Success in French Grammar | The Present Perfect (past) Tense | Kieran Ball | Skillshare

Success in French Grammar | The Present Perfect (past) Tense

Kieran Ball, Learn a language in 3-minute chunks

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233 Lessons (11h 31m)
    • 1. Introduction

      3:27
    • 2. Lesson 1

      3:51
    • 3. Lesson 2a

      3:44
    • 4. Lesson 2b

      4:25
    • 5. Lesson 2c

      3:08
    • 6. Lesson 2d

      3:26
    • 7. Lesson 3a

      3:17
    • 8. Lesson 3b

      3:23
    • 9. Lesson 3c

      2:40
    • 10. Lesson 4a

      3:47
    • 11. Lesson 4b

      2:44
    • 12. Lesson 4c

      3:03
    • 13. Lesson 4d

      2:49
    • 14. Lesson 4e

      2:49
    • 15. Lesson 4f

      2:41
    • 16. Lesson 4g

      3:02
    • 17. Lesson 4h

      3:12
    • 18. Lesson 4i

      2:55
    • 19. Lesson 4j

      2:35
    • 20. Lesson 4k

      2:46
    • 21. Lesson 4l

      2:43
    • 22. Lesson 4m

      3:15
    • 23. Lesson 4n

      4:10
    • 24. Lesson 5a

      2:24
    • 25. Lesson 5b

      2:56
    • 26. Lesson 5c

      3:02
    • 27. Lesson 5d

      3:02
    • 28. Lesson 5e

      2:58
    • 29. Lesson 5f

      2:14
    • 30. Lesson 5g

      2:30
    • 31. Lesson 5h

      2:48
    • 32. Lesson 5i

      2:37
    • 33. Lesson 5j

      2:51
    • 34. Lesson 5k

      3:06
    • 35. Lesson 5l

      2:41
    • 36. Lesson 5m

      3:03
    • 37. Lesson 5n

      3:09
    • 38. Lesson 5o

      3:30
    • 39. Lesson 5p

      2:48
    • 40. Lesson 5q

      3:22
    • 41. Lesson 5r

      4:31
    • 42. Lesson 6a

      4:33
    • 43. Lesson 6b

      3:20
    • 44. Lesson 6c

      4:06
    • 45. Lesson 6d

      3:20
    • 46. Lesson 6e

      3:43
    • 47. Lesson 7a

      4:23
    • 48. Lesson 7b

      2:27
    • 49. Lesson 7c

      2:52
    • 50. Lesson 7d

      2:59
    • 51. Lesson 7e

      2:59
    • 52. Lesson 7f

      2:42
    • 53. Lesson 7g

      2:46
    • 54. Lesson 7h

      2:38
    • 55. Lesson 7i

      2:54
    • 56. Lesson 7j

      2:41
    • 57. Lesson 8a

      3:46
    • 58. Lesson 8b

      3:08
    • 59. Lesson 8c

      3:36
    • 60. Lesson 8d

      3:31
    • 61. Lesson 9a

      2:26
    • 62. Lesson 9b

      2:33
    • 63. Lesson 9c

      2:55
    • 64. Lesson 9d

      3:01
    • 65. Lesson 9e

      3:01
    • 66. Lesson 9f

      2:56
    • 67. Lesson 9g

      2:50
    • 68. Lesson 9h

      2:30
    • 69. Lesson 9i

      2:43
    • 70. Lesson 9j

      2:39
    • 71. Lesson 9k

      2:53
    • 72. Lesson 9l

      2:47
    • 73. Lesson 9m

      2:32
    • 74. Lesson 9n

      2:50
    • 75. Lesson 9o

      3:00
    • 76. Lesson 9p

      2:43
    • 77. Lesson 9q

      2:47
    • 78. Lesson 9r

      3:33
    • 79. Lesson 9s

      3:03
    • 80. Lesson 9t

      3:03
    • 81. Lesson 9u

      2:43
    • 82. Lesson 9v

      3:14
    • 83. Lesson 9w

      3:06
    • 84. Lesson 9x

      4:16
    • 85. Lesson 10a

      1:44
    • 86. Lesson 10b

      2:48
    • 87. Lesson 10c

      2:39
    • 88. Lesson 10d

      3:59
    • 89. Lesson 10e

      2:42
    • 90. Lesson 10f

      3:03
    • 91. Lesson 10g

      3:18
    • 92. Lesson 10h

      3:16
    • 93. Lesson 10i

      3:06
    • 94. Lesson 10j

      3:08
    • 95. Lesson 10k

      3:07
    • 96. Lesson 10l

      3:01
    • 97. Lesson 10m

      3:10
    • 98. Lesson 10n

      3:01
    • 99. Lesson 10o

      3:05
    • 100. Lesson 10p

      3:05
    • 101. Lesson 10q

      3:07
    • 102. Lesson 10r

      4:57
    • 103. Lesson 11a

      3:44
    • 104. Lesson 11b

      4:00
    • 105. Lesson 11c

      3:55
    • 106. Lesson 11d

      3:52
    • 107. Lesson 11e

      3:31
    • 108. Lesson 11f

      4:02
    • 109. Lesson 11g

      3:06
    • 110. Lesson 12a

      3:14
    • 111. Lesson 12b

      2:44
    • 112. Lesson 12c

      2:53
    • 113. Lesson 12d

      2:58
    • 114. Lesson 12e

      2:51
    • 115. Lesson 12f

      3:03
    • 116. Lesson 12g

      3:03
    • 117. Lesson 12h

      2:04
    • 118. Lesson 12i

      2:17
    • 119. Lesson 12j

      2:21
    • 120. Lesson 12k

      2:18
    • 121. Lesson 12l

      2:23
    • 122. Lesson 12m

      2:29
    • 123. Lesson 12n

      2:40
    • 124. Lesson 12o

      2:34
    • 125. Lesson 12p

      2:34
    • 126. Lesson 12q

      2:28
    • 127. Lesson 12r

      2:37
    • 128. Lesson 12s

      2:36
    • 129. Lesson 12t

      2:33
    • 130. Lesson 12u

      2:37
    • 131. Lesson 12v

      2:39
    • 132. Lesson 12w

      2:39
    • 133. Lesson 12x

      3:18
    • 134. Lesson 13a

      1:35
    • 135. Lesson 13b

      2:48
    • 136. Lesson 13c

      2:51
    • 137. Lesson 13d

      2:38
    • 138. Lesson 13e

      2:41
    • 139. Lesson 13f

      2:38
    • 140. Lesson 13g

      2:41
    • 141. Lesson 13h

      2:36
    • 142. Lesson 13i

      2:39
    • 143. Lesson 13j

      2:15
    • 144. Lesson 13k

      2:15
    • 145. Lesson 13l

      2:17
    • 146. Lesson 13m

      2:19
    • 147. Lesson 13n

      2:47
    • 148. Lesson 13o

      2:45
    • 149. Lesson 13p

      2:47
    • 150. Lesson 13q

      2:48
    • 151. Lesson 13r

      4:25
    • 152. Lesson 14a

      2:57
    • 153. Lesson 14b

      2:58
    • 154. Lesson 14c

      3:04
    • 155. Lesson 14d

      2:58
    • 156. Lesson 14e

      3:00
    • 157. Lesson 14f

      3:01
    • 158. Lesson 14g

      2:24
    • 159. Lesson 15a

      1:43
    • 160. Lesson 15b

      2:39
    • 161. Lesson 15c

      2:36
    • 162. Lesson 15d

      2:40
    • 163. Lesson 15e

      2:16
    • 164. Lesson 15f

      2:14
    • 165. Lesson 15g

      2:57
    • 166. Lesson 15h

      2:15
    • 167. Lesson 15i

      2:19
    • 168. Lesson 15j

      2:15
    • 169. Lesson 15k

      2:16
    • 170. Lesson 15l

      2:16
    • 171. Lesson 15m

      2:16
    • 172. Lesson 15n

      2:15
    • 173. Lesson 15o

      2:18
    • 174. Lesson 15p

      2:19
    • 175. Lesson 15q

      2:17
    • 176. Lesson 15r

      2:18
    • 177. Lesson 15s

      2:17
    • 178. Lesson 15t

      2:20
    • 179. Lesson 15u

      2:20
    • 180. Lesson 15v

      2:19
    • 181. Lesson 15w

      2:20
    • 182. Lesson 15x

      3:13
    • 183. Lesson 16a

      1:44
    • 184. Lesson 16b

      3:01
    • 185. Lesson 16c

      2:54
    • 186. Lesson 16d

      2:58
    • 187. Lesson 16e

      2:57
    • 188. Lesson 16f

      2:59
    • 189. Lesson 16g

      3:02
    • 190. Lesson 16h

      2:57
    • 191. Lesson 16i

      3:04
    • 192. Lesson 16j

      3:04
    • 193. Lesson 16k

      3:03
    • 194. Lesson 16l

      3:04
    • 195. Lesson 16m

      3:06
    • 196. Lesson 16n

      3:04
    • 197. Lesson 16o

      3:05
    • 198. Lesson 16p

      3:03
    • 199. Lesson 16q

      3:05
    • 200. Lesson 16r

      4:52
    • 201. Lesson 17a

      3:12
    • 202. Lesson 17b

      3:13
    • 203. Lesson 17c

      3:06
    • 204. Lesson 17d

      3:08
    • 205. Lesson 17e

      3:02
    • 206. Lesson 17f

      3:17
    • 207. Lesson 17g

      2:17
    • 208. Lesson 18a

      1:15
    • 209. Lesson 18b

      3:14
    • 210. Lesson 18c

      3:14
    • 211. Lesson 18d

      0:56
    • 212. Lesson 18e

      3:12
    • 213. Lesson 18f

      3:16
    • 214. Lesson 18g

      2:04
    • 215. Lesson 18h

      3:16
    • 216. Lesson 18i

      3:30
    • 217. Lesson 18j

      3:31
    • 218. Lesson 18k

      3:34
    • 219. Lesson 18l

      2:15
    • 220. Lesson 18m

      3:43
    • 221. Lesson 18n

      3:38
    • 222. Lesson 18o

      3:41
    • 223. Lesson 18p

      3:41
    • 224. Lesson 19a

      5:31
    • 225. Lesson 20a

      7:30
    • 226. Lesson 20b

      2:09
    • 227. Lesson 20c

      3:11
    • 228. Lesson 20d

      3:00
    • 229. Lesson 20e

      3:12
    • 230. Lesson 20f

      2:54
    • 231. Lesson 20g

      2:51
    • 232. Lesson 20h

      2:58
    • 233. Lesson 20i

      1:50

About This Class

An in-depth study guide with lessons and practice exercises to help you master the present perfect tense in French

Learn to manipulate the French language to allow you to say whatever you want.

The present perfect tense is a tense you can use to talk about the past. It's made up of two parts and, in English, it looks like this:

"I have eaten"

"Have you seen Marie"

"We haven't spoken to Pierre"

"Haven't they finished?"

With this course, you'll learn exactly how to use this tense in French.

You'll learn how to form this tense and manipulate it into the negative and also into questions. We'll look at regular and irregular verbs as well as the verbs of movement.

With over 2,300 practice exercises, you'll have plenty of opportunity to master this tense.

 

PROGRESS TO THE NEXT COURSE

I have a second series of courses available called “3 Minute French”. This series builds the French language in small chunks and shows you how to put the chunks together to form your own sentences. With the 3 Minute courses, you’ll be speaking lots French from the very start. Here are the links to the 3 Minute French courses on SkillShare:

3 Minute French – Course 1

3 Minute French – Course 2

3 Minute French – Course 3

3 Minute French – Course 4

3 Minute French – Course 5

3 Minute French – Course 6

3 Minute French – Course 7

 

Additionally, I have a series of French courses called “Building Structures”. These courses use the same method found in the 3 Minute French courses, but they focus on building fluency by looking at the different structures of the French language. I recommend starting these courses once you’ve completed up to 3 Minute French – Course 3, and then you can work through both series simultaneously. Here are the links for the Building Structures in French courses on SkillShare:

Building Structures in French – Structure 1

Building Structures in French – Structure 2

Building Structures in French – Structure 3

Building Structures in French – Structure 4

 

Finally, if you want to explore the French language even further, I have some French grammar courses available. I’ve used the same method in these courses as I have in the other courses, so hopefully you’ll find them fun and interesting

Transcripts

1. Introduction: success in French grammar, the present perfect tense. The verb is the backbone off any sentence, and if you can manipulate that, you can say pretty much anything you like. When I first started to learn French, I quickly realized that if I can congregate a very bad high speed, I will be well on my way to fluency in the success in French grammar series. I'm focusing each course on a particular 10th so that you can really get to grips with it and understand its use. But before we start this course, let me share with you an extremely handy learning tip that helped me to progress quickly and effectively when learning French. When most people start studying for anything, they tend to spend the first day or two studying for hours and hours on. They get through loads of work. However, very quickly this begins to dwindle. You might feel like spending hours studying French, which is great, but you want that feeling of motivation to continue and it won't continue if you actually do spend our studying, so limit your so you time to chunks of just three minutes no more. I've given you plenty of practice exercises in this course, and in three minutes you can get through quite a lot of them. If you limit your studying to just three minute chunks, there are three amazing things that will happen. Firstly, you're maintain enthusiasm. If you want to learn anything, you have to maintain enthusiasm or else you won't continue. If you limit your study time to just three minutes, you'll keep French fresh and exciting and you'll be eager to learn. If you spend hours studying very quickly, you'll get bored with French and it'll turn into a chore. Secondly, you'll find that you still eat more consistently. It's much better to study for just three minutes once a day than to study for three hours once a week. A spare three minutes is relatively easy to find, even in the most hectic of generals. If you make sure you complete at least 13 minutes study session every day, it will quickly become a habit that you'll do without thinking it's much easier to fit in a daily three minute habit than a weekly three hour have it on. By doing this, you'll become a much more consistent letter on consistency is the key to success. Finally, you'll achieve more effective memorization. This is my favorite reason as to why you should limit your study to just three minutes. Jumps. If you study something for just three minutes every day, you'll trick your brain into memorizing the information more quickly than if it were to see the information for hours. Each day. Your brain will think I see this information every day, so it must be important. But I don't see it for very long, so I better hold on to it and make it into a memory. First, you'll be amazed at how much more easily things tend to stay in your brain if you limit yourself to just three minutes a day, so three minutes is the key on. Actually, I've set out the lessons in this course so that they last for just three minutes. You should aim to watch at least 13 minute lesson every day. Any more than one is a bonus. But at least one is important every day and you'll find that you learn French quickly and easily, so let's begin 2. Lesson 1: What is the present perfect tense in English? The president perfect. Tense is probably my favorite tense in French. But let me start by talking about this tense in English. If you understand how the tense works in English, you can easily convert it to French. In English, the present perfect is made up off to parts and all the reverb and a past participle. The auxiliary verb in English is have and it comes in seven different forms. I have. You have he has. She has one has we have and they have. So you use one of those auxiliary verbs. And then you took a past participle unto the end of it in English. To make a past participle, you choose a verb and then port e d. On the end, for example, jump becomes jumped. In the past participle talk becomes talked, phone becomes phoned. Cool becomes called finish becomes finished. So you take a new auxiliary verb and then you put a passport visible on the end on you have the present perfect tense. In English, for example, I have finished. You have jumped. He has called. She has phoned Pierre. We have worked very hard today they have painted a picture for their friend. He has delivered the news to the family. These are all examples of sentences in the present perfect tens. And as you can see, these are all sentences in the past. So actually, another way of talking about the present perfect tense is the past tense. So the president, perfect tense, is a type off past tense, sometimes in English. You can't make a passport visible by adding letters e d. Sometimes you have to add e n instead, for example, eat becomes eaten, speak becomes spoken, take becomes taken, give becomes given or C becomes scene. You can do the same thing again, just get an auxiliary verb and took one of the past participles on the end. Here are some examples sentences. We have spoken to the teacher about John. They have eaten a lot. Today I have given Marie the message. He has taken everything with him. She has written a letter for Simon. You have seen the film already so in English. Most of the time the past participle ends in E. D or E n. But we also have lots of exceptions to that rule for example, do becomes done. Read becomes red Sing becomes song, Go becomes gone, make becomes made put becomes poked and fly becomes flown And all these past participles can also report on the end often auxiliary verb to form the present perfect tense In English, for example, I have made a cake for Julia. We have put the keys on the table. They have flown to Rome. He has sung nonstop all day. They have gone to Barcelona without Steve. So that's what the president perfect tense is in English. Next, it's time to tackle the same tents infringe. 3. Lesson 2a: How do you form the present perfect tents in French? Remember how you need an auxiliary verb and then a past participle in English to form the present perfect tense. And how in English the auxiliary verb was Have we had I have you have he has. She has one has we have and they have well, infringe The auxiliary verb is avoir and here is of wire, which means have in its many different congregations. J to, uh, it, uh it, uh, on, uh, news was I ve his own his own. Now you may have noticed that English had seven forms, whereas French has nine different forms. Well, let's look at what the French versions mean. J means I have Teoh means you have illa means he has l our means she has. I know is one has news of all it means we have with a is you have his own means They have on his own means. They have. So, firstly, there are two ways to say you have infringe on. Secondly, there are two ways to say they have. Let's start with you have to, uh versus would've e The two ap form is used to mean you have when you know the person you're speaking to quite well. It can be used with friends, family or anyone who's younger than you. The boys have a form is used to mean you have when you don't really know the person you're speaking to. It can be used with anyone who's older than you or with strangers. I tend to use this form a lot more just to be on the safe side. And also I don't have any friends now. You can also use Mousavi if you're talking to more than one person, regardless of whether you know them or not. Therefore, to our is often referred to as informal on Singular. Whereas Mousavi is referred to as formal or plural, then let's have a look at the different forms off. They have ears on versus ism. Both is on Andi ism mean they are, but the difference is quite easy to understand. The zone is used if you're talking about a group of men or a group off men and women is own on, the land is used. If you're talking about a group off women, so here's own is often referred to as masculine Andi ism is referred to as feminine. So that's the auxiliary verb in French On that goes first we have Jay Teoh. You, uh, Ella Oh, no news of all with a is own and is, um 4. Lesson 2b: remember how in English to form the past participle, you can take a verb and port e d on the end. Or sometimes you port e n on the end or sometimes it was just completely irregular. Well, in French, there are three different types of verbs. Those that end in the letters e are those that end in the letters i r on those that end in the letters R E to form the past participle infringe If the verb ends in e r. You change the er to an e with an accent. If the very ends and I are you change the i. R Tuinei on If the verb ends in our e u change the R E to a U. So the 1st 1 was e. R becomes e with an accent. Let's have a look at some examples. The verb palais means to speak on the past participle. Bali is spoken. Oh, you gotta be means watch and the past participle Mugabe is watched, so you'll notice so far that narrowly on battle e sound the same, huh? Gandhi on big are they sound the same. And so in French. The past participle for er verbs actually sounds the same as the normal Web. More J means to eat. Onda Moggie with an E with an accent means eaten. Hey a means pay pay a. The passport visible means paid on why he means send on wiet. The passport visible means sent Apple A is cool happily is called. Come on, say is start gonna say with an E with an accent is started on a copy means copy Onda copy a means copied so you can tell the difference in writing in writing. The normal verb ends in the letters E R. Where is the past Participle ends in E and accent speaking. They sound the same so you can take any auxiliary verb on. Put one of these past participles on the end, for example. How would you say in French? I have spoken J. Palaly. Gee, Palaly. He has started. It's a common stay. It's a common say we have called Marie News. Irvan actually marry new Zervos. Happily, Marie, they have paid you. Don't be gay is on payday. You have watched the film. Do you have a guard? They love freedom. Do you have a gala fume? She has eaten the pizza. L Amar Pizza Pizza. I have sent the letter to John J. On Loretta J. Violeta. So that's it. Easy peasy lemon squeezy with er verbs. Or you have to do to change them into a past. Participle is replaced the ER with an E with an accent and in speaking both the normal lives on the past. Participle off. Er, verbs sounds the same. In writing, you can tell the difference, and then you comport the past participle after any auxiliary verb to form the present perfect tense in French, a k a. The past tense. 5. Lesson 2c: So we've just learned that to form the past participle with verbs in French that end in E. R. You change the er to an E with an accent. If you have a very bad ends in IR, however you change the i R to an I. For example, veneer means finish for me is finished. Shazia is choose crazy is chosen so you can see that unlike the er, verbs, the IR verbs sound different in the past. Participle to the normal ebb. So with the normal verb, you can hear the are in the end shreds year. But with the past participle the artist appears so well you have is the I sound crazy. I use EEA means succeed. How you see is succeeded. Come here is Fillmore to Philip completely is filled Mega. The year is lose weight. Mega V is the past participle, meaning lost weight across year is gain weight whereas glossy is gained weight and again, all you have to do is put