Storytelling in Movies: Tell a Satisfying Story | Protagonist's Journey, Inside Out! | Film in Flame | Skillshare

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Storytelling in Movies: Tell a Satisfying Story | Protagonist's Journey, Inside Out!

teacher avatar Film in Flame, Filmmaking Teacher

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

10 Lessons (16m)
    • 1. Trailer

      1:19
    • 2. Flawed Protagonist

      1:46
    • 3. Comedy and Tragedy

      1:37
    • 4. Set-Up Want

      0:44
    • 5. Point of No Return

      2:36
    • 6. Crisis or Triumph

      1:46
    • 7. Climactic Choice

      1:40
    • 8. Final Step

      2:14
    • 9. Review + New Examples

      1:34
    • 10. Final Words

      0:14
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About This Class

Great storytelling is different from beautiful writing. Many screenwriters know how to write good dialogue, how to set the scenes. They may have interesting characters, and a great idea; but eventually will fail to tell a satisfying story.

The solution lies in the internal journey of the protagonist. The solution lies in story structure.

In this short class, you're gonna learn the basic types of stories and the hero's journey in each type. And you're gonna learn it in a very simple way. After this class you'll be able to design a satisfying journey for your protagonist. And instead of just presenting a situation, tell a real story.

The examples I use in this class are from these movies: "Groundhog Day (1993)", "Silver Linings Playbook (2012)", "Chinatown (1974)", "Social Network (2010)", "The Matrix (1999)", "Memento (2000)."

Enjoy. Good luck.

Meet Your Teacher

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Film in Flame

Filmmaking Teacher

Teacher

Film in Flame is an online film magazine which is interested in films that are in flames.

We have such great passion for filmmaking that it makes us smile as large as the half-moon. We love great editings, big emotions, and the moments when you can feel the heat of genius in a film.

We study great masters; and here, we are to share what we’ve learned from them with you. We are willing to teach you all the aspects of filmmaking. Of course, that isn’t possible! Cause many things can’t be learned on a phone or in front of a computer. You gotta get your hands dirty in the work. But we’re gonna try our best to give you the primary knowledge so you can do the rest.

I hope you like our contents, and I wish you good luck.

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Transcripts

1. Trailer: storytelling comes naturally to human beings, but since will live in a natural world, sometimes need a little help doing what with natural do. 99% of amateur screen writers we know how to write snappy dialogue. They may have an interesting chance you're here and there some clever plot points and a great idea. But eventually they fail to tell a story that towards what they present instead is a situation. This glass is here to help you with that. Subjects such as screenplay, formatting, dialogue and character developments are outside of its scope. Focus here is on something Mawr essential and so often misunderstood. How you structure is cream place, so details a compelling, satisfying story. And I'm gonna teach that to you in a very easy, a simple way. And the good news is, I'm not going to border, saying there are some exceptions to this. Over and over, there are some exceptions to everything, but that's called style no structure. Now let's begin 2. Flawed Protagonist: the first thing to consider when designing a stories to have a protagonist, the audience is floating freely like a ghost on cell. You give them a place to land. This free floating effect can be exploited for a while. But sooner or later we need to be someone. Because if we are not inside a character than we are not inside the story. Here are some examples of protagonists in movies, even in a body movie like Fellman, Louise or Hot Falls or Zombie Latte. From the writer's point of view on Lee, one of the characters is the protagonist. Whether the audience realizes it or not, how can you understand who the protagonist is? Well, it's the one who has a flaw and his flies being tested through the story. The protagonist may have lots off loss, but only one of them is the focus of the story. It is super important for the protagonists to have a flaw. Actually, a story more than all is about a protagonist facing their flaw. The journey tests the protagonists flaw, and as the story goes forward, there will be two possibilities. He either moves away from the flaw and two are the strength or he fails to move away from the flaw. This is what distinguishes an heiress Italian comedy from an inner city alien tragedy. 3. Comedy and Tragedy: comedy and tragedy. What I talk about comedy. I don't mean funny on When I talk about tragedy, I don't mean a sad ending. These are arse Italian comedy and tragedy. Two basic kinds of stories. If white end of the story, your protagonist has moved away from the flood toward the strength, it's a comedy, and it usually has a happy ending, like the movie Ground Hog Day or Silver Linings playbook that, in contrast, if by the end of the story your protagonist has failed to move away from the flow and has failed to move toward the strength, it's a tragedy, and it usually has a sad ending, like the movie Chinatown or Social Network. Remember, a comedy doesn't necessarily have a happy ending, and a tragedy doesn't necessarily have a sad ending. For example, Bravehearts Ending is sad and makes you cry, but it's a comedy because the protagonist, William Wallace, moves away from this flawed and toward the strength, and by the end of the film, he's made the right choices. So you're protagonists flows like the DNA of the story. It is what it's all about. Now that you know this, let's begin the journey 4. Set-Up Want: the set of wants is located in the beginning of the story. The subtle wants is one of the things the protagonists wants. One, not all, not necessarily the thing they want the most, not necessarily even the wants that drives the character's motivations. It's just one thing, sometimes a little thing that the protagonist wants. Here are some examples. 5. Point of No Return: the point of no return is an event that changes everything for the protagonist. This is the events that pushes the protagonists past the point of no return, where there is no going back to the way things used to be. This point of no return makes the film the film that IHS, also the point of no return is something that happens to the protagonist. It is not something they simply choose to do someday. It is external and changes the course of events into protagonists life. It happens for the story to be set in motion. If it didn't happen to them, the protagonists would have never saw their journey because people are scared of change. At the point of no return, two important things happen. One, the protagonist is going to get their set up. Want to the first Agnes is also going to get something they didn't want. We call that the catch. The catch creates new conflicts for the protagonist, and those conflicts will become perfect. Tests off the protagonists flaw. Here are some examples. Some key notes, the point of no return and the catch are immediately and directly connected. The catch is no something to Protagonist discovers later. It is an immediate problem that comes as a part of the point of no return. The catch is not a new event. It does not require scenes in addition to the point of no return, because the point of no return must give the protagonist of their wants and also bring them a catch. Sometimes what comprises the full point of no return a a stretch over a couple of scenes and even be made up off two or three connected events. Also, the catch is always from the protagonists point of view. 6. Crisis or Triumph: after about 75% of a story after trying to deal with the conflicts that catch made. Four The protagonist. If the stories a comedy, the protagonist will reach their crisis. And if his story's a tragedy, the protagonists were reached. Their triumph in comedy The Crisis is the protagonists lowest point, and it is the exact opposite of state off mine or situation from where the protagonist was in the set up. Want. It puts the protagonist between two bad choices. Iraq and a hard place with no solution in sight. It is right before the protagonists makes a climatic choice away from the flaw and toward the strength. Here are some examples in tragedy Triumph is the protagonists highest point. It is the ultimate manifestation of the protagonists set up wants. It typically puts the protagonist between two good options. It is right before the protagonists makes a climatic choice in which they fail an opportunity to move away from the flaw and toward the strength. Here are some examples 7. Climactic Choice: whether the stories, comedy or tragedy, the protagonists will immediately face a big decision, and this decision is central to your story's climax. At the heart of a true climax, the protagonist is making a climatic choice. It is also the beginning of a reversal of fortune. It is a decision made directly from having been It's winning a rock and a hard place at the crisis in comedy or from having experienced the ultimate manifestation Off The Settle won't in the Triumph in Tragedy in a comedy, The Climatic choice is a move away from the protagonists flaw and toward the strength. It is a first step toward positive change that will comet in. They're usually happy ending at the very end. Here are some examples in a tragedy. It is a move furthering your flaw and failing to move toward the strength. It is a fair step in the wrong direction, the beginning of the downfall that will cominat in there usually sad ending. Here are some examples 8. Final Step: sometimes the climactic choices repeated a few times with similar actions until the full climax plays out. But all these actions add up to only partial change on the part of the protagonist in a comedy. That's why it's known as the false resolution. The story is not yet resolved. The final step is the protagonists last significant. Seen in the screenplay or Phil, it accommodates a second move away from the protagonist flaw and toward the strength in a new and different matter than in the climactic choice. Completing this story's resolution and the protagonists transformation. Here are some examples in a tragedy. It's a second move, furthering the protagonists flaw and failing to move toward the strength completing stores resolution and the protagonists failure at self transformation. Here are some examples A jump forward in time between the climactic choice and the final step is not uncommon. You, the screenwriter, won the full impact off the climax and its climatic choice to be experienced before approaching the final step. Let the dust settle from the climax and allow that whole chapter to come to a close and then in the last scene of the screenplay, have them take a final step to demonstrate another move different from their climatic choice, but also away from, therefore, and toward their strength if it's a comedy and if it's a tragedy and not are failing to move away from the flaw. 9. Review + New Examples: bring a comedy. The flawed protagonists has a set up, want sterile thing happens to him at the point of no return against what he wanted in the set of wants, but also against something he doesn't want, which is the catch. The catch makes new conflicts for the protagonists in a way that tests their flaw. Dealing with these conflicts, the protagonist gets the crisis, a point that is the exact opposite of the situation or the mind set he was in the subtle wants. Then he makes a good climatic choice toward the strength. And then again, in the final step, he makes another good choice toward the strength in a tragedy. The flood protagonist has a set of want an ex Cheryl thing happens to him at the point of no return. He gets what he wanted in the center of wants but also gets something it doesn't want, which is the catch. The catch makes new conflicts for the protagonist in a way that tests their flaw. Dealing with these conflicts, the protagonist gets to the triumph. Ah, high manifestation off the settle, won't he had in the beginning of the story. Then he makes a bad climactic choice based on his flaw. Then again in the final set, he makes another bad choice based on this flaw and doesn't learn his lesson. 10. Final Words: Thank you for watching this glass. I wish it's being helpful to you. Don't for you to follow filming flame form or classes on field making. I wish you the best goodbye.