna have a little look now at altering and clipping your href files. Now what I'm going to do is go to the Home tab first of all, and just check that we're utilizing the appropriate layer for our x-ray file property line drawing. So if I just click on it like so, it will automatically go to the external reference tab on the ribbon, that conceptual tab. But I can go to the Home tab and you can see that it's using the dash x refs layer in the drawing, which is the layer I want it to use so I can just hit Escape to de-select. You'll also notice that a x where f is the current drafting layer as well. Now, the reason that you want a separate layer for your x-ray Fs is just to make sure that they're separated from everything else. Now, what we want to think about is how do we alter our x refs when they're actually attached in our AutoCad host drawing. So we're gonna have a little look at that. And I'm going to select the X-ray F again like before. And you'll notice there's an option to clip our x REF In our house drawing. Now, when you create a clipping boundary, you wanna make sure that the boundary is also on the a dash x refs layer, which is why I checked it previously just to make sure it was the current drafting layer. So what I'm going to do now is I'm gonna create a clipping boundary. So when I click, you'll see it takes me into the drawing and I can select what type of polyline. Boundary I'll want to setup, I want a rectangular one. So I'm going to select rectangular. And it's asking me to specify the first corner. So if I click here and I drag across to say, halfway there, like so, and I click, can you see that the clipping boundary is implies and I can now only see half of the reference drawing. I can only see half of the property line x-ray f. So if I just hit escape a couple of times now, there's the clipping boundary there and there's half of my property line there. So the benefit is, is I can actually hide part of the x-ray f that I don't want to see. Now this particular case, it's only a property line, but it might be an underlie of some GIS information for the terrain that this building might be getting built on in. You only need to see a certain part of it. It might also be that you only need to see the X-rays for a particular part of a drawing. Anyway. Now that particular clipping boundary, I can click on it like so. Again, it takes us back to the external reference tab on the ribbon. And what I can do now is just go back to the clipping panel here, remove the clipping boundary and it takes me back to normal, hit escape to de-select. And that's the clipping boundary removed from the AutoCad host drawing. So we're staying in our x ref stopped EWG file and that's the host drawing. And as you can see, the property line drawing is referenced into the x-ray f dot d WAG file as well. So when you've got your x-ray fuel reference file attached to your auto cantos drawing. How do you edit it? Where you can edit it in the usual way. You can open up the property line drawing and you can edit the drawing. And AutoCad will actually prompt you to reload it as an x-ray f because changes have been made. So how does that work? Well, the best way to check it is to go and actually do it. So let's do that. Let's go up to open on the Quick Access Toolbar. There's our property line drawing there. And it's in the same folder as our x-rays drawing because it's a relative reference coming into the host drawing. So I'm going to open up my property line drawing. And there it is there like psi. So I'm just gonna row back on the whale a couple of notches so that we can see the whole of the property line. Now, I can make changes to this. And what will happen is because it's referenced into the host drawing AutoCad, we'll record those changes and reminds me to obviously make sure that I reload the x-ray and it's really quick and easy. Now the benefit I've got here is this is actually a polyline. So one of the first things I'm going to do is I'm actually going to explode it. So that's on the Modify panel on the home tab on the ribbon. Now that will be a change if I save this drawing now the property line drawing, that's a change to the drawing. And AutoCad will remind me to reload it as an X-ray, but I want to make some physical changes as well. So I'm going to select those two lines there and delete them. And what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna take this line here, click on the grip and take it up to that endpoint snap. They're like site. And then I'm just going to hit escape to de-select like site. Now, I will then save those changes. So I'll save that like so. So the changes have been saved in that drawing. So you'll notice there's no asterisk in the File tab. There. If I now jump back into my ex refs host drawing, what'll happen is I'll get a little reminder bottom-right corner saying that the external reference file has changed and may need reloading. So if I go in here like this, click on the link and you'll notice that the x-ray f has changed according to the changes I made to the property line drawing. And that's how quick and easy it is to edit an x-ray if you go in and edit it like a normal drawing. And if it's still attached as an ex ref into the host drawing, AutoCad will tell you to reload it. We're staying in our x-ray f dot d wj file. And as you can see, our property line is still attached as the x ref drawing, and I've left it in the same state as it was in the previous video. Now, in the previous video, we looked at editing the X-rays by open it up as a separate drawing. And then we edited it, saved it. And when we went back to the x-rays dot DW G file, AutoCad prompted us to reload the property line x-rays. Now you can edit your ex refs implies in the host drawing. So I can edit this x-ray if while I'm still in the x-ray f-stop DW G file. So we're going to have a look at that now. Just do a quick sanity check though. There's your little orange x refs icon bottom right, just click on it and just make sure that your property line x href is the appropriate x-ray f there. And you can see that we've got the dots and the property line dot EWG indicating a relative reference file path and then close the external references pallet. So why is worth doing that quick little sanity check just to make sure that you've got the right reference file attached to the house drawing. Zoom in on the top right corner where you've got that slopes line that we created in the previous video. And then just select the X-ray file, click on it like so, it goes blue. And as you can see, the external reference tab appears up on the ribbon there. And you'll notice in the Edit panel, I've got the choice of editing the reference implies or opening the reference file. Now I don't need to open the reference file this time we did that in the last video. What we're going to do is we're going to edit the reference in place. So I click on Edit reference in place, and it's the only reference there. There aren't any other x refs. So I select property line and I will select automatically select all nested objects in case there's any other reference files referenced into the property line drawing, just in case you need to select those as well. So I'll click on OK. And it's now just warning me that the x-ray if selected references or previous release drawing file. Now you've gotta be careful here because sometimes your x-ray F's might have been created by an older version of AutoCad. If you change the reference file and create some edits and save it back to the x-ray f, the reference drawing file. In this case, the property line file, will be updated to the current release drawing format. So basically the format that the x rest dot d wj file is in, your property line drawing will also end up in that format as well. Be very careful because sometimes you might save back to the x-ray f, a file format that cannot be opened by an older version of AutoCad. So always check your version settings when you're saving your ex refs and your host drawings. All okay, in this case. And as you can see now, it highlights the reference file and everything else kind of fades back a little bit. So I can now make changes to this particular file. Can you see I can select the line there, and so on and so forth. So what I'm going to do in this case is I'm going to delete the line like that and then I'm just going to jump up to the Philips or shampoo for command. It doesn't matter which one. And I'm going to hold down Shift and I'm going to select that line. And that line just to give me a strike corner like that. And that basically gives you a Philip radius of 0 or a sham for value of 0. If you hold down shift when you do fill it or sham for you, just get a strike corner like that. So I've made the changes. I'm going to go back to this panel here now, and I'm going to save those changes back to the reference drawing. So they're saved. Click on OK to confirm. And that's all done. And now I'm back in the drawing. So if I just roll back on the whale, see that my property line x ref has now changed shape. If I now open up my property line drawing here, like so, you will also say that it's totally different. Can you see that it's changed along with the reference edits that we made in place. It hasn't got that angled line in anymore. And that's a really clever tool. So I'll just close the property line. And do I want to save the changes? No, I won't worry about that in this case. But you can see there that you can edit your reference file in place if you want to, rather than have to keep opening up the reference drawing all the time. 21. Locking Viewports: We're starting another chapter nail in our AutoCad Essential Training course. And we're going to be looking at working with layouts and the annotation in those layouts and in the viewports in those layouts as well. So we've got a new drawing for you. It's called Layout stock DW G, and you may recognize it from previous chapters in the course. It's the floor plan with the grids, the dimensions, the walls, the doors, the windows, et cetera. And what we're going to look at initially is locking viewports in a layout tab to stop people changing the scale of the viewport by mistake or perhaps altering the properties of the viewport by mistake or perhaps deliberately. So what we're going to look at is how these viewports are created and how they locked down. Now at the moment, where in the Model tab where everything is drawn full size as per what we have covered previously in the course. In order to create a viewport, we need to go into one of the layout tabs. Now we're going to create a layout tab for the left-hand staircase, which is staircase. So that's this staircase over here on the left in the modal space. So first thing we're going to do is rename layout one here. So we'll right-click on it and we'll rename it to stare a like so and press enter. So now we know that that particular layer is going to show us staircase. So if I click on that stare, a layout now you'll see that it just opens with a default sheet and a default viewport. Now what we need to do is make sure that our viewports on a separate layer. So go to the Home tab on the ribbon and NCO Layer Properties and just expand out the liar names like so. And if we scroll down, we need to just make sure that we've got a view ports layer. So you just roll down on the wheel and you'll notice there's no viewports layer by the look of things in our drawing. So we'll just create a new layer. We'll call it viewports. And just press enter. I normally give it a blue color so that it stands out on a white background like psi. So I'll give it a blue color like psi. Now the other thing that you want to do in the layer properties manager is make sure that your viewports don't plot. So say this little plot or icon here, just click on it and you'll get a little no entry symbol. That basically means that it won't plot when you plot any of your Auto CAD drawings. Also make it the current drafting layer for the moment as well. So double-click on the sheet of paper next to it and then close the layer properties manager. Now, as with most layout tabs, in order to catch roaring, she'd do get a default viewport. It's here. So if I click on that right now, you can see that its own layer 0. So let's just go to the layer drop-down and scroll all the way down to the bottom and put it on our viewports layer. So it's now on the appropriate layer. We're now just going to quickly resize the viewport a little bit with it selected, just click on the grips. And we'll just take that up a little bit inside the prince limits there. Take it across this way, like sign I'm going to double-click inside the viewport to activate it. I'm going to zoom in on staircase there, like size. Let's get that roughly in the middle. And if you now have a look down here on the status bar, you can see that we've got a scale of naught point naught 1.5.0, 79, Not a standard scale. Click on the arrow and we'll set that to something like one to 20. And that's a little bit too big, so we need to bring that down a bit. Let's try say one to 30. And if we keep going, I think probably once a 50 will work in that case. There we go. And then just pan, don't zoom. Otherwise you'll mess up the sky like site. Double-click outside the viewport, deactivate it, and we've now got a viewport set to a known scale. So what we want to do there is we want to look that a viewport to that scale. So just click on the edge of it with it deactivated. And you'll notice down here on the status bar there's a little padlock Click on it. That means the viewport is now locked. Double-click away from the viewport or hit escape to de-select. If it's activated, double-click away from it, hit escape to the select. And now if I double-click inside that viewport and activate it and try and zoom by rolling up and down on the whale. Can you say it doesn't affect the scale of the viewport because it's locked. Double-click away from the viewport, deactivate. You now have a locked viewport at a scale of one to 50 that you cannot change unless you select the viewport. Again, unlocking. We're staying in our layouts dot DW G file. And you'll notice that we're still in the stair, a layout tab that we set up in the previous video. So we've got our viewport. They're looking at staircase. And at the moment of viewport is locked. What we're going to look at now is freezing viewport Liars. Now this is quite important because as you can see there, if you look at the viewport and the moment you see the dimensions kind of half on, half off on the viewport there. Now, if you want to freeze viewport layers, you're going to have to unlock the viewport first. So you select the locked viewport, go down to the status bar, click on the little blue padlock and unlock it like sine. And then just hit escape a couple of times to de-select the V4, we now need to activate the viewport. Now, there's a quicker way than double-clicking in side the view port. If you come down here to the status bar and click on the pipe a button, it'll go to model ageing, say there's the model there. And you can see that the viewport is activated. Now, the best way to freeze your viewport layers is to utilize the liar pull-down in the layers panel in the home tab on the ribbon. I sit at the moment that viewports is our current drafting layer. Now, the layers that we need to freeze in the viewport, as you say, are the grid lines and the dimensions. So let's go into our layer drop-down here. And you can see there's lots and lots of different layers. I'm going to slide up using the slider to the top. Now the dimensions need to be frozen in the viewport. And we're going to utilize this little icon here. So if I click there, that phrase is eight and you get a little frees snowflake symbol. And I'm going to do that with the anode EMS 100 as well. Now we need to obviously lose the grid lines as well. Keeping an eye on those grid lines in that view port to the left of the drop-down menu. So there's s grid. So we're going to. This little icon here that looks square one and you'll see them disappear as well. And we're going to also do S grade iodine, which is the grid bubbles as well. Now if I hit a Skype just a day, select the dropdown menu. You'll notice now that that view port is a lot clearer. All you can see is the staircase without any of the grid lines or the dimensions, go down to the modal button on the status bar. And that deactivates the view port. And that's a much cleaner viewport width. The viewport layers frozen off. Now you would have thought where our frozen those layers in the viewport. If I go back to the Model tab, those liars will already be frozen as well. Let's have a look. Let's go to the Model tab. And you'll notice in the Model tab, you've still got your grid lines or your dimensions around staircase. They only freeze in that current viewport, which is very useful. So when I go back to stare a, the layouts, you'll notice that they're not in the viewport, but they're still in the modal space in the Model tab so that I can carry on working on my design in the modal space. We're staying in our layout starts DW G file, and as you can see, I'm in the stair a layout tab we've created on nice viewport for stare a, where we frozen off the viewport layers and we've tidied everything up and locked it down to a particular scale as well, which is one to 50. Now that is a metric scale by the way, obviously, if you're working in imperial inches, you're scales for your viewports will differ. Now what we want to look at is adding a simple title block to our drawing so that it looks more professional. Now I'm not going to add a completely professional title block with all the logos and the revision columns and everything else. But I'm gonna show you the process and the workflow of generating a small cycle block that we can add to our stare a layout. Now the quickest way to do this is to actually jump back into the Model tab. And what I'm going to do in my layers dropped down in the home tab on the ribbon is I'm gonna utilize this title block layer that we've got in the drawing. So make sure that's the current drafting layer. And then zooming towards the top left corner of the floor plans so that you've got the dimensions sort of over there, a bit like that. On the right-hand side, we're going to draw a rectangle. And the rectangle is going to be 420 by 297 millimeters. I'll explain why in a moment. So click and drag upwards to the right and then type in 420 comma 397 as the other corner point and press Enter. You'll see that it's quite a small rectangle, which is why we zoomed in, zoom in on the rectangle, getting nice and tight on the rectangle. And then we're gonna go to the Offset command here like site. And the offset value is going to be 20 millimeters. Select the rectangle you've just drawn. So I click on it, move inside it, and then click again. Don't go outside because that original rectangle is the outer edge of your sheet of paper. If you imagine that as a sheet of paper with a title block on it, press N sets of finish on the offset like sign. These are really, really simple title block. Obviously you'd add things like a Notes Column, your company logo, your revisions, et cetera, et cetera. But I'm showing you the workflow and the process rather than how to create a total Book right now. So that's in our model space. So what we're going to do now is we're going to select both of those rectangles. Just put a crossing selection over both of them. I'm going to right-click and I'm gonna go to clipboard. And I'm gonna utilize an auto CAD specific copy with base point, that one there. And the base point is going to be this corner here, the bottom-left corner of the outer rectangle, just click on that. And that's now copied to the Windows clipboard skype a couple of times just to make sure it's de-selected. Double-click on the whale of the males to zoom to the extents. And you can see how small that rectangle is when user email, we're now gonna go into our stare, a layout stamp. And what we're going to do is right-click, go to clipboard and paste in our title block. So there it is there. And because we use copy with base point, the base point is the bottom left corner of the title block. The insertion point you want to specify is the origin which is 0 comma 0. Type that in and press Enter. And you'll see it goes exactly to the corner of that little dashed line that goes around on the sheet beneath the title block. So rollback on the whale a little and you can see that our sheet does not tally up with our title block. We need to set up what is commonly classed as a page setup. Now we have previously covered this a little bit at the beginning of the course as well. But the whole idea is I'm taking you through the entire workflow now where you would develop your viewports, add them to the title block so that you have a professional drawing psi. What we need to do is right-click on our stare a layout tab and go to Page Setup manager. And you'll notice that we've got an A1 landscape Page Setup in there already. We don't want that one. We want a new page setup, so we're gonna click on New. And this time we're going to call it a three landscape, which is a different iso metric sheet size. So we'll just call it a three landscape this time. And we'll click on OK. and as you can see that the principle author is set to none. So let's set that to an auto CAD, DW F6 blocks. So it plots out through a dw f. When we actually plot the drawing should we need to. The paper size will be ISO A3, such scroll up a bit. And there's our 420 by 207, which was the size of our original rectangle. That's the paper size that we need. Plot area. We're going to set that to extents so that basically everything goes to the extents of the sheet size. So our title block will go to the extents of the white sheet behind it. We're going to censor the plot. So our title block and are shaped or center on top of each other. And the scale will be one-to-one because both our title block and are shaped now it's set to this ISO A3 for 20 by two 97 size plot style table. I'm just gonna use the default monochrome black and white for now. And make sure that you're drawing orientation is set to landscape. Click on Preview. And what you'll see now is it looks a bit weird, but that's because the viewport ASM in placed in the toggle block properly yet, but you can see that our border is sitting nicely on top of the sheet. So just right-click and exit the preview. Click on OK. Now and you've got your A3 landscape page setup. Now, our current layout is stare a I3 landscape is selected. If you double-click on A3 landscape, it applies the i3 landscape Page Setup to the stare, a layout tab. And you can see there that it sits nicely in the background there. Click on close. And all we've got to do now is move our view ports so that it sits nicely in the title block. Now you see why did the offset of the rectangle now, because the inner rectangle sits nicely inside those little dashed lines, those dashed lines or your principal limits. So basically those printer limits truncate the sheet so that your printer head doesn't go off the edge of the sheet of paper. So the idea being is this inner rectangle is as far as you can go with your drawing information without the printer missing it and not plotting it. So we'll just select our viewport. And what I'll do is I'll right-click select Move On the shortcut menu. And I'm going to use this corner here and take it to this corner here. And as you can see, the viewport now sits nice and neatly inside the title block, ready to be plotted should we need to. We're staying in our layouts dot d WAG file. And in the previous video, we set up our little title block and we made sure that our viewport was sitting nice and neatly in the top left corner of the title block there in the stair, a layout tab. Now, what we also need to think about is textiles now and how our text is going to appear in our viewports, in our layouts. Now, the best way to do this is to utilize annotated scaling. So you can use annotated textiles. You can also use annotated dimension styles. We're going to look at using an annotated textile first. So we're gonna go back to our modal tab like site. And you can just see all little title block there in the top left corner where what I've done is I've double-clicked on the wheel of the mouse to zoom extents, we can actually remove that little title block now that can be deleted. We don't need that anymore. Now, you'll notice that we've got the overall plan view in the modal space. We're going to zoom in just at the bottom of stare a here like so in the stairwell and just pan up a little bit like sign. Now you'll notice that we've got the text layer as the current drafting layer. That's fine. Utilize the text layer because we're going to place some text labels on our drawing now. Now we're going to make sure that we're using an annotated text style. So that means we need to set the annotation style in the modal space that's down here on the status bar. And we're going to set that to one to 50, which is the same as our viewport scale in the layout. We've got the right layer, we've got the annotation scale sets up. We're gonna go to the Home tab on the ribbon and click on the annotation fly outs. And there's our textiles available to us. You need to select this one here, labels model to 50. So that means that any labels that you place in the modal space will be 250 millimeters high. And then all we're going to do is place a little piece of single line text here that says stare I. So if I click on the fly out here and select single line text, pick a point about haha and click. Now you're not just this no height selected for the text that's in the text style. But we need a rotation angle. Just press enter to accept the 0 because we want it to be horizontal. And then just type stare a like so in capitals. And wants to go to the next line down, Enter against finish the command. So there's our label, you can click on it. You can click on the grip and just centralize it a little bit more at your leisure, if you will. What I would normally do is click on that grip and maybe place it down a bit though like that in case you need any dimensions in here. So I'm just going to Skype today, select. And if you jump back to your stare, I layouts have now there's our texts, they are showing us that that is stack. And what we've done there is we've utilized an annotated textile that has picked up an annotation scale of one to 50 in the model spice and a viewport scale of one to 50 in the Layout tab. So if you select your viewport here, you'll see down on the status bar that the scale is once a 50. And you can see that it's unlocked there as well. So just make sure that you lock that viewport like so, so that nobody changes that scale because if they do, the annotated text based on the annotated textile will not appear in the viewport. So just hit Escape there just a diesel let your viewport and that's how you play some of your annotated text using an annotated text style. We're staying in our layouts dot-dot EWG file. And as you can see, we're in the stair a layout tab. And you can see are stare a label that we placed in the previous video using an annotated text style. What we're going to have a look at now is using annotated dimensions. So the viewport is still at one to 50, a scale of one to 50. What we're going to do now is jump back into the Model tab. And you can see that we're still zoomed in on step where we were previously in the previous video, there's our stare a label. Now if we're going to be placing an iterative dimensions using an annotated dimension style. We need to make sure that our annotation Skype is again set in the Model tab to the appropriate scale. So we check here and we make sure that this is still one to 52, obviously time with our 150 viewport in the stair layout tab. Now, we're going to change liars in the layers panel here in the home tab on the ribbon, there is a layer available for you, which is called a demes that layer there. So we want to use that one. Now the reason we're using that layer is because other dimension labs have been frozen off in that vehicle. Remember we did that previously. So we're gonna use a dims there which hasn't been frozen off in the viewport. Then we go to the Home tab on the ribbon, and we go to our annotation flier again. And we go here to our dimension styles and click on the flyer. And you say there, there's an ISO dim style, anno dimensions style. That's the one that you want. That's the annotated dimensions style that we're going to use for this particular drawing. So make sure you're using that dimension style. Now what we're going to do is we're going to place a couple of dimensions going across the bottom of the stairs just to show the width of each base of the stair case. So we can do that in the annotation panel in the home tab on the ribbon. Click on the fly out here and linear dimension. So zoom in a bit now and make sure that you select the endpoint of the state of that and the end point of the stay there and just drag that dimension down a bit to say they're like that 1320 sits there. And then we'll do the same again, another linear dimension going from this end to this end here. And if you want to line n, Just make sure you get the endpoint on the arrowhead and click and they're both obviously 1320 because the stack ice is the same width or the side row back on the wheel a little bit. And you can say I line up nice and neatly and look really accurate there in the drawing, in the modal space. Click on the stat I lamps app, and you'll see that those dimensions have not appeared. Now why is that? We need to just check why they're not there. So we go back to the Model tab and we make sure that they're on the right layer, first of all, and they're not there on the demes layer. Now the reason they're on that a anode dims layer is because the dimension override is kicking in in the annotate tab on the ribbon. So we need to change the liar. So we go IDMS like So first of all, and then hit escape to the select. And then you'll notice in the annotate tab on the ribbon, I, anode dims is the override, so we need to change that to a dims To make sure that that doesn't happen again. Back to the Home tab. And then if I jump into the stair, I layouts have now see those dimensions appear in quite nicely and everything looks thoroughly professional in R12 50 scaled viewport in our layout. Staying in our layouts dot DW, G file. Something you might want to consider utilizing in AutoCad is revision clouds is actually a command in AutoCad called Red Cloud. And it allows you to place little cloudy bubbles around the revisions on your drawings. Now you can do this in two ways. You can put your revision clouds into the modal space if you wish, using the Model tab or my personal preference is to do it in the layout tabs on top of your viewports. That way, you don't actually have to keep jumping in and out of the modal space all the time. So in the previous few videos, we've set up our little stare, a label and our 1320 dimensions on the staircase there. And I'm in the stair, a layout tab looking at my 1250 people. Now I'm just going to stay on the demes layer for now in the last panel in the hind tab on the ribbon. And to draw your revision clients, you guide to the draw fly out on the drawer panel and I'll just pin it open and you'll see there's the little revision cloud command there. Click on the fly out and you can have a rectangular, polygonal or freehand revision cloud. I'm gonna go for a rectangular one. In this case. I'll come into the drawing area and you'll notice there's quite a few options there down on the command line. Let's right-click and bring those up on the shortcoming here. So you've got arclength object, rectangular polygon or free hand and style and so on. We need to make sure that our arc length suits our layout that we're working in. So at the moment, our minimum arc length is 0.5 millimeters. It's a little bit on the small side. Ideally you want something, let's say about 40 millimeters HR. Let's do that and see whether that looks good. And then I'll press Enter. And obviously the maximum length of the arc will leave out 40 as well and press enter again. So now it's asking for the first corner point of our rectangular ref cloud. So I'm going to pick a point about hair as if I'm drawing a rectangle. I'm then going to click and drag. And as I drag, there's my rectangular revision cloud or click there. And you can see my revision cloud now sits nicely on top of my new label and my new dimensions in my movie port that is set to one to 50 in my nice new title block. So that's how you can work with your layouts and your annotation to make sure that everything looks professional when you're ready to start communicating your design intent using your auto CAD designs. 22. Plotting from the model and layout tabs: When our starting a another chapter in AutoCad Essential Training, we're at a point now where we can start considering creating output from our AutoCad drawings. So we've got a new drawing for you. It's called creating output dot d wj. And you can see there that it's the floor plan that we've used previously with the grid lines, the dimensions, et cetera. What you can also see in the bottom left corner of the drawing is the fact that we have a G, a layout tab and Astaire a layout tab. These have all being set up as if we're going to start creating output from this particular drawing. Now what you can do in this particular drawing is create output from both the model and the layout stamps. If I wanted to plot, let's say a particular area from the Model tab, I could very easily just right-click on the Model tab with it currents and go to plots. You'll notice I can even set up page setups. If I won't say, I'm just going to click on Plot them. Now, you will notice if you've never plotted before, AutoCad will prompt you to say that you've got multiple drawings, all layouts open. We've got two layouts, GA and stare a. So it saying do you want to batch plot from those two layers, but we don't, so we're just going to continue to plot to a single sheets. Don't tick the box though because it's a good prompts to remind you on whether you want to batch plus or not. I'm going to continue to plot to a single sheet. And it brings up the plot dialog box. Now there's no page setup in this case. And I might want to plot to say a dW F6 plots there, which is the default for the Autodesk dw WWF file format. Now I'm going to use an ISO A4 that's clipboard size here in the UK and metric, which means that I can obviously put that on a clipboard and take it out on site with me, for example. And I can choose a plot area that I want to display. So if I click there and go to window, what it does is it takes me into the drawing. I want staircase, i, so I'm going to click there. Drag over staircase i. That's the area that I want to plot. Now, I'm going to send to that plots on the sheet. And what I'm also going to do, you'll notice is I need to rotate that into portrayed so it fits nicely on the sheet in the preview there. Now the plot style table, I'll just say monochrome black and white for now. Do I want to assign this plot style table to all layouts? No, not really. Now, I'm not going to actually plot this, but if I preview it, you'll see that that fits nicely on a sheet of A4. And I could take that out with me on-site, perhaps to read line with some red pens and highlighters to mock up the changes to the staircase. I'll just right-click now and exit Preview. And I'll cancel that plot command. So that's how I can plot from the Model tab. If I want to. Plotting from a layout tab is much, much easier. I'll go to the GA tab here. As you say that. So set up, ready to go with a nice title block. We've got some notes, tells us it's the general arrangement in plan and so on and so forth. If I right-click on the GI tab and go to Page Setup manager, say that the current layout GA is using the A1 landscape page setup. So we've got an A1 landscape page setup already to go. So that means that our plot is ready to go. And if we select that page setup and go to modify, we can check the settings if we need to. And you can see it's plotting to a dW F6. Again, the Autodesk dw f file format. You will notice the red lines there. Don't worry about that. I'll just cancel that for the moment and also close the page setup manager, you get in those red lines because you've got that outer rectangle sitting outside the parental limits there. And that's there for a reason because it denotes the edge of the sheet for you when you created your title block. If I wanted to plot this particular drawing, again, I would right-click on the GI tab and go to plots. And again, it's prompting me about batch plotting. I will just continue to plot a single sheet. And again, I'm just going to preview it. I'm not gonna make you watch a drawing plots and you'll notice there that it's already to plot ageing, say the notes, the title, the drawing already, and it fits on the sheet nicely. So I'll just right-click, exit the Preview and I'll cancel the plot command again. So that's how you would plot individually single sheets from both the Model tab and any layout tabs that you've got in your AutoCad drawings. Once again, we're staying in the creating output.txt WG file. What we're going to have a look at now is packaging up all of our drawings, all of our layouts, all of our textiles are printer configurations and so on into a package to send what used to be known as in the drawing office when I used to send out paper drawings, a transmittal. And it was a drawing transmitted that you send out to a client, a contract structural engineer and architect or whomever you may be working with. Now, a command in all type had that you can use for this is a thing called E transmit. And you can literally just type it so it's E and then the word transmit. So there's a transmit there showing on the suggestion menu on the Dynamic Input. I'll just press Enter to confirm. Now, it's telling me that the current drawing is not saved. Do I want to save the current drawing? Well, yes, you should. You should always save your drawing before sending it anyway, just in case. Now, as I see them, you can create the transmitter. The current user is obviously me. That's my name where I'm logged into AutoCad. But you can see that there's all this information available that goes with your drawing. So this just using a standard transmittal setup. And you've got files tree like that or you've got files table salt to you which view you won't notice. You can also add other files are the drawings, word documents, excel spreadsheets. You can also enter notes to include with the transmitter. You might have information about what to use in the drawing, what the dock other documents, all the Word document might be an engineering manual to build a lift-off, for example. Now, what you can also do is set up your own transmittal setups. At the moment we're just using the standard one, but if I click on New and create a new one, let's call it training, for example, so that we can differentiate from the standard one. What it allows you to do is it allows you to set up all the information for the transmittal. So what package type do I want? Do I want a folder or a zip file? Normally you'd zip it up to save on space and send that zip file as an attachment in an email file format. Do you want to keep the existing drawing file formats? Now it may be that you're working in, let's say in this case, AutoCad 2019. But you want to save max1 Oh, the file format because you know that the people you're working with a using an older version of AutoCad. So you might go back to say 2013 or 2010, for example. Most of the time nowadays I would suggest going back to 2013 just to be on the safe side. Now if you're using annotated scaling and things, you can maintain the visual fidelity for any annotated objects as well. There's your transmittal file folder where it's going to save it to. And the transmitted fall nine will prompt for phone I where it's creating output training dot zip. So that's your zip file that you'll send down. You can use organized folder structures, place all the files in one folder, or keep the files and folders as they are. You can also add a transmittal set-up description. And there's all these settings as well. You can send an email with the transmittal set, the default plots, it's a nun. You combined any external references to the host drawing. There's all these different settings that you can utilize when you're creating a transmittal setup. So for example, if I wanted to send an email with the transmitter, that would automatically open up my email client, whether that be Outlook or something else. And it would say, oh, here's the new email. And by the way, you'll zip file isn't attachment. You can then send the email to the appropriate party. So I'll okay that. And there's my new transmittal setup ready to be used there. I click on close and I can use that transmittal setup to send all my infor