The Joy of Keeping a Sketchbook: mixed media autumn sketches to kickstart a sketchbook practice | Suzanne Abraham | Skillshare

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The Joy of Keeping a Sketchbook: mixed media autumn sketches to kickstart a sketchbook practice

teacher avatar Suzanne Abraham, Artist

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

12 Lessons (3h 31m)
    • 1. Introduction

      6:41
    • 2. Suggested Materials

      6:29
    • 3. Project: Create an Introductory Sketch

      17:25
    • 4. Harvest Vegetables in Watercolour and Ink

      24:38
    • 5. Pumpkins: Pencil and Watercolour Sketch

      20:50
    • 6. Abstract Pumpkins in Watercolour and Ink

      24:54
    • 7. Mushroom in Watercolour and Colourpencil

      17:25
    • 8. Create an Imaginary Toadstool Landscape

      25:26
    • 9. Collect and Paint Autumn Leaves

      14:07
    • 10. Illustrate an Autumn tree in Mixedmedia

      16:42
    • 11. Urban Sketching: Autumn inspired doorway

      29:23
    • 12. Final Thoughts and sketchbook flip through

      7:15
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About This Class

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Discover the Joy of Keeping a Sketchbook: Joyful Autumn Illustrations in Mixed Media Line and Wash Technique.

Hello!

I am thrilled to share my experiences and tips from a daily sketchbook practice. Welcome to my class on how to enjoy keeping a sketchbook; and we are particularly looking at the theme, Autumn. 

I am a watercolour artist, based in the south east of England, we are currently enjoying autumn. I wait for this time of the year as it's my favourite season. I am inspired by the change in the weather and the little joys that come with it.  If you’ve seen my works before, you may have noticed that I do a lot of sketches and paintings inspired by the urban scenes and nature that surround me.  In this course, I'd like to show you what I do in my sketchbook, and to give you an idea of the different experiments that you can include in a sketchbook.

Why Sketchbook?

Sketchbooks are a personal thing. They are normally not something that most artists choose to show other people, mainly because its their personal space; more like keeping a diary, if you like to write.

For most people, painting or drawing feels too daunting and even though they like it, they may have never tried doing it themselves only because of the fear of how it could turn out to be and what other people would say.  Well, if you have thought of it the same way, I am here to tell you that it doesn’t have to be that way. If you do enjoy painting or drawing you should express it in a way that best feels right. 

Where do I begin?

So, where can we begin?  Sketchbooks are perfect at this point. Keep it as personal as you like. You don’t have to show it to anyone and it gives you a space to try out your skills. You can use any medium you like;  choose any theme you like; or if you cannot find one, simply start with mark making!

What will you learn?

In this course, I will show you a few examples from my sketchbook, which I started a few weeks back. I have used a few different drawing media as well as watercolour, which is always my first love.

I have made these examples into 9 different projects which you are free to follow along. Some of the examples are personal interpretations and you do not need to copy it as such. In such cases, you can watch the video and think about how it has inspired you to create something of your own. However, if you do like other things that you like to draw, I hope that these projects will give you an idea of the different things that you can fill your sketchbooks with!

Complete at your own pace

This course is not something that you can finish in a day. I would suggest that it is broken down and completed at your own pace.

I hope you will enjoy this course and be inspired to continue filling more things in your sketchbook as you go along.

Happy painting!

Meet Your Teacher

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Suzanne Abraham

Artist

Teacher

Hello, I'm Suzanne. I am an artist and I love to inspire people to paint! My favourite medium is watercolour and ink and I have been painting with it ever since I can remember! I did my post graduation in Fine art and I have a degree in History of drawing and painting, that has given me a strong base. 

My life as a full time mother to 2 very young kids is challenging. However, I have considered it as a blessing in disguise; allowing me to spend some time painting while my children sleep/ rest. I also spend time painting with them and this has given me a lot of confidence to teach drawing and painting to children. I also conduct workshops for adults online and in my local area.

I Hope to inspire more people to paint and discover their hidden talents!

 

... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hello and welcome to my class on how to enjoy keeping a sketchbook. And we're going to look particularly on an auto and sketchbook. I am a watercolor and mixed media artist, and I am based in the southeast of England. We are in the season, autumn at the moment, and I have decided to create a sketch book inspired by all the things during this time. Auto-tune is one of my favorite seasons of the heart. And I normally wait for this time to arrive, mainly because I loved the Long Walk that I can do in the Woodlands around me. And as well as the part. And most of my sketches are inspired by the things that I see around me. And it has a lot of urban structures as well. But in this sketch book, I have a lot more that is related to the hidden stuff. I have been walking in the past few weeks in this course. I'd like to show you what I do in my sketchbook. And also, I would like to give you an idea of what you can do with your sketchbook. If you haven't kept a sketchbook. Therefore, I'd like to tell you how important sketchbooks after us. Scatterplots are a very personal thing. They are more like keeping a diary. And you can add in any sketches of scribbles that you personally like in that sketchbook. It's not something that an artist would normally show to other people. We are quite reluctant to exhibit our experiments in the sketchbook. But saying that most of the ideas and the successful paintings or illustrations, or even any type of artwork that you do, stems from the very scribbles that he could find. If you're not a person who enjoy doing art professionally and would like to keep it as one of your hobbies, a sketchbook. I still really great, especially because you can have them altogether in one book. And you can try out different things and different styles in your book as well. As well as that. I also like to include a lot of writing in my sketchbook throughout this course, you can see that I have written some bits and bobs in each and every page. And I do it in my own style. And and what comes to me fast as there could be something really personal or it could be something regarding the illustration as well. So I would say that sketch books are really great to express yourself. Whether it's the painting, drawing, little craft that you like to do, collages or even writing, anything that it may be a sketch book. Journaling is a really great way to express yourself. So by showing you an Ottoman sketchbook, I really hope that I will inspire you enough to start with a sketch book. And it doesn't have to have a theme like I have done here is I can just feel where you keep coming back to you to fill in the pages, sweat lots of different ideas and to express yourself, feel free to follow along the little sketches that I have included in this course. Or if you did not want to do it exactly the same way, you can also come up with your own ideas. And I hope that these sketches would be an inspiration for you to try out something new. In this sketch book, we are concentrating mainly on the line and wash technique, which is one of my favorite techniques. I love using watercolors in each and everything that I do. And as well as all the different types of characteristic lines that I can make with drawing media. I initially started off with using ink and I doing quite a bit of ink and watercolor illustrations. However, lately I have realized that using a colored pencil or a pencil or even charcoal or pastors can be equally enjoyable. So I had been experimenting with these drawing media in my sketchbook. And I'd like to show you a few examples in this course as well. You may also notice that most of the sketches differ in style. That's mainly because each and every piece is quite experimental, especially because we're using different drawing media. Are Stein stench. There are quite a bit. The most important thing about this course is that I do not want to show you a particular technique are such that I'd like to encourage you to try and do little sketches or doodles to express yourself in your sketchbook. I'd like to encourage you to come back to your sketch book on a regular basis if you'd like to create something in them. So it would be really great if you can break down this course into little chunks that he can do each and every day. One small illustration is day would be really great. And that way you can keep your illustrations quite short and sweet and fresh as well. And think of, think of illustrating in your sketch book as a way of relaxing and unwinding towards the end of the day. Or if you're somebody who likes to do these drawings and illustrations in the morning, it could be a great start for your day as well. Happy painting everyone. 2. Suggested Materials: Here are a few examples of the materials that you could have for your sketchbook practice. Starting off with our sketchbook, I have a small sketchbook and a medium size sketchbook here. I've also got other sites, sketch books with me. It really depends on your personal choice of how big you'd like your sketchbook to be. The reason why I have kept it quite small less because it's really easy for me to just put it in my hand back and take it outside when I'm out. For all the other materials, I usually keep them inside a brush row. So it's easy for me to just carry them. Variable I'd go. The reason I do this is because I like to carry my sketchbook and my materials wherever I am. So every time I get a spare time, I usually sketch in my sketchbook. And the first material that goes in there is my pencil. I have different shades of pencil as well as a mechanical pencil. And the one that I'm using here in this illustration is a freebie pencil. Pencils are quite good with shading, with light and dark. And I use them very often for my sketches as well as a shading. So if you didn't, if you do not have other types of pencils with you, of three or four, B is probably the only thing that you need as a pencil. I love to include a fountain pen and my materials and I loved drawing with them. I usually love ink drawings. And Gwen, I can't use pen and ink part. I usually use a fountain pen. I also have a dependent, and this one's a mapping pen with very fine nib. And I have just used the cap off. I repent to protect my nib. And for the ink I'm using Winsor and Newton. Indenting or any other colored ink that you like. The pen and ink are a great way of enhancing your watercolor washes. I love especially because the nib is quite flexible. And that helps you to make very light as well as thicker lines at the same time. With watercolor brushes, I tend to use medium-sized round pointed brush, either size eight or 10, or I also have a mop theories brush size. And it all depends, again on your personal choices of how big you like your brushes to be. For water colors, I have pallet and pan paints. You can use Payne's from pans or tubes. It's again your personal choice. It would also be great if you have board clips or bulldog clips to hold the papers of your sketchbook together. And for other drawing media, we will be using some color pencils today. I have here is Prismacolor pencils. They are high in people and really great to make sketches or even use them for enhancing your watercolor sketches. If you're taking them out for a plaintiff sketch, I usually use some basic colors, like violet or purple, a little bit of brown, red, yellow, and blue, the three primary colors. And that's probably all you need for some basic sketches. If you didn't want to carry the whole box with color pencils, if you're on a D out. Another medium that you can use, its charcoal sticks or charcoal pencils. And it looks really great with watercolor washes. And other medium that I have used in this course is oil pastels. I love using oil pastels, overhauled colors, especially because they enhance your washes and the color is so saturate and it can sit on top of your washes, giving us a very highlighted. You can also use or in parts tools for sketching in the beginning and to use watercolors over it. And it is a great way of using watercolors and oil passwords, especially because the passwords don't mix or smudge when using watercolor, your sketches will be intact even when using watercolors. These are the materials that I will be using in this course. But these are only just a few examples. And there are other medias. Are there drawing and painting mediums that you can use in your sketchbook? It doesn't have to be exactly the same materials that are used. This course is quite special because I am only giving you an idea to start off a sketchbook. And I hope that it will inspire you to use materials that you like in your sketchbooks. If you do not like water colors and if you wanted to use acrylics or quash, or even oils, or if you wanted to do some collages or sticking fabrics together, anything can work in your sketchbook. And I think it's all about bringing your idea into a sketchbook. Now as more important than trying out different materials. 3. Project: Create an Introductory Sketch: Hi, I'm starting off with my autumn Sketchbook today. And because it is a fresh new sketchbook, I like to start off with an introductory page. And I've just started to sketch some often tackle starting off with pumpkin and a watering can. This is just an illustration from memory. So I am not looking at any reference pictures for this. But just because I know what kind of watering cans I like. And we've all seen pumpkin. I'm just drawing it from memory, but if you do like to refer to pick chose, I usually just go on the internet and find the pictures that I like to start off sketching. But if you do want to follow along in this sketch, you can always use my finished sketch, which you can find in the projects and resources section. So if you look at what I'm doing here, I've started off my sketch with a pencil, and I am only doing the very basic shape of the pumpkin and the watering can. I'm not adding any details at this stage because I'd like to start using pen over it, Institute of pencil. So that's just the stock of the pumpkin. And I've got a basic round shape of the pumpkin just in pencil. And you can see the watering can behind the pumpkin. And I've started that off in the corner of my sketchbook. Also because I am an left-hand, I'd like to start with a right hand corner of a paper, but if you are a right-hand, you may want to start off with the conventional left-hand corner. That again is your personal choice. So coming back to our sketch, I'm just putting the little sparks of the watering can. You can always use my sketch as your reference if you'd like to copy from it, as well as watch me draw. So you get an idea of how to get these simple shapes. So I'm starting off with a pen now I've got the basic shape of the watering can. And now I'm just starting off with a little bit of foliage inside the watering can. So now I know where the watering can edge is. I can always put more elements inside the watering can and then go over the pencil lines. One's finished with water I need to include inside the watering can. So just some simple foliage, simple leaves and some flowers and flower buds. Again, you can see I'm keeping the shapes quite simple. More like little scribbles. Just giving the idea of foliage or leaves and flowers. It doesn't have to resemble any flower in nature. It can be your own. And let me keep on reminding you that this is your sketchbook, a personal space where you can bring in all your ideas and it doesn't have to be Conventional. So please go on and explore what you can do with different drawing media and what you can draw. So if you can't copy water I'm doing, it doesn't matter. You can include your own little elements of flowers. Now I'm going to go over the neck off the watering can, which I have done in pencil before. And I'm going to leave out the pencil lines that are underneath the leaves. So now I know where to start off with the lines on the watering can. So because we have the basic shape of the watering can underneath, we can just follow along those lines and it wouldn't look awkward. And now I'm just going to finish off the watering can itself. So I'm just following along those pencil lines again. So something that I didn't draw while using the pencil was the handle off the watering cans. So I'm just adding little handle on the side. Again, you can notice that they are simple shapes. I'm not adding anything too complicated. As I said, we're only doodling or roughly sketching in our sketchbook, not concentrating too much on the details. So again, just following along with the lines that I drew for with the pencil. And now I'm going to start off with the pumpkin. We've already got the basic shape of the pumpkin in pencil. So I'm just going to go over it, a width pen. Just trying to make large pumpkin right in front of the flowerpot. And other idea is for you to try and do two smaller pumpkins stacked together in for honesty flowerpot, just giving you different ideas that you can try. Once you've got the outline, I'm going to go over it with a little bit of darker lines just in the areas where I think it could be darker. So I like giving the light and dark effect in my illustrations. That's just my personal choice. I know some people will prefer it really plain and flat, which again is fine, is your personal choice. So if you do like the lightened shadow techniques that are used, you can try adding in a little bit more darker lines just to give it a bit more 3D look. Again, that's optional. Now looking at the page itself, I like to include a little bit more on this page into students leaving it quite blank. So one option is if you enjoy calligraphy, you can always try and write something, or you can even try doodling something more. So here I am starting off with some leaves, just simple leaves. And I'm trying to group them together in groups of four or five, more like the Virginia creeper leaves. It's one of my favorite leaves during this time of the year, especially because of their fiery orange color. During autumn. As you can see, the leaves shape is quite simple. And I'm just grouping them together and feel free to and any other different types of leaves that you like. I would also suggest that it would be great if you can collect leaves on your walk outside and you can look at them and sketch them. I've now finished with my ink drawing, and I'm going to move on to some watercolors. So I'm not really good at calligraphy. Go to i2, allow for writing in my own style. And I'm just trying to write or Trump sketchbook in there. And you can see it's never written. That's just my way of writing. You don't have to copy it exactly the same way you can write it in your own way. Unfortunately, I'm not really good with calligraphy, so I believe they spit to your own liking. And now I'm going to finish it off with some leaf like brushstrokes before moving on to painting my watering can and the pumpkin. You may also notice that at this point I'm only using wet brush to activate the ink drawing that I did. So the ink that I used was not waterproof and so you can see how it spreads when I use water and finishing it off with some splatters. This project was mainly a free play session just to explore the different brush strokes that we can do, as well as thinking of what we really like to include in our sketch book. So you don't have to stick to the same composition as I do. You can. Always try and include anything that you like in this page. Now finishing off the pumpkin with a quick wash, started off with a wet brush, just activating the inclined. And now for this job, I'm adding a neutral tint for the gray color. Again, you can notice that I'm leaving a little areas of white painted spaces just to reflect light. And I also like splattering paint because it just gives the whole illustration a little bit more movement. And now finishing off that watering can with some aqua green. Again, just a personal choice of color. And you can see how the ink lines have spread into each other. The pumpkin is bleeding into the watering can. And it looks like I've created a huge puddle in that area. Which is okay because I really wanted the colors to bleed into each other. And I know the lines have been washed away mostly. I'm not too worried at this stage because I can always enhance H using an ink pen or a fountain pen later on once the illustration is completely dry. So I've done a quick wash on the watering can and the pumpkin. And I'm going to add a little bit of color on the flowers and foliage. I am using a little bit of watercolor here. In this case, it's warm yellow. As you can see the splatters, they are warm yellow, but when they're mixing with the ink, they do become a little bit muddy. Which is one of the reasons why I'm only trying to drop in pigment at this stage and not to paint over anything because I would like to preserve a little bit of those lines. Again, I'm not too worried as this is just an experimental piece and I can experiment, even painting outside the lines. That way I can preserve a little bit of those lines. And if you notice, I'm not working or doing any layers at this stage because all I meant was little wash. So I can still see those lines clearly. Now that my sketches completely dry, I can now go back to my fountain pen and enhance those lines a little bit more just to give the whole thing a little bit more form. So not carrying over each and every line, but just enhancing only a few areas where I think I need a line. So especially the watering can. And you can see how wonky my lines look at some point, which is okay again, a little bit of unevenness and wonky nurse will really add to the beauty of your sketch. So just reworking on the lines kin as well. I'm also including a little bit of shading on the watering can just behind the pumpkin. Mainly because I like the use of lines to create texture and shadows. And I also like scribbling a lot, which is very therapeutic for me personally. Which is why you can see there are a lot of line work in most of my work. So I'm just enhancing the watering can, just darkening or enhancing the areas where I think needs a little bit more rougher shadow. Just a few final touches. And I think I'm nearly done with my sketch. And now I'm going to go over the writing. So at this part, I would again leave it to you completely. As I did mention that I'm not the one for calligraphy. I just like writing in my own style and I love mirror writing, which is one of the reasons why you might see a lot of written text in most of my sketchbooks as you go along. But it's not necessary that you need to mirror, right? Just like me. So I'd like to remind you again that this course is all about creating your personal sketchbook. So you do not have to copy it exactly as how I do. And I hope that I am inspiring you enough to create your own writing if you needed that in your sketch. Feel free to add any more doodles or sketches that you may like in this page. I'm just going on and adding a few more leaves at this stage. Just to enhance the brush strokes that I did for leaves, it's not really necessary that you do it and I'm not going to overwork. I'm just going to keep those brushstrokes little bit more character to it. Just adding a few more leaves. Before I finish off. I think I'm done with this page, just creating the literal introductory page for my sketchbook. And I am done with Project 2 1. And you can take as many days as you would like to finish your first project. It doesn't have to be done in one go. I hope you will enjoy the next project. 4. Harvest Vegetables in Watercolour and Ink: Today's project is inspired by the veggies that are heartless to route around this time of the year. And normally what we grow in our little gardens or backyards. So today we are going to sketch a carrot, some peas in a pod, and veggies. Because this is what I grow with my children in my backyard and we enjoy the process of selling them and seeing them grow and asked my harvesting then, you can include any batteries that you like in. There could be other veggies that you like painting, especially because you grow them in your backyard. Something that you commonly see in your local market or farm. Feel free to go ahead and choose any veggies that you like, and please consider these as examples for your creative journey. So I'm starting off with the carrot, started off with the basic shape of the carrot. I'm also trying to paint only one side of the carried and leaving the other side brighter and unpainted tissue light reflection. It also good. Shake up the character little bit more 3D. So once I've done this, I'm using the tip of my brush. Draw groups on the carrot or to create the texture or the color that I used for a carrot is orange, cadmium orange or parallel orange, anything should work. And now to make the group a bit more darker, and I'm going to use a little bit of crimson red, mix it with orange. And this time I'm using less water and more pigment to draw the group so a little bit darker, creating a bit more texture on the cabinet. Darkening the right side again, and a little bit more shape of the carriage has nearly done to add a little bit more deeper shadow areas in their coverage, especially where the groups are. I have used only to be too old in denser in blue. Just to enhance the carrot. And with this, we're nearly done with the shape of the carrot. Now starting off with the stock off the carrot, I'm using sap green. You can use any green, any basic cream that you have in your palette. Or you can even make green using warm yellow and a blue. I'm pulling up the stocks with the tip of my brush again. And you can see how I'm holding the brush quite away from the tip. And just pulling out lines that resemble the stocks of carrot. And also drawing little minds called 3D. You can keep your illustrations quite simple. You do not have to make it realistic. If you are interested in making it realistic, please go ahead and give it a try. Or you can also do these very simple shapes that gives us the impression of leaves on the stock and leave it at that. Also, you can vary the amount of pigment that you use here. So for example, you started off with a lighter wash of green. And if you wanted some darker areas without adding extra water on your brush, go back into your watercolor pan and just drop in pigment. You can also splatter. It just creates a lot of movement in your illustration. Again, it's a personal choice. With, these are characters done. Our next illustration is going to be Chileans, and I've got two treatments from my fringe. These are short. Unfortunately, I didn't have Chile's growing in my backyard this time. However, I love the red fiery color for the leaves. And I thought it's a good idea to look at it from life and illustrated. Because a half through a lot of space left on my paper. I'm going to add on the two leaves at the corner and just creating a very small illustration. And for the trillions, I'm using a mark of red, a permanent red, which is a slightly warmer turned. And if you do like to vary your pigments, you can always add a little bit of crimson red or even choose another neutral red, which is more like a Winsor red. So looking at the shape of the truly, I'm just trying to get the basic shape of the chimney with my brush. You may notice that I'm not actually using a pencil for my outlines and we just start straight away your wet my brush. If you're not comfortable with that, you are free to use a pencil for some basic calculations. But if you want to challenge yourself or just basically have fun, please go ahead and try with using a brush for your outlines. So just a basic shape with the end tapering. As well as just making sure that I'm not painting a huge block of color. Instead, I have left some white unpainted areas for light reflection. As well as now adding in more pigment to areas where I think I need a bit more color. So we always start off with a light wash with a little bit of water in it. And what's the next step? You can always add in a bit more pigment. And now I'm just adding a little bit more darker color like a balloon back mixed with crimson grade would begin to give me a very purply or darker red, which I thought was quite necessary, saw the darker areas on the chilly. If you'd like to keep your trainees quite pure red, then you don't need to use blue at all. So do you give edit, do to give it a try? The colors that you prefer. And we all have different styles and different likings. So I would suggest that give it a try with the different colors that you like and see what you prefer personally. Just drawing the next Chile. And since I've kept my illustrations quite small, I've been able to tackle it in a few brush strokes. And our finishing off that second trillion with a little bit more darker pink, like how we did on the first one. Adding or dropping in pigment. And this time I'm using permanent red or even crimson. Great work. And again, the blend is optional if you really need a few areas dark. So we've got the main shape of the tree. Now what we are left with is the stock which is green in color. I'm not going to wait for these redshifts to dry, but I'm going to go straight in with my green. I'm using sap green. Again. It doesn't matter if you do touch the wet red area. And I think it would look really charming if you net the red and the green mix. Few areas such as drawing the basic of the stock. And also making sure to leave a little bit of white, unpainted area to create. The reflection of light does definitely make it look a bit more 3D like. At, with this, we are nearly at the end of our Chile illustration. That was a very quick illustration. You could consider this as another day's project if you don't want to do the, all the veggies together in one day. So feel free to break it down at your own pace. And one more illustration that I would like to include in this page. Again, you don't have to do it on the same day. You can come back to this page and include as many things as you'd like on this page. And the last administration that we're going to do is in a pod. So I'm starting off with the stock cost, a piece. I know that the illustrations are quite small. So I'm going to try and keep it really simple with some smaller leaf-like shapes for the stock. And when the illustrations are this small. There's no room for details working to try and keep it really simple and fresh. It doesn't look charming. And now I'm going to do the pod. So long brush strokes using the whole body of the brush. And you can see that tiny speckle, white, unpainted area. Again, just to making sure that I'm leaving space for light reflections, going to draw another one. So that's the stock and the body of the piece. So just adding in some deeper green. Again, the same style of illustration that we did for the chimneys, such as adding more pigment and less water, and that gives a darker area to the piece. So I'm done with the industry. Now I'd like to show you how you can enhance these watercolor illustrations. This is completely optional only if you do like enhancing it with our drawing media. I'm going to use a fountain pen for this purpose. So before I start enhancing the veggies, I'd like to show you what we can do with the band. Just starting off with illustration that first on the drawing bit first. Before we add in any watercolors, I'm just drawing a piece in the quad on the same stock. Now that my watercolor illustrations are all completely dry, I'm going to begin to enhance them using ink. I have been using fountain pen before to show you how I can draw our peas in a pod. But now I have switched to using a dip pen and Indian ink. Just to show you or give you an idea of how it can be used as well. So not just enhancing the true leaves first, I'm not going to do an outline for the whole, but just basically drawing lines where I think it needs to be a bit more darker and lighter areas can be left to us it is. And also, you can use a broken line to enhance, which means you don't have to have a single continuous line around the shape that you can just add. Little bits of broken lines or dots. Just those things usually add on to the texture and beauty of your illustrations. Now moving on to the cabinet to enhance it a little bit more. So again, we're going to keep the same principles were not outlining the whole shape of the camera, but just enhancing the areas where I think it needs to be a bit more darker, especially with the stock where the beginning of the stock from the bed can definitely be darker. And also adding a few extra leaves. Feel free to explore with the lines that you're using. It doesn't have to be just like mine. If you wanted to add a bit more drawing around your watercolor illustrations, you can do that as well. It doesn't have to be just enhancing if you can even draw carrots with just ink if you like. So this course is all about exploring your own style as well. So, and especially because this is your sketchbook in your personal space where you can explore different things that you'd like to do. And also you don't have to stick to ink and you can use any drawing media that you like. I am also enhancing the grooves. It as well as adding a few using ink. I personally love illustrating carrots because of the many textures that this vegetable. And I like the rough body of the camera, as well as the different groups that are sticking out from the vegetable itself. I think something like this or a veggie like this personally for me. It's very therapeutic to illustrate because of all the lines that I could use on here. And finally, enhancing the piece in a pod. And just taking my time to do all the lines. Just to enhancing, creating a shadow or even adding extra stock as well. Anything really that you think is good for your illustration. I'd also like to show you how you can begin with a sketch. So I'm going to start off with that. So just like how we did with watercolors, we're going to start doing it with ink or any drawing media of your choice. I'm doing starting off with a stalk or the search, just like how we did with watercolors, just looking at the outline or the basic shape of the chimney. Also, I can include some darker lines or textures where I need to be a bit more darker. Just like how we did with watercolors again, where we used to darker areas. Here we're going to use lines, doing the beam, the main part of the chimney, the sheep. And that's wider at the top, tapering off towards the end. And like watercolors, we do not have an option to show the light reflections, but we can add in some lines and textures to show in the darker areas. And if you do like adding water colors later on, you can do the dark and light at that time as well. You can also add a sharp lines called hatching. Darker area of the chimney. Just giving you a more 3D look without the use of paint. I just wanted to show this to you so that I have given you an option of how to use drawing media. First, victuals starting off with watercolors. Some people really like starting off with drawing and then filling that in with paint. And some others will not be using watercolors first and just enhancing that with ink, Motorola your style, maybe. I hope that I have inspired new enough to try it today. Another quick illustration of peace and abroad using pen. So again, starting off with a stop. And if you notice, we are able to give a little bit more details when we are starting off with the pen. If that is something matching personally like to give this a try. Say I'm again, I'm using the picture from the start from the Internet for I'm drawing the police in a pod, just trying to get the basic shape. And here again, I am able to add extra lines as well to show the texture or the grooves on the bench. So this time I'm illustrating and open pea pod where I can show details like linking piece sitting inside, which are such a small illustration, may not be that easy when you start off with watercolors. So which is why I thought I'll try one or with ink so I can give them all these details. So just trying to get the basic shape of the pea pod with the piece in there. It's not necessary that it needs to look exactly like colleges in the picture. But if you do have an idea of how the lip of you do have the vegetable width. You then feel free to use it as a reference to draw from life. And once I've done the line drawing now I can go into the darker areas. To make that area a bit more darker, I can use lines or scribbles or even little dots, anything that you like to enhance those areas, making it a bit more darker. You can even do a little shadow. And you can just complete the whole illustration with just ink, which is totally your choice. I'm just trying to add a few more little piece around that area. And you can go on with this illustration for as long as you'd like. Bounced. Consider this as something that you really like to do. And sometimes it's really difficult for us to stop. And especially because if we are enjoying the process of adding lines and texture, you might want to go on for a long time. So whatever makes sense to you or watermark feels good to you, make sure that you do it in your sketch book. You may also notice that I haven't given you any instructions on how to draw the piece in a pod. This is mainly because in this course we're not concentrating on the technical skills of drawing. But basically we're trying to enjoy the way we draw attitudes. We don't need to have the technical skills of drawing, which is going to observe what we see in front of Athos and trying to copy that on paper. There is no right or wrong in it. And it doesn't matter if it doesn't look exactly like the reference picture. You might want to make it a little bit more simple. That is totally fine. Whatever that makes you happy. And what are the lines that comes easily to you should work as an illustration. And finally, just finish off. You can always write little notes in your sketch book. It could be something to do with how you feel that day, or it could even be about how you tackled or how you went about the process of creating this page in your sketchbook. Or it could even be something that is not related to what you have drawn on this sketch book at all. Anything that you feel like that makes you feel happy can go as writing as well in your sketchbook. Consider this as a genre or as I always mentioned, personal space to express your feelings and also to draw the two things that probably could make you happy. 5. Pumpkins: Pencil and Watercolour Sketch: Hello. Today we're going to make a sketch inspired by pumpkins. And we're going to do something like us to live from memory. Again. You can find the line drawing of this illustration in the project section. If you'd like to trace them onto your watercolor paper before starting to paint. So just starting off with the wooden crate to begin with. And I'm starting off with a basic shape of the wooden crate 2, which is rectangular in shape. And I'm using a pencil to begin with the sketch. If you'd like to know how I illustrate these in perspective. If you notice the rectangle that I just drew, it is slightly wider towards the left side. And the side of the rectangle is slightly shorter on the right side. And now I'm drawing two lines on top. That would be that would become the rectangle at the top. And the bottom line, again is slightly parallel to the line on top. But it is also slightly ever so slightly moving to words the line on top. So that way you can create wooden box or a rectangular shape that looks as if it's sitting on the paper itself. If you'd like a line drawing, I have left it in the projects and resources section. Feel free to use the line drawing. If you are not too keen on drawing. This would inbox. Now I have to basic rectangular shape. I'm going to start use them, drawing a little bit more details. Mainly the wooden planks that make up the crate. Drawing lines on the two sides of the crate that we can see, as well as leaving a little bit of a space between those rectangles, planks. I'm also going to add little marks that would probably look like pumpkin sitting inside the crate. So I think that little line would definitely make it look as if the crate is completely full with pumpkins, as well as that. We're going to draw a pumpkin on top as well, where we can see the pumpkin sitting inside the crate. Before that, I'm just going to finish the other side of the crate with the same rectangular lines. And now for the pumpkins that I sitting inside of the crate, starting off with the shape of pumpkins. And if you like, you can refer to pumpkins at home if you have. Or you can even draw from memory or use pictures of the Internet, we're not looking for a realistic pumpkin. So it doesn't matter if it doesn't look exactly like how our pumpkin work look. Just an idea or an impression of pumpkins should do. Besides our sketches quite small. So there's no room for a lot of details. So I'm just referring to the pumpkins that I have on my table here to draw the, the pumpkins inside the crate and fill it in with as many pumpkins SU like stack them up or anything that you like. I'm also going to refer to another little pumpkin on my table here, the yellow one with an OT for grooves on it. So it's just going to sketch them just the way I see it on the table. It may not look like a conventional pumpkin, given that I have very small space to work with and it's such a small industry. So I'm just going to squint my eyes and get all the details. Just sketch it out as I see it. Again, I'm not giving you a lot of instructions on how to draw these pumpkins. This is because I'd like you all to try out your own style and to try and sketch things that you can see in pictures or from life. It doesn't matter that it doesn't look exactly like how it is. Or please don't worry that you're not able to do it the way you think it has to look. It can be the simplest of the shape. The main thing is that you are enjoying the doodles that you are doing. You're giving this doodling a little try. Also, this way of creating or sketching will help to develop your own style. So I really hope that you would give it a try to sketch pumpkins in your own style. Just looking at what you see in front of you. And I'm going to continue placing a few more pumpkins, similar shaped pumpkins. The shapes that I have on my table, or I can include other shapes as well. The, the usual pumpkin that you see that reuse for carving is also fine if you want to try that. So any shape is find. Continuing my sketching. I'd like to add another larger pumpkin, just beside the creator of smaller pumpkins. So I'm just going to do that now. And again, it's just a simple pumpkin shape, not referring to anything. It's just from memory. After seeing so many pumpkins around during this season, I think we all can try and do a little pumpkin sketch and to finish it off one more smaller pumpkin. And this time I'm going to try and sketch this yellow pumpkin in front of me on the table. So the basic shape of that pumpkin, a circular from where I'm seeing it. And it's got the the stock bit at the centre. And it's got so much of grooves and pattern. This is where I'm trying to create now, from where I'm looking, if I squint my eyes, it looks more like a nice open flower. And I'm just going to draw those lines. It doesn't have to look exactly like the pumpkin on my table. And it's very small, so I'm not adding any of those colors and textures in there. I can keep on adding elements into this sketch. And by looking at this sketch, I feel personally that I need a little bit of flowers or a little splatter of color when I start using watercolors. So for this reason, I've decided to place a flowerpot just beside the wooden crate, but sitting away from the edges of which and create like how you can see where I've placed it. I'm just trying to add some scribbles for the foliage and maybe a few lines for the leaves. And also I can do a little bit of shading with the pencil that I have. So just darkening the areas where there is a lot of shadow, darkening the lines. So if you remember how we used lines to enhance watercolors in our previous sketch. We are going to use the pencil in a similar manner. So just adding a little bit of shading, just enhancing the darker or the shadow area. Now we're finished with the sketch. So I'm going to use some watercolors on this. Some of the pencil lines may get washed out or blurred out when I start using watercolors. But most of them should be retained. And again, I will go over it with either ink or pencil lines, whichever that I feel is best at that time. So I'm going to start off filling these shapes with watercolors. So starting off with the pumpkins, adding a little bit of yellow as well as a bit of green. I don't have any space for details, so I'm just dropping in pigments using the tip of my brush. So just finishing off all the pumpkins, just using different colors. So it's a mixture of yellows, greens, oranges, a little bit of red to enhance or make it a little bit more brighter. Any of those colors, any of those pumpkin colors that you really like, feel free to add them in there. But also at the same time, make sure that we're leaving enough white, unpainted areas just to reflect light off the surfaces of these pumpkins. So always try and drop in pigment using the tip of your brush. As it's a very small illustration, you could even try using a smaller brush if that's more comfortable for you. The brush that I'm using here is a size eight. If you feel it's too big for your own illustrations, you can always size it down to four or six, should even work well. As you're working on these wet areas of the pumpkin, also add in a little bit of darker pigment. For example, the orange color of the pumpkin can be enhanced using darker red or even a mixture of blue and red to give it a little bit of shadow area. And also notice the way I'm leaving the white and painted areas on this pumpkin and dropping in more darker pigment as you can see here. My illustration doesn't look very clear at the moment because the paint is quite wet and there are a lot of reflections from the light I'm using. But in any doubt, always refer to the reference pictures in my projects and resources section. It would be a great idea if you can download those pictures on to the computer or the form that you're using and have them as a reference while you're working. And that way you should be able to see the sketch a bit more clearer than in the video at the moment. Just finishing off the pumpkins at the back. And I've used a cooler color, like a very light blue. And just to add in some interests, because I have a lot of warm colors for these pumpkins in the foreground. So I thought it might be a good idea to add in a little bit of a cooler color for the pumpkins in the background. And then finally, I am just enhancing these with darker colors where I think there can be a lot of shadow. For the shadows, I'm using a mixture of blue and crimson rent or even permanent red or when I need it to be a bit more darker or warmer. If you don't have in down three and glue, you can use Prussian blue as well, or even ultramarine blue if you like it to be a bit more vibrant. And now for the shadows on the ground where the pumpkins and the crates are placed. I'm using a mixture of indenter in blue and crimson rate. Or even an ultra marine mixture of ultra marine blue and permanent red should do really well for shadows. And now finishing off the largest pumpkin. Again, adding pigment using the tip of my brush, trying to enhance those grooves are the lines, so the groups that I've already done and trying to leave a little bit of a white unpainted areas as reflection. And also let the colors bleed into each other, especially the pumpkin. Here, you can see the color has led a little bit into the shadow areas at the bottom. And also adding some deeper shadow colors on the pumpkin itself. It's not necessary that you do so much of details in such a small illustration. If you'd like, you can cleave it quite simple and just have one single wash of colors. It's totally your choice of what to and, and whatnot to add. In your illustration. I am just giving you an idea of the different styles that you can try out in your sketchbook. Moving on to doing a watercolor wash on the wooden crate. And I'm using a mixture of Indian red and in density in blue to get a very dark, grayish, too dark brownish shade for the wooden crate. Again, it's just my personal choice of color to add gray so that I can see the warmer tones of pumpkins better when I'm using a gray color for the crate. But if you do want it to add a bit more brighter color, feel free to do that as well. I am not painting the other side of the crate as much as the side that I've painted right now. This is because I'd like to leave it to depict that light has been reflected onto that side of the crate. So I'm just adding lines just to show the wooden planks and just to enhance those wooden planks. And finally, for that part, you can add any color for the port. You're like, I'm adding Indian red. You can choose any color that you like for the part. And again, if you remember where we did a little bit of shading on the pot, I am adding pigment on detail those areas, trying to leave the other areas as light as possible, giving it more of a 3D look. And now adding a little bit of shadow for that part, as well as adding a few more lines and even dots just to enhance the whole illustration to make it more interesting. You can add short lines, dots, splatters, anything that works for you. Again, it's just an experiment and you feel free to experiment how you can create different brushstrokes using some warm yellow for the flowerpot behind the pumpkin create. And again, I'm using some status here. That's the easiest way for me to depict flowers in a pot. And also some deep green for the foliage. And with that, I think we're nearly done with our watercolor wash. If you do feel the need to enhance your illustrations anymore, you can try and do that or if you want to add to it. Later on, feel free to do that as well. Once the watercolor is completely dry, you can go back to using our pencil or even append to enhance and make a few areas darker or define a few more areas. I'm using a pencil here to add a little bit more details like little stones or cobalts lying down on the ground. You can even try adding blades of grass on the side. Like the whole setting is grassy area, or even add pebbles or pavement Under those areas. You can enhance or darken the areas where you think it needs to be a bit more darker, especially the inside of the crate. And also if you think it's not possible with a pencil, if you think you need to add a bit more darker areas or enhance it a bit more that you can use another medium like a pin or color pencils, pastors, anything that works for you. And finishing off the background with a little bit of pencil shading. And we're nearly at the end of our illustration. I hope you really liked this illustration. And if you find a challenging to draw this onto your paper, feel free to use my line drawing to trace onto your paper. 6. Abstract Pumpkins in Watercolour and Ink: So we're going to move on and try to illustrate some pumpkins. We're going to try doing something slightly different. Something that is a little bit more illustrative and a little bit more abstract at this stage because we're going to start using watercolors first. So starting off with the pumpkin, going to start off with some warmer colors, and I'm not going to stick to exactly the same colors. I'm just going to pick out a few warm colors that I like. So here I'm starting off with lemon yellow or when city at, this is actually a Winsor yellow. You can even use lemon yellow or a warmer tone of yellow light yellow ocher, or cadmium yellow should also work. Cadmium yellow is a very good warm yellow. I'm starting off with lemon yellow. We're going to try and do little circles. So I'm going to show it to you here now I'm going to try and do little circles, but at the same time we're going to leave a few areas unpainted. So if you see I'm actually using the tip of my brush, a shape, something like a very irregular circle. And at the edges going to try and create those little growths. Pumpkins usually have. So if you think you cannot get the ship straight away, don't worry because it comes, it will come with practice. So if you want to give it a try on a rough piece of paper or on the other side of your sketch pad. Feel free to do that. So to start off with like a rough circle. And then you just need to add in little groups. So little better like sheets. So the edges would look something like that. And at the same time leaving a few white unpainted areas as well. So keep practicing until you think it's it's okay for you. So if you look at my brushstrokes again, starting off with a point, just putting it all down like that, and then just carving the tips like that. And that's one way of doing it. Or just start off with a circle, just feeling a little bit of white area and then just adjust the edges. So we're going to try and do that here on this side of the paper now. So starting off with a little circle here. And again, using the tip of my brush to recreate the little green dots that you see on the pumpkins. Good to look like a blob, very irregular blob, which is okay at this stage. So I've got one yellow pumping like shape or us very abrupt circular shape. Now I'm going to go into my orange. Orange here. I haven't washed my brush. So I've just gone straight into my orange. Just activated a little bit. And if you think yours is too dry, you can add a tiny bit of water. And now I'm going to add another one, maybe here. And you can let that touch with the yellow pumpkin. So in a way that the yellow color bleeds into orange. There's not a lot of work that I need to do with a brush here. I'll just let them mix together. Now, moving on, I'm not going to wash my brush again. I'm going to go straight into my crimson red. And then I'm going to try another pumpkin here. Again, trying to add those groups. And as I go along. And I'm also letting it blend toys. They yellow pumpkin. If you think yours is too light, you can always go back into your crimson red pattern, get some paint, and then just begin to drop it where you like some darker areas to be. So simply drop it and you can just see it all mix symptom together. So that's another pumpkin. Now I'm going to wash my brush a little bit and then go on to a very deep blue. You can either use Prussian blue or in Dan, three blue. I have in blue, which again is my personal choice. Just getting a little bit and using it along with my crimson red. So I begin to get like a deep purple shade. And I'm going to use that right next to the red pumpkin that I had. So in reality, we probably wouldn't have such a deep red colored pumpkin or a purple colored pumpkin. But this is just an imagination, just using different colors that we like. And I'm trying to stick to autumn colors as well. So if you don't like this color, you are free to change it. So again, I have to let that mix with the red. You can see how I have used the tip of my brush to just do it a little bit. Just getting the shape of pumpkins for the next pumpkin. And I'm going to wash my brush again. And I think I'm going to add a little bit of yellow. So going back into Winsor yellow or cadmium yellow or any yellow that you like. And I'm going to place another pumpkin here. So I'm using the tip of my brush this time trying to doodle a pumpkin with the tip of my brush. Just letting it mix with the other pumpkin as well. Maybe add another one here. Again, yellow. You can add little bit of orange if you like, it's completely your choice. So going back into my orange, then maybe plays an orange pumpkin here. So I think I have a lot of warm colors. So I think I'm going to place a purple one here just to break the continuity between these warm colors. And now I'm going to start to using a little bit more cooler colors. So I'm going to start adding a little bit of blue along with the oranges. So I'm going into cobalt blue. And then maybe I'll place one here right next to the orange and black that mix again with the pumpkins nearby. So I'm feeling a little bit experimental. I'm going to try some aqua green just because I have that in my palette. Maybe place one here. So you can see I'm literally scribbling now. And sometimes it doesn't even look like pumpkins witches. Okay, we're going to work around it too wet ink after we finish this. But right now the main idea is to get the shapes to touch each other and let the pigments bleed into each other a little bit. And now just placing another, let's say I'm going to place another orange one here. So they're still wet. I think it'll be nice as I place one there. So now I'm going to move on to decide and start making these pumpkins a bit more lighter. So I don't have any pigment on my brush now. I'm just using a wet brush to pull up the pigments. So if they're still quite wet, there is a high chance that, that when you start painting with a red brush, all the pigments are going to flow into the wet area. Now I'm going to add a little bit of cobalt blue. Again, not too thick, quite watery. So adding more water to make it quite diluted. And then I'm going to add another one here. So without washing my brush, I'm just going to briefly go into some aqua green again. And then place another one day and maybe finish up with some washing my brush again and getting some orange. Just quick scribble. Also. Now is a good time to do some splatters. So I've got orange loaded on my brush. I'm gonna do a few splatters and maybe a few red splatters as well. Maybe add a little Great Pumpkin there just to cover that speed up. And with this, I think we are going to stop with our watercolor. We'd like this to dry before we move on to inking this. So if you're in a hurry, you are free to use hairdryer or you can just let that dry and then work over it once it's completely dry. So now that this is dry, I'm going to start using a little bit of ink over it. So now I'm going to use Indian ink with a dip pen. If you are not keen on using a dip pen and any Indian ink, you can always use calligraphic brush bends or Micron pens, ballpoint pens, anything that works for you. Or if you don't want to use a pen, you can always use a darker shaded pencil or colored pencil, or even a thin brush, anything that works for you. So right now is the time we're going to try and do a few lines to define these shapes. So I'm going to start with my dip pen. The ink that I'm using here is waterproof. So if you wanted to work over your pen lines are Waterford of waterproof pen is very good. So I'm starting off with the yellow pumpkin here. Just starting off with the top. And then I'm going to pull out a few lines to show grooves on the pumpkins. And if you can see I'm using very thick lines as well as center lines. Say a thick and thin line would help us to see it. And what make it look a little bit more 3D like. And again, I'm not going to define each and every line. Probably do only the ones that are necessary. And I think I can leave a little bit tier, see how that works. You can add a few dots and dashes, anything that would create some interest in your lines. I've done one pumpkin there. Now moving on to my next one, maybe on stopped doing this one here. I'm trying to get those groups right. That's another pumpkin. So wherever there is a white unpainted area, I'm going to try and make my lines a little bit more thinner. So it goes in line with the lighter colors. Now I think I'm going to try and do one over here. I'm going to put a little stop here for this pumpkin. So that's the bottom of the pumpkin Then I guess. And that's one Pumpkin there. Maybe I'll do another one on this purple one here. Again, our stock for this one. Now, you can see these shapes any way you like. It doesn't have to be exactly the way I am looking at it. It's more like when you probably would've done finger paintings when you were little or you could still be doing this with your children? When we have no clue what those fingerprints mean. And we're trying to work around it and trying to make it look more relatable to what we wanted to be looking like. So here we're looking to make it look like pumpkins. So we're going to try and walk around. They're trying to find a way that I can make that look like a pumpkin. So at this one, I can see these lines going like that. So maybe that could be the top. And then we're going to print out lines here. So starting off with thicker line and then I'm going to thin it down. Now if it comes to the middle. So you get that very round shape of the pumpkin that way. So that's another pumpkin that's a very dark area where the two pumpkins meet and there is a chance that there could be like a shadow. So I'm just going to darken that areas where the pumpkins meet, as well known as these areas that in-between areas. You can either fill that with more fun convex shapes or you can just use black ink to cover those shapes. Moving on to the next one. I can see this shape is naturally darker here and lighter there. It's going to try and keep that up. So starting with darker lines here, maybe put a stop here. And then I'm going to make it lighter lines on this side, only because I have lighter color here. So that's another pumpkin done. Now for this blue one here, I can see growth's going this way. So maybe I could do a pumpkin like that. And it's okay if your lines become a bit sketchy, doesn't have to be smooth. Each and every one of us will have different ways of doing lines, just like we all have different handwriting's, they are going to look different. So this is just an idea that I could keep. And the end product will look very different to each and every one of us. Only because we are all individuals and we have different ways of doing things. And they're all charming in their own way. Maybe a little pumpkin, pumpkin there. I think I can put a stock they like with this one. If I try to make that shape a stock, I don't know what would happen, but we could try and walk around. It. Found a way to make that into a pumpkin. For this pumpkin, again, I'm going to put a stock then. You can see how different it does look compared to the picture that we referred to. With this one again, I'm going to make a pumpkin in another one, maybe another one. So I think that I can make that a stock for this pumpkin because I automatically created all the lines to meet here, making it look as if the pumpkins turning around to the other side. So you can see how repetitive the lines are. More like creating a pattern. And sometimes the pumpkin that you started off width may not look anything like the pumpkin that you're finishing with. Because by the time you got to the end, you would have mastered the way of creating these loose lines. And if you're not, if you want more pumpkins, just with ink, you can try doing that as well. Now, let's add another pumpkin, small pumpkin there. Maybe another one here. So just adding those lines. So just scribble in different shaped pumpkins if you like. And you could go on with this illustration and fill in the whole page if you like, and that's completely your choice. So this is just an idea of how to use line in wash using ink and water color. We're just going to the full final touch. I'm just going to darken the negative space around the pumpkins. Otherwise, it does look a little bit awkward. Okay, I think I'm nearly done with the pumpkins. 7. Mushroom in Watercolour and Colourpencil: Hi. Today we're going to illustrate two different types of mushrooms. One is sending to cap mushroom, and neither one is told to. The reference pictures of my industry are given in the projects and resources section. If you want to refer to it. Or you can simply just follow along with the shapes that I'm drawing here. It's quite a simple shape. So we're starting off with a cone shaped top of the cap mushroom. And I'm using color pencils to do the line drawing. First, Institute of starting off with watercolors first histone. If you did not have color pencils, if you wanted to use something else. For drawing media, feel free to do that. I'm using a darker shade of color pencil. And I think this one indigo. And you do not have to stick to the same colors that are used. If you prefer using something else. Feel free to do that. Now let's draw the stem of the mushroom, which is a very simple cylindrical shape. And as I'm working on the outline of the mushroom, I'm trying to bring in a little bit of texture. If you noticed the ink cap mushroom in my reference picture, you can see that the edges are quite uneven. So I'm just trying to do some uneven lines on the edges just to bring in the, a rough texture or the mushroom cap. And now for the bees, I'm just going to do some dry leaves. Something that looks like a very rough shape of a leaf should be fine. And some twigs or whatever that works for you. You can even leave the bottom of the mushroom quite plain if you did not want to include autumn leaves, all tweaks. Now moving on to the cap of the mushroom, you can do a little bit of shading for the areas you decide for it to be a bit more darker, as well as add a little bit of texture. And if you notice my illustration, the income mushroom has a lot of texture. Towards the bottom of the camp. The edges are quite uneven. And if you notice my illustrations, and I'm just going to try and do a little bit off lines to depict those uneven edges. And I can always use my watercolor to do a little bit more. And it depends on how much you want to do with watercolors and with the pencil. If you're somebody who would prefer to eat proper drawing with the pencil, then feel free to do that before you start using watercolor washes. So I'm just shading the bottom bit of that count to be a bit more darker. Just like how an ink cap mushroom is. Just to indicate that it is slightly darker over there. And then when I start using watercolors, I can adjust the pigments accordingly. So I think we're nearly done with the drawing or shrink cap, mushroom. Now let's start off with some water colors on this sketch. So I'm starting off with very gray shade for the bottom of the ink cap mushroom. Say for this, you can either use indigo or if you do not have indigo, you can always mix blues. So I'm using a mixture of dancer in blue and permanent red to give me a little bit of that gray color. But because I also like great colors of the watercolors, I'm using the dancer in blue acetone just to give me a bit more of a bright bluish color. I know in reality the EEG cap mushroom is in this vibrant, but it's just my personal way of indicating a vibrant colors in my illustrations. And again, the color choice is completely yours. So I've just done the bottom bit of mushroom enough, added all the uneven edges. And now I'm going to wash my brush clean. And I'm using my clean brush with a little bit of water on it to just print out the pigment towards the top of the ink cap. So keep washing my brush again and then making sure that I'm evenly spreading it out. I definitely do not want a lot of gray or blue towards the top of the mushroom because I'd like to leave that weight. So I'm only adding a tiny bit and letting the other areas to look white without doing any pigments on that area. And I'll see you see the little shapes towards the top of the ink cap as well. I have enhanced them using the same pigment. Now for the stem of the mushroom, I'm sure there is definitely going to be a shadow just under the cap. So I'm starting off with a gray wash it. You can either use a neutral tint or even use the same mixture of blue and permanent red to create a very vibrant gray. Just doing a little bit of pigment on one side and then using a clean brush to spread it and to make the edges a bit more softer. And I think we're nearly done with a mushroom. I'm just going to do the the ground whether mushroom is now for the dry leaves on the ground. I am using a mixture of red and a little bit of yellow ocher to give me a dung brown color. And also little bit of crimson, red or even orange for some brighter leaves as well. I'm also looking at the colors that I've used for the endcap mushroom, which is more of a blue collar. So I'd like to use thing that would complement the end cap mushroom. So I'm using a little bit of crimson red to varying it from Crimson dredge to Indian red. To give it a bit more vibrant. You can even use brighter yellow leaves if you like, or even if you don't want to do leaves at all and you can always use a little bit of splatter as well. And with this, we are done with our EEG cap mushroom illustration. And moving on to the next mushroom of which you see toad stool. And I'm starting off with an initial sketch with the same color pencil. And again, our chosen indigo. You can choose any color that you like or if you want to just stick to black pencil, that's also fine. And we all know the basic shape of her towards it's quite it's like a very shallow cup on inverted cup on top with a nice stem and a ring towards the middle of the stem. You can refer to my illustrations in the reference pictures as well. So I'm just sketching this input shape of the mushroom. I'm also going to do a few autumn leaves on the ground as well, just like how we did with a cap mushroom. And you can even add some tweaks or the bark of a tree fallen on the ground. Anything that you love to add. And you do not have to do the composition of this illustration exactly like mine. You can, obviously, you can place your mushroom on a flat ground. Here. I have chosen to place it on a very slanting ground. I'm also adding some details like bees kills off the stool. And if you like, you can even use some white color pencils to block that area of, so you won't have any watercolors over it when you're painting. Or even you can enhance it later on as well. So starting off with watercolors, I'm using mixture of permanent red and crimson red. If you do have another type of read like a Winsor red, you can always use that. I'm starting off with the red and also at the same time adding a little bit of darker areas on the cap of the mushroom as well. I like to work wet in wet with watercolors, which means I like it when the self as if the paper is quite wet and I can just add some pigments and let it mix on paper. So that's why I keep on using a lot of pigment together in one goal. If you think it's not working for, you, always feel free to stick to this. Of watercolors that you personally prefer. So completing the range of the mushroom. And also making sure that I leave a little bit of white on painted areas for light reflection. Also, I like a knitr area of red on the end cap mushroom. So if left that huge area of white painted area, and now I'm going to wash my brush and slowly try to make that area a bit more lighter. So I'm just using a clean brush to just pull the pigments from around that area to make it lighter that we are preserved a little bit lighter area there. And again, I can drop in more pigment. I think my first wash risk-weighted light. So just adding in a tiny bit more red to make it a bit more brighter. I think we're nearly done with the count of the mushroom. Quickly moving on to the stem off the mushroom. And again, I'm using a mixture of in-depth green, blue, and permanent red. If you do have a gray color that you'd like to use or a neutral tint that you'd like to use. Feel free to do that as well. So I'm only painting on one side, just giving it a shadow. Because in reality we know that the stem of the mushroom is usually white. The reason why I'm giving a gray is only for the shadow. And I've only done on one side of the mushroom, leaving the other side quite clean. Now for the grass on the ground, I'm using the same neutral tint or the gray color. This is simply because I feel that green color can be quite strong with the range of cap of the mushroom. So again, I'm moving onto the dry leaves on the ground using a neutral green, too brownish color. Or if you do not want to any sort of illustrations or any sort of elements on the ground. You can leave that area as is. Or you can just finish it off with some line-drawing instead. That's completely up to you, how you want to finish it off. Adding that little bit of green on the side just to indicate a green color that the ground me. And that's it. I think we're done with our total tuner as well. And once these illustrations are dry, if you did want to enhance the scales on the mushroom, you can use white gel pen or even colored pencils would work nicely at this stone because watercolor is completely dry. Or you can even use white gouache. So for the income, I'm using my white gel pen, but the ink is running out for the toads to. I'll try and use some white gouache. If you do not have both of these materials with you, even white color pencils or chalk, or even pass tools could work for enhancing the white skills of the torts tune as well. And I'm using goulash, using my brush and taking it straight from the tube. I do not need to add any altered to mix it. I can just drop in some white quash straight on top of the toadstools. And now we're done with the two mushrooms. I hope you really enjoyed working on these mushrooms. I also saw a few mushrooms on my walk outside and the Woodlands. So I will try and share the pictures here as well. They are not great as reference pictures. But if you do find them on your walk, it's a great idea to observe them, but by no means please do not pick these mushrooms are a highly poisonous. I hope you enjoyed today's illustration. And I see you in the next one, which all my friends. 8. Create an Imaginary Toadstool Landscape: Since all the different types of mushrooms and my dog. And I've noticed an increase in a lot of different types of mushrooms there. This one is quite whimsical. It's more like huge land or mushrooms. Just a little idea that came up to my head. While I was out there. I'm using the red toadstools to fill the page now. And we're going to keep the sheep's very simple, no details here. Just a little shape of basic shape of the mushroom and that should be it. So I'm starting off with a light red color wash for the carpus and mushrooms. And I'm going to try and illustrate a few caps on this page. So I'm going to vary the sizes. Like it's going to be bigger and then a little bit smaller. And I'll say for the stock of the mushrooms. For now, I'm just going to wash my brush clean and pull the color down from the cow. So you can see it's a very light wash where you can see the pigment has spread into that stock as well. When I use a wet brush over it. I'm adding a few tabs on this page. If you wanted to add a mushrooms on this page, randomly placed anywhere you like. Off the mushrooms are quite wet. Now I'm going to just drop in a little bit gray color just to show some shadow for the stems. And you can let them mix in with the cap of the mushroom as well. So fairly light wash for the stem, very light gray wash. Also. You can add a little bit of splatters if you like. Think of it more like little jingle time with a lot of watercolor play in it. Now continuing to draw more mushroom caps across the page. And feel free to add as many as you like. I'm also vary the shape of the top students likely where it's facing upwards. If you notice. You can see that they're not always kept like they can even turn up sometimes. So I'm just trying to vary the different sheets so it doesn't look the same. And you can also see how rough sketch. At this stage, I'm only trying to just place the colors there. And once they're completely dry, I can go over it with a drawing media. So it could look really messy now. And don't worry, even if you think you're going wrong, There's nothing much that you can go wrong in here. Mainly because we doing this very simple shapes and it's quite repetitive. Place them anywhere you like on this paper. I am placing them at an angle in a hope that I can draw a valley on that. Just where the mushrooms. If you want to see what I did with this illustration and how it looks. In the end, you can look at my reference picture. Enhancing those mushroom caps with a little bit more pigment now, I'm sorry, I did not want it to be very, very night. I like it to be a little bit more brighter, especially towards tools which are quite bright red. Also, some toadstools also have an orange sheet to it. So in this one of which is the one that's slightly bigger than the others. I'm going to use a little bit of orange as well, along with the rate that I'm using. You can see I've just placed a little bit of orange along with the red here. And I'm trying to get the shape of the mushroom as well as the base and the stem of the mushroom as well. Now I've placed these mushrooms at an angle. So it looks as if they are all prompting on very small and valley. So I'm just doing the ground now with some brown shapes, very abstract shapes for brown leaves on the ground. See, you can see that I have not really done any particular leaf-like shape here. I'm just adding some abstract shapes with the tip of my brush. Basically, I'm just worried about what color I am placing at the moment. And then I can always work over it with some pencil lines. So for the ground or the leaf like abstract shapes, I'm using a mixture of Indian grade, a little bit of crimson, red and some yellow, or for some bright yellow color, the leaves as well on the ground. And you can see that I've actually made a very abstract Valley where these mushrooms are placed and leaving a lot of whitespace at the moment. I'm not quite sure how this is going to turn up to be. But more importantly, I am enjoying the process of placing these colors on paper. I think I have very vague idea of how the landscape is going to look, and I'm only working towards it at the moment. Now. I'm also going to add a little bit of green grass in between these leaves. So I'm trying to create a ground width which is quite grassy as well as it's got quite a bit often leaves that's fallen on the ground. Often seen. These this doesn't come from any reframes pictures. As such. It's just from memory or from experience of walking around in the neighboring woodland areas. I'm using the tip of my brush to pull it out, quick lines for it to look like grass. And also, I'm doing a mixture of green, brownish grass as well and some abstract shapes, shapes for the needs as well. Now since the color in the foreground quite bright and vibrant, I'm going to add a few grassland sheets with some neutral color in the background just to show depth in the landscape. Our mushroom landscape, lovely taking shape now. And now I need to start doing a little bit more darker color for the shadow areas. So I'm starting to use a mixture of Indian threw in blue, little bit of Indian red, been CNR, a mixture of brown and gray, just to add some deeper tones in my landscape. Also, I have kept these videos in real time because I'd like to show how I use these brushes to create brush strokes. They are quite self-explanatory. So I really hope that you will be able to copy a little bit of brushstrokes. Now finishing off one of those last big mushrooms right at the corner. Looking at the landscape itself now, I feel there needs to be a little bit more depth in the painting. So I'm going to add a few blogs are very light red in between these bigger mushrooms, in a way to depict the mushrooms that are in the background as well. And you can also use a cooler tone or the gray color for those mushrooms just to show them as shutters. And that's all we need to do. And make sure to keep your washes very light by adding a little bit more water. So they do not become very dark green mushroom. I'm quite happy with the watercolor illustration now. And now I'm going to use some drawing media to do some lines and enhance the background as well. This, again, is an option if you prefer to leave your landscape just like how it is in a very abstract form. That's completely fine. But if you do want to add a little bit more Vim second look to it. Why not use a little bit of drawing media as well? So starting off with charcoal pencil and just adding a background and around for those mushrooms. I'm also adding our client to a few of the mushrooms as well, and enhancing their needs as well as the grass on the ground. Starting off with some trees in the background. So as I said, I need it to look like a valley on which to mushrooms are growing and just adding a few trees in the background using my charcoal pencil. If you do have charcoal stick, that should also work. So I'm adding some branches for that tree and I'm going to continue adding a few more trees in the background and making it look like a nice, beautiful valley. Feel free to bring in your own ideas into the landscape. We all have different fantasies about whimsy can landscapes. So feel free to add in your own ideas as well. And I hope that my illustration with serves as an inspiration for your work. So if you feel you're not able to copy it as such, don't feel let down because I did not mean for this to be copied exactly the same way. I only would like to give you ideas of what you can do. Making, creating what landscaped like this. So if you prefer, you can first to watch this video and then think about what you'd like to do and do something from memory. And now continuing to add more trees in the background. And I'm trying to say the darkness and the light. And that way I can create a sense of depth in the background as well. For the tree. That has more details, will be the trees in the foreground to the lighter. Lines could serve as a tree is far, far away in the background. And that creates a depth in your landscape. And feel free to add as many trees or mushrooms that you like in this landscape. It doesn't even have to be on a valley, like how I have placed them. You can't just have them on a plane drummed. I think my background is done. Now I'm going to work on the foreground, are mainly adding a little bit more details on the mushrooms. So if you remember the two mushrooms that we did in the previous video, how we enhanced them using lines. You can try doing that here as well with your chocolate pencil. You can even use black color pencil or parcels if you think that has a darker or deeper tone than the charcoal. So here I'm adding lines to the mushrooms. And also the schemes of the mushroom. I'm enhancing a few lines and details on mushrooms. And if you notice, I'm also adding a little bit of shadow on the stem as well. If you don't and you do not have to. Do you a clear outline for these mushrooms. But you can enhance just where you think is a bit more darker. And as well as the mushrooms which, which is a texture on these mushrooms. So continuing with the next mushroom. Now I'm just going to continue enhancing all those mushrooms that are in the foreground. In the similar manner. Soldiers basically enhancing with the lines on new way I think needs to be a bit more darker. Shadow can phone. And also this kids on the mushroom cap. And that's all I'm doing for every mushroom in the foreground. And for the mushrooms that turned upwards, we can see the gills of mushrooms and we're going to draw some lines for that as well. So please follow along if you need any guidance in bat. But other than that, it's pretty much repetition. I hope you will enjoy this repeating. Pattern. Finishing touches, you some water color. Some finishing touches. The shadow. Just a little bit more texture using my drawing. And finally, I would like to add a little bit of writing on the pages, perhaps explaining about how I got inspired to do these illustrations or something that happened that day. Or it could even be something really personal. If you do like writing, you can use up the whitespace for some weighting as well. 9. Collect and Paint Autumn Leaves: Hello, today's illustration is quite straight forward. I collected these leaves on my walk this morning, and I'd like to recreate the colonists and different lines on the leaves here. I'm going to show you a quick and easy way to do an outline for their needs. I am simply going to trace around the leaves. So I get to an outline and then I can play with the colors inside the shape. I'm going to start off very simple with the biggest leaf here. So using a pencil, I'm just roughly making an outline around the leaf shape. Now I've got the contour of the leaf. I'm going to add in the extra lines. The veins on the leaves started off with a stem. And then just copying the major lines of the veins on the leaf. I'm not going to do all of the smaller thing. Perhaps too much of detail. We're not look good on a leaf like this. So you've done a quick sketch, and now I'm going to use watercolors to try and capture the different colors that I can see on the leaf. So first I'm going to prepare all the colors. So starting off with a little bit of lemon yellow. So the consistency of watercolor here is medium consistency. So I've got enough pigment on my brush. And I'm generally going to start at one of the corners of the leaves. Wild, that pigment is quite wet. I'm going to start adding some green. And I've used sap green here and let that bleed into the yellow as well. And the next color is orange. You can use either cadmium orange or pyrrole orange, anything that you have in your palette. So I'll just start adding orange and you can see that the colors are all bleeding into each other. Also dropping in little bits of orange. You can even add a bit of crimson red at this point. And now let's continue to play with the different pigments that we see on the lead. So a little bit of green there. And then you can continue using an interpreter for yellow and orange as well. Sometimes you may notice that when you are switching between different pigments, there is a chance for your washes to be a bit more lighter and once it dries, it can look quite washed out. To avoid that, you can try using different brushes. Or if you'd like to still stick to one brush, you can wash the brush and use new pigment on it. But when you use new pigments, Make sure to take out extra water from the brush and try and use a lot of pigment to prepare your pain interstitial, adding a lot of water into it. The idea is for us to keep the pigments that you add on to the leaves. Little bit more thicker inconsistency compared to the first wash that you added. So if you have a wet area on your leaf and you wanted to add a fresh color on that wet area. I would suggest that you go straight into the pan of the pigment that you need and take in a little bit of pigment on the brush and just simply drop it into the wet area on the paper. That way, you can see a differentiation in the different pigments. And you can even watch them bleed into each other. But at the same time, when they dry, they won't look quite washed out if you don't have a lot of water on them. I also not a lot of paint. That way. It is more sun as well as you don't target lot as controlling either way your paint is clattering onto your paper. So it does house and little bit of excitement that way. So few lakhs flattering pinned, feel free to try that. Moving on to another leaves. And this one's quite simple in shape. And I don't think we need to do any tracing focus. Some going to start using my round brush for this. And I'm starting off with some yellow. I also mixed a little bit of orange into the yellow to make it a little bit more warmer. And now starting with the shape of the leaf, It's quite basic shape like how a normal face. So started off with one side of the leaf. And then I'm going to finish off the other end. So nice simple shape of the leaves. And you can see that our connector little bit of unpainted area right in the middle. If you didn't manage to get that, don't worry, because we can always use a color pencil or a white paint once you finish your illustration. And once your watercolors completely right? And now, while that paint is still quite wet, I'm going to start blocking in pigments. Starting off with a little bit of crimson red. You can even use a warmer red if you like. And if you notice carefully that hasn't of uneven edge. So you can bring that in as well if you like. So drop in, again to have a little bit of fun trying to drop in different pigments onto that wet surface. Say now I'm recreating the uneven edge of the leaves. And also you may notice that I am using a little bit of brown. Now. You can use either been CNN or Indian. Great, forgot. And as I mentioned in a while, we were working with the premium sleep. We are going to try and use more pigment and less water when we try and drop in pigments onto a wet surface. So try not to wash your brush all the time, or even if you do its best to take our extra water from your brush. So you do not have a very wet wash. So you may notice that I'm not really painting much. I'm only dropping in peak means any troubles are trying to retain the yellow that we did fast. At the same time, I'd like a little pinch other colors as well. I'm not really referring to the news at all now. I think I have been carried away trying to play with paint on this shape. Mile. Just adding some final touches like the stem, as well as the uneven edges of the leaves. Again, using the tip of my brush to just pull up paint and creating the uneven inch. And with this, we are done with the autonomy. Now, we will go over this with drawing media one. The watercolor is completely dry. I'm using Indian ink and dip pen for drawing the outlines obsolete. If you're interdependence and if you like to know what Japan I'm using, this is a mapping pen and the name for flexible. And it can create thick lines as well as very thin lines simultaneously. So it's quite flexible and great for inking. Some starting off with the lines of the leaves. And as always, I'm not going to outline the whole leaf, but I'm going to stick to only a few lines just to enhance the shape of the leaves. And maybe a little bit of the veins as well. I'm using characteristic lines. So you can see a mixture of thick and thin lines that create a sense of depth in the painting and also brings in a lot of dynamic quality to the painting. I'm also trying to add a few veins of the leaves. I'm not going to add each and every line, and that may not look very nice. So I'm going to stick to the main ones. And this one is especially this link, has a few main veins that goes into each site. And I'm going to add a few smaller ones as well, just to keep up with the lines. And continuing with outlining that lead. As such with thick and thin lines. It is also fun to splatter ink onto your drawing if you like doing that. And then it makes it a bit easier as well, rather than using ballpoint pen or a microchip pin. That if you do not have these and you can give the ink tried using brushes as well. Now moving on to the next. We're going to do the same thing as we did for this leaf. So just adding a few thick and thin lines to enhance fiddling. Also add a little bit of veins as well. The shape is quite simple, so there's a lot of lines that we need to satisfy one, to finish off, feel free to add some biting your sketchbook. It could be anything to do with how you've been inspired to do this sketch. It could be anything. It doesn't to be related to your sketch. 10. Illustrate an Autumn tree in Mixedmedia: My altruist sketchbook is almost never. An alternate. History, is something that I discussed on one, why walks in the mornings. I instantly fell in love with it with this tree, mainly because of all the different textures see on the bark. As for less a fiery red and yellow leaves that. I am using color pencils to do this. If you are not comfortable with using color pencils and you wanted to use a pencil, feel free to do so. Or if you did want to use pin, you can do that as well or any other drawing media that you prove out. The reason why I'm using a color pencil is because I like the fact that it can go a bit darker with the color pencil, as well as use different colors that I prefer. Here I'm using indigo. Again. I think I preferred that more to using a black pencil. So this illustration, we are going to try and recreate the shape of this tree as well as straight to make it a little bit more whimsical. That again, it's just what I thought when I saw this tree because it didn't look very dramatic with its fiery red and yellow leaves. So I'm starting off with a very simple sketch of the tree. Looking at the reference picture. You can download the reference to pictures from the projects and resources section if you'd like to have it. Besides, why did you are trying to draw this tree? I'm trying to get all the textures on the tree bark. Although I know it's not easy for such a small sketch, I'm trying to keep the shapes rather simple. And as well as doing that leaves of the tree as well, trying to create simple shapes in a cluster. Now, drawing the tree bark, the bottom of the tree trunk. And it's got a lot of texture on it. Into groups on the tree is really interesting to see. So I am using uneven edge e lines to create the texture. Now continuing with drawing clusters of leaves. As I can see in the reference picture. In this illustration, I am hugely depending on the reference picture. If I had the chance, I would probably do a plane. But concentrating that this tree is quite busy. I don't think that's an option for me, but that is why I'm using the reference picture. I really look at to try to recreate the shape and the quirkiness of this tree. I'm also adding a little bit of shading on the tree trunk just to show the dark and light areas on the tree trunk. So when I start using gold, has a little bit better with the pencil lines underneath. A few did just want to do the drawing and not do the watercolors. These lines would still look really beautiful on its own. The sketch of this tree. Just adding a little bit more leaves on the branches. If you notice, I've left the top of the tree width, lesser lines. As I'm concentrating mainly in the middle of the tree and mainly on the tree bark. Mozah adding a few leaves on the ground where it has fallen. And as you can see in the reference picture as well. And with this, we're done with the sketch of the tree. If you're interested to use watercolor, please follow along. If not, this sketch in itself is charming. Some starting off with preparing or my watercolors when preparing a little bit of yellow. And I'm using Winsor yellow for this and for the red, amusing crimson red, which is slightly brighter, cooler than the warm red, although permanent that year. And you get once you've prepared the pain to washed my brush. And there's almost nothing on that brush but a very, very painful red on that brush and just wetting the area. Just to start off with. And I'm going to start off with some splatter, splattering the red paint in macro wet area where I just created. And now I'm going to start adding little areas of red onto the top of the tree. I'm also trying to work quite quickly, so I don't want the paint to dry out. So I'm just continuing to add the red paint onto the leaves. The good thing about watercolor is that we can add more pigment and more colors while the paint is still wet. I'm going to prepare a green now using index three, blue and Winsor yellow. It is going to be quite a deep green. And I'm going to use it for some of the leaves on that tree and that car you can see in the picture. Naught, all of the leads have to change their colors. There's a little bit of green as well. In there. You can also use a mixture of sap green with a little bit of yellow or CO2, just tone it down a bit. We don't need a bright yellow, bright green for the tree. Considering that we're in oxygen and that leaves, the green of the leaves are quite done. I'm using my tip of the brush to create the shape of a leaf just by dabbing it onto the paper. I'm also adding a mixture of blue, bluish as well as green. And almost a little bit of brownish leads us well to the bottom of that cluster of leaves there. And continuing to add a little bit more green and yellow leaves on the other side as well. Now that I've got my greens and reds onto the tree, I'm slowly going to start flattering yellow ocher in it. And you can see that the colors are bleeding into each other. Mainly because the colors on that tree are quite wet at this stage. And I like to work wet in wet because I can get the colors to mix with each other on paper. And now I'm going to do the tree trunk starting off with the bronchus, the top. And I'm using a mixture of Indian rent and in downstream glue. It creates a very dark brown, grayish color for the tree trunk. And I think the branches that are on top in between all the leaves, I would prefer a grayish color to the brown color of the tree trunk. And also if you look at the reference, the tree trunk itself is quite darker in color. Moving towards the bottom of that tree. Using the same gray that I mixed just now with Indian grade 3 and bloom only this time, it has a little bit more blue than before, creating more of a blue gray mix. I started off with the darkest parts on that tree trunk, mainly the group and the textures on the tree trunk. And now I'm washing my brush clean. I'm just going to pull out from that area to create a lighter wash for the rest of the tree trunk. Dropping in a little bit more deeper into that tree bark. I'm going to now finish using watercolor with the tree. Because the finer branches would probably be better if I do it with our Pen. I'm just going to do the very basic branches and delete the finer ones to do with the pen. And finally, I'm going to add a little bit of green to the base of that tree is low just to depict grassy area, as well as some splatters of red and yellow to depict leaves as well. Once my watercolor washes completely dry, I'm going to start using my fountain pen to add some lines and textures to this illustration. I'm using a fountain pen, but you are free to use any pen that you like. Starting off with the branches, mainly the finer branches that I wanted to add in this illustration as follows, own little bit of texture on the tree trunk and also some leaves. So doing a little bit of leaf-like structures where I think there needs to be a little bit more lines for the leads, as well as some texture on the tree trunk and some finer branches sticking out from the trunk as well. A few more leaves using the ping, a little scribbles just like how we did with the pencil initially. And now for the finer grind. If you noticed the reference picture, the tree has a lot of branches and I personally like using a lot of lines in my illustration, which is why I've decided to add. Voltron. Did not want to do this step. That's completely your page. You can stop way you think is going on. Pretty much ready. And I don't think I need to do anymore wrong. But because I did want to try out all your passwords as well on the tree, I'm going to try a few bright colors if oil pastels, especially the bright red and yellow for the elites, and a little bit of highlights as well. For the highlights, I'm not using white, but rather mod or her buff color. But then again, that's just my personal choice. You can use white if you like. And just adding a little bit of red on top of those darker leaves as well as some yellow. Okay. 11. Urban Sketching: Autumn inspired doorway: Hello. Today's sketches based on photographs that he had taken a couple of years, but it's based on doorway. And I think it was taken around autumn time. If you'd like to know more about how to sketch this doorway, please follow along. Or if you're not too keen on sketching this, I have provided a line-drawing aspects, the reference picture in My Projects and Resources section. And you can always trace it before you start painting over it. I'm using Winsor and Newton ink today and I'm using a crimson, red and as well as brown. So I'm trying to use both the colors together using a dip pen. I did not have a pencil sketch because I did not want to use a pencil. As there is a high chance that I go back to erasing each and every line that I think went wrong, I'm going to give myself the opportunity to go wrong, as well as just to try and work around the lines that I begin to make. Also, it helps me to think before I start doing each and every line. Which is one of the reasons why I like using pen, because it gives me a little bit more confidence. And even later on if I want to use pencil for other sketches. So I'm starting off with the doorway, starting with the wooden beam right above the doorway. So just giving it a little bit of texture. Next, I'm going to start off with the door itself. So the rectangular shape of the door. I'm trying to begin with the most simple shapes that I can see here. So the rectangular shape, the door. And if you notice, I am taking it very slow and each and every line with a lot of care. I'm not too worried that I would go wrong. But even if I did, I am going to try and think that it is not a problem and I'm going to try and work around it. So a little bit of a flaw in your sketches is not something we always need to worry about, because in the end we can always work around dish and use different media to enhance your sketches. Now that I'm done with the rectangular shape and I'm going to do the other details like the doorway itself, the wooden doorway itself. I can see that there is some declarations of bunting. So I'm going to sketch that first before I start doing anything on the doorway because I can see that that is the first and foremost thing or the thing that is right in front of the doorway. So just doing little triangular shapes, string, not really worried about anything else. Now continuing with the doorway itself. So I'm dipping my pen into the brown. I might interpret into a red as well simultaneously. Again, no particular reason. Nice, just because I'd like to experiment with different colors and different media. So that's the main doorway frame. And you can see in the picture that it's got a half doorway, behalf door. And it's also got details of wooden planks on that door. So I'm just going to draw some long vertical lines just to show the wooden planks. The next lamp that's right on top of the doorway. And you can see again, it's quite small and there's no room for a lot of details. I'm just getting the cylindrical shape and putting a frame, a black frame, as you can see in the picture and cone-shaped top. If you notice, when we are trying to sketch this picture, we're trying to stick to a very simple shapes. So everything that we see in the photograph, we're going to identify the simple shape of what, how it looks. And we're just going to try and draw that. In our sketchbook. So at this stage we're not really worried about anything else, just the simple shapes. That's where all the main sketching begin. And now starting off with the frame above the doorway, which looks like a very simple rule. So it looks more like a triangle when you finish it, but if you look at the bottom of it, it's not really touching the door at all or the wooden beam at all. And it ends in two short horizontal lines on either side. So I've just done that and then I'm just going to finish it by trying to do, and I'll claim for that triangular shape. And if you look at that area, you can also see some shadow falling just below that space there. So I'm just going to shade that area, making it a little bit more darker. I'm just drawing in our claim where I need to do some shading and then I'm just going to darken that area using my dip pen. And again, I'm just mixing both crimson, red as well as brown ink together in no particular order. And no particular reason, just because I like these two colors together. And now I'm going to show us some details of brickwork in that triangular shapes. So just a random new drawing, some rectangular shaped bricks, making sure that it doesn't go on. So if you notice that I am actually appreciating the conical shape or the lamb. It's only because I accidentally drew a little Greek sheep that went also loved on that. So I'm just trying to cover up and trained to work around it. So this was one of the things that I wanted to show you how it's going to be when you start working with the pen. And that we are just going to try and work around it. Not really going to be worried that we have made a mistake or it doesn't have to be a mistake, you can always enhance it. Improvised, something else around the wrong line that you may have made. So I'm trying to do a few little lines inside that doorway just to show a little a few items are sitting in that shop. I'm not really sure what it is in the photograph, but I've decided to place little shelf with some jars on it. And maybe like a few clothes or drapery handing just below that. You could fill that in what? Anything? It could be a bookshop. It could be a sweet shop. It could be anything that you like. Feel free to use that little space. Doodle, anything that you like in there. And in the front of the doorway. I am going to illustrate a few like sheets just to indicate dry leaves that's fallen on the ground in front of that doorway. And now you can see huge pumpkin sitting and in front of that doorway. Institute of step one, Huge Pumpkin. I'm going to place two pumpkins stacked one on top of each other. Just to create like a little autumn decal. Just, I'm actually, I actually need to overlap the doorway where the pumpkin this place. But I know that there are lines of the doorway just behind that, which I feel is okay. I'm just trying to go over it with the lines of the pumpkin and trying to make that area darker as well, just to enhance the lines of the pumpkin. That way the lines of the doorway will not been noticed underneath that. And also to have rough drawings underneath. It's nice to see how you have worked. So once you have finished doing your sketches and if you look back at someday, you can see how you did go around to working on this particular sketch. And it's charming to have little sketches underneath your washes or your paintings. So I've done two pumpkins stacked one on top of each other. I'm also going to do that little detail of the cafe board that shaped in the shape of a teapot. Hanging on the wall there. And you can see it's at an angle. So if I am going to show you how it's going to drop, I'm going to be drawn. I think I need to explain a little bit about perspective. The side which is away from us or those side which is narrow to the wall, is going to be shorter compared to this side that is nearer to us. So when you start drawing that little teapot sheet, the side which is nearer to the wall is going to be slightly shorter. Their lines are actually at an angle, not horizontal, but they are slightly slanting, giving you an impression of how it is placed. So it's actually perpendicular to the wall. The whole thing is perpendicular to the wall. So that's not a very easy thing to do in one goal as it has got a little bit of technical drawing in there. But if you found that difficult, always feel free to trace only that little bit from my line drawing. And besides, if you're not too worried about perspectives, go ahead and give it a try. Because as I said before, this sketchbook practice is all about trying different things. And if you're not so worried about the perspective for how perfect it is going to be or not. You can give it a try. A little quirkiness is going to be really beautiful anyway. And now I'm going to add little planter on the other side of the doorway. So if you can see in the photograph, there is a planter just beside that huge pumpkin. And I have decided to place that plantar on the other side of the doorway in my illustration. So that's the good thing about drawing from a photograph. It doesn't always have to be exactly the same. You can change according to how you like it. Or you may think that it could look a little bit more balanced if you had extra elements in your illustration. For example, here the planter was on the other side along with the pumpkin, whereas the left side was fairly planar. So I just want it to move it move the planter to the left side. So both sides of the doorway bit more balance. That again was how I thought it would look better. So I've just sketched the planter, quick planter. I'm not really concentrating on how the leaves slip. So just I've just added a few zigzag lines just to show the leaves. And I think we're nearly done with the doorway. And an optional thing is for you to finish off that foot baths or you can just leave it the way it is. I'm just up decided to add that flip past there as well. So as the edge of the foot past and I think I took the photograph standing on the other side of the road. So now our line-drawing is completely finished, and I'm going to go straight away into watercolors. So if you did not do the step of doing the line drawing, you can trace the drawing onto your sketchbook from what my line drawing, which is provided in the Projects and Resources section. And once you have Trieste that you can either choose to go over it with a pen or charcoal, color pencil, any drawing media that you like. And then once you've done that step, you can go on to water colors. So before I start off, I like to keep the holes kept very low. And I think I might even wash off a little bit of the ink. So I'm not too worried about that. I'm just going to see how it's going to look if I didn't keep all the brushstrokes, very limbs. So because of that, I have a wetted the paper a little bit. And now I'm going to start off with some yellow ocher or even draw CNR if you don't have yellow ocher. Just to show some details of brick work. And if you see here, I'm using a flat brush, just quickly placed a brush on the paper and give it the brick work. The area just inside that triangle is quite small. So I'm just going to fill that in with some yellow ocher. Just need to make sure that it doesn't go over the Lamb. I'm lifting out some watercolor as well. So if you want to know how to lift out water color, all you need to do is wash your brush clean and wipe your brush onto a clean tissue or cloth and make your brush renewed dam and girls for the area where you want or don't want water colors. So that way you'll be able to lift off most of the women that do you have just pleased. Just continuing with the yellow ocher, quick splash of color. No details here. I'm just enjoying the splashing of color and just the free movement of the brush. And just painting the doorway with Indian red. Because I like the very reddish brown rich ground color that it harms. And you can see all my pigments are bleeding into each other. I'm losing most of the details, but I think it should be fine for now. Because once this completely dry, I also think of going back into it with some ink and finishing off some lines. So I've done the Indian red and now I'm adding a little bit of Danthine blue, just in the area where there are shadows, especially the beam above the doorway and the triangular shape. The space under that where we had shaded some shadow. Now for the pumpkin, so I'm going to use orange. What I have here is pyrrole orange. You can even use a cadmium orange. And I'm just quickly going to paint the area where I could have drawn pumpkins. And you can see that the color is also bleeding into the other areas outside the pumpkin. You might even end up having a huge color bleed of orange into the doorway, which I would suggest to try and leave it that way. Don't try to fix it. Let the colors bleed into each other. Because it's quite charming to see how the colors bleed into each other. And you can always enhance your lines once watercolor is done. So you can see my pumpkin colors are bleeding into the rural area behind it. For darker colors on the pumpkin, you can even add crimson, red and a little bit of green, blue or Prussian blue, whichever you have. Now for the part of decided to give it another color. So are done core green here. And you can see that I've left one side lighter just to show light falling on it. So that's another thing that we can do with watercolors. And now just a few brushstrokes, quick brushstrokes for the foliage, using any green that you have. I'm using a mixture of sap green and green blue just to give it a very deep green. Now for the inside of that doorway, you can either choose to do like a very dark color. And then you can add details later on with pen. Ethanol, you can try using a smaller brush and doing a little bit of a smaller industry insight that doorway that again, smell choice and I leave that to you. For the ground in front of the doorway. Have just done a quick wash of gray. So that was a mixture of in dancer in blue and crimson red. And I'm using the same mixture for the little hanging, the cafe hanging in front of the doorway. Again, because the illustration is quite small, I don't have a lot of area to do, a lot of details. But if you are somebody who enjoy a little bit more details, you can try and use a smaller brush to see if you can get in a few more details once the watercolor wash is finished. But for the watercolor wash, it's always better to keep it nice and loose with the larger brush. Now my first wash, or the first watercolor wash is completely dry. You can still see a little bit of ink lines underneath it because the ink that I used was not a 100 percent waterproof. But it was more or less waterproof. So I can still see a little bit of lines underneath. But I'd like to enhance it a little bit more. And especially the pumpkin and the sides of the doorway and everything. So I'm going to go over the lines with a little bit of ink. And here I'm using a fountain pen. If you're not using a fountain pen, you can also use a normal pen that you use to doodle, like a microchip or a gel pen, sketching pen, anything that you have. So if you notice I'm not going over each and every line. I'm only enhancing the darker areas. So I had started off with the shadow area under that triangular shape. And now just enhancing the alarm at especially the frame or which has a darker color as well. And now for the wooden beam above the doorway, I can see that it's being washed off quite a bit. So I'm going to enhance that area. Just probably a lot more lines that did wash away. When I used watercolors. Adding a little bit of texture or who would as well on there. Just shading the underside of the wooden beam. The main door frame is and it's definitely a little bit more darker. As you can see in the picture. I have realized that the lines on the right side of the door, the especially the frame of the door has being really washed off. So I'm going to enhance start with some lines now. But at the same time, I do not want to disturb that nice, beautiful watercolor bleed that is happening that because it does look charming, I'd like to retain that as well. So we need to make sure that I'm not overworking. Moving on to the half DO enhancing the top of that half ago and a little bit of shadow underneath the top half ago. And now enhancing a little bit off those wooden planks as well. And maybe do a little bit of shading just to under just under the top it off that Halftone, just to show some shadow. I'm going to do a little bit of details of those jobs is sitting inside the shop. Not really giving a lot of details of what is in their own thing, but just giving a little bit of indication that there are some things sitting on the shelf. Maybe a little hanger with a cloth hanging down could be shorter. It could be like a little shop in the village. And now I'm working on the left side of the doorway. And as well as the foliage, adding a little bit of lines for indicating the leaves. And as well as enhancing making the areas of that doorway of litho bit more darker. So you can do any type of leaves that you like for the foliage. It doesn't have to be the same as that in the photograph, you can't chip and change. I'm also giving a little bit of darker area just behind the plot because it is quite white and I'm painted right now. And that means it could reflect a lot of light. And the picture in itself would be great if some areas where a little bit more darker. So I automatically moved to the one of the elements here that are little bit more highlighted. So the elements here that are a bit more highlighted are the lamp right at the top of the doorway, the pumpkin, the doorway itself, and the port two in front of us. So anything else could be a little bit more darker or not with a lot of lines. And now finally, to enhance the pumpkin, I'm going to go over the group. Is the pumpkin likely. But at the same time, making short-run leave that white unpainted areas, cities so that it can reflect light. I'm also darkening the lines in between the two pumpkin, where it could be a bit more darker because of the shadows falling on the bottom, pumpkin. I'm also going to do a little bit of texture on the ground where the pumpkins are pleased. So maybe RT lake details of little cobalt pathway we're nearly done with using are pinned. But at this point, you can take a look at your illustration and see where you think it needs a little bit more enhancing. So it could either be making that area look a bit more darker or putting that into a shadow area. So you can highlight something that was right next to it. Or you could even enhance those lines which you think needs a little bit more detail on it. So whatever you think is good for your artwork, now is the time to do that with the pin. And with this illustration of the doorway is complete. You can add to any more details that you like with any other drawing media. 12. Final Thoughts and sketchbook flip through: Hello, Here's a flip through all the illustrations that we've done so far. So this was the Mavs can sketch book that I had been doing all the illustrations in. And I usually open it from the back of the book, mainly because I'm left-handed and it's more comfortable for me to start from the back of the book. That's the first illustration that we did, which was the Ottomans sketch book, introductory page. And the elements in here are just the things that came into my mind that they influenced by the things that I see around me. Watering can that came from my backyard. The pumpkin. Just because I was inspired by the number of pumpkins that I had been seeing that day. And obviously I needed a little bit of foliage in there because it's again, something very personal that I like. The Virginia creepers, like leaves that I've painted here, are one of my favorite creepers during this time. The, mainly because of their fiery red and yellow color. If you'd like to copy these elements, I have provided the line-drawing. So moving on to our next sketch, which we did, was see harvest. It again was influenced by the many things that we plant in our backyard. And I loved planting and harvesting things in the backyard with my children. Again, another very personal sketch. This illustration of the wooden crate with the pumpkin. Where again, inspired by the pumpkins and the Halloween, the many pumpkins that I kept seeing too much the end of October. And this is not just to the life that I copied from a picture. It, I built it from memory with the pumpkins that I had a TM. And the only thing that I referred to was a wooden crate from and which came from the internet. You can find these reference pictures in the projects and resources section. With the next illustration, the mushrooms, again was inspired by my morning walk where I started spotting mushroom. Wherever I go. The first one that I spotted where in CCAP I think it was my first experience seeing ink cap mushrooms so close to my home. I think I was really excited to see them. And the tools, again. It was my first time seeing towards tools. And that inspired me to go on and do the next demonstration of the landscape or the woodland landscape with towards tools in it. Moving on to the next illustration. Yet another day's experience of picking dry and colorful leaves from the ground while I was out. So I decided to paint them. And this tree was very important for me on the DIP into debt because not many of the trees colors had changed during the time I saw this tree. And I think I was really happy to see this fiery red and yellow color of leaves on this tree. So this is why I decided I should paint it. And after that, the colors of the leaves started changing so drastically, drastically. And I think this was probably wanted to first trees that started changing color. And again, the next illustration, yet another day's illustration. It is from a photograph which are took a couple of years back. And I've improvised a different bit. And I have used Incan watercolor and tried to do a very loose style. So in each of these illustrations, you can see how the styles differ. They were all illustrations inspired on that day or something that I've been wanting to try for a long time. For me personally, it was more like recording my experiences and my sketchbook during the season off or two. So here's another one, which again was inspired by older pumpkins that I saw around the time of halloween. And I decided to use different colors and to make it a little bit more personal. So there are colors that are not very conventional in this sketch, which again was just my personal ideas. So I think that was all the sketches that we did for this course. I'd also like to show you a couple of other sketch books, which I did before I started this sketch book. The first one that I did, did not have any theme in it. I did a lot of sketches from different themes. It was more likely to study book where I practiced whatever I really wanted to do. Some of them turned up good, some of them were not that good. Again, keeping a sketchbook is also really good for your learning journey as well. With the last sketchbook, which I wanted to show is more like a work of art. I started this off in a concertina sketchbook and I decided to, and some paper cut art as well in it. I really enjoyed the process of working on this. So it has so many layers which was caught to using a surgical blade. And it was very painstaking. But in the end, I really enjoyed the process and also the outcome. Although this is done in a sketchbook, I really wanted this to be a work of art as well to be displayed in on one of my tables. So this is just what I wanted to show that the sketchbooks doesn't always need to be with rough sketches. As you go forward with sketchbooks, you may come up with new ideas of how to use a sketchbook, or you can even come up with new ideas to create larger artwork as well. So I'd like to conclude by saying how important sketchbooks are and how it can help us and help us in our learning journey as an artist as well as to make creative journey very enjoyable. I hope you enjoyed painting everyone.