The Business of Video & Photography | Greg Hung | Skillshare

The Business of Video & Photography

Greg Hung, Travel Videographer

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12 Lessons (1h 31m)
    • 1. Business of video portfolio invoice

      7:43
    • 2. Business of video pricing

      7:04
    • 3. Negotiation & Game day

      4:32
    • 4. Invoicing

      7:43
    • 5. Pricing

      7:04
    • 6. Course Trailer

      0:42
    • 7. Introduction

      1:05
    • 8. Developing a portfolio

      11:03
    • 9. Investing in yourself - How to develop your skills

      19:56
    • 10. Developing your website

      10:44
    • 11. Business of video Developing portfolio

      11:03
    • 12. Business of video summary

      2:07

About This Class

Too many courses focus on the technical side of video and photography. It is important, but just one aspect of running a video and photography company. I've learned the hard way that taking a great video or a great photo doesn't mean automatic success. You have to develop skills that often aren't taught in video and photography classes things like:

Getting assembling gear kits – Camera, lenses, and accessories – Introduce some camera's and gear that you can use to assemble your first kit

Getting a logo – A logo is important for your brand and is one of the pillars for your marketing on-line and offline

Getting a website - If you're serious about showcasing your work and services you are going to need a website to showcase your presence on-line. This lecture will introduce you to the technology I use, where I host, and how I manage the website.

Developing a portfolio - When you are starting out you are going to invest time producing great videos and photo's to showcase to future clients. How do you get started and how do you go about it

Investing in yourself – video and photo skills - Resources and tip to develop your video skills and education to a professional level

Social media – Facebook, Pininterest, Youtube

Getting your first sales

Networking

Pricing

Negotiation

Game day – preparation & shotlist

Course Summary

This course is designed to fill the gap and arm you with the information and skills you need to start running your video and photography company. I've structured the course so it is logical beginning with the basics and progressing to skills you'll need to learn as you get customers and deliver your products to them. I also introduce a different business model for earning an income with your videos for those that are not comfortable with networking and meeting new people.

I've created this course because I've been through the struggles to figure out how to run a video business and want to pass on what I learned. My hope is by taking this course you can save a lot of the time, money, and effort it took me to figure out what I've learned so far.

Transcripts

1. Business of video portfolio invoice: Here's Ah, sample invoice that, um I'm showing you, um, no. When it comes time Teoh collecting payment from the customers, the language we use is an invoice. And, uh, it's a customer that's over the Internet. I'll send them an invoice using pay pal. Uh, so, uh, some important information to include on the invoice is the date that the invoice was issued out on when the invoice needs to be paid by and over here include your company information on duh you want. Include what, uh, what? You're offering video footage on the price, and this one's this pretty simple. OK, um, I tend to use another just a pdf invoice, just a supplement for PayPal invoice. There's more flexibility doing it that way on. Um, like I said in the previous video, I like to collect 30% of the deposit up front and, uh, while, um, after we shot the video and had a chance to come back and edited on the laptop and come up with the working drive, Um, that's when you'll find yourself in the actual postproduction on communication phase of the project, which will jump into now, so post production and communication when you finish your project, the first thing I recommend is to back up your project right away. Uh, you don't want to lose that valuable footage. So what you can do is come back to stick the memory cards in and you can review the shots. And that's the fun part. I like reviewing the shots that will give you a good idea of what the project may look like . Okay. And, um, you should have already decided on the music. And so then you can go ahead and start your project, and, um and you can start putting the videos into the timeline. Um, so the music drives the pace. And I tried to cut the video according to the beats. And, um, usually I'll start off by putting in the video clip sequentially. And it's just like more of an artistic thing that you'll put together what feels right to you, um, important to get the logo from the customer if you're gonna include the watermark, their watermark in the video. And if they don't mind, you can also put your watermark in the video. But I'll put that after because this is a customer's video, not a promotional video for you. Okay. And so once you have that first draft, um, finished, you can go ahead, put it on YouTube on YouTube has an option to allow you to, uh, make a video unlisted, See if I have any unlisted use. Okay, This one here, it's just an example. Uh, you can ending it. And you can inside. Okay, there's no public. This is unlisted, but you can still shares a link out, and, ah, because it's under your YouTube account. You can delete it at any time. So, um, in case the customer side say they're gonna leave. The project did not pay the rest of the mount. You can just delete the video. Okay, so you still have control of it at this point. Once you finally do finish the video, um, you can again use YouTube to show the final version. And once they pay the remaining amount, what you can then do is send them the final copy, and I use dropbox dropbox dot com Onda. That's a really good way to transfer a large file and share it out. Well, the last thing you want to do is to make sure that they're happy. Okay, Um, during the communication phase, there's gonna be a lot of communication between you on email and, uh, Robson person or on the phone. Make sure you get back to the customer quickly, and, um, and don't promise things that you can't do. Eso the old, um, phrase under promise and over deliver. An example of this video was that the customer wanted a one minute video. I ended up giving them a two minute video. I already had enough shots to give him a two minute video. And, um, you know that for the customer, that was just an added bonus. It wasn't something that we agreed to, but I went above and beyond. And, uh, hopefully the customer appreciated that, uh, something you could do after you finish. The project is to ask for any feedback and a testimonial. And the feedback is really valuable for you to use for next time. And ah, And when you conduce out in the testimony a testimonial to your site, if they're OK with that, and then you can add a project to your portfolio which is important for future customers. Um and this part is important if the customer was happy with their work is chance that they may refer you to someone, someone else through order mouth the referral. Um, something is you can do after you put the video on your portfolio. Something I could do better. Job of a swell is provide details on the customer and what video was about. Okay, uh, this is an example, was a different customer. So you can say, Oh, this was the grand opening off this business. And you can just put some details here, okay? And the actual video, if you want to go above and beyond, you can provide another page and provide some behind the scenes information. Like what the customer wanted. What were some particular challenges filming this video and what equipment to use? Um, some people love that type of stuff, depending on who your audience is is your audience, Um are the video people and they're learning from your side, or are they customers? And they want to see what you have. So, uh, that's something extra that you could do 2. Business of video pricing: Hi. Now we're gonna talk about presales pricing and negotiation. So this assumes that you've got a customer who's interested in your work on they contact you. And now it's up to you to work out the details. Okay, so I'll use the example of someone who's interested in some photos. Um, let's say if they're interested in photo had shots, Um, well, you gotta kind of get more clarity on what they're looking for and what you can provide at the moment. I can't provide passport type photos, so that's what it was clear about. Say, what I can provide is if you want a photo shoot while you're you're out at, um at a place or attraction. If you look head shots at a place of beautiful scenery outdoors, Hey, we can do that. And that's what they were interested in on Day asked me for the pricing. So, uh, what you can do is you want to make sure that your giving a fair price for the market where you live in. So what you could do is get an idea of what the pricing is. I think it's, um, 100 100 us. If you want toe vote 5 to 10 headshots for a one hour shoot. Something like that. What I did is I gave several different packages. I named them Gold Silver on bronze, Uh, for the goal package. What they offered is 15 really good photos, which, which I was promised to retouch later on. Andi, I would take, um, to three different locations, and and, uh, yeah, we would go to those three locations and we would spend about, I think to the locations were in our reach on one was about 30 to 45 minutes. Eso charge about 200 us for that. And that worked out really well afterwards. Um, you know, I decided we had agreed on 15 shots, but I already took a couple 100 shocks, so I offered to give him given those shots, and he could pick select 15 all those shots, and I wouldn't touch those. What it would probably do next time is to pick out the good photos myself on off those photos. He could pick 15 to retouch. Okay. However you want to do that. So that was a gold package. The the silver package was, um, about how much they offer about 130 us, and then I just dropped that to two locations. Um, think about 10 or 12 photos. Something like that. Bronze package Waas one location and the one our shoot for about 100 US, Something like that. So I think by offering them some packages, it gives them the choice. And what it does, is it use? You are the one that's taking the initiative. So, um, you know, usually they're gonna pick something in the middle or pick top one, right? So that's one tactic that you could use. It's important to listen to what they need specifically. Maybe they need some head shots because they wanna go to a speaking and they need some professional photos. Or maybe they need something for, you know, maybe their Facebook profile. And they really want something for personal purposes. So be clear about what the customer wants before going on and talking about price for videos in the Canadian market. Probably this is the similar for the North American market. Um, I know from experience. I paid about 2400 Canadian for, um, a two minute video, and, um, I got a video file on that allowed me to publish to YouTube. Um, out here in Taiwan, it's a different market. They don't, uh, are not willing to spend as much. Um So I found that about 1000 U S for ah for one minute Corporate videos about the standard . And you can go. You can go higher if the work is going to be more involved, um, or lower if it's just a more simple job, so it really just depends. And, um, while you're trying to figure out these things, it's important to get more details on what the video it is that they want. What type of style is the video for? Is it to promote, um, something a corporate initiative? Or is it to promote restaurant or lounge? Or is it Teoh? Is it Teoh for a campaign to raise money? And another important question is to ask, what type of length is the video game before? Because longer it is, the more work it is for you, they may ask you questions like what type of equipment do you use? What type of format the video is gonna be in, for example, is going to be 9 2010 10 80 HD Don't Emel v and what compression to use. Be prepared to answer these types of questions, and once they feel comfortable, then it's, um, time to start talking about pricing. Usually once we agree on a price, Uh, that's when we get to invoicing. But before we get there, we want Toe, um, be ready to negotiate something that we're both prepared. Uh, that's gonna be a win win for both of us that we can both agree on. 3. Negotiation & Game day: in this lesson, I'm going to talk about customer expectations and final preparation for game day on Duh. Actual execution on your day, you're going to shoot. Um, So once you've agreed on the shot lists and what you're gonna do, it's important to let the customer know, Um, some expectations. So if you're gonna shoot on Saturday, you're gonna say, I'm gonna arrive two people on my gear is there somewhere that we can leave our gear? And, um, if there is a particular seen that they wanna have shot, that's very timely. For example, if you want a shot off the apparent food and they're only gonna be doing it once that day, we want to make sure that you get that shot. Okay, um, you can also explain to them after we do the shoot, it's gonna take me three days to review the footage and put together the first dry on. Then, after you review the draft, I get feedback. It's gonna take me another five days to come up with the second drop, Uh, things like that. And after I'm done, I'm gonna send you the final file through Dropbox. So I think you get the idea, setting the expectations and, um, so back to game day. So once you have all your shots, I like to review the shot lists and this kind of picture in my mind, Um, all the things that need to do, of course, you want to check all your equipment the day before the shoot on the actual day of heading out. They want to charge your batteries, have extras. Um, bring to counter bodies. If you can make sure you got your memory cards. You want to take a quick sample video clip. Make sure that your camera has the correct settings. Sometimes, you know you might might set it Teoh by definition. 19. Any 10 10 80 from previous shoots. And it's the wrong format. It might be the wrong frames per second. Or, um, it might be like pl hell format instead of NTSC. Just things like that. You want to review that before you head out, especially for a paid shoot. If you've hired an assistant, it's a good idea to meet with them before just to go over the game. Plan things to watch out for during the night. Go through the shot list and get if you can go to the site together early and set up their equipment, set up the big bag. I like to carry my big bag and having in one place so I can fetch different pieces of gears . I need them. And I like to have ah, shot list with me. Uh, check off the shots as I get him. And, um, yeah, just be ready for things that happened that you don't plan. Um, it's gonna be really crowded. Uh, just try to be careful trying not to hurt anyone. Try to make sure people don't get in your shots And to make sure you get all your shots. Be careful. You're doesn't get damaged. And if it's a place where there's alcohol is tempting as it is, you want to stay professional unless your customer insists have a drink. But don't drink too much. You wanna got too expensive equipment there and a lot of people that are drinking around you, so it's a dangerous environment for your equipment. So be very careful, okay? And yeah, it's a spring out. Your a game. You know what to do on Do it And remember after you finish your shoot. The most important thing keep in mind is that memory card, and that's got all the footage. Uh, that you spent all that money and time, uh, getting so make sure you look after that. What? To get home, Doc, that memory card up. And then you can relax and review some of the some of the footage, which is the fun part for me. 4. Invoicing: Here's Ah, sample invoice that, um I'm showing you, um, no. When it comes time Teoh collecting payment from the customers, the language we use is an invoice. And, uh, it's a customer that's over the Internet. I'll send them an invoice using pay pal. Uh, so, uh, some important information to include on the invoice is the date that the invoice was issued out on when the invoice needs to be paid by and over here include your company information on duh you want. Include what, uh, what? You're offering video footage on the price, and this one's this pretty simple. OK, um, I tend to use another just a pdf invoice, just a supplement for PayPal invoice. There's more flexibility doing it that way on. Um, like I said in the previous video, I like to collect 30% of the deposit up front and, uh, while, um, after we shot the video and had a chance to come back and edited on the laptop and come up with the working drive, Um, that's when you'll find yourself in the actual postproduction on communication phase of the project, which will jump into now, so post production and communication when you finish your project, the first thing I recommend is to back up your project right away. Uh, you don't want to lose that valuable footage. So what you can do is come back to stick the memory cards in and you can review the shots. And that's the fun part. I like reviewing the shots that will give you a good idea of what the project may look like . Okay. And, um, you should have already decided on the music. And so then you can go ahead and start your project, and, um and you can start putting the videos into the timeline. Um, so the music drives the pace. And I tried to cut the video according to the beats. And, um, usually I'll start off by putting in the video clip sequentially. And it's just like more of an artistic thing that you'll put together what feels right to you, um, important to get the logo from the customer if you're gonna include the watermark, their watermark in the video. And if they don't mind, you can also put your watermark in the video. But I'll put that after because this is a customer's video, not a promotional video for you. Okay. And so once you have that first draft, um, finished, you can go ahead, put it on YouTube on YouTube has an option to allow you to, uh, make a video unlisted, See if I have any unlisted use. Okay, This one here, it's just an example. Uh, you can ending it. And you can inside. Okay, there's no public. This is unlisted, but you can still shares a link out, and, ah, because it's under your YouTube account. You can delete it at any time. So, um, in case the customer side say they're gonna leave. The project did not pay the rest of the mount. You can just delete the video. Okay, so you still have control of it at this point. Once you finally do finish the video, um, you can again use YouTube to show the final version. And once they pay the remaining amount, what you can then do is send them the final copy, and I use dropbox dropbox dot com Onda. That's a really good way to transfer a large file and share it out. Well, the last thing you want to do is to make sure that they're happy. Okay, Um, during the communication phase, there's gonna be a lot of communication between you on email and, uh, Robson person or on the phone. Make sure you get back to the customer quickly, and, um, and don't promise things that you can't do. Eso the old, um, phrase under promise and over deliver. An example of this video was that the customer wanted a one minute video. I ended up giving them a two minute video. I already had enough shots to give him a two minute video. And, um, you know that for the customer, that was just an added bonus. It wasn't something that we agreed to, but I went above and beyond. And, uh, hopefully the customer appreciated that, uh, something you could do after you finish. The project is to ask for any feedback and a testimonial. And the feedback is really valuable for you to use for next time. And ah, And when you conduce out in the testimony a testimonial to your site, if they're OK with that, and then you can add a project to your portfolio which is important for future customers. Um and this part is important if the customer was happy with their work is chance that they may refer you to someone, someone else through order mouth the referral. Um, something is you can do after you put the video on your portfolio. Something I could do better. Job of a swell is provide details on the customer and what video was about. Okay, uh, this is an example, was a different customer. So you can say, Oh, this was the grand opening off this business. And you can just put some details here, okay? And the actual video, if you want to go above and beyond, you can provide another page and provide some behind the scenes information. Like what the customer wanted. What were some particular challenges filming this video and what equipment to use? Um, some people love that type of stuff, depending on who your audience is is your audience, Um are the video people and they're learning from your side, or are they customers? And they want to see what you have. So, uh, that's something extra that you could do 5. Pricing: Hi. Now we're gonna talk about presales pricing and negotiation. So this assumes that you've got a customer who's interested in your work on they contact you. And now it's up to you to work out the details. Okay, so I'll use the example of someone who's interested in some photos. Um, let's say if they're interested in photo had shots, Um, well, you gotta kind of get more clarity on what they're looking for and what you can provide at the moment. I can't provide passport type photos, so that's what it was clear about. Say, what I can provide is if you want a photo shoot while you're you're out at, um at a place or attraction. If you look head shots at a place of beautiful scenery outdoors, Hey, we can do that. And that's what they were interested in on Day asked me for the pricing. So, uh, what you can do is you want to make sure that your giving a fair price for the market where you live in. So what you could do is get an idea of what the pricing is. I think it's, um, 100 100 us. If you want toe vote 5 to 10 headshots for a one hour shoot. Something like that. What I did is I gave several different packages. I named them Gold Silver on bronze, Uh, for the goal package. What they offered is 15 really good photos, which, which I was promised to retouch later on. Andi, I would take, um, to three different locations, and and, uh, yeah, we would go to those three locations and we would spend about, I think to the locations were in our reach on one was about 30 to 45 minutes. Eso charge about 200 us for that. And that worked out really well afterwards. Um, you know, I decided we had agreed on 15 shots, but I already took a couple 100 shocks, so I offered to give him given those shots, and he could pick select 15 all those shots, and I wouldn't touch those. What it would probably do next time is to pick out the good photos myself on off those photos. He could pick 15 to retouch. Okay. However you want to do that. So that was a gold package. The the silver package was, um, about how much they offer about 130 us, and then I just dropped that to two locations. Um, think about 10 or 12 photos. Something like that. Bronze package Waas one location and the one our shoot for about 100 US, Something like that. So I think by offering them some packages, it gives them the choice. And what it does, is it use? You are the one that's taking the initiative. So, um, you know, usually they're gonna pick something in the middle or pick top one, right? So that's one tactic that you could use. It's important to listen to what they need specifically. Maybe they need some head shots because they wanna go to a speaking and they need some professional photos. Or maybe they need something for, you know, maybe their Facebook profile. And they really want something for personal purposes. So be clear about what the customer wants before going on and talking about price for videos in the Canadian market. Probably this is the similar for the North American market. Um, I know from experience. I paid about 2400 Canadian for, um, a two minute video, and, um, I got a video file on that allowed me to publish to YouTube. Um, out here in Taiwan, it's a different market. They don't, uh, are not willing to spend as much. Um So I found that about 1000 U S for ah for one minute Corporate videos about the standard . And you can go. You can go higher if the work is going to be more involved, um, or lower if it's just a more simple job, so it really just depends. And, um, while you're trying to figure out these things, it's important to get more details on what the video it is that they want. What type of style is the video for? Is it to promote, um, something a corporate initiative? Or is it to promote restaurant or lounge? Or is it Teoh? Is it Teoh for a campaign to raise money? And another important question is to ask, what type of length is the video game before? Because longer it is, the more work it is for you, they may ask you questions like what type of equipment do you use? What type of format the video is gonna be in, for example, is going to be 9 2010 10 80 HD Don't Emel v and what compression to use. Be prepared to answer these types of questions, and once they feel comfortable, then it's, um, time to start talking about pricing. Usually once we agree on a price, Uh, that's when we get to invoicing. But before we get there, we want Toe, um, be ready to negotiate something that we're both prepared. Uh, that's gonna be a win win for both of us that we can both agree on. 6. Course Trailer: I learned the hard way that taking a great video or great photo doesn't mean automatic business. You have to develop skills that aren't taught in video photography classes, things like getting gear kits, logos, business cards, getting a website, developing portfolio, social media, getting your first sales, networking, pricing and negotiation. I've designed the course to fill the gap and arm you with the information and skills you need to start running your own video of photography business encourage you to preview some of the free lessons, and if you enjoy it, enroll in the class. 7. Introduction: everyone. My name is Greg Hunk of World Explorer and entrepreneur on Welcome to My course, the business video photography. I think too many courses focus on the technique on the gear off cameras that you need Teoh phone videos of photography. I'm also guilty. I believe that is an important part off having a video and photography business. But it's only on aspect off the skills that you need to know. So that's why I've come up with this course based on my own experience. There's a lot more skills that you're gonna need, Um, for example, getting website, business card logo, building a portfolio, getting those first sales on, uh, negotiating, pricing. All that stuff is gonna be covered in this course. I encourage you to check out some free courses, and if you enjoy it, I invite you to enroll in the course. I hope you'll join us 8. Developing a portfolio: went to get Teoh level where you're comfortable with your work at or you're getting people that are saying, Hey, your videos look really good or really professional. Uh, good ideas. Start putting your videos up on, uh, you can use them, you or YouTube for that. So this is an example of my immune channel here. About 42 videos and videos. A good community for higher quality videos. Sort of a trucks the creative community on. Um, yeah, good to get some feedback on here. YouTube is another place that I'll put videos. I'm sure a lot of videos and, uh, got quite a lot of videos on our channel here. So I recommend creating a channel. And when you post your videos, you can put a link from your video back to your website or your website portfolio so that you're driving traffic from YouTube to your website. Let you take a look at my portfolio page here. This is probably one of the most important cages that you wanna have on your website. And the reason why you want to have this is for prospective customers. People from all over will come across your websites on they're going to check on your videos, check out your work. So from my website here, I got a list of videos on, uh, some photos so people can go in a particular drill down in time for the particular picture , and they can even just play the video from there. I host the videos on Vimeo or YouTube. Uh, lately, I've been just doing more YouTube on, uh, it's another way you can earn revenue through monetizing off the videos or the number of people that watch your YouTube page. If you don't mind putting some ads on them, I don't mind. So monetize on the videos. And so more people check out your portfolio that actually gives you another revenue stream . So there's a tip there. Um, so when you're starting out your portfolio, you might think about once. Are you gonna shoot? There is lots of things you can shoot. Um, when I started out, um, I just went out with, took my camera with where I went traveling, and I would feel attractions or scenery, nightlife, food and people. Eso I would do that on my built up my travel collection like I did for Taiwan or my If you look at my video real for 2013 and it's some shots all throughout the world, So I put that together in a three minute video, and, um, that showcase the global collection that I was doing depends on what you're cool is if you want a tractor video customers, you obviously want to do wedding videos. This is a video I did in Taipei. I volunteered for this one, and it's good to volunteer the first couple of times, so you have something that's more professional that you can. You can show new customers what you can do and, um, other things you could use for volunteering our events. You could do restaurants. I've contacted the marketing manager of a restaurants on Volunteered Taken a Come in your restaurants, film video, and I'll give you some of the footage. You can use it for your own use, and sometimes it might be willing to pay. If you're just starting out, that's OK. You get exclusive access to film people at the restaurant or their lounge rather than just going in there as a customer and just taking out your tribe out in Cameron, you you might, uh, scare some people. Or some people might think, Who Who is this person? Right, so better the arranged those things ahead of time and, uh, doing that, you'll slowly build up your election of, uh, videos that you cannot see your portfolio. It's important to also put your your branding on the video. Um, just expend this one here so you can see. So I've got a watermark that I've put in the video here with my website. So when they're watching the video, they know where to go to. Okay, on YouTube is a little bit different. I'm gonna find video that we can use as an example. We'll use the Marquis video. This was wanted it for a customer in Taipei. Okay, you can see in the top right hand corner. I've got the logo there. That's something that you can you can set up in YouTube. And at the end of the video, I'll have an altro oven outro that has my logo on my website, and I think that's just important for branding and again bringing people that wants your videos back to your website so they know how to get in touch with you. Um, I'll just show you this video here. I'll show you an example of how I do that. Okay, so at the end of the video, you can add some branding. You can add a link here that goes back to your website, and you can also but your logo at the end so people know where to go. So those are some tips for putting together your portfolio. And remember, the goal off portfolio is to show potential customers when you can do and remember if you put your videos on other platforms that you want to link back to your website so they know how to contact you when you're putting videos on YouTube, I think it's important to have branding and link back to your website so you can do that with logo that you can set up on YouTube so that it shows up or all your videos, which is really useful in a good time saver. I also recommend putting a link in the description under this area here with the directly actor website to make it easy on a customer. If they like your video, they just gonna have a quick click and the reason why we do this is so they can contact you very easily and quickly. Also, at the end of the video, you can put an annotation that if you click, goes directly back to your website and you can muscle at a logo just a quick 34 2nd with your logo. And, um, I didn't do it there, but you probably should. Which is puts the u. R L in the actual video, so they know the web address. So several places you can attack. Now, in addition to YouTube, I'm gonna tell you about another area for another type of sites you can but share portfolio . This is, uh, mawr on the selling video footage for money over the Internet rather than doing customer client work. But it can also get you business for for your videos. OK, this site here is Pawn five, and I've got about 3226 video looks. So these air short video clips and you learn more about this in my under course making money with travel videos. But, um, this side actually functions as another portfolio of my work. So if someone's looking for a video clip and they come here. It's just a really good, quick way for someone to preview my work. Here's one in Las Vegas. So these air mawr of my videos I shot around the world, um, short clips about 5 to 15 seconds, and you can sell them. And beauty of this is that once I have these video close on there, more than one customer can buy them. And, um, the reason why I mentioned this originally is that a customer looking for these video clips conceal your work. And I've been contacted before by a company that asked if I could put together um, custom video for them using some of these video clips. So you just never know, um, whom I come on here. It's a good idea to use stock footage site, too, to give you more exposure to other customers. 9. Investing in yourself - How to develop your skills: I in this lesson, we're gonna be talking about investing in yourself. Your video and your photography skills will be more of an emphasis on video, but there is relation between video and photos, so let's get started. When I first got my camera, I went up there. I was so excited. I opened up the box, took the camera and then just started snapping photos. Um, it actually wasn't until um, several weeks later, I discovered the video function. I think it's important to use, um, a number of approaches to learning. The first is, it's good, Teoh. Just go out there, play with a camera and do some testing. See what you can produce. And, uh, when you come back, you might be hungry for more knowledge, and that's when you can go on the Internet. The problem with the Internet is that there's so much information, it's hard to know who and where to trust, so that can take some time. Um, I put together a video resource page. I'm going to go through that in this lesson, where have assembled some of the best resources for video I found on the Web and, uh, the other approach is more traditional, I suggests taking photography class. It's good to get a foundation, learn about things like lenses and aperture. And framing is good to just being a classroom environment. You're gonna learn some things that you can apply it to video. For example, I actually learned about Chase. Jarvis, who were gonna be covering here from my photography class on Chase is actually one of the more. Um uh, let's just say he's one of the more modern photographers. He's also gotten into video. Andi, his sight is just really great resource because he shares information and he invites guests in the creative space that share their expertise. It's also, uh, good, because you're gonna do things like I s O That applies to both photos and video aperture and, uh, lens focal length. Um, so photography classes, a good foundation there isn't, uh, or there wasn't that many video classes for a Salar filmmaking. When I got into this in 2011 I had to do a lot of my own self learning. Um, but there are some specialists out there. Uh, Philip Bloom is one of the well known names in the SLR video space and he came for a workshop in Vancouver, which is very rare. So it was actually good timing because I had some experience by the time that he came because his class was a lot more events and I took that opportunity. Teoh, go to his class and learn some new things from him. S O. I think it's a good idea to also do, uh, video workshops if they are available in the city. That you look OK. Uh, let's go through the video resource pager. I think that will be the most helpful for you. Okay, The first Resources Vigna video school and I found this a good resource just for learning things like lenses, SLR, counter bodies. How do you frame a shot? How do you get up the field on what type of lens do you need for that? How do you do a time lapse? So all those types of things, um, you can find on the video video school? Vigna Video school has a lot of great resources for learning that you can watch and then you can go out in practice. So I built up a lot of experience using them. You video school on, uh, Then I started putting out video and my first couple of videos. When I look back at them, they weren't very good. But don't be afraid of that. It's good to get feedback from people on the Internet. Also, your friends ask him what they think about it, and you can listen, uh, feedback and improve on it Another way you can improve. This is more unconventional, but it was actually how I started my fascination with video for Russell ours. And what I did was I hired a video production company in Vancouver that was producing some what I thought was really cutting edge videos. They're doing videos off nightclubs and parties, and I really liked the style that they filmed in. And so I hired him to do video and it waas a to a shoot. And I learned a lot despite seeing what equipment they used asking questions off the videographer on Uh, yeah, some of the some of what I learned there, even though, you know, he wasn't that forthcoming just by observing and, uh, paying attention to how he approached it, I picked up a lot of things that I still used today and one of those techniques was the use of the Dalai get high production value footage and s. Oh, that was a good way to learn for me. And maybe you can do that too. Um, okay. I've also got some courses here. If you want to start getting into selling your videos, I've got a course year. Thea Artur Travel video is, of course, that I designed It's gonna cover everything from the gear you need Film plan your shoots at its using final cut pro accent and publishing on, uh, specifically for people who want to create videos using SLR video camera. And, uh, I edited final cut Pro X on at the time, I didn't see any other course out there that was covering the beginning to the end process from filming all the way. Teoh finding, editing and then publishing. So that's why produces course. And that's why I'm including it in here. There's also, um, a new aspect to making videos other than NASA. Lars Really exciting time. The GoPro cameras. That small auction camera allows you to shoot in places that you couldn't with an SLR camera, like in the water or in the air using drones. Ah, whole new I mentioned to video filmmaking and it can actually help you with your business is a great tool to have again. There isn't a lot of courses on the subject. So I made a course for this is, Well, Chase Jarvis, who I mentioned is, uh, photographer, and he has a video show. It's like a live interview and he'll invite guests. And, like I said, they will share their expertise of them on. And he has a live audience. The questions from the speaker and you can also go to chase Jarvis's page and look up past episodes. Chase also has a YouTube channel, Andi. She'll go through his gear kits on you, love other set of videos, and he'll tell you, uh, what equipment he uses and give you some tips on how to do that particular shoot. Another guy that I mentioned before Philip Bloom. He was on the cutting edge of SLR video making, specifically with canon cameras he's diverged from that is getting into other cameras recently. Um, but yeah, he's his interesting guy. He's got a British sense of humor, and he doesn't filter his language, too much, but I used his blawg as a resource for researchers researching what lenses to get for my canon cameras. He has a really good section on lenses and check this page regularly to see what he's up to . Uh, he uses some really high end equipment, some of which I can't afford. But at least I can see what he's using. Get more budget. I can upgrade Teoh. Maybe perhaps some of the equipment that he's using on. Uh, here's a picture of me and him. He came over to Vancouver and I learned some good stuff with him. Actually, I'll share with you from that workshop. One of the big takeaways. WAAS Learning the use of sound effects in my videos to add, Um, that's quite a bit too. Your videos, especially the audio in general. I mean, most people focus on the music, but if you go to some sites you search for sound effects. You can add sound effects. Let's say, um, you're asking someone to subscribe and you want Teoh get a bell ring. You can download that sound the fact that included in your video and it just adds a whole lot more production value. And the second thing was also the aspect of storytelling using video, not just putting random video clips together. Teoh put something together, but, uh, the use of the video images to tell a story, um, was very powerful. Teoh big takeaways for me anyhow, where it's checking out. Philip Bloom Site. Vincent Tafari It's someone I discovered a little bit later, and he was actually responsible for starting the the Revolution of SLR filmmaking with the Canon SLR cameras specifically with the model the Canon five D Mark two. Vincent's Blawg is good for his gear kits. He has several gear kits, basic events and his own addition. And I like the way that he talks about every single piece of equipment in those gear kits. So you actually learned quite a bit. And that helps you assemble your own kit or gives you some ideas. And you know, you you can assist the comprehend one place to go to, to figure out if I wanted to put a kid together, and if I'm just starting out, that's what I need. If I'm a little bit more of in advance, uh, production shop, this is what I should should be using. So that's what Vincent site is good for. If, uh, you're just starting out No film skill, no, from school is also a good resource. They are probably the most active in terms of providing use updates in the filmmaking space . And I really like the focus because it's not there trying to provide a lot of education, but they don't. You can tell by the name their anti anti school, Um, but they have a really good guide on SLR filmmaking that you can download if you give your email address. And, uh, it's just a good resource to keep up to date on what's happening in the film space. Um, so let's ah, let's cover some resources on product research. So when you're ready to go buy equipment, where do you go? Well, B, NH photo video is a really good resource if you wanna research and buy something, and, uh, they usually have all the equipment that you would need, and the value and going to hear is you can see the customer reviews that they have on certain equipment, and they'll have a nice little summary and tell you what the best uses off. This equipment is on the pros and cons, and the pricing is fairly fair. So no matter where you are, you can always check. B NH photo video and you can use the pricing on this site sort of as the baseline standard . I purchased my drone on here, and B NH is based in New York, so they were able to ship to Hawaii fairly quickly. Digital rev TV is YouTube channel actually really entertaining YouTube channel? And, ah, it's based in Hong Kong, and it's really entertaining. It's hosted by a Chinese guy with an English accent that reviews products usually quite timely. So, for example, if there's, ah, a new camera like the Canon seven D mark to, he's going to do a review on that pretty quickly. But it's not like you're really dry, um, type of review show. He does it in a really entertaining way. So I've learned actually a lot about equipment through his YouTube channel, so it's a good idea to check him out and subscribe. I got some resources here that you can find out more about on my other course, make money with travel videos, and, um, it's all here on the video resource page, which I'll put a link to on this lesson. But, uh, those are what the sites are. Um, Now we're looking at rentals. Rentals can be a good idea if you wanna try out some new equipment because buying gear camera gear can be really expensive. I've used this to try out different lenses. Um, when I went to the US, I would actually rent it and ship it to the border on pick it up from there. And, uh, that was a good way for me to test all things like the shotgun mike for my SLR. Um, I also tested the Canon five D Mark three and various lenses that I use. I was actually I was my first introduction to the L Series lenses, and I could immediately tell the difference in quality with the kit lens that I got with my canon 70. So lens rentals dot com is It is a good site for renting in the U. S. And their sites also informative. If you want to get their take on a certain type of equipment or if you need equipment for a particular shoot, like shooting a wedding video. They're gonna have wedding video kits available so that sites good for that being in Canada Well, being in Canada at the time, the local shops just didn't stalk the equipment that I would need. And if they did, it was a lot more expensive. So lens rentals dot com was, uh, really good. And, um, let's see here something else I could add is, if you're if you're in ah, another country other than the US I've been able to find companies in Singapore, Taiwan, even South Africa that rent out equipment. So I'm pretty sure most major cities have a shop that would ran town equipment. And it's ah, it's a good way if you just have a you know you need equipment for, ah, one day shoot one or two days shoot. It works out or may work out better if you just rented rather than purchasing it. And then when you generate some income from that video, maybe you rent again and then eventually decided to purchase the equipment. If you, if you really like it, if you need music, took me a while to find from good resources for that. So premium beat is a good site, Teoh by quality trucks. That's a really well organized site, and they're very clear about the licensing I use. The law of the trucks wore my, um, Asia travel, adventurous areas. She quite organ Asia from Premium Beat. And, uh, another resource for music is that's not on here, is um, and there's a store for music on video so you can check that on. But lately, I've been going to sound now because the music is free and it's still pretty good quality. There's just not as good as selection as premium beat. But you can search for trucks and you could use for commercial purposes, and you can find something on soundcloud on. Uh, premium beat is also a good resource, and there's not too many about video editing software that I use Final cut pro X. So if I had a specific question, I found that a lot of the articles would come from Premium beat and, um, yeah, so you can check them out for. For that, some final thoughts about investing in yourself tryingto read as much as you can use these resources and, uh, going and try things a lot of what you learn is just gonna be through experimentation, putting out your work and asking what people think When your friends tell you Hey, your videos look really professional. That's probably the time when it's ready for you to, you know, set up your portfolio and, uh, start looking for clients. 10. Developing your website: Hi. In this lesson, we're gonna be talking about getting a website for your business. And what do you need to know on getting a website? Well, the reason why we went to the website is because think of it as your your, uh your business, your actual building that you see on the street. But this is on the Internet. It's a new age, and the place your home on the Internet is your web page. You're going to use the Web page to showcase your work. Um, allow people to find you and see what what services you offer and how to contact to you. Um, in terms of a website, it's It's, uh it's a little of overwhelming. Like, where do you start? Right. Um, I ended up trying to outsource it in the beginning, using ODS. Uh, that was a big mistake. It's really hard to build a website with the team in India That's remote. I know. Finding a local team of young, talented guys through a referral from established company. These established companies were over my budget but end up finding a team that together this site for about 13 to 14,000 Canadian was a lot of work. It took over six months from way, started the project till when website was ready for me to actually start putting in content . Keep that in mind. It's, Ah, long process, especially if you, you know you want. You want to customize it, Um and okay, let's talk about the technology I recommend WordPress. It's the most popular established platform for Web site developers will have a lot of things negative things to say about it. But I have been using mind for since 2012 and allows me Teoh up a content without needing a . Developers help. And there's plenty of upgrades that you can had on the WordPress at a low your website to be more effective, something things to look for in a website team. It's good to meet with him first, see some websites that they've done before. They should have a business development guy, like a guy that really got good people skills, got good customer service that's gonna communicate with the technical team. He functions like a here. She functions like a project manager and, um, your go to contact when you want to final what the status is of something phone that really useful. Um, what else? Hosting? I decided to host with a company called Go Daddy. So that's the Internet company, rather than hosts with the company have made it because I would be, uh, at a physical address. Where is larger companies that go? Daddy has the resources. So, um, you know, they got all the backups for the servers of the websites on. I trust him. I don't need to worry about our going out or earthquake or disaster. The website's gonna be safe. No matter. Uh, where I am in the world and also purchased my dodo name. Name my your all address from Go Daddy. And, uh, I'm very happy with it. Um, yeah. So, uh, what are some important features? How on your website. So that's my website here. Um, on area for your logo is important. I try to keep this website as clean as possible. Contact. That's is probably one of the most important parts. Uh, customer needs to know how to contact you. Okay. And they should be able to get your phone number, email address or fill out a form. The form is an ad in for WordPress by a company called Gravity and a plugging is out of scope for this course. But it allows you to kind of download and easily. I just installed something on top of the base installation. It's easy enough for non technical people to do it and allowed to add these forms throughout website. It is not that expensive. The other important, um, each year on your website that you should have is services page on this page. You explain, What do you do to dio video and photos? Okay. And then maybe you go into more detail about your your method and how do you go about things on? Um, yeah, what other services you provide. And, uh, another important part is your portfolio. Okay, Portfolio. You're gonna showcase your work pictures, videos, and it's good to have a variety of different type of work, depending on type of customers, and you're willing, attract, maybe focus on nightlife, parties, restaurants or property videos. It's up to you. But make sure that, um, you have some sample videos that your customers and see, so give them some assurance that you can do the job before they hire you. Other important features have on your site is that it's mobile friendly. You can buy an upgrade where sites, um, is a company of leap. It's called brave code, and you can add the song your War press site to allow it to become mobile friendly. I'm actually going to go behind the scenes on the website because I want to make sure that you leave this lesson knowing where to go. And this is what behind the scenes will look like. If you're the one managing the content, it's basically, um, a lot of everything's laid up pretty, pretty Well. Here's a company of you touch pro made by brave new code. All right, so that allow your website to be very nicely on a tablet or smartphone. I think it's very important these days that, um, it shows up nicely for mobile. More, more people are surfing the Web, doing that, using it that way. Um, other features you could have in your website are buttons to your social networks, YouTube and Facebook. And, um, the rest of this stuff is because I have other types of, um, digital products and services on my site like stock footage. Um, I'll show you that. So here you can get all the different countries I've got stock footage for and I use a YouTube playlist too. Allow people toe rows of those clips because there's so many. And if they want to buy, I comptel give them options cause I outsourced to these sites to sell my collection. Or they can contact me for a quote. Maybe you want to sell your own products. I got some venue courses, and this is another type of business that you can get into once you get more experience. I've got some courses here, um, making money with your travel videos. And I showed people details on the course. Okay. And I provide some video previews, and if they wanted taken by this by the course, Alright, right from your site. And if you're one to get into this, you can use a company called Gum Road Lousy Teoh store the files for the course and also manage the, uh, payment side of things, which is, uh, actually recently discovered. Okay, um, so you can go ahead and take a look at my site If you want to browse a bit more Sheikhly AJ Productions dot com. Uh, the last thing I think is important and useful is to have a slider, a lot of slice side top this and it's a good way. Teoh, um, kind of promote things that are important or going on with your business. And they can click on those things if they want, and it changes every five seconds or so, and you can adjust that setting. Um, one more thing is I think you got to take into consideration, um, your branding, the colors that you use on logo. So this, um, color code, it's the same as my business car code. And on other platforms, I try to use the same color scheme just for that consistency and branding. Um, OK, so I think that's it for websites. 11. Business of video Developing portfolio: went to get Teoh level where you're comfortable with your work at or you're getting people that are saying, Hey, your videos look really good or really professional. Uh, good ideas. Start putting your videos up on, uh, you can use them, you or YouTube for that. So this is an example of my immune channel here. About 42 videos and videos. A good community for higher quality videos. Sort of a trucks the creative community on. Um, yeah, good to get some feedback on here. YouTube is another place that I'll put videos. I'm sure a lot of videos and, uh, got quite a lot of videos on our channel here. So I recommend creating a channel. And when you post your videos, you can put a link from your video back to your website or your website portfolio so that you're driving traffic from YouTube to your website. Let you take a look at my portfolio page here. This is probably one of the most important cages that you wanna have on your website. And the reason why you want to have this is for prospective customers. People from all over will come across your websites on they're going to check on your videos, check out your work. So from my website here, I got a list of videos on, uh, some photos so people can go in a particular drill down in time for the particular picture , and they can even just play the video from there. I host the videos on Vimeo or YouTube. Uh, lately, I've been just doing more YouTube on, uh, it's another way you can earn revenue through monetizing off the videos or the number of people that watch your YouTube page. If you don't mind putting some ads on them, I don't mind. So monetize on the videos. And so more people check out your portfolio that actually gives you another revenue stream . So there's a tip there. Um, so when you're starting out your portfolio, you might think about once. Are you gonna shoot? There is lots of things you can shoot. Um, when I started out, um, I just went out with, took my camera with where I went traveling, and I would feel attractions or scenery, nightlife, food and people. Eso I would do that on my built up my travel collection like I did for Taiwan or my If you look at my video real for 2013 and it's some shots all throughout the world, So I put that together in a three minute video, and, um, that showcase the global collection that I was doing depends on what you're cool is if you want a tractor video customers, you obviously want to do wedding videos. This is a video I did in Taipei. I volunteered for this one, and it's good to volunteer the first couple of times, so you have something that's more professional that you can. You can show new customers what you can do and, um, other things you could use for volunteering our events. You could do restaurants. I've contacted the marketing manager of a restaurants on Volunteered Taken a Come in your restaurants, film video, and I'll give you some of the footage. You can use it for your own use, and sometimes it might be willing to pay. If you're just starting out, that's OK. You get exclusive access to film people at the restaurant or their lounge rather than just going in there as a customer and just taking out your tribe out in Cameron, you you might, uh, scare some people. Or some people might think, Who Who is this person? Right, so better the arranged those things ahead of time and, uh, doing that, you'll slowly build up your election of, uh, videos that you cannot see your portfolio. It's important to also put your your branding on the video. Um, just expend this one here so you can see. So I've got a watermark that I've put in the video here with my website. So when they're watching the video, they know where to go to. Okay, on YouTube is a little bit different. I'm gonna find video that we can use as an example. We'll use the Marquis video. This was wanted it for a customer in Taipei. Okay, you can see in the top right hand corner. I've got the logo there. That's something that you can you can set up in YouTube. And at the end of the video, I'll have an altro oven outro that has my logo on my website, and I think that's just important for branding and again bringing people that wants your videos back to your website so they know how to get in touch with you. Um, I'll just show you this video here. I'll show you an example of how I do that. Okay, so at the end of the video, you can add some branding. You can add a link here that goes back to your website, and you can also but your logo at the end so people know where to go. So those are some tips for putting together your portfolio. And remember, the goal off portfolio is to show potential customers when you can do and remember if you put your videos on other platforms that you want to link back to your website so they know how to contact you when you're putting videos on YouTube, I think it's important to have branding and link back to your website so you can do that with logo that you can set up on YouTube so that it shows up or all your videos, which is really useful in a good time saver. I also recommend putting a link in the description under this area here with the directly actor website to make it easy on a customer. If they like your video, they just gonna have a quick click and the reason why we do this is so they can contact you very easily and quickly. Also, at the end of the video, you can put an annotation that if you click, goes directly back to your website and you can muscle at a logo just a quick 34 2nd with your logo. And, um, I didn't do it there, but you probably should. Which is puts the u. R L in the actual video, so they know the web address. So several places you can attack. Now, in addition to YouTube, I'm gonna tell you about another area for another type of sites you can but share portfolio . This is, uh, mawr on the selling video footage for money over the Internet rather than doing customer client work. But it can also get you business for for your videos. OK, this site here is Pawn five, and I've got about 3226 video looks. So these air short video clips and you learn more about this in my under course making money with travel videos. But, um, this side actually functions as another portfolio of my work. So if someone's looking for a video clip and they come here. It's just a really good, quick way for someone to preview my work. Here's one in Las Vegas. So these air mawr of my videos I shot around the world, um, short clips about 5 to 15 seconds, and you can sell them. And beauty of this is that once I have these video close on there, more than one customer can buy them. And, um, the reason why I mentioned this originally is that a customer looking for these video clips conceal your work. And I've been contacted before by a company that asked if I could put together um, custom video for them using some of these video clips. So you just never know, um, whom I come on here. It's a good idea to use stock footage site, too, to give you more exposure to other customers. 12. Business of video summary: I got his congratulations on finishing the course. Hope you learned a lot. I know there's a lot of ground to cover on. A lot more has to wear other than just operating the camera on. I'm sure if you cover a lot of the things that I taught in the course, you'll do just fine. You gotta have the basics covered first. Getting the gear, having a good portfolio, having your website up and along your business to be easily found through the Internet. On those just rely on Internet marketing methods. He also got to get out there and meet some people on Bring your camera, Do some volunteering on really get the word out. People should be thinking about you when it comes to photo and video in the area that you want to be doing business. Now, if you're not comfortable getting out there meeting new people and finding new customers, there is another way. Good news, another way off making money with your videos on that through the world of stock footage. And, uh, I made a course for this. It's called Make Money would travel videos on to summarize what that is about its video clips that you shoot. It could be anything from nightlife food to people or enjoy traveling beautiful attractions . And you can clip your video shots into 10 to 15 2nd clips and upload them and sell them through the Internet. Now this is a really good form of Internet path of income, a lot of opportunity and eso your industry. Check it out to make money, which, how videos I suggests using a combination of these methods. If you're comfortable dealing with people and enjoy a shooting video, which is what I like to do so anyways, good luck and thanks for taking the course on. We'll see you later.