Sound Design - Create Whoosh Sound Effects | Mikael Baggström | Skillshare
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6 Lessons (14m)
    • 1. Introduction to Whoosh Sound Effects

      1:31
    • 2. How to create Whoosh Sound FX

      5:14
    • 3. Live Example 1 - Vocal Whoosh

      2:39
    • 4. Live Example 2 - Noise Whoosh

      2:20
    • 5. Live Example 3 - Rhythmic Whoosh

      2:07
    • 6. Whoosh Effects - Your Project

      0:24
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About This Class

Whoosh Sound Effects. These are sounds that are short transition effects, that sounds like a whoosh. Like something flying by fast in the air. You often hear the whoosh effect used as a sound effect in movies. For example in fights when someone swings his fist or weapon towards the opponent, making a whoosh sound in the movement, followed by the punch or hit sound.

The whoosh sound effect is mainly made up from white noise, like the sound of the wind for example. Meaning it doesn't really have a tonal pitch, at least not that prominent. But it has movement in it, that quickly changes its tonal center, and sometimes even the stereo field.

The whoosh sound effects is very effective before a transition point, but since these are shorter sounds, they also work great to simply introduce a new part in your music. And especially just before a big hit or impact type sound.

You will now learn from practical live examples and demonstrations: how to create your own whoosh type sound effects in various styles. So let's continue in the next video, right now!

Meet Your Teacher

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Mikael Baggström

Music Composer | Sound Designer | Video Producer

Teacher

Hey Friends and Creative People!

My name is Mike, and I am a Music Composer, Sound Designer and Artist. I Share my Story, Journey, Experience and Knowledge, to Inspire and Empower Creative People like you. =)

MY PASSION

I believe that learning should be fun. I love to bring my personality into my teaching style. I also try to make my courses dynamic, to be more interesting to you. =)

You are more than welcome to visit my website to learn more about who I am.

Friendly regards,
Mike from Sweden
Founder of professionalcomposers.com

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Transcripts

1. Introduction to Whoosh Sound Effects: Bush is. These are sounds that are short transition effects that sounds like a bush, like something flying by false in the air. You often hear a Bush effect used in sound effects in movies, for example, in fights when someone swings his faced or weapon towards the opponent, making a bush sound in the movement, followed by a punch or hit sound. The Bush sound effect is mainly made up from white noise like the sound of the wind, for example, meaning it doesn't really have a tonal centre or pitch, at least not a prominent one. But it has movement in it that quickly changes its tonal centre and sometimes even the stereo field. The bush sound effect is very effective before a transition point, but since these are shorter sounds, they also were great to simply introducing new port in your music. And especially just before a big hit or impact type sound, you will now learn from practical live examples and demonstrations, tips and tricks and guidelines on how to create your own Bush type sound effects in various styles. So let's continue in the next video right now. 2. How to create Whoosh Sound FX: How do you create your own Bush sound effects? Well, the most important aspect of a bush is that it is mainly noise, like wind on that it has movement in the frequency range. If you try swinging a towel or something really fast, you will hear a Bush sound. Or if you stand by a road, any core is pausing you. Then you will also hear kind of a Bush sound effect. The Bush sound is the sound off air displacement or a sound similar to it. Here are the main ways I used to create Bush sound effects. One voice Bush. It's actually pretty easy to create bushes using your own voice. Basically, you tried to mimic a burst of wind. Pausing by the main way is to move the frequency center off the bush up as you make the bushes sound. Sometimes you might want to go up than down again. You can also adjust the speed when you make the bushes sound. It all depends on what kind of transition sound you want. So let me demonstrate is live by trying it out here on my vocal microphone. So the first thing is you want to think about is that you want to avoid it, making the Bush sound right at the microphone, because that will create too much wind. Burst for the microphone to handle, which will sound like this. So angle your microphone so that you blow the air. When you make a wish, sound over it instead like this, for example, or a longer or shorter one. A short can sound like this or so. You might need some practice to create good wash sounds with your voice. But remember that these are only this starting material that he will then use effects and other sound design techniques on to shape the final Bush sound to noise bush. You can also use a synthesizer to create the Bush sound. If you use a white noise generator, add a band pass filter and then automate a sweep in the frequency range. Then you shape it with the AMP envelope, and you will have something that will work as a bush type sound. So I simply started by adding a noise generator as the also later here, and this sounds like this random white noise. Then I applied a filter, specifically a band post filter because it has a narrow focus in the frequency range set the cut off and residents low and used the field through envelope to slowly open up with the attack. Value the cattle value over time, which sound like this. So that's a good start for the Bush sound effect. And finally I added an analog facer as well as a retro phaser to add even more bushing movement in the sound. The final wish effects sounds like this three rhythmic wish. I find that adding a tremolo facer or Flander can be a great way to add movement into the bush, especially if you increase the rate so that it becomes a rhythm it movement. I also like using stutter type effects like Breathe me Gates, for example. So here we are, back at this bush sound, and you can sink these modulation effects and increase the rate So you hear a riel rhythmic value like eighth knows, for example, like this, or you can apply a rhythmic gate effect as an insert effect on the track. As I did hear with this step effect pattern here, which sounds like this, as you can see, you can do very much starting from Onley, a white noise generator or a simple vocal bush, you recorded yourself with your microphone. Now here are some power tapes on Bush effects. One. You can use time stretched on the old you afterwards. If you want to lengthen or shorten the Russia sound to, I often use a high pass filter to get rid of all that low and rumble that might have been picked up when creating the bush sound effect. Three. You can also record a filter sweep if you want to add more movement into your bushes. Sound. Four. If you want to add movement in the stereo field, you can also automate a panning sweep from left to right or vice versa. In the next videos, I will show you practical examples and demonstrations off specific flavors off Bush transition effects. So let's continue right now. 3. Live Example 1 - Vocal Whoosh: so creating a bush type sound with your voice. It's actually pretty easy. Once you get the hang of it, you simply use your microphone and your voice and try to make a Bush type sound than you can control the pitch and the curve off. How the Bush changes over time like these three different versions here, a short one. What a longer one and an even longer wall. Now one thing I like to do is to make this less voice like, and that's when you use effects. Well, the first effect I usually add is an e que and filter, because if you listen here, there's actually way too much rumble in the low end. So I added these EQ You turn it on, removed very much off the vote where and even low mid frequencies boosted a bit here in this range and then even cut some of the highs. So compare before and we ve que on. That makes the Bush way more clear in the mix and also removes some of the voice like quality, which you might not want to use because he might not want it apparent that the Bush type sound effect is made from a vocal and using heavy filtering, an e queuing will have removed most off the authenticity over the vocals. And in this case, it can be your advantage. Now. The next effect I like to use on Bush type sound effects is a facer, because that adds even more movement because it sweeps in the audio file like this compared to so, a facer will remove in even more off the vocal authenticity, which again can be to your advantage and finally, in effect, that can be really cool. To add is this pitch shifter and I have actually dial it down on a full octave and just mix in a hint of it into the complete sound like this, especially since I've removed so much off the low and low meets here. Adding, the speed shifter can add a bit more off that low presence again. It doesn't have to be a full octave can be any type of value like this. Whatever you want, basically, and how much you mix it in is up to you. All right, let's continue in the next video 4. Live Example 2 - Noise Whoosh: now a knowest type bush sound effect is simply a sound that starts with a white noise generator that you automate a sweep in the audio and I use the same called atmosphere. Then you simply use a noise generator asked away form. So how do you create a sweep? Well, you can do it by, for example, automating the filter here. And since white noise has a full frequency spectrum off static noise, you want to use a narrow where filter like a band pass filter I have here and then automate the frequency sweep, which is this noble cattle value, which it can do manually by right clicking and choosing me. Learn and automated in your sequencer. Or, as I do automated with a filter envelope, and it sounds like this. So you control the speed of this. Weep with the attack. Nope here, because this tells how the cattle value will open over time, so a longer time here will make it open slower like this. Then I also like to add again a face or effect. Without it. It sounds like this the rial white noise sweep. But if you add modulation effects like Face Er's flanges and so on. It will add even more sweeping movement into the sound so before after. So to make it even more clear, I want to show you the vocal bush here and actually what happens in the frequency range as I play it. Look at the frequency spectrum. You can actually see that it sweeps through the spectrum to a higher frequency. And that is what you create with a noise. Bush, by automating the cut off value on the filter to slowly open up. So after applying automation to the filter, cut off frequency, check the frequency spectrum. Now on the noise. Bush stay. You can clearly see the frequency sweep in the frequency spectrum here, and that is what creates the Bush type sound. All right, let's continue in the next video. 5. Live Example 3 - Rhythmic Whoosh: now to create a rhythmic bush type effect. I like to either use a modulation effect that is sink to a note value or using rhythmic gate type effects as an insert effect on the track. So let's check out the first kind first. So this is before adding in effects. Now, if you addy Flander or a face irritable at movement into the sound, but not in a rhythmic way, well, you need to sink and use a note value here that is clearly a rhythmic value. Like, let's say, eight notes. Listen to this. Use it on the face around. It will be even more apparent, the same to kind eighth notes compared to original. He used them boast both together at the same note value to make it even more apparent. But if you want really stepwise rhythmic effects on the bush, I recommend using in actual read meter gauge type effect that you can program a pattern for the rhythm with like this one in logic. And there are many ones you can use, including a standard friends gate effect, and these I've already programmed. So it sounds like this, and of course, you can add modulation effects as insert effects as I showed you with the face or and Flander inside atmosphere, adding them instead as an insert effect on the track. And one other in start effect I like to use is the tremolo, which really adds that rhythmic vibe. So let's set that on eighth notes, and it sounds like this. Sometimes I also export the Would it sound too in or the attract and then go into the volume automation and drew in a rhythmic volume changed like this. All right, so now go ahead and experiment with Bush sounds and I will see you in the next video. 6. Whoosh Effects - Your Project: Now it's time for your project. Use the knowledge, tips and practical examples you have learned from to create your own Bush sound effects. Vocal wishes. No is bushes bushes with added movement and modulation effects and whatever you want to add good luck and have fun in creating bushes for transitions in your music.