Textured Floral Illustrations in Affinity Designer for iPad | Tracey Capone | Skillshare

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Textured Floral Illustrations in Affinity Designer for iPad

teacher avatar Tracey Capone, Illustrator, Photographer & Cat Mom

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

20 Lessons (2h 40m)
    • 1. Welcome | Class Project

      2:10
    • 2. Downloads & Resources

      3:03
    • 3. Gallery | Creating a New Document

      6:29
    • 4. The Designer Persona

      11:26
    • 5. The Color Studio

      8:16
    • 6. The Pixel Persona

      2:48
    • 7. The Shape Tools

      6:48
    • 8. The Pen & Pencil Tools

      10:48
    • 9. Saving and Exporting Documents

      1:52
    • 10. Preparing Your Canvas

      2:38
    • 11. Creating Leaves with the Shape Tool

      13:16
    • 12. Creating Leaves with Pen and Pencil Tools

      11:11
    • 13. Adding Texture to Single Layers

      8:12
    • 14. Adding Texture to Groups of Layers

      5:29
    • 15. Simple Flowers from Shapes

      12:10
    • 16. Complex Flowers From Shapes

      13:16
    • 17. Flowers with the Pen & Pencil Tools

      10:55
    • 18. Adding Texture to Flowers

      13:41
    • 19. The Assets Studio

      6:11
    • 20. Putting it All Together

      9:38
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About This Class

In this class, you will learn how to use Affinity Designer to create beautiful, textured florals and leaves right on your iPad.  Designer is a vector based program, with raster elements built in to it, making it perfect to create complex flower and leaf shapes and give them a wonderfully organic feel using pixel based texture.

I will provide you with all of the guidance you need to create your very own botanicals that can be used in illustration, surface pattern design, for print on demand sites, client work and much more.

You will also receive, as a free download, a set of assets, and a vector brush pack that I have created specifically for this class. Throughout the class, I will show you how to use them to create your own colorful, textured florals. I have also included, in the Resource Guide, a complete list of all of my favorite Affinity Designer brush makers and texture designers so you can further build your own go to collection of tools for creating your own textured flower illustrations. 

Downloads can be found at this link, and the password will be shared in the Downloads & Resources section of the class.

Please note, while I don't provide texture files for this class, there are a number of resources for either free or paid textures out there. I have put together this blog post covering a few of those sources, which also includes a quick video about how you can use Designer's built in stock studio to pull texture images right from Unsplash, Pixabay and Pexels.  Find the post here on my blog.  The class itself isn't about the specific textures or brushes I use but, rather, the process to add them so feel free to use whatever you have on hand.

In this class, you will learn:

- All about the User Interface in Affinity Designer for iPad, including the vector and pixel personas and how they can work both together and separately all in the same app.

- How to create your own custom color palettes using reference photos or your own illustrations. 

- Use the built in shape tools in Affinity Designer to create the vector base for your leaves and flowers.

- Use the Pen and Pencil tool to create freehand shapes that you can turn in to beautifully textured, colorful flowers.

- The three methods I use to add texture and dimension to my flat illustrations.

- How to create, save your completed objects to the Assets Studio and use assets in the Nature Elements Asset Pack to build your leaves and flowers and use them in future illustrations or seamless patterns. 

- Learn how to save and export your documents from Affinity Designer for iPad using the Documents Menu

Already familiar with the ins and out of Designer for iPad and just want to get started creating? Please feel free to jump ahead as I created this class with all levels in mind so, so you can easily do so.

The methods you learn in this class will give you the building blocks you need to create more complex illustrations in Affinity Designer for iPad. The class will be taught on an iPad Pro, using a second generation Apple Pencil, but you can also use your finger or another brand of stylus.

Do you love textural digital illustrations as much as I do? Join my Textural Illustrations for Digital Artists Facebook Group. In this group, you can share your creations, learn tips and tricks for adding texture in the various digital apps, and ask questions of other artists who love texture as much as you do. Check out there group here.

Please note: Affinity Designer is compatible with specific iPads. Click the link to find out more information on Serif's website.

INTRO SONG CREDIT: "Acoustic Breeze" Bensound http://www.bensound.com

Meet Your Teacher

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Tracey Capone

Illustrator, Photographer & Cat Mom

Teacher

Hello and welcome! My name is Tracey and I am a full time illustrator, photographer, and teacher located in the Chicago area. 

What can you expect from my Skillshare classes?

In my classes, I take great care to not only show you how to do something but I also explain why I do it. By understanding the why, you will have a greater chance of not only retaining the information, but applying it on your own in other ways.

 As a self-taught artist, I believe anyone, given the right tools, and regular practice, can be creative and let their inner artist shine. My hope is that sharing my knowledge with you will help you continue to grow as an artist, whether it's for fun or to further your own creative career.

What do I bring to the Sk... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Welcome | Class Project: I'm Tracey Capone I'm an illustrator, photographer and designer. and welcome to my class all about creating beautiful textured florals right on your iPad. using Affinity Designer. In this class, you'll learn how to use Designer's powerful vector and raster tools to create beautiful textured flowers and leaves like these, and what you learn in this class will provide you the building blocks you'll need to go on to create even more complex illustrations. First, I'll take you on a comprehensive tour through Designer's User interface, show you the difference between each of the workspaces as well as explain the tools and studios within each one. After that, we'll take a look at the built in shapes in the rectangle tool, as well as the pen and pencil tools, and I'll show you how to use all of these to create organic looking flower and leaf shapes Next, I'll show you how to add additional dimension to your flat illustrations by using a combination of vector and raster based tools to add beautiful texture to your designs. We will also explore the asset studio, where I'll show you how you can easily save complete objects for using future illustrations or surface patterns and I'll show you how you can use the Nature Elements Assets Pack that I'm providing as a free download for this class. Now, if you're already familiar with Designer's interface, want to jump right into creating, please feel free to. I sent the class up for everyone from beginner to intermediate so you could easily skip ahead if you would like. The project for this class will be to create two sets of flowers and leaves, using the tools that you'll learn about the class, the shapes in the rectangle tool, as well as the pen and pencil tool. You'll complete these flower shapes by adding texture in whatever format you would like to add it using texture image files, vector or raster brushes. And finally, you will create a full textural bouquet illustration using a combination of all the methods that you've learned in the class. For the class, you're going to need a compatible iPad, an Apple Pencil or other stylus or, if you prefer, you can even draw with your finger. I can't wait to see what you create using the methods you learn in this class, so let's get started 2. Downloads & Resources: Before we get started, I want to show you how to download the Resource Guide, brush and assets back that I've included with the class. I want to note, you're going to need to access the downloads through the Projects and Resources section on the SkillShare website and not through the app. You'll find a link at the top of that section. When you click on it, you're going to need a password to access the downloads, and I'll put that up on the screen now. Once you've entered the password and access the three downloads, you'll find three files. The Resource Guide, the Nature Elements Assets Pack and the Textured Florals Brush Pack. Go ahead and download these, either to your iPad or to an accessible Cloud file. as you'll need to open these on your iPad to import them. The resource guide includes information about Affinity Designer, as well as links to Serif's website, in case you haven't already downloaded the app. It also includes a comprehensive breakdown of the difference between vectors and rasters, so that you have a better understanding of how they work and can best decide what's right for your design. Now, while Designer comes with a large number of really great vector and raster brushes which we're going to use in this class, I've also included a list of my go to brush makers in case you want to further build your collection. Designer does not come with built in textures to use for the texture image files. so I've included a list of my go to texture makers because when it comes to adding elements like these, they can really make or break your design. You need to make sure you're using high quality, high resolution images to include otherwise you could run into quality issues. Included with the download is a set of nature elements assets as well as a brush pack to help you further enhance the middle sections of your flowers. I'm going to be using all of these in the class. But first, let's go ahead and import them. Once you download the two files either onto your iPad or to a Cloud file, you're ready to import them in Designer. Let's go ahead and start with the Assets pack. Select your Assets studio, which looks like nine squares in a block formation. Now my screen set up for a left handed person, so yours may be on the other side. Select the hamburger menu at the top of the studio and tap on Import Category. This is going to take you to your files. Locate the file that you saved. Tap on it, and it's going to add it into your Assets Studio. And finally, let's go ahead and import the brush pack. This time, you're going to want to make sure that you're in the Designer Persona, which is this first icon right here, and you'll select the Brush Studio which is just under the color dot here... it looks like a brush with a little swoosh formation under it. Once you're in the studio again, go to the hamburger menu at the top. Select "Import Brushes," locate the file that you saved and tap, and it will import the brushes into your Brush Studio. Okay, we're all set to get started. If you have any issues with downloading the files or importing them, please let me know. In the next section. We're going to begin taking a look at Designer's Gallery, and User Interface, so let's get started. 3. Gallery | Creating a New Document: In the section, we're going to take a look at designers Gallery screen as well as get started with creating a new document. Now the gallery is the home page. This is where you will create a new document, access Help, change your preference settings as well as organize existing documents. The very first time you open this, it's going to be relatively empty, with the exception of a link to some video tutorials as well as sample illustrations. But at the top right, you'll see a plus sign, question mark, and a cog. I'm going to skip the plus sign for right now. That's for you. Access the new document menu. The question mark takes you to the help area. On the left, you'll see written help, which is broken down into section so you can more easily find everything and on the right, you can access a collection of video tutorials as well as the user support forums on Serif's website. So there's a number of ways of accessing help directly inside the app. The cog takes you to System Preferences, and it's broken down into traditional Preference categories at the top. I haven't changed very many of my settings. I'm going to show you the ones that I have changed as well as some additional ones, and you can decide for yourself if there's any additional changes you want to make. In the General Preferences, I make sure that my Undo Limit it is relatively low. Designer takes a snapshot of every movement you make within a document for undo and redo purposes. The larger this number, the more taxing it is on the application and the slower everything is going to move. I keep mine anywhere between 110 and 130 haven't found a need to change that. In the Interface Preferences, you can change your Background Gray Level here with this slider. The further you go to the left, the darker your screen, the further right, the lighter. Now I am left handed, so, while this is off by default, I have made sure that left handed mode is on. All this does is flip your screen opposite of one another. The tools are exactly the same. If you prefer to tap a button rather than use to finger three finger tap, you can turn on "Show Undo and Redo Buttons," here, but by default it is off. I haven't made any changes to my color preferences. If you have particular needs, you can take a look at the menu here and see if there's anything that you need to change. In the Tools Preferences. I make sure that "Allow Canvas Rotation in all Tools," as well ass "Touch for Gestures Only" is on. Canvas Rotation allows you to use two fingers to rotate your canvas rather than rotating the entire iPad. I keep this on overall for the application, but on a document basis there is a way of locking it, and I'll show you how to do that when we get into the workspace. "Touch for Gestures Only," because I don't draw with my finger. what I was finding is when I was using my modifier, my finger rather, as a modifier, it was accidentally moving objects. So I make sure that this is on, so that doesn't happen again. If you are someone who draws with your finger, you're going to want to make sure that this is on. If you're using an apple pencil in the pencil preferences, you can change your pressure settings, as well as make some basic changes to how the pencil interacts with the application. Your font preferences will show you fonts that you'd imported into the application, and then finally, the shortcut preferences will provide you with a list of keyboard shortcuts. If you use either a Bluetooth or a smart keyboard, let's go ahead and create a new document now. I'm going to go ahead, hit the plus sign here, and it's going to give me a number of options. I'm going to skip the first option here for one moment. You can create new from a clipboard you can create from a template that you've saved, you can also open or import from the cloud, as well as import photos from your iPad. This final option allows you to create what's called a project and it's basically a folder. I'm going to take you back to my gallery screen. These top four documents are out on their own, but in the bottom here I have project set up, which again are just folders, and I use those to organize my documents. So, for example, I have one set up for my SkillShare class documents now within the folder. I can reorder my documents. I can tap on this hamburger menu and get a number of options, such as renaming it, saving it, and moving out of the project. And then the projects themselves also have a menu. Now if there's something inside of it. The only thing that you can do is rename it. If this were empty, it would also give me the option to close it. Let's go ahead back in here and go to new document. Now, this is where you can manually key in the information for your document. I, for the most part, ignore the left side. The only time I use this is if I've created presets, and you can do that by tapping on this hamburger menu, and then you'll find the presets under this drop down. But for the most part, you can key your information in on the right side here. Now, the one thing that you do want to keep in mind when you're creating your document is if you plan to print it, because, while this is a vector program, it has raster elements to it, so you need to create your original document in the largest size you plan to print. That's to avoid any pixelation, or muddy textures. So when you're creating that, just keep in mind what your plans are for what you're creating. So let's say I want to create a 16 by 20 inch document in pixels. I'm going to go ahead and take that in as 4800 by 6000 and then I'm going to choose my DPI. There's a list of preset ones as well as a way of keying in your own if you have a particular need, so I'm going to tap 300. Now you can change your orientation, and it will automatically change the numbers at the top here, but let's just stick with a portrait orientation. If you prefer to work with the transparent background, you can remove the background by tapping on this. I personally prefer to work with the background that's really up to you. and then finally, if you want to work with art boards, you can create that here. And then there's a way that you can adjust the art board and add additional ones. once you get into the workspace? I'm not going to use one here, So I'm just going to tap okay and it's going to create my new document and take me into the User Interface. So in the next few sections, I'm going to take you on a tour of Designer's interface and take you into each of the personas that provide with the tools that you need to create your own illustrations, So I'll see you there. 4. The Designer Persona: In this section. we're going to take a closer look at the tools under the Designer Persona. I mentioned in the the last section, the Designer Persona is the default persona, where you'll find the vector based tools. Now, if you're coming from another vector program, you're likely familiar with the tools in this one. What's probably less familiar is the layout. In Designer for iPad. there are Tools on one side, and what are called Studios on the other. Again, my screen is flipped for a left handed person. The tools allow you to create, move, resize and reshape objects as well as perform edits to those objects. And the studio side gives you advanced functionality to perform additional appearance edits to those objects. The two don't necessarily work in conjunction with one another, with a few notable exceptions. For example, if I select the vector brush tool, I'll go to the Brush Studio to select what type of brush I want to use. Similarly, there's a text tool that also has a corresponding text studio, but for the most part they work independently of one another. Let's take a look at the individual tools themselves, starting with the arrow, which is the move tool. The move tool allows you to select move resize as well as rotate your objects, and we're going to use the rotate function, especially when it comes to creating flowers in an upcoming section. I'll turn the labels on here. The Node Tool, Point Transform Tool and Corner Tool allow you to make edits to the lines, shapes, curves and paths that make up your objects. The Pencil Tool, Vector Brush Tool and Pen Tool are used to freeform create those objects, as well as perform additional edits to them. The Fill Tool and Transparency Tool are used to add gradients to the objects, whether it's a transparent gradient, color gradient, or you can even add texture to a group of layers, and I'll show you how to do that in an upcoming section. The Rectangle Tool, which I'll tap, and tap again, will provide you with a list of built in shapes, and when we get into creating leaves and flowers, I'm going to show you how to do that two ways, and one of those ways will be using these built in shapes. I mentioned the text tool already... we're actually not going to use any sort of text in this class, but this is how you would add it to your design. And then finally, there's an Eyedropper Tool, and this allows you to sample color to use in your existing document or save for future documents. There's actually two ways to use the eyedropper. The one down here, and the one in the color studio which we'll get to in a little bit. I typically use this one over in the Studio rather than this, but it's really up to you, whatever is more comfortable. Let's take a look at the bottom of the screen. This is the contextual menu, and if I tap through the tools, you'll see that menu change. This just provides you with additional options specific to the selected tool and just keep an eye out... some of them actually have "carrots" here, where there's additional options that are hidden. This primarily works with the tool side and not as much the studio side. But there are some exceptions that I'll show you when we get there. Moving to the Studio side... starting with the Color Studio. I'm not going to focus a lot of attention on the studio in this video as I have created a specific video dedicated to the Color Studio where I'll show you how to sample color as well as create your own palettes. But this is where you will select the color for the fill and strokes for your objects, and you can do that using the eyedropper tool, a color wheel, sliders as well as swatches. And again, we'll go into greater detail on that in a bit. The's stroke studio allows you to make changes to the appearance of an existing stroke. So if I add a black stroke to this pink box, I can use the stroke studio to change the width of that stroke. I can change it to dashes and change the pattern of that dash. I can change the handles here, to change the pressure settings on the stroke to give it a bit of a warp. And then there's additional settings under this carrot that you could make changes to ass well. the brush studio again is where you're going to select the type of brush use with the brush studio. But additionally, you can make changes to the appearance of a selected stroke simply by selecting and tapping on a brush. So I have that same stroke selected here and want to tap this acrylic stroke brush, and you can see that it changed the appearance of that stroke to match that of the brush. The Layers studio is where layers are housed and organized so you can group layers and ungroup them, you can reorder layers by tapping and dragging, you can also click, clip, layers rather, and we'll be using that a lot when we add texture to our objects. You can delete layers, add a blank layer or mask, and you can also go into the layer options of a selected layer simply by tapping these three dots. And here you can make a change, the name of a layer, you opacity as well as the Blend Mode. The Appearance Studio provides you with detailed information about the stroke and fill that make up a selected object. So in this case, I have his orange box selected, and it's telling me there's no stroke and an orange fill. If I tap the pink box, it's telling me I have a 30 point black stroke and a pink fill. We're not going to use this studio at all in this class, but there's some really interesting design elements that you can add using the higher functionality of the studio. So I recommend checking out Serif's website for additional information. The assets studio is, by far, my favorite thing about Designer. This allows you to save objects, whether they're single layer objects or multiple layer objects, that you can use in your existing document as well as future ones. I use this a lot for surface pattern design as well as when I'm creating an illustration that I just need a little bit of fill for, and I don't want to have to start from scratch. All you do is tap and insert, and it will insert your object exactly as you saved it. So in this case, since I saved this is a group, I can go into these individual elements and make changes to them if I want. Now, I mentioned in the resource section that I provided you with a link to a set of nature element assets, and this is where you'll find them. In an upcoming section. I'm going to show you not only how to use them to add color and picture and create your own designs, but I'll also show you how to save your own assets as well as organize them. The Stock Studio allows you to directly access Unsplash, Pixabay and other sites to find reference photos. Now you are used to having to leave an app to go to Pinterest or a web browser. you no longer have to do that. All you have to do is type in a search, I'm gonna go ahead and do car again here, and it'll pull up the stocks, the stock images for that particular search. So if I select this VW bug here and tap and then release, it pulls it in as a separate layer in my document, I can resize this and have it off the side. I can sample colors from it. I can use it as a reference image. You can also add it to an art board if you're using art boards instead of a single canvas. Now, because this is a separate layer. when I'm done with it, I can either turn it off or delete it completely. We're not going to use the Symbol Studio in this class. I use this a lot for surface pattern design. What this allows you to do is add an element known as a symbol and duplicate it across your design. and when you make changes to one of those symbols, it will make the exact same change to the rest of the symbols that you've placed. So again, this is really handy for something like surface pattern design, where you're adding a duplicate of the same thing and don't want to have to go into each one to make a particular edit. The FX Studio allows you to add nondestructive layer effects to your objects. So, for example, if I select the orange box, I'm not going to go through all of these but we'll select Gaussian blur. I can drag across the canvas and at a blur and change the level of blur. I can also do that down here at the contextual menu. If you remember, I mentioned earlier that this menu typically works mainly with the tools. This is one of those exceptions and these are non-destructive layer elements, which means I can go into them at any time. I can turn it off. I can change the the amount I could even add additional layer effects if I want. Similarly, the Adjustment Studio, adds non destructive adjustment layers to your design. This primarily works with the raster elements, under the Pixel Persona, where you can add like a black and white layer, you can add a curves layer to make changes in contrast. There's a whole list here of things that you can do to make appearance changes to an existing design, and again, they are nondestructive so they could be changed or removed at any time. Again. The Text Studio works in conjunction with the Text Tool. This allows you to make additional edits to any text that you put in your canvas and then the Transform Studio, we're going to be using a great deal in this class. This allows you to reorder your layers instead of going to the layer panel. You can flip and rotate. Using any of these buttons you can change the dimensions of an object, either by scrubbing, or tapping on the number and keying in a specific number. You can change the position by doing the same thing, either scrubbing or tapping and keying in a number. You can also change the rotation of an object and simply either scrub or tap and change the number back to zero to get it back to right. You can also align objects. If you have two or more in your campus, you want a line horizontally or vertically, you can do that here. The Navigator studio allows you to zoom in and out on your canvas. You can also lock your canvas here. If you remember when we discussed the settings, I talked about keeping the campus rotation for all documents on so that you can go ahead and rotate your canvas rather than having to rotate the entire iPad. There are times where I find that inconvenient, and I need to turn it off so you would lock it here and now. I can still zoom in and out, but I can no longer rotate it. Now, if you do have this unlocked, and you rotate your canvas, and you want to get it back to zero, just tap on this number, type in zero and it's going to right your canvas. And then finally, there's the History Studio. There's a number of ways that you can access the snapshots in the history you can either scrub up and down using the slider you can tap and hold on the clock and, again, scrub up and down with your pencil, or you can tap into a particular snapshot. This is driven by the number that you selected in settings, which, if you recall, I mentioned keeping that number rather low will help your application run much more smoothly. So this is the Designer Persona. In the next section, I'm going to take you into the Color Studio where, again, I'll show you how to sample colors from reference images, as well as create your own color palettes to use in your documents, so I'll see you there. 5. The Color Studio: In this section, we're going to take a closer look at the Color Studio in Designer. I mentioned in the last section that you can use the Color Studio to sample colors from reference images, as well as creating your own swatch palettes for use in the existing document or save for future documents. Before we get in to that though, let's take a closer look at the studio itself. So every vector object that you create consists of a stroke and a fill, whether they're visible or not. So, for example, this rectangle currently has an orange fill and a white stroke, the stroke and the fill are represented by the two icons at the top left of the color studio. The fill is on the left and the stroke is on the right, and you can select between the two simply by tapping. Whichever one is on top is the one that you're going to change. Now there are a number of ways that you can select colors for your stroke and the fill, but before we get to that, let's take a look at what you can do with the icons themselves. If I were to select this blue circle and wanted to swap colors between the stroke. and the fill, I would simply swipe across the two icons, and I can swap the colors back and forth. Let's say I wanted to remove the blue, fill completely so that I'm left just with the white stroke. I would select my blue fill, because again, whichever one is on top is the one that you're going to change, and I'll just swipe up. I could do the same thing with the stroke by selecting the stroke and swiping up and that same change can be made to either simply by using this quick swatch of the bottom. As far a selecting color for your stroke and fill, there are a number ways that you could do that, starting with the color wheel. If I wanted this blue fill to be purple, I would select my fill, and I would tap into the purple area of the color wheel and just start dragging my sliders around until I find the color that I want. Now, if you have exact values you want to key in, you can also use the sliders, which can be accessed by using these arrows or by tapping in the middle until you have the full list. Additionally, you can use swatches... Now, on this main screen, you're going to see a set of quick colors, including the null. That applies to every single document across the application. Below that, you'll see a list of recent color swatches for the document there currently in. There's also a list of pre-set pallets that are already in Designer, which you can access by tapping on swatches. And again, you can use the arrows to go back and forth. You can change it to the exact values rather than just the dots, or you can tap in the middle and it will give you the full list. Now, in addition to the built in palates, you can create and use your own palettes, and there are two ways to do that. If you tap the hamburger menu at the top, it's going to give you two options. One is to add an application palette. The other is to add a document palette. If you add an application palette, you can use that color palette no matter what document you're in. So, for example, I have a list of go to colors so every time I create a color that I find myself using a lot and I want to save it I will save it to this "Go to Colors," palette, which is set as an application palette, which means I can use it in any document. Let's go ahead and create a document palette just for this one, though. I'm going to go to my hamburger menu, and it's going to ask me whether I want an application palette or a document palette. Go ahead and tap "Document Palette," and it will set up an unnamed palette. Now, to change the name, I'm going to go to the hamburger menu again. tap rename and let's call this, "Color Studio," and now, I can begin adding my colors. So I'm going to use my eyedropper tool to do that, and I'll sample the colors throughout this document and we'll start getting added here. So let's use the eyedropper and drag and let's sample this gray one first. When I release my pencil, the icon next to the eyedropper is going to change to the color I just sampled. To add a color to your palette, you need to change the fill to whatever color is here. So to do that you simply tap and it will change the fill to that color. So now I can go to my hamburger menu again and select, "Add Current Fill to Palette," and it will show up there. Again, let's go ahead and drag down until I select this orange, it's going to change the orange to that selection. I'll tap until my fill is orange, go to my hamburger menu and hit, "Add Current Fill to Palette," and you could keep doing this for all of the colors in your document. And finally, let's take a look at how you can sample colors from a reference image, either for use in your existing document, or to save as a swatch palette for future documents. The first thing I want to do is find a stock photograph to use for the reference photo. So I'm going to go to my Stock Studio and, let's say I'm going to create an illustration of a watermelon. I'm going to type in watermelon and then select my photograph. I like this particular one because of the variety of color, so I'm going to tap and hold and release, and it's going to add it to my document as a separate layer. I'm not worried about the exact size of this. I just want it large enough that I can get a wide variety of color from it. So I'm going to drag out and then deselect. I also want to make sure I lock that layer, so I don't accidentally move it around. So I'm going to go into the Layer Studio and tap on the lock next to the watermelon image and now we're ready to start sampling. So we'll go to our Color Studio and Swatches. And now we need to determine. Do you want to use this just for this document? Or do you want to make it available for future documents as well? In this particular case, let's just select a document specific palette, So we'll go to the hamburger menu, tap on "Add Document Palette," and now I could go ahead and rename it if I like by tapping on the hamburger menu again, selecting "Rename Palette," and we'll type in watermelon. Now, when you're selecting colors from a raster image, you're going to see a lot of variation in the various pixels. What I'll typically try and do a select from highlights, mid tones and darks, and I'll try to select two from each one, if it's available. So let's start with the darks. I'm going to go ahead and drag over here to this really dark red, then I'm going to release, and it's going to change that dot to that color. Now, remember, the swatches in the palette are based on the fill, so I need to make sure the Fill is selected. I'm going to tap the dot, and it will change the fill to that color. Now I can go back to the hamburger menu, select, "Add Current Fill to Palette," and now it's in my palette. So let's go ahead and find another dark that's just slightly lighter... I'm going to tap... go to my hamburger menu and select "Add Current Fill to Palette," and I'll just keep doing this until I feel like I have enough of a variety of colors that I can work with. Again, I typically select from the darks, mid tones, and highlights, and, in this case I'm going to make sure I'm selecting from the rind as well. So let's just keep on selecting here. Now, sometimes you may need to zoom in just, in this case, the rind is so thin that to get the greens, I just need to zoom in so you can always do that, if it's helpful. So it's going to go ahead and get this final lighter green here. So I think that gives me enough to work with to create my watermelon illustration. So that's how you sample colors from a reference image to create swatch pallets. In the next section, I'm going to take you through the Pixel Persona and show you the tools that you can use to add some really interesting texture to your designs, so I'll see you there. 6. The Pixel Persona: In this section, we're going to take a closer look at the Pixel Persona. Now, I'm not going to focus any attention on these studios, because, while there are some studios in the Designer Persona that aren't found on the pixel side, those that do remain are exactly the same. So we're just going to focus on the tools themselves. I mentioned previously that the Pixel Persona is where the raster based tools are housed, and you'll use those tools to add raster texture to your vector objects. And you can also access the number of selection tools that allow you to select specific sections of your designs for edits. Now something I haven't previously mentioned is that the two personas work independently of one another. Well, you can go into your designer persona and create flat vector art and not use the pixel persona to add any raster texture, conversely, you can use the pixel persona exclusively to create raster based paintings from scratch, it's totally up to you. If you're coming from a raster based illustration program, you're likely very familiar with the tools in this one. So let's go ahead and take a look at those tools. The arrow is the move tool, just like in the Designer Persona, and it works exactly the same. You can select, move, resize and rotate your objects. You're going to use the Paint Brush Tool to apply the raster texture to your objects and select the type of brush that you want to use in the Brush Studio. Now, just like on the designer side, there are a number of baked in brushes that come with the application. I've also included a list of my go to brush designers in the resource guide, and I'm using number these brushes throughout the class so you can see how they work. There's also an Erase Brush Tool that allows you to erase away portions of an object, a pixel tool, That allows you to create those fun. 1980s type illustrations. We're not going to use that in this class, but it's actually kind of fun to use. There's a Smudge Brush Tool, a Flood Fill Tool, that allows you to flood a selection with color with a tap. And then finally, there's a number of selection tools, as well as a Refine Selection Tool that allows you to modify your selections. And, just like in the Designer Persona, there's also an eyedropper tool, that allows you to sample color so that you can add it to a swatch for use in your design. Now, one thing that the pixel persona does have that the designer doesn't is that when you go to your Paint Brush Tool, if you tap to the right here, you're going to see that there's a symmetry and mirror tool so you can use that to create radial or mandala type designs. So that's the Pixel Persona. In the next section. We're going to start creating some designs, and I'm going to show you how to create leaves using the built in Shape Tool, so I'll see you there. 7. The Shape Tools: In this video, I'm going to show you how to create leaves and flowers two ways. One will be using the built in shapes in the Rectangle Tool. The other will be using the freeform Pen and Pencil Tool, all of which can be found in the Designer Persona. In this section, we're going to focus our attention on the Rectangle Tool, so I'm going to tap to select it, and tap it a second time to pull up the list of shapes. I'm not going to run line by line through the shapes. I'm going to focus on a few of the shapes we're going to use in this class, but what I'm showing you in this section applies to all of the shapes. Go ahead and drag out a rectangle and a crescent. Both of these, we're going to end up using a stems. And then finally, I'm going to go ahead and drag out an Ellipse. When you use the Rectangle Tool to create a shape, that's exactly what you're getting. It's a shape, not a curve. What that means is that I can't use my Node tools to make any further edits to these shapes in fact, if I select my Node Tool and tap on the Ellipse, there are no nodes because they don't exist. It's actually giving me the bounding box for the Move Tool so I could make it bigger and smaller, wider and more narrow... and, depending on the shape that I select... I may also get these red dots that I can use to make some minor edits. But, for the most part, I'm limited as to what I can do. We're not looking for realism with these illustrations, but we do want that organic quality that you see in nature. so I need to be able to add some texture and dimension and a little bit of warp to these shapes, because, right now, as they are, they're not really cutting it. To be able to use my Node Tools, I need to convert these shapes to curves. Let's go ahead and select this crescent one... start with that one. There's two ways that you convert this to a curve with its selected in the contextual menu, I can tap "To Curves." If you don't see it there, you can also go to your Edit Menu then you can tap Convert to Curves. Now, it will take me to my Node Tool and give me four nodes to work with. That means I can drag these out, I can move these, I can use these handles, to make further changes. I can also drag on the paths themselves between the two nodes to make additional changes so I can do all sorts of edits to that original crescent shape to get it to where I want. Let's take a look at the individual nodes themselves. So, the top and the bottom of this pointed crescent are made up of sharp nodes, and you can tell they're sharp because they're square. The middle, because there's a slight bend to this crescent, has two smooth nodes on them, and you can tell they're smooth because they're circles. Now, if I wanted to use those two nodes to pull a little bit more of a bend, the way you would see in some stems, I could do that by selecting my node tool and dragging across the two middle nodes until they're both selected, and I know they're selected because they're blue. Now, because these are already smooth nodes, when I start to drag, I already get that nice bend and I could move it up and down, and I can go back and forth to place it where I want. I'm going to put it about there. Now, as is, This kind of looks a little bit like a pink green bean instead of a stem, but that's OK, because we can make additional changes. If I were to go up to this node at the top, I could drag in, to make it a little bit more narrow. And I like the bottom, the width that it's at, but I'm going to tap on this right node and just drag in and down a little bit, just to make the middle a little bit more narrow. So now I've gone from a basic crescent shape to a shape that I could see using as a stem. Let's go ahead and get rid of this and take a look at the rectangle tool again. This is a shape, It's not a curve, so the first thing I need to do is convert it. I'm going to go ahead and with its selected, tap, "To Curves," and now it takes me into my node tool and gives me four sharp notes to work with. But because there's no bend in this the way there was with the crescent. I don't have any nodes in the middle, but I can add them. I'm going to go ahead with my node tool selected, tap on one side and tap on the path on the other. They don't have to be exactly lined up, but they should be in proximity to one another. Now I can go ahead and so left these two nodes, but before bend them because if I were to bend them right now because they're sharp nodes, it would be very angular, and I want that nice curve the way we had with the crescent. First, I need to convert these from sharp nodes to smooth, so they're still selected, I'm going to go ahead to my contextual menu at the bottom and tap smooth, and now they're converted from square, sharp nodes to round, smooth nodes, which means when I start to bend, it's a nice curve. So I'm going to go right about there. If I wanted to, perhaps, bevel the bottom, I could select one of the nodes and just drag out and down and let's see at the top I wanted it to be more pointed. I could either take this node and drag it over, or I could select that node, go to my contextual menu at the bottom and tap delete, and it makes it a really sharp point. So then we've taken that from a basic rectangle to another shape that we could use as a stem. Finally, let's take a look at the Ellipse. I'm going to convert it to curves, It gives me four smooth nodes because this is a perfectly rounded object. And let's say I wanted this to be a pointed petal, and I wanted it pointed at the top and the bottom. With my node tool selected, I could drag across the two nodes until they're both selected and go to my contextual menu at the bottom and tap Sharp. Now I have a nice point at the top and the bottom, but it's still kind of a basic shape and doesn't look so much like a petal. But I can use these two smooth nodes on the side to make some further changes. If I tap on this one and start dragging up, and out, with that handle and then select this one and perhaps drag in, and down, or move this in a little bit, I could go ahead and make that nice petal shape now. If I were to rotate this around, a circle, it would make a really nice flower. So that's the basics of the rectangle tool that we'll be using once we're creating our leaves and flowers later. In the next section, I'm going to show you how to use the Pen and Pencil tools to free form create objects similar to these so I'll see you there. 8. The Pen & Pencil Tools: In this section, we're going to take a closer look at the Pencil and Pen tools in the Designer Persona Now these two tools will allow you to create shapes that have a more organic feel than the built in shapes coming out of the rectangle tool. Let's start with the Pen Tool. I'm going to go ahead and select a stroke, I'm going to leave my fill empty for right now, and I'll go ahead to the contextual menu at the bottom here and key in 15 points for my width, just to give myself a nice, thick line to work with. Now, when I start tapping around on the screen, it begins to lay down a number of nodes and paths, wherever I tap, to begin forming a shape. If I tap the original node that I created, that closes my shape out. If I wanted to make further edits to this, the benefit of working with vectors is that I can use my node tools to further manipulate the nodes and the paths that I've already laid down to do that. So I'm going to go ahead and select my Node Tool, and I'm going to drag these around where I want them. I can also delete nodes that I don't need, and I could get a different shape than I started with. Additionally, if I wanted to, I could create bends in these paths, either by dragging the line itself or by dragging the handles that create them. I could also change the type of node that's in place. So right now, the selected node is a sharp node, if I tap smooth in the contextual menu. I get a completely different feel. I could add a fill if I wanted to, I could use the Stroke Studio to change the width and the pressure settings, I could also use my curve tool. I'm sorry, my Corner Tool to select the corner and a corner type at the bottom. and when I drag down, it helps me create another shape. So that's a few things that you could do straight out of the box with the pen tool. Let's take a look at a couple of others. I'm going to delete this shape and again we're going to start with a stroke. I'm going to leave my fill empty, so let me come full and I'll tap and tap again. Now, before I release, I'm going to drag down, and it's going to create a nice curve. It also gives me these two handles that help direct the curve. Now, if I wanted to close this shape out with a straight line, I could do that. But in order to do that, I need to let my handle that's currently under my pencil know which direction I want to go. If I were to simply release and tap, it's going to close that shape out with a curve rather than a straight line. So, let's start that again. I'm going to tap, tap and I'm gonna drag. Now I'm going to use my finger as a modifier key and hold it down. I'm gonna drag my handle up and release so that the handle is facing the direction I want to go, and when I tap, it completes the shape with a nice straight line. Now it's actually not perfectly straight. If I zoom in here and select the Node Tool, you can see that the handle is slightly up from the main line. That's not a problem. With my snapping on, I can simply drag the handle down and it will snap into place and form a perfectly straight line. Additionally, with the Node Tool selected, I could use this handle at the top here to change the position or the depth of the original curve. I could also drag down with my path or with these handles to create a curve in the bottom. if I wanted to. I can add a fill, just like I did previously. I could also change the width and the pressure settings. So there's a number of ways that you can use the pen pool to create and edit shapes that give you a little bit of an advantage, in my opinion, over using a raster where you're kind of reliant on shape tools, erasers, undo and redo. So I'm going to go ahead and delete this and show you one more thing before we get into the Pencil Tool. Again, I have a stroke selected, I will select my Pen Tool, and I'm going to change my mode to Smart Mode. If you're coming from an illustration program that has a separate curvature pen, this program does not have that, but the Smart Mode in the pen tool works very similarly so I want to make sure that my pressure settings look OK here so you could easily see this and I start tapping around on the screen. It's going to pay attention to where in place my nodes and give me the best curve for that placement. So if I were to go ahead and tap and finish this, the program is determining that this is the best type off curve for where I placed my nodes. And that's fine, I could still go into my Node Tool and I could move things around, I could use the handles to drag up or in, I could also change the type of node. So this one is currently a Smart Node. I can change it to sharp, and you can start seeing that we can form something like a petal. So we're going to end up using this later when we start creating some of our freeform flowers, we'll use the smart mode in the pen pool to do that. So I want to delete that and show you one more thing before we move on to the pencil tool once again in the Pen Tool, If you selectLine, and you start tapping around, let me just make sure I have a stroke selected here. There we go. You can create lines on your canvas that are perfectly straight, but they're not contiguous. So if you have a need for a perfectly straight line, you could easily form those. You can also use your node tool to then join nodes by dragging up topping Join. And now I have two lines that have formed one. So that's your Pen Tool and the basics on how to use it. Let's move on to the Pencil tool, and I'll show you how to use that to create some really great freeform. leaf shapes. The pencil tool is one of my go to tools for free form creating leaves and flowers and we'll use it a great deal in the upcoming sections. But for now, let's look at the basics of the tool. So I'm going to select my Pencil Tool, and we can use either just a stroke, a fill only, or both, I'm going to show you both ways. Let's start with a stroke. So I selected that, and I have selected a 15 point width here, and if you do that here in the Stroke Studio or down in the contextual menu, and now I'm gonna start drawing. You can see it works just like a pencil. Now this is a vector, so it's made up of nodes and paths, which means I can go into my Node Tool, and I can start moving these around if I want. I can use my handles to further drag things, I can delete nodes that I no longer need, I can also convert my nodes from sharp...from smooth to sharp rather and just like with the Pen Tool, I could add a fill to this, or change the pressure or width settings in the Stroke Studio. Let's go ahead and get rid of that. Now, if you're like me, and you have a difficult time drawing a smooth line, one of the benefits of using the pencil tools is that there are built in stabilizers, which you can access in the contextual menu by tapping on that carrot. There's three options: No Stabilizer, Rope Stabilizer and Window Stabilizer. The Rope Stabilizer and Window Stabilizer, work pretty much the same, the difference is just the tool itself. Let me start with No Stabilizer first. if I turn that off and I just start drawing, you can see that I have a rather imperfect curve here, and it it keeps it, even when I remove my pencil. So there's little imperfections throughout. Now let's get rid of that and go back in, and I'm going to turn on Rope Stabilizer. We'll zoom in here so you can see how this works as I'm dragging across, Let me go ahead and make this a little bit bigger so you can see it. There's a rope pulling my stroke, which is helping to stabilize that stroke. As I move along, I'll zoom back out. So now, If I do this and I create that same loop, I get a much smoother... line and curve here. Again, the Window Stabilizer works very much the same. The only difference is how that rope that I showed you actually works. I definitely recommend just playing around with the settings on this, whether it's the length of the rope or the type of stabilizer you use, because they do work slightly differently, depending on the size of the rope that you use. So let's go ahead and take a look at the fill option. I'm gonna swap that just by swiping across. I'm going to tap on Use Fill. And now, when I start drawing out, you can see I can create this leaf. Now it looks like it's completed. If you just look at the shape, it looks like it's a full shape. But if I zoom in, you can see that the initial node and the final node don't have a connection. There's no blue line connecting them. There's two ways that I can correct this. I can select my Node Tool, and I can drag one node to the other, but that also adjusts my shape. If you want your shape to remain as is you could also with the Node Tool selected simply tap Close and it will automatically bridge it with whatever line works best. And now my shape has remained exactly as I drew it, but I have a complete shape to work with. Now one final thing I want to show you with this is the Sculpt Tool. I'm gonna turn that on. If you want to either cut away, or add to this shape... and I'm not talking about adding another object on top and then combining the two. I can actually add to this shape. I'm going to show you the takeaway first. Let's say I'm creating a Monstera leaf and I want those little cutouts I could just simply start with the blue line, draw down and then draw my pencil up and you could make these little cutouts. Now, this could be an extremely frustrating tool/ I definitely recommend practicing with this. And the more you practice, the easier it gets. But I can guarantee you that I used the undo and redo button a lot with this one. You can also add... so you can just draw out. And it broke the line between these two nodes and bumped everything out. And then I can just keep going with that. Just keep adding to the initial shape. So that is the pencil tool and a nut shell. In the next section, we're going to start creating our leaf shapes and I'm going to show you how to do that, using the built in shape tool. So I'll see you there 9. Saving and Exporting Documents: While we haven't touched on the export persona in this class, I do want to show you how you can easily save and export your documents using the Documents Menu. There's two options in here: Save a Copy and Export. Save a Copy is going to allow you to save a Designer formatted copy of your original illustration to whatever file folder you select. It's important that you toggle on Save History to make sure that you save all of the layers and history of your document. Otherwise, it's a flat file. You also want to make sure that you do this before you fully close out your document in the Gallery. Otherwise, you're going to lose it completely. So I'll ahead and I'm going to change the name and I'll just tap save, and it's going to take me to my folders so that I can select where I want to save to. The next option is using the Export. This is going to allow me to export a file in any of these formats to a folder, or if I want, I can also use the share button down here to save it to my camera roll, shared to Instagram, text it to somebody or email it, whatever I want to do. I'm not going to focus any attention on this. Let's just go ahead and focus on how you can save it as a file. I don't change anything here on the quality to 100% and this is going to be set up the original size that I set the document up. Now, typically, I save it as a TIFF file. In this case, I'm going to keep it as a jpeg. I'll just go ahead and change the name and I'll go ahead and hit OK, once it gives me this size here and again, it's going to take me to my folders. I'll hit Save, And now I have a jpeg formatted file saved to my folders. 10. Preparing Your Canvas: Okay... it's the moment of truth. Over the next few sections, we're going to be creating leaves and flowers with beautiful organic textures, and I'm going to show you how to do that, two ways. The first will be using the built in shapes in the shape tool, and the other will be using the freeform Pen and Pencil Tools, all of which could be found in the Designer persona. Now, first things first, Let's go ahead and set up a canvas. I'm going to tap on the plus sign and then select New Document. Now remember, whenever you're introducing raster elements, you need the size accordingly. And in this case, because we're adding texture, we are going to be using raster elements. So think ahead to your final output and create your original document at the largest size that you plan to print. Otherwise, you're potentially going to run into muddy textures and pixelation. I'm going to go ahead with an 11 by 14 canvas a 300 dpi. and that should suit my needs perfectly. So I'm going to go ahead in key and 3300 pixels by 4200 pixels at 300 dpi, I'm going to keep my orientation portrait orientation. I don't need a transparent background and I don't need art boards, so I'm going to click OK, and it's going to create my new document. Now, before I move forward. I always add a background layer, and I do this for two reasons: One, the white gets a little taxing on the eyes. but the bigger reason is that I always use my background as part of my overall design. In fact, a lot of the times I actually add texture to it. Now, sometimes I'll go dark, and sometimes I'll go light. I definitely recommend playing around with it because as you start adding textures, and changing the colors of your leaves and flowers, as well as the blend modes that you're using. you're going to see a wide variety of end results, so play around with it until you find something you really like. In this case, I'm just going to go ahead and choose an off white color. So I have changed my fill to an off white color. I don't need a stroke, so I'm going to select that and turn it off. I'm going to make sure that my snapping is on at the bottom so you can see the blue circle around the magnet, and I'm going to select my Rectangle Tool. I'm going to drag up from the bottom corner to the opposite top corner, and because my snapping is on, it's going to snap that rectangle into all four corners. So now I have my background layer. Now, before I move forward, I want to make sure this is locked so that as I start adding elements, I don't accidentally move it around. So I'm going to my Layer Studio and, on that layer, just tap the lock and now it's in place. In the next section, I'm going to show you how to create leaves using the shape tools, so I will see you there. 11. Creating Leaves with the Shape Tool: Now that I have my canvas in place, it's time to start creating some leaves using the built in shapes in the Rectangle Tool. I'm going to start with my stem, but before I do that, I want to select a color. So I'll go to my color studio and I have some greens down here that I typically use for my leaves in my recent color swatches. You can select your color, however you like, using the Eyedropper Tool, the color wheel or sliders. Or if you have a swatch palette, you can set that up as well. So I'm going to go ahead and select this green color here. I typically only use a fill and not both a fill and a stroke. There are some exceptions to that, and I will point those exceptions out throughout the rest of the class. I like the green color itself, but I find it a little too light, so I could go back in to my color studio and used the sliders to change that. Or, I can simply tap and hold on the icon for the Color Studio and just drag down. So that's another way that you can easily change the light and dark value of the color that you selected simply using your pencil or stylus. So now that I have my color selected, I'm going to go ahead and create the stem. Let's take a look at the shapes available... so we'll select the Rectangle Tool, and tap again to pull up the full list. Now in the section about the Rectangle Tool, I used a crescent and a rectangle. I think this time, I'm going to use a trapezoid. Let's just drag out a trapezoid. Now, as is, again, this is a pretty plain shape. It could be used as a stem, depending on the aesthetic you're going for, but what we're looking to do is pull in more of that organic shape that you see in nature and this just wouldn't work for us. So we need curves to work with, in other words, we need nodes and paths to manipulate, but we can't do that right now because this isn't a curve, it's a shape. So remember, the first thing you want to do is converted to a curve, either by tapping "To Curves," down here at the bottom or selecting it in the edit menu. Now when we go to the Node Tool we have nodes that we can work with and I could drag these paths out to create the bend that I want for the stem, but I wanted to be more uniform than that. So what I'm going to do is, with my Node Tool selected, I'm going to tap and add nodes on either side of my shape here. Then I'm going to drag across and select both of them. And remember, if you start out, dragging two sharp nodes, you're going to get an angular bend. What I want is that smooth curve. So I'm going to tap smooth at the bottom here to convert those nodes. And now when I bend, it gives me that nice, smooth curve. I'm gonna leave it about there. I also want to go ahead and make my top a little more narrow. So just drag this over. I'm going to bevel my bottom by selecting this this left node and just dragging down. So now what started out as a basic trapezoid has a much more organic feel that could work very well for our stem, but now we need the leaves. So let's go ahead and take a look at a few of the shapes that we can use in the Rectangle Tool to create our leaves. There are a couple options here in the Rectangle Tool. The most obvious would be the tear and if I drag that out, it could be a leaf, but to me that's pretty boring and kind of too on the nose. It looks just like I went in and drive the shape out and I could manipulate it with my node tool, But I think it would take a little bit too much time to get it exactly where I want this particular shape. So I'm going to delete that. My go to actually tends to be the Ellipse, which looking at it yes, is a very boring shape. But again, I think I hadn't used my Node Tools to make changes to those to make it much more like a leaf. So the first thing I want to do is tap, "To Curves," and now when I select my Node Tool, I get these four, rounded, smooth nodes to work with. I want my top and bottom to be pointed and you can do whatever you would like with your leaf. I'm going to make the top and bottom of mine pointed. So I'm going to drag across with my Node Tool selected to select these two nodes. And you know they're selected because they're blue. I'm going to go to the bottom here and I'm going to tap, "Sharp." So now I have a sharp top and a sharp bottom. But again, it's still little too on point and little too obvious for a leaf shape. I want to warp this a little bit more, so I'm going to use these two smooth nodes on side to make further changes. I'm going to go ahead and I'm going to drag this handle up. I'm going to drag this node in a little bit and then the handle out some, and now I have a nice, wavy shape that gives a little bit more of a leaf feel. But don't get too hung up on the exact shape because this is a curve, which means I can always go back in and make a change to it, using my Node Tool, once I have it in place. If I see it's not working just so I can go ahead and edit it easily, but I'm going to work with this right now. So I'm going to go ahead, use my Move Tool and select it and with About Center on I'm actually going to make this a little bit smaller, I'm going to rotate it, and I'm going to add it to my stem here. So now we have the beginning off our leaf shape. But we need to add leaves all the way around, and there are a couple of ways that we can do that. Let's take a look at those. Now that we have our first leaf and our stem in place, there are a couple of ways that we can add additional leaves all the way around the stem. The first is to go into the Rectangle Tool and continue to drag out shapes such as the Ellipse or others, and use the Move and Node tools to then make individual change to those leaves and place them where we want. The other option is to duplicate the original leaf all the way around, and, when we're done, go back in, and again, using the Move and Node tools, make individual edits to each of the leaves. Time wise, both are the same. I'm going to show you the second option, though, so that I can show you easy ways of duplicating an object. So the first thing we want to do is, with the Move Tool, select that initial leaf. The easiest way to duplicate this is to go to the Edit menu and tap Duplicate. And now, in our Layer Studio, you can see we have two of the same exact curve, one is sitting on top of the other. So I could just drag this down. I can rotate it and tuck it against the stem here. I'm not going to focus any attention on the size or shape. At this point, my focus is first going to be getting the leaves around the entire stem. So the other way that you can duplicate is using your two fingers as a modifier and your pencil. With the object selected, tap and drag at the same time. So again, tap and drag at the same time. Now, with this last duplicate still selected, don't deselect it, the third option is that I can go into my Edit menu and I can tap duplicate. And not only does it duplicate it, but it moves at the exact distance that I moved the other one. So I can continue that all the way down until I have the amount of leaves in place that I want. So the easiest way to get these six leaves now to the other side is to go ahead and drag and select them, and as long as I have all of the leaves in this blue bounding box, it's going to select them. But because part of this leaf and part of the stem are outside of it, when I release, they don't get selected and that's fine, we don't want them selected. So I'm going to go ahead into my Edit menu and tap Duplicate. Now I have the same six leaves duplicated and sitting on top of the original, so I'll go to my Transform menu and I want to mirror them. So I'll do a horizontal flip, then I'm just going to drag those duplicates over. Now, this is a jumbled mess. but that's okay. We're going to use our Move tool now to move the leaves roughly in the place so that we can start making individual edits. Before I begin making any edits to my leaves, I like to just get an idea of the amount of space that I'm working with on a stem, and I roughly place my leaf shapes using my Move tool. I don't aim for perfection for two reasons. Nature's not perfect. She's perfectly imperfect. So I'm not looking to have leaves lined up with one another, actually try and stagger them. But the other reason that I don't aim for perfection is because, inevitably, I'm going to end up moving them a little bit more as I'm changing the shape of them. Again, I'm just trying to get an idea of how much room I'm working with here, and it just makes it easier when I start making those changes to the shapes to have them organized better. Let's go ahead and keep dragging these out. Now that those are in place, I'm going to use a combination of my Move and Node tools to make changes to my individual leaves so that they look unique from one another. I typically start at the top with this and I actually like how these two leaves are playing off of one another, but I want this one to be a little bit bigger. So I have my Move Tool selected, and About Center selected, this just makes it so that everything's evenly distributed when I drag. I'm just going to make it longer and maybe a little bit wider. I'm just going to start following this down. I could go ahead and flip shapes so that the wave pattern is a little bit different. Make this little wider, maybe a little longer. I could also use my Node Tool to drag the handles to get a different shape. And I just follow this process all the way around until I am happy with where things are placed, and then I'll take a look at it overall. So let me just go ahead and work my way around this and finish this up. OK once I'm done, I'll typically take a step back and take a look at my overall shape and see if there's any individual ones that I want to change. For example, this one here was actually about a little bit too close to the stem, so I'm just going to rotate it a little bit, so it's not quite so blended with the stem. I might rotate this one a little bit more, maybe make it a little longer. Alright, so I like the overall shape. At this point, we are good to go as far as adding texture, but we need to group them first to make it a little bit easier to do so. So let's take a look at the two ways that you can group these layers to prepare them for the texture... Now that our leaves are in place, and we have shaped in the way we want them, we're at the point where we can begin adding texture, but before we do that, we want to organize our layers to make that an easier process. There's a couple of approaches that you can take here, and the approach that you decide on will ultimately determine how the texture is added. I dedicated an entire section to adding the texture, so we're just going to focus on grouping here. The first approach is that I can take all of these layers that make up my leaf and I can group them together in a folder. So one of the ways that I could select all of this is with my Move Tool, I'm going to drag across my entire leaf, and now all of these layers are selected. I can go ahead and tap on my group icon, can tap again to ungroup it. You can also simply pinch to create a group is well. So that's the first approach. The second approach, is to take all of these individual curve layers and combine them to create one curve. So when you're adding your texture, you're adding it to one piece rather than multiple. So let me show you a different way that you can select your entire leaf here. When you're in your Layer Studio, you can tap on the first layer that you want to select, and two finger tap on the last one, and it will select all of the layers in between. So now what we want to do is add these together to create that one shape, and we're going to do that using a Boolean operation. If you recall when we went through the User Interface, I mentioned that you can find these under the Edit menu and these are geometric operations that you can perform on a shape that you've created, to create another object. So I'm going to go ahead and I'm going to tap Add because, again, we're adding all of our layers together. And now, if you look at your layer studio, you'll see you of one curve layer rather than multiple. So I can move this around, I can use the Node Tool, and I can make minor changes. Now the only thing that I can't do with this at this point is use my Move tool to tap in to individual leaves and move them around. But if you take the time up front to place your leaves where you want them, that shouldn't be an issue. So these are the two approaches to grouping your layers to get them ready for the texture. In the next section, we're going to take a look at the free form Pen and Pencil tool and use them to create leaf shapes similar to these. So I'll see you there... 12. Creating Leaves with Pen and Pencil Tools: In the last section, we used the shape tools to create our leaves, and, in this section, we're going to focus our attention on a combination of Pen and Pencil tools to freeform create leaf shapes. Now I'm going to start with my stem, just like I did in the last one. But instead of using a fill, I'm going to use a stroke. So I have my green color selected here, I'm going to select my Pen tool to make my stem. and I'm going to tap in about 16 points. Now, that's just a starting point so that I can see where I'm laying my stroke down on the canvas. I'll likely change it, because we're going to add some imperfections to the stem to give it an organic feel. And to see them that needs to be a lot wider. So I'm just going to go ahead and tap, and then tap again and drag. Now, I'm not loving exactly how this is bending, but that's OK because this is a vector, which means I can go into my Node Tool, and I can drag things around until it's where I want it so I can use this handle to change the depth of the bend, I can move my nodes around where I want them... I like that just about there. But right now this is too thin. Again, to see the imperfections we want to create, to make it less static and more organic, we need to make it a little bit thicker. So I'm going to go to my stroke studio and I'm going to make the width about 60. So now we have a nice line to work with here. But again, it's kind of boring. Just like the shapes were right out of the rectangle tool. So I want to give this some waviness and imperfection. I'm going to use my handles here in the stroke studio to change the pressure settings of this stroke, exactly how I want them. So the two points on either end represent the two points on either end of the stroke. So if I drag this down, you can see the top of my stem there getting more narrow. I'm going to leave the bottom the thickness that it's at, but I actually want to tap and add a handle here and just drag in so that starts thinning out about there. So now I can go ahead, I'm going to add some more handles, and I'm going to drag up and down. And if I go ahead and deselect this, you can see that it has that nice waviness that you might see in a real stem. So I'm going to stop with that. At this point, we're ready to go ahead and start adding our leaf shapes. Now just like with the shape tools, there are a number of ways that I can add leaves to this shape. Now, one of the things I don't do is create one leaf and then duplicate around because when you're free form drawing of leaf, it's a lot quicker to do that, than duplicate one leaf and make changes with the Node Tool. So I'm going to select my Pencil Tool, and I want to use a fill instead of a stroke. So I already have my fill selected. I just swapped them out, and I'm going to make sure that my Use Fill is on here at the bottom in the contextual menu. Then I'll just go ahead and start drawing my leaf shapes and you can see that I can get the nice, waviness that I want without having to use my Node Tools to get it. So I'm just going to go ahead and I'm going to keep drawing my shapes out here, and I'm going to try and vary the length and width and the waviness as I go around. So we have our leaf shapes, and I sped this video up but hopefully you saw that I actually used the undo and redo and restarted, and I thought about editing that out, and beginning again, but I wanted to leave that in for a reason. The beautiful thing about using these digital tools is that you have things like undo and redo available to you and digital erasers and masks, and things like that. Because everybody has to use them. Nobody creates the perfect shape right out of the gate. I look at it the way I look at my photography. I can go out and take 1000 shots and only like 20 of them, and it's the same way here. I can draw 1000 leaves and have to undo and redo 900 of them, so don't get so frustrated when you can't create this, especially if you're new to the tool. Just keep practicing and keep progressing, and you're going to find it becomes a lot more second nature as you do that. Our leaves are in place and we're ready to go ahead and turn this into one large curve. Before I do that, though I want to make sure that my stroke in the middle that's making up the stem is actually a fill, that's not only going to prepare it for the Add function, but also for texture. So I'm going to go ahead and going to select that curve. I'll go to my Edit menu and top Expand Stroke. Now, when I top on it and use the Node Tool, it's no longer a single line stroke, It's actually a fill and my nodes are surrounding it. So now we're all set to go ahead and do the Add function on this. I'll go ahead and select all of my layers. Go to Edit, tap Add and we're all set. Okay, so I like how the leaf shape is looking here. I'm actually going to call this done, and I've already combined it into one large curve by selecting all of the individual curve layers and then doing an Add function under the geometry in the Edit menu. I'm going to go ahead on and tuck this off to the side for right now and turn it off before we move to the next section. I want to show you one additional way that you can use the Pen and Pencil tools to create a different type of shape. This is going to have more stems in it, and you can use the building blocks from this to create things like branches on trees. Because really, they're created the same way, they're just a larger wider size. So I've gone ahead and I've selected my brown stroke. My pressure is back to normal, and I did that by tapping and hitting Reset Pressure... and I'll go ahead and start with a nice, thick stroke. I don't have to worry about it being thinner. So I'll tap... tap again and I'll drag out. Now, I'm actually going to raise this up a little bit more, and I'm going to set my pressure settings now because I want all of the offshoots from the stem to have the same feel. So I'm going to make the top. more narrow. I'm going to narrow at the bottom just slightly. And I'm just going to do the same thing I did with the last stem and just add some handles and drag up and down to give it some of that waviness. So now we have a nice start as far as our branch, but I actually want to make this a little bit thicker. So I'll drag up the slider here. Now, I want to make sure I deselect this, because if I keep going with my Pen Tool, it's going to complete a shape and I don't want that... I actually want offshoots of this. So I'm gonna close my studio here to zoom in now with my Pen Tool and with this deselected, I'm just going to start tapping and dragging out branches. And I want this to be a little bit smaller, so I will go ahead and just reduce the size of that. And you can just make sure you deselect each time. I'm gonna create these little offshoots and you can change the size, and you could do this on the back end or even do it as you go. I tend to like to do it as I go, just so that I can see where I might need something else. So, again, make sure you deselect. I'm going to drag out, make that a little bit larger. Okay, now that I have my stem pieces in place, I'm just going to take a look and make sure I don't have any overhang. For example, I don't have anything hanging past this. Or if there's anything I want to change the size like these to look a little bit too similar to one another. So I'm going to select this one and maybe change the pressure, setting slightly... just to have it be a little bit more unique than the other one. And now you can see because I did that and I made the bottom a little wider, It actually extended it beyond the stem here, so I'll just take my Node Tool, and I'm just going to drag that up. So before I go ahead and create one large piece out of this, I just want to make sure everything is where I want it. And I'm liking how this looks. I'm just going to go ahead, and the first thing that you want to do... before you create one large curve out of this is to expand the strokes. So the way we did with the last stem, where we had to go up to our Edit menu... you can actually go ahead and select all of these, and I'm going to tap on the first one and two finger tap on the last, go to your Edit menu and tap Expand Stroke. So now that's created fills rather than strokes. So I had the benefit of being able to use the Stroke Studio to create the feel that I wanted. And now I'm going to convert it to a fill so that I can add the texture and I can combine them. So again, I'm going to go ahead and select qualities, and I'll go to my edit menu, and I'll tap Add and now I have one large curve piece to work with. And because this is a fill, I can also add texture to this down the road. So let's go ahead and start creating our leaf shapes. I'm going to go ahead and do that with this... Let's see... I think we're going to use this nice light green color here, and I'm going to make this a fill because I actually want to use my pencil tool on Fill. So I have selected Use Fill here. I'm just going to start drawing out leaf shapes and they don't have to be perfect because they're leaves so they don't... you're not going to get perfection from leaves. Just you can always go in and you could make changes if you want. Or again, you can go ahead and delete them and start again. I kind of went the wrong direction with that one. So I'm going to go here, and I'm going to go ahead and draw all the way around until I have all of the leaf shapes that I want on this stem. So I like how these are looking and you can see that you can use your Pen and Pencil tools not just to create straight lines or curves, but you can also go ahead and creating type of leaf shape that you want. So it is one of the reasons that I lean more heavily on these Freehand tools in the shape tools, because I can get it where I want a little bit quicker than I can use my Node tools or Shape tools. But I wanted to show you both ways because really, it's up to you whichever works best for you. Now, before we move on to the next section, where we're going to start adding texture. I want to do something with these multiple curve layers with these leaves, and I'm going to just go ahead and do a Boolean Add operation on this so that I have one curve layer to work with. I could have just as easily grouped it, but I actually want to be able to add my texture uniformly across one layer rather than multiple. So again, in the next section, we're going to start adding, texture to the leaves that we've been creating, so I'll see you there 13. Adding Texture to Single Layers: One of the benefits of using Designer is that you have the best of both worlds and one app. So I could create this flat illustration using the vector tools in the Designer persona... and if I wanted to add additional depth and dimension, I could do that by using the raster tools in the Pixel persona. Now, the way that you add the texture depends on how you've grouped the elements in your object. I broke the texture sections into two sections. The first is going to focus on how you can add texture to a single curve. So, in other words, we take a number of individual curves and combine them into one. The next section is going to show you how you can add texture to individual curve layers that are simply grouped together. Now, before we get started and actually adding the texture, I want to remind you that any time you pull in raster elements, you need to make sure that you size your original document accordingly and size up to the largest size you plan to print so you don't run the any quality issues. Beyond that, you also want to make sure that any of the tools that you use, whether it's texture image files, or brushes are also high quality and high resolution, whether it's ones that you create or purchase. I have included a list of my go to brush makers and texture makers in the Resource Guide. in case you want to take a look at those, The first step I usually take to add texture to a single curve is to add a texture image file. So I'm going to go to my document menu and tap Place Image, and it's going to give me the option of either importing from the cloud or importing from my iPad. Since my texture files are rather large I keep them on the Cloud. I'm going to go ahead and select one of these textures from this collection that I have here. I like this one in particular... it's going to go ahead and tell me that you can drag to place your image and you want to make sure that you drag large and if you need to size down, that's OK. But you don't want to place your image small and size up because, once again, you could run into quality issues. So I am going to drag this down now that I placed it. I'm going to drag it down slightly, just going to get a little bit more manageable. But right now, this texture file is sitting on top of the leaf, and I can't see where it falls within the shape itself. So I need to clip this, and I'm going to do that by dragging the layer until the blue line shows up in the middle of the layer that I'm clipping to and make sure you keep your pencil to the right because moving it to the left is a completely different function. So I'm going to go ahead and move it there, and I'm going to release. And now my texture is within the leaf itself, and I can better see where I'm placing it. When it comes to these texture files, I find the uglier the better. And the reason for that is when you start using blend mode working with particular colors, these little imperfections come through in such a way that it really tends to look very much like the perfectly imperfect imperfections that you see on an actual leaf or flower. So I like this grittiness and I like this light and dark in these little spots, so I tend to use those over the softer textures. Now this is a little too much. So I'm going to go ahead and change the blend mode. And since since this is it's own layer still, I can go ahead into the Layer Options, and I can either drop the opacity or, if I want, I could start flipping through the blend modes. You can tap through, or, if you happen to use a texture a lot and you know what blend mode works best, you can also tap and just select. And for this one, I know that either Soft Light, or Hard Light works best, possibly even Overlay. I want to go with Hard Light, but this is a little too much, so I'm going to go ahead and drop the opacity. So now I have added the first layer of texture, using a texture image file. The next step I'll typically take is using my vector brush to add a little bit more detail. When it comes to adding texture to your illustrations, you don't have to rely solely on a raster tools, whether it's brushes or image files. you can also use your vector brushes. And the benefit of doing that is that you don't have to worry about size and quality because they're vectors. So I'm going ahead, select my vector brush. I have this off-white color selected, and I'm going to go into my brushes here. And I actually like this set by Frankentoon. I'm going to select this "Mudspeckles." I want to make sure that my brush is rather large in this case, then I'm going to swipe. Now this looks a little chaotic. We have a lot of stuff on the outside of leaf, but just like with the texture file, we're going to clip this. So I'm going to group these two and clip them as a group of selected both layers, not just to stop here for one second. Whenever you use a vector brush. the beauty is, just like when you're creating shapes, you get separate layers, which means you can go in and you can use your Node Tool to move things around. You can use your Move Tool to size and move things, so you have a nice, separate layer to work with. So again, I'm going to group these two together, and I'm going to go ahead and clip this by dragging down, and once I release, everything is within the leaf. Now this is a little too intense. So again, I'm going to go ahead and change my Blend Mode, and I'm going to change it for the overall group because these are separate layers. You can go into each individual one if you want, but in the interest of time, I'm going to do this as a group. So, go to Layer Options, and again, you can click through until you find one that you like. I like this color one, but I think I want some of that creamy color to come through. Now, I happen to know that Soft Light works really nicely for this one. So I just tapped and I'm going to go ahead and just drag down the opacity a little bit now. Its added some of that nice little spottiness that the brush had in it, but it's a little bit more subtle, so that's the second method that you can use to add texture to your illustration. The next is employing raster elements by pulling in your Paint Brush Tool from your Pixel Persona... One in the final ways that I add texture is using the Paint Brush Tool in the Pixel persona. So I've done ahead and selected my Pixel Persona and the Paint Brush tool. And I actually want to add a little bit of color with this one. So I've selected this teal color. Now, just like the vectors, there's a number of built in brushes. I'm actually going to use one of my favorite texture brushes by Frankentoon here, though, So I have gone ahead and I've selected my brush, I'm going to drag up just a bit, make this a little bit bigger, and I'm going to select the curve that I'm adding to, because when I do that, it automatically clips the layer to that curve, I don't have to drag it down. So I'm just gonna go ahead and I'm going to add some color here and there. I'm going to be using a blend mode, so even though it looks a little bit too much right now, we're going to be blending it in a little bit. So I like that... Now, let's go ahead and change the blend mode here. So the difference between working with a vector brush and working with a paint brush tool is that, unlike with the vector brush where you get a different layer with each stroke, no matter how many times you pick up your pencil and lay it back down, when you're using the paint brush tool. It's all in one layer. So if you do want to use different blend modes for each of your strokes, make sure you're adding a new pixel later each time. In this case, I'm using the same Blend Mode and opacity, So I just kept it on one layer. I'm going to go ahead in, and I'm actually going to change this, I think to color because I actually know that works really well with this. You could also just flip through until you find one that you like. I am going to drop the opacity a little bit. Now we've gone ahead and added texture three different ways to this illustration. We used a texture image file. We've used the vector brush tool, and we've also used a paint brush tool in the Pixel persona. Now you can use one or all of these, It's totally up to you and the look you're trying to achieve. In the next section. We're going to take a look at how we can add texture to a group of individual layers using these same methods, so I'll see you there. 14. Adding Texture to Groups of Layers: In this section, we're going to take a look at how we can add texture to a group of individual layers rather than one large curve. This is the leaf shape that we created in the shape tool section. I just changed the color so that you can more easily see the texture. This is the one where we left the individual leaf layers separate so that we could access them at a future date, and we just grouped them together. That means we have to approach the texture differently than the last leaf. The first step that we took was pulling in a texture image file using the place image function. But we can't do that here because you can't clip to the overall group. Instead, we're going to go ahead and use the fill tool to add an image file, and I want to keep the color of the leaf and just add the texture on top. So I'm going to go ahead and I'm going to duplicate the group, and I'm going to add my fill to this group. layer rather than the bottom one. I'll go ahead and select my Fill Tool, and I'll drag up and you'll see a gradient form, but this isn't the type of gradient we want. We're actually going to go to the contextual menu and will select bitmap and that will allow you to pull an image file in as the fill. I'm going to go ahead and select this one right here. You can get some really interesting results right out of the gate with the Fill Tool, But this isn't the look we're going for. We actually want it to have that nice, subtle organic texture that we had with the other one. I'm going to use these handles to drag this around until it's placed where I want it. So again, I like how it has that nice grittytexture, and there's some dark and light areas here. I'm going to go ahead back to the group, and I'm going to change the blend mode of the group overall so I'll select the layer options, and I'm going to just go ahead and select Soft Light because I knew that that works best with this particular texture, you could scroll back and forth until you find one that you really like. I actually think I like Hard Light better. So we'll go with that and we drop the opacity a little bit. So now we have that nice texture here, and we have some dark and light values, and we were able to add texture to leaf overall. Now, what about adding texture using the vector brush tool or the paint brush in the Pixel persona? We can do that. So let's go ahead and take a look at how. If you want to add additional texture to a group of individual layers using either the paint brush tool in the pixel persona or the vector brush tool, you can do that. But again, you can't clip to the overall group, which means we need to focus our attention on the individual leaf layers. So in other words, if I go ahead and I select my vector brush tool and I select that same brush that I used previously, I'm gonna make this a little larger, and I swipe down. It looks just like it did with that last leaf. But if I go ahead and group these and try to clip them, it doesn't do anything, it just adds it to the overall group, and I still have this mess on the outside, so I need to focus my attention on each individual leaf. So I'll go ahead and select a leaf and I'll swipe and I can go ahead and clip it that leave and now change the blend mode. Just drop that down a little bit and I would just work my way around. Now, This is why it becomes time consuming, and you also have to give it a little bit more thought because you don't want to look... have anything look, like it's placed, you want it to look organic, which means you really need to think ahead as to where you're putting your texture because you can't simply swipe across the entire shape. The same goes for the pixel persona and using the paint brush tool so I'll go ahead and select that same blue color and that other one that we use before. And I'm gonna select this top leaf again. Now, if you select an individual layer, and you start using the pixel brush. It's going to automatically clip that pixel layer to that one. Let me zoom in here, I'm going to start painting in blue and you can see it's already clipped here and I could go in, and I could change the blend mode to try something like Color, and I'll drop the opacity. But again, I need to work my way around this leave, so I'm going to go ahead and do that now. And I'm going to work my way around the leaf using a combination about the vector brush tool and the paintbrush tool. Okay, I am going to stop there. I added some texture, using both the paint brush tool in the pixel persona and the vector brush, and I like how this looks. But it took a lot of work to get it to this point where I could have achieved very similar results simply by using one big curve. Now it's really up to you how you want to approach it. You may find that you haven't need to use a group of layers rather than a an individual curve. And like I mentioned previously, when it comes to the flowers, I do tend to use grouping a lot rather than combining everything. So it's just a matter of your needs and how you want to approach it. But just keep in mind that when you use this particular method, it's going to take more time and a little bit more thought up front. So in the next section, we're going to take a look at how we can begin creating floral shapes to using the built in shapes in the Rectangle Tool, So I'll see you there. 15. Simple Flowers from Shapes: Over the next two sections, I'm going to show you how to create a range of flowers from simple to more complex, using the built in shapes in the Rectangle Tool. What you'll learn in these two sections will provide you with the building blocks to go on to create even more complex florals as well as other illustrations. So let's get started. Let's take a look at how we can use the Ellipse tool to greet simple floral shapes like this. I want to go ahead and select my fill and, again, I typically don't work with a stroke, just a fill. I'll select this peach color and I will make sure that my ellipse shaped is selected in my Rectangle tool, and I'll just drag out a nice, long, narrow Ellipse. Now this is my starting point for my petals. Again, it's a shape, not a curve, so I need to convert it so that I can use my Node tools. Now when I select the Node Tool, I have these nice, smooth nodes to work with. I want the top in the bottom to be pointed, though, so I'm going to go ahead and drag across and select them and tap sharp in the contextual menu. Now this is a good starting point, but it's rather generic. I'm going to make some additional edits to the appearance, but first I want to create my entire flower shape first. So I'll select this petal with my Move Tool, and I want to make sure that my Transform Origin Point is on. It's the little bull's eye in the contextual menu. And what that does is tell Designer what you want, where you want to rotate from. So right now that little bull's eye is in the middle of the shape. So if I start rotating it, it rotates around the center of itself. I actually wanted to rotate around the bottom of the pedal, so with my snapping on I'm going to drag that down and the snapping is going to guide it as well as snap it into place. Now, when I rotate it, it's rotating around the bottom of the pedal. I'm ready to start duplicating this. So with it selected, I'll go into my Edit menu, and select Duplicate, and I want to begin rotating my petals at 45 degree angles, and I can guide that by starting to drag and then tapping my finger down holding it, and it's going to snap in 15 degree angles. So now I'm at 45. If I continue to hit duplicate with this selected, not only will it duplicate it, but it's going to continue to rotate it, It's 45 degree angles. Let's go ahead and do that, okay... I have my entire flower shape here and again. I don't need to work with the individual layers, so I'm just going to go ahead and select them, and I'm going to create one large curve by tapping Add, and now I have one piece to work with. It's looking a little one dimensional, though. I actually want there to be multiple levels of petals. I'm going to duplicate this in place again and his rotate this out just slightly. Now, in order for there to be some depth between the two, I'm going to go ahead into the bottom curve and just drag down from the icon for the color studio just to change the dark and light value of that. I'm not going to change it a lot. I just want it to be enough that you can see the difference between the two layers. So now this is looking a little bit too perfect and I don't want that. You want to kind of play into nature's perfect imperfections. So, I'll select my Node Tool, and I'm just going to start dragging out in various areas with my Node tool. Okay, we have some nice differences between the pedals. There's a nice depth and dimension between the two layers. I think I'm gonna call this done and now move on to the middle of the flower. So I'll just go ahead and select my Ellipse shape again. And this is one of those instances where I use both of a fill and a stroke. I'm going to select this yellow for my fill, and this white for my stroke. And now when I start dragging out a circle and if I hold my finger down, we'll get a perfect one. You can see that this stroke is rather large, and that's okay. In this case, we're going to change it in one moment, I'm just going to drop it into the middle of the flower. Now I want to change the appearance of this stroke to match one of my brushes, and in particular, I want to select the brush. That's the stamen brush that I provided in the downloads. When I tap that, it's going to change the appearance to the dot formation that's in the brush itself, and I can go into my Stroke Studio, I can make this larger. I can also change my alignment to get some different looks. I actually like this particular one because I like when it's a little bit on the inside and a little on the outside, but it's totally up to you. I think I'm going to make the middle a little bit smaller. Okay, I think that's done. That's how we can create a nice, simple flower shape, using a combination of the Ellipse shape in the Rectangle tool as well as a specialty brush. I'm going to move on and show you how to use a combination of a triangle and a crescent shape to create another flower formation. I created this flower shape that could be used two directions with a combination of the triangle shape on the crescent shape. Let's go ahead and select our fill. I think I'm going to go ahead and just keep that yellow that we use and I'll turn my stroke off. I want to select my triangle shape. I'll just drag out a triangle. Now again, I want to convert this to a curve, and then I want to flip it. So I'll go in to my Transform Studio and do a vertical flip, Select my Move tool and make sure that my transform origin point is at the bottom of my pedals will just drag got down. I'm going to make this a little bit smaller just to give ourselves some room to work. I always make sure that About Center is on so that when I do size up and down, it does it evenly. Now we're starting ready to start duplicating this. Now, I don't actually want to duplicate this in perfect angles. I'm going to start by duplicating that shape, and I'm just going to drag out to where I want it. Now, because I don't want it to continue in that same width I'm going to deselect and I'll select again hit, Duplicate, and I'll just drag this out to where I want it again. I'll deselect and select again and hit duplicate. I'll drag that to about there. Let's make this a little bit smaller. I also want to make it one large curve. So again I'll select all of the layers and do an Add, Just make this a little bit smaller. Now I want to duplicate this shape in place. So we have that same depth we had with the last flower, so I'll duplicated in place. Now I'm going to drag my transform point down to the tip of the triangle just to keep them aligned, and I'll just rotate out, make it a little bit smaller. I don't want this perfect. I don't want it right there. I want it a little bit overlapping and I'm going to go ahead and deselect. And when I do that again, it doesn't have any sort of depth, and I want that. So I'm going to change the light value of the bottom curve. I'm going to drag down from my color studio. And I think I'll make the top one a little bit lighter, and now I have a nice contrast between the two. But again, these petals are a little too perfect. So I'm going to go into my Node tool and I just want to make some changes. Okay, I think that looks good like that, and you can make whatever changes you want. I have a tendency of always going back in and making additional changes. But in the interest of time, I'm going to call this done. I'm going to make it a little bit more narrow, though. And now I want to select my crescent shape and select a nice green for my fill. I'll drag out a crescent. And this is where I'm going to use one of those red transform nodes here. So this is still a shape, so I'll just go ahead and drag this up, then I'll go ahead and convert it because once you convert it, those little red dots are gone, you can't use them anymore. So I'm going to start rotating this and dragging it in with my Move tool, and I'll just try and size it to about where I want it. Sometimes you can't get it perfectly aligned and that's okay if you want to leave it like that, or you can select your Node tool, Just drag it to where you want. I might also make this a little bit imperfect. And I'll just back out and see how I like it... Okay. And that's how you can use a combination of the triangle tool, triangle shape rather, on the crescent shape to create a flower that can be used in two directions. So facing up it can look like a flower that's almost closed and facing down. It can look like a flower that's fully open and facing the sun. One of the things that I like about doing these illustrations with the flowers is that I can give a nod to my favorite flowers without them being exact. You can go for realism if you want, and these tools will get you there. But in this case, I like to have a little bit of whimsy and fun with my flowers. So I created this Chamomile flower, using a combination of the trapezoid and ellipse shape as well as my specialty brush. Let's go ahead and take a look at how we can create this. We'll start by creating the trapezoid, the petals with the trapezoid. So I want to select this nice off white color for my fill and select my trapezoid tool and just drag down. Now again, I need to convert this to curves that I could use a node tools. I'll tap To Curves, I'll select my Node tool, I want the path between these two nodes. to be bent in a little bit, so I just want to drag up, and I'm going to drag these two nodes in towards each other. And if you hold your finger down when you do it, it will keep it straight, and I might bend the paths out here as well. Okay, so I have a nice start to my camomile flowers. I'm going to make this a little bit smaller, so we have room to work. Now I'm going to make sure that my transform origin point is at the top here so that we rotate around the middle and drag this down. And now I can start duplicating, and I'm going to duplicate a 30 degree angles, so I'll duplicate it and start dragging and hold my finger down and snap at 30 degrees. Now I'll just continue this around to create the full flower. Okay, I have my entire flower shape there and again. I don't need to work with the individual curves. I'm going to create one large shape out of this. The easiest way to do this because it's so large, is to go into my layer studio. select the first curve and then two finger tap on the last, and I'll go ahead and do an Add operation so that I have one large curve to work with, and I'm ready to add the middle. So I'll go ahead and select my Ellipse, and I think I'll select this orangish color. Make sure that you deselect your shape before you change the color. and I'm going to select this red, for my stroke, and I'll start dragging out... and again hold your finger down to get a perfect circle if you want. I'm going to place this in the middle of the flower and I'm going to change my stroke again to the stamen brush, I'll drag it out to the largest width. But in this case, I actually want that on the inside. So go to my advanced settings and I'm going to tap this middle one so that the dot formation is on the inside. Now, if you wanted to, you could go back in with your Node tool and just change some of these petals just to make them look not quite so perfect. All right, time to stop there. I like how this looks. Again, it's a very simple flower shape, but we created it using multiple shapes as well as a specialty brush. In the next video, I'm going to show you how to start creating some more complex flower shapes again, using the shape tool, so I'll see you there. 16. Complex Flowers From Shapes: In this second look at how you can use the built in shapes and the rectangle tool to create your florals I'm going to approach the more complex floral shapes like these and show you how you can use a combination of shapes as well as some specialty brushes to create these flowers. Let's get started. Let's start by creating this dahlia type shape, and we're going to use a combination of the ellipse shape and the duplicate and rotate function to create this more complex flower. I'll select my ellipse and drag out an ellipse. I'm going to make it a little bit wider here, and I'm going to convert this to a curve, but I'm not going to change the nodes at all. I'm going to drag my transform origin point down. And I want my initial set of petals to be very dense because the Dahlia flower is very dense in its arrangement. So go ahead and do a duplicate, and I'm just going to rotate 15 degrees and a way to continue this all the way around. Okay, I have my full set of petals here, and I've gone ahead and I have dragged up, selected it and did an add function to create one large curve. Now I'm going to start duplicating miss rotating and sizing in as I go. And because that duplicate function remembers all of the steps that I took, it will continue that for me as I go along. And one thing I want to know if I change the darkness and lightness values of the various levels as I'm going through this because there's so many layers and it's so dense, I find it easier to change it as I go along and waiting until the very end. So I'll go ahead and select this and hit duplicate. I want to rotate this to the middle here. so it's about 7.5, and I'm going to go ahead and hit duplicate. I'm keeping that the same size right now, the back to petal sets and keeping large, and I'm going to rotate this again. But I'm not going to do it quite so perfectly, and I'm just going to size in. I want to change the level here and I'll go ahead and keep hitting duplicate. With that selected, I'm going to grab my Ellipse again, and I'm going to choose that yellow color for my fill and I'm going to choose white, or off white, rather for my stroke. Now I'm going to drag out my circle and I'm going to move it into place and make it a little bit smaller. And I want to change the stroke to my brush again so I'll choose my stamen brush. Now, in this case, I actually like that. It's in the middle again, like it was that the one of the last flowers were created. So that's how you can create Dahlia type flower using a combination of the ellipse shape as well as the duplicate function in the Edit menu. Let's go ahead and take a look at another one. We're going to create this Gerber daisy flower with a process similar to what we used for the Dahlia, but we're going to shift it a little bit so that we can get this more ragged feel that the daisy typically has. So I'm going to go ahead and I'm not only going to select a fill, but a slight stroke, just to give a little bit more definition between my petals. I'll select my Ellipse and drag out a nice narrow oval and convert it to a curve. I want to make sure that my transform origin point is at the bottom here. We're going to start duplicating this around, but we're going to do it in a much more random way than we did with Dahlia. So I'm going to duplicate this and I want to rotate it. I'll let it do its thing again, but I'm going to drag it out, and I'm just going to continue to repeat that around and move it randomly until I work my way all the way around. I don't want to create one large curve out of this because if I do, it's going to convert the entire thing to this off white color. And I'm going to lose my stroke. So I'm going to go ahead and select the whole thing. Go to my layer studio, and I want you group that. Now I'm going to duplicate the group. But unlike with the Dahlia, where we rotated and kept going inwards, we're going to randomly size down and up as we duplicate inward. Now, I kept this middle section a little bit empty for a reason. Most Gerber daisies have another set of smaller petals around the middle shapes. Let's go and grab our Ellipse, and I'm going to create my middle section with a mix of this wheat color for my fill and this brown for my stroke and I'll drag out my circle. I don't need it to be too big, because again, I want those petals around the middle of this in place, and I want to make my stroke much larger, and I want to select the stamen brush, So we're all set with the middle now. I want to create that small petal now. I'll select my Ellipse again and drag out a small oval here, and I'll go ahead and drag my transform point to the bottom and we'll move it into place over the middle section. I want actually center it. Now, I'm going to size down a little bit, and eventually this is going to be behind the center, but for right now, I want it on top, just so I can see what I'm doing. I'm going to go ahead and duplicate this. I am going to go in and I'm going to start taking some of these out. I really just wanted to get this shape in place just to see where I want it. So just take some of these out, and now I'm going to go through and I'm going to change the size of some of them. I think that's actually good enough, I'm going to group these. I'll select the 1st one two finger tap on the last one in the Layer Studio. Because this is sitting on so much other stuff. It's a lot easier to use my layer studio instead. I'm going to drag this below the Ellipse, and I'll just shift it slightly. I'm going to go ahead and duplicate this, I'm going to rotate it and I'm going to make it a little bit smaller. And that just gives it another group of petals that I'm going to make a different color. So there's our Gerber Daisy again. Once we start adding texture to this, there's going to be a lot of more definition to it. But this was created using a series of ellipses as well as our specialty brush and a process of using the duplicate function while randomly spacing both the actual petal and in sizing up and down as we move our way inward. And finally, let's take a look at how we can create these abstract type poppy flowers using a combination of the crescent tool, ellipse tool, as well as the pencil tool to do these little cutouts to give it that ragged feel. I'm going to go ahead, and I'm going to use these various shades of blue as my fill. Again, I like to have fun with the colors of these flowers. They don't have to be perfect, They don't have to be realistic, You could make them whatever color you want, especially when you get into the realm of abstract like we are here. So I'm gonna start with this lighter blue and I'll select my crescent shape and just drag out of crescent, rotate it and converted to curves. Now I want to use my node tool to just give it a little bit of that wave that you might see in a poppy flower. And let's drag this node out a little bit, and now I want to select my pencil tool and make sure that sculpt is on. Now, just a disclaimer about this process. I mentioned it when we went through the pen and pencil tools. It can be very frustrating and it takes some practice to get used to doing it. I recommend doing it slowly and carefully, so you're going to start from the top and just draw down and up and release carefully. Inevitably, you will have to undo and redo at least once, and I guarantee I'll have to do it here. But again, just practice and it becomes really handy to do cutouts in different floral shapes. So I'll start drawing down and just carefully draw up and you can see that's breaking the path and creating these little cutout shapes. And I'm going to vary the size as well as the distance until I make my way all the way around. If you do have to undo and redo honestly, it was a miracle I didn't have to there. Sometimes it helps just to go to a different spot and try again because there's just particular spots, especially whether some curves or you might have some trouble. But again, just keep practicing. I'm going to go ahead and create another crescent. I'll move this out of the way, and I'm going to use this darker color now, and I'm not going to create the wave on this one. I actually wanted to be very much like a crescent, and we're going to use these to build up an open flower shape as well as a closed. Once again, I'll go ahead and select my Pencil, I'll make sure it's on sculpt, and I'll just work my way across the flower. So as you saw, I had to do undo and redo a few times on that one. Time to drop the lightness of this a little bit more than I'll move this one out of the way and we'll go ahead and create one more. I'm going to choose this mid range color here. So now we're going to actually duplicate two of these so that we can create our one large open shape. And I'm just going to start rotating these around and just changing the size and building up on one another until we get a nice open shape. Let's go ahead and add our center. I'm going to select yellow and black for my stroke. and just drag out a circle, and once again I want to go ahead and choose my stamen brush, and I want it on both the inside and outside, but I'm gonna drag it up. So its its largest size. There we have our first completed piece. Let's go ahead and use a few of these same layers to create the closed piece. I'm going to select some of these and drag out some duplicates. And I think I want that really small piece too. I'll drag across this large piece and group it so we can move it easily. And I'm going to go ahead and I'm going to rotate these pieces together, and I want them to layer with one another just to give them that closed flower type of feel. So I like how that one looks. I'm going to go ahead and I'm going to select my Ellipse tool with the same colors, But I'm not going to drag a full circle. I want it to be a little bit more narrow because I don't really want anything hanging out, and I'm going to change the color to white because I do want to show you what you can do if you do need to place it where some pieces are hanging out, Let's go ahead and change that to the stamen brush. Make it as large as possible and then drop it behind. So I'm just gonna go ahead and drag this in where I want it. Now, you can see some of this hanging out, and I don't want that. I just want it to be in the space here. What you can do is go into your pixel persona and grab your Eraser tool. Select the layer and just started erasing away the spots that you don't want. It's going to add a mask to that particular shape and just mask away the extra there. In the next section, we're going to start adding texture to some of our floral creations so that you can see how we can build up and create even more depth and dimension in our flowers. So I'll see you there. 17. Flowers with the Pen & Pencil Tools: In this section, I'm going to show you how to create flowers like these, using the freehand pen and pencil tool in the designer persona. So let's get started. Let's go ahead and create this flower shape using a combination of the Pencil tool and the Ellipse shape. I'm going to go into my Color studio and select this lighter color for my fill. Again, no stroke. I'll select the Pencil tool, and I want to make sure Use Fill is on. And I'll just start drawing out my petal shape. Again when you use the Pencil tool, even if it looks closed, the shape isn't yet, but I'm going to close it once I create both petals. So, once again, I'll select my Pencil tool, and I'm going to draw up from the bottom here and do my second petal. Now I want to go ahead and close both of these, so with my Move tool, I'll select both, change to my Node tool, and just tap close. And while I have them both selected, I'm going to create one large piece. So I'm going to my Edit menu and tap Add. I just want to take a look at the bottom because sometimes they won't meet up, or you'll get this little jagged mark. I'm going to select this with my Node tool, and in this case I'm going to drag the handle so it's straight. I'm going to delete these nodes that are causing the problem, and I'm going to make sure this one is smooth and delete the other. And now we have a nice pointed bottom. It's aligned, and we have our first front petals to work with. Let's go ahead, and create our back petal. I'll select my Pencil tool, and I want to use this darker salmon color and I'm just going to start drawing out and it doesn't have to line up. in fact it probably shouldn't. And I actually want to start that again because I wanted to dip down a little bit more than I did. And make it almost like a heart shape, and I'm going to go ahead and close it and then drag it below the other curve. So let's take a step back. Now, I want these two meet up a little bit more, so I'm going to drag this node over, and with Snapping on, it's going to line up there. But I have a little bit of spot here peeking out, so I'm going to hold my finger down as I drag this handle, so it only drags that handle, and then I con just tuck it in. I don't necessarily need all of it meeting up, I just want to move it over just a little bit. I like how that looks. I might pull this up just slightly, maybe add a node. Now, let's go ahead and create our middle... I'm going to go ahead and select my Ellipse tool, and I'll select this brown color for the fill and black for the stroke. I'll draw out my shape, and tap To Curves, and I'm gonna change the stroke that stamen brush. I think I'm gonna lighten up the middle a little bit. I'll rotate this into place and tuck it between the two curve layers so that it's in the middle there. Now, because of the size of this, there shouldn't be any issues with any sort of stroke hanging out, but just to be on the safe side, I'm going to change it to white, just to be sure. so I don't see anything there. The only thing I might do is select the whole thing, and I'm going to kind of make it a little bit more narrow, a maybe a little shorter. Okay, I like how that's looking. Let's move on to creating a chrysanthemum using the Pen tool. We were going to use the Pen tool to create a series of strokes that we're going to then group and turn into this nice, shaggy chrysanthemum. So I'll go ahead and select my primary color. I think I'm going to start with this off white color as my fill. Again, I don't need a stroke. I'm going to select my Pen tool on pen mode and I'm just going to start tapping and dragging so I get a slight curve. Then I want to deselect and start from the same point and just keep tapping and dragging out various sizes and various distances. I want to change course. Now, make sure you deselect because, I didn't there, and it actually completed the circle. So I am going to deselect, and I'm going to change course here and go in the other direction. So I'll just keep doing this until the whole thing is completed. Okay, I like how it's looking. I'm going to go ahead and select the whole thing, and I want to make sure that the bottom is completely in alignment because I did move some of them. So I'm going to select my Transform studio and go into the alignment and do an Align Vertically at the bottom. It didn't move, so it looks like it actually was okay. If you start from that point each time, there shouldn't be an issue. So now I'm going to go ahead, and I'm actually going to select the whole thing and make it a little bit more narrow and rotate it slightly. And I'm going to change the bounds so that the handle moves with that shift that I did Now we're going to create an entire round shape out of this. So I'll go ahead and I'll duplicate it and I'm going to move my Transform node down to the bottom here and just start rotating out. And again, I'm going to let it do its thing and duplicate all the way around. Okay, so we have our first shape here. I'm not going to make one large curve out of this. I actually want to create a group out of it. So I've selected all the layers, and I'll tap Group. Now we're going to start duplicating this group. Let me just make it a little bit smaller first. So I'll duplicate the group, rotate it slightly, randomly, so that it doesn't look fake, it looks a little bit more like nature, and I'm going to change my curve. I'm sorry, my fill, as I go, So I have the group selected, which means I can go ahead and tap and change my fill. I'm going to drop the lightness a little bit and I'm going to let it duplicate itself again. Now I'm going to increase the lightness. I'm going to rotate and I'm going to drag it in just slightly. I'm going to let it do it again and again, just drag down. Now I'll do it one more time, and I'm going to decrease it a lot more this time and change the lightness value. Okay, we have our main flower shape. I'm just going to go ahead and just drag it in slightly, and I'm going to group the whole thing. Now I want to create my center shape. I'll select my Ellipse tool, I'll go in and get a fill. I'm going to pick this green color and a black stroke, and I'll drag out a circle, change my stroke to the stamen brush. And I think I'll make this a little bit smaller. And now what will end up doing when we add texture is just adding texture to each of the grouped layers so that we have a little bit more dimension. The reason I was changing my light and dark values was to give it a good start with that. So there's our chrysanthemum, using the Pen tool. Let's go ahead and create one more shape using the Pencil tool... Let's go ahead and create this final shape using our Pencil tool. The first thing I want to do is turn on my guide. Sometimes when I'm creating flowers like that, I find that guide is very helpful. So I'm going to go in to my Document menu. tap Guide and turn them on. Now I had already created one for another piece, so it's already out there. If you don't see one tap Show Guide You can add horizontal and add vertically, and you can use your Move tool to drag them where you want them. So this is all set. I'm going to go ahead and select my Pencil tool and I want to select a color. I'm going to start with this yellow fill and no stroke. I'm just going to start drawing out some petals, and I want four all the way around. Okay, I have my four shapes, and I'm going to turn my guides off just so they don't get in the way. Now, I want these to be closed. I'm going to go ahead and select all four, go to my Node tool, and tap Close. Now my shapes are all set, and I'm going to start dragging these together a little bit more and rotating them because I'm going to create one large piece. but I want it to be a little less like across and more like, say, an iris or something like that. We'll also make some of these a little bit more narrow and just rotate them a little bit, so it's not quite so perfect. Okay, I like how that's looking. Sometimes you just need to turn your Snapping off. I'm going to go ahead and select this, and I'm going to create one large curve by doing an Add operation. Now I want to duplicate this again and I'm going to drag out. But I'm going to drag away so that my petals aren't all the same next to one another, and I'm not going to be perfect about this. I don't want it so perfect that it looks evenly spaced. I actually want it off like this, and I'm going to go to my bottom layer and drop the lightness values just slightly to give it a little bit more dimension. If you wanted to, you could also make an additional shape and make a smaller piece. But I think we're fine with this. So I'll go ahead and choose my Ellipse tool, and I'm going to select this chestnut color for the fill, and I think, probably, black for the stroke. I'll go ahead and drag out my shape, change my stroke, and I think we might shift some of these petals just slightly. In the next section, we're going to start adding texture to some of the flowers that we've created so that you can see how you can very easily add additional dimension to your floral creations the same way that we did with the leaves, adding some raster and vector elements, so I'll see you there. 18. Adding Texture to Flowers: In this section, we're going to begin adding texture to the flowers we created in the last two. Just like with the leaves, the way that you add texture to these flowers is determined by whether you've grouped a number of individual layers or you've combined the layers create one large curve. Let's get started. I'm going to start with this simple flower. While it's grouped for convenience so that I could easily move it around or turn off layers, ultimately, it is three separate, individual curves that I could easily add texture to individually. So I'm going to start with this light petal at the top. I'm going to start the same way I do with my leaves. I'm going to place a texture image file, and I'm going to choose a lighter texture because I want to play into the dark and light value differences between the two layers. So again, I'll just drag large. You can always size down, but you want to drag, you want to size up first. I'm going to drag this in a little bit and move it over. Now I'm going to clip it to that first curve, so I'll drag down and clip. I'm going to change the blend mode of this to Soft Light. I'm not looking for anything obvious. I want it to be rather subtle. I think I'm going to go ahead and change the opacity slightly. So now I'm going to go ahead and choose something for my back one. And I'm going to choose a little bit darker texture to pull out some of that difference there. I'll go ahead and choose this one here. I'm going to drag down and clip it. Then I could go ahead and drag in so I can see where I'm going. OK, I like how that's placed, I like how there is this subtle, organic kind of messiness here and I'll go ahead and change the blend mode of this. I'm going to try both Overlay and Soft Light, just to see how both look. I think I like Overlay and I'm going to drop the opacity just slightly. So now I have my first set of texture on both of my petals. I want to play into the difference between the two a little bit more by adding some more texture to the top. But I'm going to stick to my vector brushes and we're going to use some of the built in brushes here. I'll select my vector brush tool, and I'm going to go ahead and use this off white color for my brush. And I'm going to use one of the built in Gouache brushes, specifically this Gouache 4. When you do short strokes, you can really see the variation, and how the brush lays down. Just draw it up a little bit larger, and I'm going to start drawing in in various directions, just like we did with the leaves. And it's going to look chaotic at first. But we're going to clip this and change the blend mode, so I'll go back into my layer studio. Again when you're working with a vector brush, you get separate layers each time you lay down a stroke. I'm going to select the first one and two finger tap on the last so that I can group them. and I'll go ahead and clip them to that top curve. So this is a little too bright. I'm going to go ahead and knock back the brightness just by changing the blend mode, and again, I'm going to go with Soft Light. I like how that's looking, but I want to drop the opacity just slightly. OK, I like how that looks, we have some nice variation and texture between the top and bottom level, as well as a difference in the dark and light values. I'm going to add a little bit more subtle texture to this, using my vector brush and I'll go ahead and select My inking brushes specifically my fountain pen ink, and I am going to make the brush a little bit smaller. I have this off white color selected, and I'll just start drawing lines up. Okay, I have my lines in place. The first thing I want to do is right my canvas, so I will go to my Navigator studio and under canvas rotation I'll tap and type in zero... that's going to bring my canvas upright again. It's important to make sure that you do that throughout. So, I need to clip these curves. to this top layer of leaves. I'll select my top curve and then two finger tap to select the bottom, group them, and now I can clip the whole group to this curve. It's a little too obvious again, I want it to be more subtle, so I'm going to go ahead in and I'm going to change the blend mode to Soft Light, and just drop the opacity a bit. I really just want subtle lines here, I don't want them to stand out too much. Now, I could take this a step further, and I could go into my pixel persona, grab my paintbrush tool and perhaps add some subtle shading throughout or some variation of color. I like how this is looking. It's a relatively simple flower, so I want to keep the texture simple overall, but it's really up to you. Let's go ahead and take a look at another flower. In this exercise, we're going to add texture to a flower that's made up of a number of groups of individual layers. When we created the Chrysanthemum flower, we used the Pen tool to create all of these individual curves. To go into each individual one and add texture to it would be very time consuming so instead, we're going to focus on adding texture to the groups that make up the whole flower. The first thing I want to do is make sure that these curves are no longer just strokes, but they're fills because you can't add texture to a stroke. I'll just go ahead and I'll select the four groups, go into my Edit menu and tap Expand Stroke. The appearance doesn't change, but the type of curve you're working with does. They have now been expanded. So we're working with fills rather than strokes, which means we're ready to add our texture. I'm not going to add texture to every layer. I find that sometimes when I leave certain elements flat, it adds an additional layer of dimensions. So I'm going to go ahead and start to add texture to the bottom, but I want to keep the color the same. I just want to add texture on top so I"ll duplicate it first and, with it selected, grab my Fill tool and drag up. Now I have the gradient, but it's not the type of fill that I want. I want to select Bitmap, and I want to choose a lighter texture file. I like how this looks, but it's not quite the look we're going for. Just drag it out a little bit to give myself a little bit more of that graininess, and I'm going to change the blend mode of the overall group. So I'll go ahead in and begin to tap through. Now I already know I'm going to use Soft Light, I'm just going to go ahead up to that. You could try different ones if you want to tap through. Hard Light is nice, but it's a little bit too much. So knock it back a little bit with Soft Light. We still have that color, but there's some nice texture in there as well. So I'm done with that one and I'm going to go ahead and deselect it and let's move on to the next group. I'm going to leave this one flat, and I'm going to go up to the next one in the lineup again. I'll go ahead and duplicate it, and I'm going to grab my Fill tool and swipe across. Its added the gradient, and I'm going to changes to Bitmap and I want to choose a little bit darker on this time, but not too dark. I'll go ahead with this and, again, not quite the look I'm going for. I do like it and you can get some really interesting results just leaving it as is, but we're going to go ahead and change the blend mode. You could also get some interesting results. Just using the blend modes themselves and add a little bit of color or something like that Okay, I think we're probably going to end up somewhere in linear burn or darker color. I like darker color but I'm going to knock it back a little bit. Let me try Linear burn here. Okay, We're gonna do that one instead. So I like how we have the texture, but it's a little bit darker. So again, we're giving it a little bit more dimension. Now I want to choose this last group and again duplicate it, and with it selected, I'll just drag across and I'm going to select Bitmap, And I want to go even darker with the texture. Because I really want that middle section to stand out. And I'll just go ahead and drag up, And then just change the blend mode until I get something I like. And I actually like that brown. I like how it plays into the neutrals of the rest of it. So I like how the overall flower looks. The only thing I might do at the end here is add some texture, and I'm going to go into my pixel persona and grab my paint brush tool. Grab a nice grainy brush and off white color. I'm just going to start adding some texture around the edges here. Again, it's not clipped, so it's ending up on the outside as well. But that's OK, and I want to leave the center a little bit darker. I'll go back in and I'll grab that pixel and I'll clip it to the Ellipse. Now I'm I just change the blend mode just to see some of the options, and we'll probably end up again in the Soft Light or Hard Light area. I like Hard Light, but I'll just drop it down a little bit. So there's our overall chrysanthemum flower, where we've added texture to individual groups rather than individual layers. Let's take a look at one more flower. And finally, let's add some texture to this simple flower we created using the Pencil tool. Because it's so simple, I don't want to add too much texture, but I do want to focus on the difference between the light and dark of these two layers, as well as the fact that it's a curved flower. I'm going to play into that. The first thing I'm going to do is place a texture image file on that top layer, and I wanted to pick something kind of light. So I'll go ahead and drag this out. And I wanted this dark part here to be the bottom of the flower. So I'm going clip it and then I'll change the blend mode. I'm going to choose Soft White because I knew that works best with this particular texture Now the next thing I want to do here is to add a little bit more texture using a vector brush. Specifically, I want to use one of the acrylic brushes in the acrylic section of Designer, So I'm going to go ahead and choose this glazing brush. When I add texture with this really large, it just adds a nice cottony feel. So I'll just go ahead and swipe up, and I'll swipe up this direction, and I'll go ahead and group them together and clip it. And then once you start changing the blend mode of this, it blends in really nicely and adds a nice textural quality. I actually like Overlay here, but I'm going to drop the opacity. So I like how that pulled in a little bit of that yellowish kind of feel from the off white color I used but kept that peachy pink. I'll go ahead and add a texture image file to the back, and I want to pick a little bit of a darker one. I'm going to go ahead and drag up... Now, it clipped itself to the wrong layer but that's okay. We're going to grab it and drag it down, and I'll go ahead once again, change the blend mode. I like Soft Light in this case, so now the difference is subtle, but it's still there, so you still have the impression that it's a closed flower. I'm going to go ahead and add a little bit of texture to the middle section here again using the Place Image. And I want something in the brown family with some grittiness because it's kind of dull and flat. So, I'm going to go ahead and pick this one... and I'll just go ahead and swipe up. I like this section here in particular, and I'm just going to change the blend mode again, To either Overlay or Soft Light. I think I like Overlay the best. Okay, then one final thing that I want to do is just add a little bit of light to the side. Here, I'm going to grab the paint brush tool again. I have my off white color selected, and I'm going to go and grab this nice gritty brush. I want to go ahead and start adding some light texture to the very side here and a little bit of the top. Now it's already clip itself because I selected this layer to begin with. But I do want to change the blend mode to Screen, and that'll allow not only the texture to come through but the lightness will stay as well, and I just want to add a little bit of dark to here. I'm going to choose this dark paint color. Now because this was a Screen blend mode, and I actually want to use a different blend mode here, I need to add a pixel layer so I'll go ahead and hit this plus sign, and it added the pixel layer. Now I can start adding my texture here. I don't want to do too much, just a little bit. We'll change the blend mode to multiply and drop the opacity. Okay, I like how this flower is looking. In the next section. We're going to go ahead and take a look at the assets section, and I'll show you not only how you can save your own objects to use in the existing document you're in, but for the future, but also introduce you to this nature elements download that I provided you with and show you how to use the elements to create your own floral arrangements. So I'll see you there. 19. The Assets Studio : One of my favorite things about designer is the Assets Studio. It allows me to see objects I create, whether they're single air objects are made up of multiple layers for use in future documents. I use this a lot when I'm creating surface patterns, or I'm creating an illustration where I just need a little bit of fill and don't want to start from scratch, creating a whole new flower. If I save single layer assets, I can stack multiple assets on top of one another to create a new design. If I save multiple layer objects like this one, it will insert it exactly how I saved it. layers in all, so I can go in to make edits if I want. Let's take a look at the assets studio. It's broken down into categories and sub categories, and you will always need at least one subcategory to begin adding assets. So in this case I have a category set up for my flower shapes, and it's broken down into multiple subcategories. So I have this flower that I created, and I love it and how it looks. So I want to keep it for future use. The first thing I want to do is make sure that all of the elements that make up this flower are grouped together. You can save as individual layers, but it's going to save it as individual elements in your assets studio. So if you want to save it as it is, make sure that you group those layers first. Now, I made sure this is grouped together, and I'm going to go ahead and select it, and go in to my assets studio, and I'm going to select which subcategory I want it in. So I'm going to place it in this Flower Heads, and I'll tap on the menu for this subcategory and then select Add Asset from Selection. Now it's added to my group here. And if I delete this one, if I want to add it back in I can simply tap and hit insert, and it's placed into my document again. . Again, it's broken down into the original layers that I created it with. Let's take a look at how you create your own asset categories to save to. The first thing you want to do is go to the hamburger menu at the top of the assets studio and select Add Category. You can rename this by going back into that same menu, selecting rename category, and I'll go ahead and name this Skillshare class. And again, you're always going to need at least one subcategory before you can begin adding to this particular category. So go back into that same menu tap, Add Subcategory, and I'll go into the menu for that subcategory to rename it. Notice changes to Florals. Okay, I'm all set to start adding. So, once again, I would go ahead and I would select my object. I'll go into the menu for the subcategory. I want to add to and then tap Add Asset to Subcategory. If you need to delete a category, you go into that top menu and again you go ahead and delete it. You also can import from here as well as export from here. As part of the downloads for this class, I provided a Nature Elements Assets Pack, which is a group of single layer flower on leaf shapes that you can use to create your own designs. Let's take a look at how these work. I'm going to recreate the flower shape that we started with, so I'm going to go ahead and I'm going to select a flower shape and tap Insert. Let me first go ahead and turn this one off. I'll go ahead into my assets studio, I want to select this shape here. I'll tap on it and hit insert, and now it's in my document and again starts out as a single layer with no color. But you can go ahead and add color to it. So I'm gonna select this darker fill, since I know this is going to be my bottom petal. I'm going to go back to my assets studio and add a second of that same one, you could also just duplicate the first one in place, it's really up to you. I'm going to go ahead and add a lighter color to this second layer, and I want to make it smaller and rotate it slightly. I'll go ahead, and center these, and I'm ready to add my texture. So I'll ahead and grab a texture image file. I'm gonna pick a nice, light one. I'll drag across, and I'm going to clip this to the first layer, change my blend mode to Soft Light, and I just drop the opacity slightly. Now I'm going to go back in and select another one for my bottom layer. I'm going to choose a slightly darker one. Remember to drag large, you can always size down, but you want to make sure that you start out with the larger size. I'll go ahead and clip this to my bottom and change that too Soft Light Okay, I'm all set with my texture on the two petals. If you wanted to, you could go further and add lines to the petals, it's up to you. I'm going to go ahead and add my middle section. There's three flower middles here, and when you start with this solid one, it's created using one of the brushes from the Textured Flower Brush pack that I provided as a download. You can change it to whichever one you want in the pack. First, I'm going to go ahead and change the color of my fill and my stroke. I'll go ahead and make that black and I think I'm going to choose this coffee beans stamen. I'll make this a little bit smaller and move it to the middle, and I'll just increase the stroke size just to make the stamen a little bit larger. Now, I can go in and I can add texture to this, I think, But I'm going to do is all at another one of these flower middles, just to add to the middle section here. So I'm going to select this one and hit insert. I'm going to keep the brush that's selected for this particular stroke. But I'm gonna go ahead and change the colors again, and I'm just going to make this a little bit smaller. I'm also going to change the alignment of the stroke so that it's in the center. And that's how you can take single layers from an asset studio and build them up, add texture and color to them to create a whole new design. In the next section, we're going to put everything together and create a beautiful textured bouquet using everything that we learn in the class. So I'll see you there. 20. Putting it All Together: In this final section, we're going to take some of the flowers and leaves that we've created and put them together in a textured floral bouquet. Now it's up to you how you want to place them together. You can make a traditional bouquet that's tied together, or you can place them in a bowl or cup. Or, if you want, you could even make a flat lay bouquet, it's totally up to you. I think I'm going to make a nice little cup to put them in, so I'll start with my Pen tool, I'm sorry, my Pencil tool, and I'll go ahead and select this red color. I think I'll make sure my fill is on and my stroke is off and I'm just going to go ahead and draw out a bowl shape. I like to make it slightly imperfect, as if it's pottery. I'm going to go ahead and add some texture to this first, and I'll clip it and change the blend mode. I'll stick with Overlay here. I want to add a little bit more to this, so I'm going to go back to my pencil tool. I'm going to turn off both my fill and my stroke, and I'm going to go ahead and just draw a little circular, swirl formation here. And I'm going to go into my brushes, and specifically into the engraving brushes that are built in to Designer. And I want to select one of my engraving brushes and make it rather large, and I like how it gives it that nice little engraved pottery feel. I'll go back in, and I want to make sure that this is clipped to this curve and nothing's on the outside. I'll change the blend mode and choose Soft Light, and drop the opacity slightly. This is something where you can play around with the color and the different blend modes and you'll get different feels. I like how this one looks, so I'll go ahead and call that done. I'm going to go ahead and start adding my flowers now. Actually, the first thing I'm going to do is add some leaves to the pot. so I'm going to go ahead and insert one of the leaves that I saved and I want this behind the pot. I actually want two of them, so I'll go ahead and flip this. I may add more later, but I'm going to just start with these two for now. I'll go ahead and group these and drop them below the pot. I accidentally clipped it there which is fine, I'll just two finger tap to undo and I'll re-drag. Okay, so now everything is behind the pot. I'm going to go ahead and start placing flower heads. I usually do my stems after the fact, once I place the flowers where I want them. So I'm going to go in and I'm going to grab those two poppy flowers that we had, I need to drag these up to the top, though and I'm going to make them smaller. I'll put this one up here and this one, I'm going to make a little bit smaller and rotate it and place it over here. I don't try and be perfect about this because really, it looks more natural when you just place things and you can always move them around. I'm going to go ahead and take a look at my assets studio at a couple of the flowers from there. I like this little salmon flower that we created I'll go ahead and drag it smaller though, and I actually went a couple of them in various spots, and I want them to have different orientations. I think I'll drag one over here, too. And I think we need some white flowers. So I'll go ahead and add this one as well. And you can vary the sizes, maybe even vary the shapes. If you want to drag in a little bit because not all flowers are perfectly round and I just like to give it a little variety and maybe we'll just go ahead and add one more here. I'm going to add this yellow flower, I'm going to drop the size a little bit and put this one up here, and I want to lay it on top of the poppy. If you wanted to tuck things behind other things, you could just drag the layer. So if I wanted this behind the Poppy, I can do that. I actually want that above. and I think I'm gonna move the poppy flower over just slightly. Okay, I think I'm going to stick with this for now. I'm going to start adding some stems just to fill this in, so I'll go into my Pen tool, and I'm going to make sure I deselect, so that when I change the color. I don't accidentally change the color of the flower, and I'm going to make that green my stroke. And I'm just going to go ahead and I'm going to tap, tap down and drag. Now this is much larger than we need, so I'm just going to go ahead and change the size. I'm also going to tuck it behind the head of the flower and I also want to make sure it's behind the stem. I'm sorry, the bowl, and I'm going to use the stroke studio to make some changes to it, so it's not so perfect. I might even make this a different color just to make it a little bit different from the plant. the leaf formations, they're just make a little bit lighter. I'm just going to go ahead and I'm going to keep adding stems to this. I can also use the ones that are in my Nature Elements Assets pack. I just want to go ahead and add this, change the color, and I can add texture to that if I want. So I'll just go ahead and fill this in and then we'll start moving things around just to get them in the perfect spot. Okay, I like how my flowers are placed, I'm actually not going to add any more. I added some additional leaves, and I left them flat. Sometimes I like to have a little pop of color without texture and something that you wouldn't necessarily expect just to add as a filler. The last thing I'm going to do is add a texture to my background and then add a unifying texture across the entire thing. So I'm going to go ahead in and select an image file for my black background. And when it comes to the black ones, I like to use a black and white type texture. And I accidentally hit one there while I was talking. Let's start that again, and I like it to be kind of screenish and ghost like when it comes to black and you'll see why in a second. So I'm going to drag that up and I'll place it and I want to drag that down. So that's on top of my black rectangle there, and I like how this gives it a little bit of light almost coming from the one side and I'll just tap through until I find the Blend Mode. Now what I like typically end up leaning towards is glow because it just gives a little bit of subtle light there. So that's good for my background. I'm going to go ahead and I'm going. to lay a unifying texture on the top now. So I'll go back, and in this case I don't want one of my black and white ones. I'm going to choose a lighter colored one that I have. It's this antique white, and I'll just go ahead and rotate this. It doesn't really matter if it's perfect. I really just want the texture. And again I want to place it large first and then size down, and I'll just place it so that it's got that nice amount right there. And now I want to change the Blend Mode. I don't want to move it down. I want it on top of everything because I wanted to add a little bit of texture to everything, and I'll go ahead and change my blend mode again, and I want it to ultimately be subtle, so I'll end up dropping the opacity, so I'll start high and then work my way down. Usually Add or Lighter Color is a nice one. I'm going to drop the opacity there. Okay, so again this is a little bit of subtle texture here, as well as what's coming up from the bottom and it's over the entire thing. So it unifies everything. It's up to you whether you want to add that. That tends to be one of my finishing touches. But I'm gonna go ahead and call this done. Thank you so much for being a part of this class. I hope you're going to use the methods you learn here to go on to create many beautiful illustrations. My biggest piece of advice when creating these botanicals is to Have fun with them, the flowers are all yours to create so you can use abstract shapes, fun colors or go for complete realism. It's totally up to you. If you have any questions about the class or about Designer in general, please feel free to reach out to me either on the class discussion board or with the contact info in the resource guide. And please feel free to share your creations on the Class Project board as I'd love to see what you've created!