TOEFL Speaking Question 1 - Acing the Independent Speaking Question | John Healy | Skillshare

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TOEFL Speaking Question 1 - Acing the Independent Speaking Question

teacher avatar John Healy, TOEFL Coach

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

2 Lessons (15m)
    • 1. Get Pumped!

      1:20
    • 2. Question 1

      13:39
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About This Class

In this short video by John Healy, learn you how to use a structured response to get a high score in Speaking Question 1. For more information about how to get a high TOEFL score, please visit http://www.toeflhometraining.com

Meet Your Teacher

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John Healy

TOEFL Coach

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Hey, I'm John. I love the TOEFL! Can you believe that? Know what I like even better than taking the test? Helping people like you figure out how to get a high score. 

I have a Master's Degree in TESOL and years of experience helping non-native speakers achieve great things in English. Let's study together!

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Transcripts

1. Get Pumped!: My name is John Healey, and this is your Tofel preparation course inside the Tofel speaking section. There are six questions inside this training program. I'm gonna walk you through each and every one. We're gonna break it down. We're gonna look for patterns inside the prompts so that we can anticipate them. But I'm gonna give you a system, a really proven system toe. Answer these questions in a way that regardless of the prompt, you can be highly confident of delivering a great answer. A lot of people talk about templates, right? Using a template. And listen. Templates are great, but I have another type of templates, something new that you haven't seen before. And I call it a time template. A time template is simply a guide toe. Help us apply a response strategy. That is time box. I'm going to show you how to use this really powerful tactic inside this course. So join me and see inside 2. Question 1: Hi, kneeling here from TOEFL home training. If you're struggling with the Speaking section, I'm going to help you. You're probably struggling with one of two areas. Either what you're saying there, content died or how you're saying it, the delivery side. And in many cases you're struggling with both. The solution is to use a structure, to use a framework. Some people call them speaking templates. It's basically a grid, a Guide to allow you to organize what you'd say in a way that responds to ETS is TOPO speaking rubric. Alright, in this Strategies module of my bigger flagship course, I'd talk about the importance of setting yourself up for success and how to study with no time limit to work on your fluency. This lesson is tactical, okay, and in this lesson, I want to focus on showing you exactly how I teach my clients to answer question number one. So get your four tabs open. I'm going to take you through these one by one. The first tab is the TOEFL speaking rubric. Now, the TOEFL speaking rubric, remember, what you're trying to achieve. Here is a, Says it here, a highly intelligible and sustained response, right? The rubric is pretty clear on content measures, like the clear progression of ideas, for example, or a high degree of automaticity. High degree of automaticity. Here you see in plain language, this is sort of how natural you sound. These represent the qualitative judgments of the human rater who was actually employed by ETS and is going to listen to your response. But remember, ETS also uses, they call their speech rate or engine that uses speech processing algorithms which measure things like your articulation rate or what linguists call connected speech or speech run rate. For example, the parts of your responds that are not broken by a hesitation or self-correction, right? This is what you and I would call fluency, right? Or how smooth you are. This is what it means here. Generally, well paced flow. Tab2 is your question source. Now here I'm using Xamarin. It's best to use. You can original ETS materials if you can afford them. Okay. There no question that the best. But here's one from TPO 40. Some people think that materials printed on paper, such as books and newspapers, will one day the replaced by electronic versions of those materials. Others believe that printed materials will always be popular. Which point of view do you agree with? Explain why akin to prepare your response after the beep. And then we'll have our 15, then we'll have our 15 seconds, right? Okay, so now we know basically what we're shooting for. And now we have a prompt here for the input. Right? Now it's time to go to the famous grid. This may look more complicated than it is. You'll see in a minute. That's really is just a fancy Tic Tac Toe board. Okay? The grid simply forces you to structure your response according to a proven formula. The flow goes like this. Basically I'm asking you to say nine things to chunk your response into nine different set of buckets. The first is a setup. For example, you can say, I love this question, you praise the question here. The second is your hook. You qualify yourself as the right person to be answering this right. You establish yourself as a credible person. You say something like, I'm the right person to answer this question, or I'm definitely the right person to answer this question up in like that. And then your t is what I call your t's, which is a statement of your opinion in this case, and a declaration that you're going to offer two reasons to support that opinion. This is the first 15 seconds, right? You get into the question. This is such a great question. I was just talking about this with some of my friends, so I definitely have an opinion on it. And here's my opinion. And I think this way for two reasons. And then you're going to go to your first reason here. You're going to state that reason. That's the fourth thing that you're going to say. That first reason, like uses sequencing word like that first, write, indicate to the reader that you are sequencing your ideas first and then my first reason, and then I'm going to explain that reason and then I'm going to give an example. So my examples supports my explanation, and my explanation supports my reason. And then you're going to do it all over again. Now you don't have time to brainstorm or taking a real nodes during this 15-second preparation window. So that's why. It helps to have your grade ready-to-use like in the test center. Make sure you have your tic-tac-toe board set up just like this. Again, it helps to have the 15 seconds, the first 15 seconds of your response memorize this first column here, right? You praise the question. You establish yourself as an authority on the subject and then state your opinion. Then the next 30 seconds should be pretty easy. Reason one explanation example, then reason to explanation example. And we'll return to this grid in just a minute. Ok. The fourth tab is online voice recorder. You can use your phone or anything else to record yourself, but I love doing it here on my desktop. So let me record my response ok to TPO. Question one, tB 040, and we'll then we'll analyze it together. Okay, so for my prep time, I'm going to use Google drawings so you can see what I do and I'll put a clock in the corner as well, okay. Okay. I love this question of the right person to answer it too, because I used to read a lot of paper-based content and not so much anymore. I think paper materials will become obsolete for a couple of reasons. The first is the wide variety of digital platforms out there. Paper-based content is doomed because there are so many ways to consume material online. For example, I can read books and newspapers and even magazines on the web. The second reason is the wide variety of digital devices. Almost everyone has access to some kind of internet connected device. For example, I think in the US, smartphone penetration is at 70%. Online voice recorder is so great because it shows you your your time, right? And I knew I was getting is getting up to it. Yeah. So in fact and the real TOEFL, My response would be clipped here. Right? Smartphone penetration. By the way, I don't think I would be penalized for that. I'm pretty sure that this represents a good high-scoring answer. Online voice recorder is great because it shows you your time, right? And so I should be able to, to notice not only my, my time, but my wave form here. And I can see my little hesitations here, my little silences. That's perfectly normal. And if you look at the waveform of someone who is really struggling, you'll see these large gaps or at an extreme sort of variation in their wave form. It's almost like you can recognize it on site. So I want to go over this, this wave form with you and try to show you how in your own analysis at home you should be able to break down your response into 315 second chunks, right? Like you should be able to figure out where your first break is. I'm guessing mine is there. Let's see if I'm right. Okay. I love this question of the right person to answer it too, because I used to read a lot of paper-based content and not so much anymore. I think paper materials will become obsolete for a couple of reasons. The first, get their ego for a couple of reasons. It's actually here, right? So my time is great. Look at that. Just 1.4 seconds off. And that means that the next 15 seconds should be here from first 20 somewhere. And I knew I was watching my time. So I know I'm just over there. Let's listen to the first reason and then the explanation. And then the example first is the wide variety of digital platforms out there. Good. So there's my reason. Paper-based content is doomed because there are so many ways to consume material online. There's my explanation. For example, I can read books and newspapers and today I go over and even magazines on the web. Okay, so there it is as the second piece there. And then going down to the third piece here. The second reason is the wide variety of digital devices. Okay? So I like to first reason is the wide variety of platforms. The second reason is the wide variety of devices. I love thinking and tools that are easy like OK, what is it? It's the web and it's the phone, right? It's the platform, it's the device, it's the browser, and it's the tablet or whatever like that. Very easy in the notes. You can see that as soon as you develop those ideas very quickly, they're pretty easy to explain and then to exemplify. So here's my explanation. Almost everyone has access to some kind of internet connected device, for example, if good. And that's the explanation here. And then of course, the last part where I go over, for example, I think in the US, smartphone penetration is Sal is tragic, sort of speed up there a little bit. But again, you get the idea. I wanted to do this authentically for you. And I've been doing this for well over a decade. Okay, so I have this 45 second kind of formula, almost like baked into my brain. But the good news is for you, it can be too like it can become a habit. It's certainly not a natural way to speak right in 15-second chunks. And in fact, you could break it down into 5 second chunks, right? So 55555, it's an unnatural way to speak. That's one of the reasons why TOEFL speaking is so hard.