Soft & Flowy Watercolor Landscapes - Wet On Wet Technique Explained | Sukrutha Jagirdhar | Skillshare

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Soft & Flowy Watercolor Landscapes - Wet On Wet Technique Explained

teacher avatar Sukrutha Jagirdhar, Watercolor Artist

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

17 Lessons (1h 28m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:55
    • 2. Art Supplies

      1:28
    • 3. About This Class

      6:36
    • 4. Wet On Wet Technique - Basics

      14:41
    • 5. Wet On Wet - Trees & Reflections

      6:39
    • 6. Wet On Wet - Water & Ripples

      3:55
    • 7. Soft Details

      2:25
    • 8. Class Project 1 - Dusk Walk - Part 1

      6:13
    • 9. Class Project 1 - Dusk Walk - Part 2

      5:07
    • 10. Class Project 1 - Dusk Walk - Part 3

      2:12
    • 11. Class Project 2 - Gloomy Lake - Part 1

      6:43
    • 12. Class Project 2 - Gloomy Lake - Part 2

      6:01
    • 13. Class Project 2 - Gloomy Lake - Part 3

      3:54
    • 14. Class Project 3 - Murky River - Part 1

      7:29
    • 15. Class Project 3 - Murky River - Part 2

      6:03
    • 16. Class Project 3 - Murky River - Part 3

      5:34
    • 17. Final Thoughts

      1:15
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25

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About This Class

Have you heard about this very famous yet very complicated techniques in watercolor called “Wet On Wet” ? wet on wet actually means adding wet brush full of paint to an already wet surface/paper..the moment paint touches the paper, there will be an explosion of paint and this is where you either make the painting or break the painting..this is exactly where you need practice, knowledge and learning,,most importantly patience to control and flow of paint and use it to our advantage..

For a beginner in watercolor this  technique seems very confusing and quite overwhelming..so I am here to do my best to clear out a few confusions and give you basic idea on wet on wet technique..

What Are the Class Projects :

Well there are three class projects

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1) Dusk Walk

2) Gloomy Lake

3) Murky River

All these three class projects will be painted with the help of techniques learned previously

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Sukrutha Jagirdhar

Watercolor Artist

Teacher



Hello Everyone, Thank you for visiting my profile..I'm Sukrutha, Watercolor artist based in India..A small story on how this medium has come into my life..i was always fascinated with the water and colors react and do this sort of magical dance when they meet..when i was a child, i did not know much about watercolors even though i was using them..over the time and very slowly i was introduced to the magic of this medium, the different kinds of papers, textures,colors,their vibrancy and i will not even get started on brushes :]

When you show up no matter what, opportunities tend to welcome you in a whole different kinds of ways..one of those doors was Skillshare..whatever i learnt over the years i want to share with all of you wonderful people here,,Thank you for everyone ... See full profile

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hello guys, welcome to another class. We love experimentation and learning. Today's class is all about exploring wet-on-wet technique and how to paint soft landscape. Using the set technique. Wet on wet means adding wet brush full of paint to an already wet surface are a wet paper. One thing you guys need to know is when you apply wet paint to wet surface, it creates an explosion of paint, giving us blurry and soft effects. And today, we're gonna learn how to use these effects. Forever. Advantage and Bain, three beautiful place projects. And with that, I'm going to also teach you guys the very basics of wet-on-wet technique. As well as the basics very specific to the class projects for today's class is a very complicated and confusing technique for beginners. I hope with the techniques that I have curated and with the class projects that I have taught in this class would be a little bit useful for you guys in your journey. I am an artist and a teacher. Can't wait to welcome you guys in the journey of learning, wet-on-wet watercolor. And without any delay, let's get started. 2. Art Supplies: Let's first talk about art supplies that we are going to be needing for today's class. I will first get started with the papers that I've used. For today's class. I have used Fabriano, a 100 percent cotton and 300 GSM paper. And I buy them in roles and I cut them in the shapes that I need. You can buy them in tight or blocks to come into the paint. I have used only two colors For today's entire class. So they are pines gray and burnt sienna. And I have used white tights brand. Coming to the brushes. I have used five brushes for today's class. Among those, breast trauma brush for initial washes and two round brushes for detailing. And one synthetic brush for, you know, it's also for detailing and one flat brush for blending the hard edges. Remember to always use the supplies that they are comfortable with. 3. About This Class: Well, before you like and get started, I just wanted to make sure to give you guys an idea on what this class and class projects are about. It'll be three class projects. And I have used wet-on-wet technique 50 generously in all of these landscapes. Each class project will be a step ahead of the previous one. But that doesn't mean that difficult. So for example, I have used very simple form of wet-on-wet in our class project one. As you can see here, I have just used it for the background and to paint the background trees. And just a little bit to paint water and the ripples. And when we move to the second class project, I have taken one step ahead and I have used Onward even to create the reflections as well. Compared to the previous class projects, this one class project tree is a little bit difficult because there are so many things to do. And you have to work faster when you are going for wet-on-wet. So that is that as you guys can see, there are far too many techniques to learn here. But what do you not? I got you guys covered. I helped plan to D2 guys, everything related to wet-on-wet and some more in today's class. First, we are going to learn how to paint a simple washes using single color as well as two colors in wet-on-wet. This is the basic step you not to get started with wet-on-wet techniques in watercolor. I'm going to teach you guys how to manipulate the wet-on-wet technique. And how do, you know make use of water and paint the shapes and structures that we wish to paint. So I'm going to show two examples. That is how to paint a sky as well as reflections in this video. And then later followed by what not to do while we are going for wet-on-wet. And my favorite of the ball is how to avoid the mistakes in watercolor and how to correct our mistakes as well. So this is a very basic wet-on-wet technique. Techniques that we are going to be learning today. So even if you are a beginner, please tune in and do not miss this particular video. So the next few videos would be about, you know, painting, background are blurry trees that I have used to paint into class projects. These are exactly how I have been dead, those inner background trees. So we're going to learn that. And later, we're going to learn how to paint reflections in wet-on-wet. And in two of my class projects, I have used this wet-on-wet technique to paint the reflections, as you guys can see here. Later, we're going to learn how to paint loose water and lose rebels. And I have used it to paint in all of the three class projects. So you guys can see how important it is. My personal favorite, how to paint the soft details. It's not wet on wet, wet on dry. Nonetheless, it is also important. All these are very specific to the class projects that we are painting, except for the ones you're seeing right here. The washes and manipulations. These you can use for any of the landscapes. These are just like basics to get you started on wet-on-wet. So beginners, please follow the video that is basics of wet on wet technique. So you can have an idea on what to learn when you are starting. That being said, this is not the only place to go for wet-on-wet technique. I'm just showing you guys the basics of wet-on-wet and basics of how I paint, how I go when I'm painting these soft landscapes. So this is my technique and my way of teaching you. Last thing before we can get started on our class. Please practice twice, thrice and as many times till you get all the techniques that I have mentioned today. So obviously, practice makes it perfect and use the right paper, right brush. So the process will be easier for you. So without further ado, let's get started with one of our foster video, basics of wet-on-wet. So please click on the next video and thank you for watching. 4. Wet On Wet Technique - Basics: Hello guys. Welcome to learning the basics of wet-on-wet technique. Wet-on-wet technique is very complicated and a very confusing technique in watercolor, especially for beginners. In this class. For all these three landscapes, I have used extensively this wet-on-wet technique. So it also has some wet on dry as well. But mostly it's wet on wet. Hence, you can see this, you know, soft edges and soft effect over on. So it's also a very extensive technique. So I'm going to quickly introduce you to a very important basics in wet-on-wet technique. So let's get started. First, I'm going to show you how to paint quick and simple washes. In the first wash, I'm going to be using a single color. And in the second wash, I'm going to use two colors. So obviously, we have to get started by reading the paper. I'm going to take pines gray. And I'm going to start with the first wash using single color. And as you can see, I'm not doing any anything else here, just letting the water and the paint do all the work without any effort. I have made a clean wash with using only one color and also using wet-on-wet technique. Let's move on to making another wash using two colors this time. So let's get started by first creating a small area. And I'm going to use two colors, Payne's gray and burnt sienna. And I'm gonna blend these two colors while the paper is still wet. First time earning pines gray, and which is followed by bandanna. So I'm going to alternate these two colors. And as you can see, they're going to blend all by themselves. It doesn't matter how many colors you use. They're going very well, get blended together. So here I'm only using two colors, but if you are practicing these washes, you can use as many colors as you want and you get the same soft blended result that we are done with the basic washes. We're gonna see how we can manipulate wet-on-wet to our convenience. So you can literally paint any shape structure on any kind of mode using a wet-on-dry technique. So I'm going to show you a couple of examples today, which are extensively used in today's class projects. So I'm going to show how to paint the sky, how to manipulate this guy in a way you want, as well as the reflections. Now. So obviously, let's get started by reading the paper and say, I want to paint a stormy sky. So what I have to do is cluster, I want to read the paper. So later, there is one important step. You have to keep something under the board. Usually a masking tape or any small walks would do so that it is easier for the band and not to just flow down AQR seeing here. So I usually use masking tape. You can use a small box as well. So what happens is because the water is there on the paper, it helps the paint to come down. So not much work for us. Basically the water and the paint will take care of your painting. So I want to paint the stormy sky. So i 1, do you not create dark, misty, rainy effect? So I'm just going to take my brush and I'm going to drag lightly. The bane to order is left, as you can see, it's already looking like a storm. So this is how you paint. You manipulate the paint in wet-on-wet technique. Very few strokes. You just have to let the paint and the paper and water do the trick. So coming to the next one here, I want to show you how you can manipulate the downward technique and paint your own kind of reflections. So I am going for a soft reflections in straight off. The mirror reflections that we usually painted in one of our previous classes. Kind of the reflections that I've used in our class projects, as you can see here. So we're going to try to paint this. Once that is water on the paper, all you need to do is use your brush, you know, in order to create the shapes you want. Here, I am just do not dragging the paint down to create the reflections as well as you know, I'm giving you a hint of water. So my brushes going vertical and horizontal at the same time. So let me add a bit of land over this reflection so, you know, we can clearly see the perspective of what we're painting here. To get a clear idea. I hope you guys can see that I haven't done anything. I haven't worked too hard to create. These reflections are water. I just load my brush in a way that I want in a shape that I wanted. Oh, these two are the major techniques that we're going to be needing to paint wet-on-wet. So next topic would be, you know, what not to do, why they are going for wet-on-wet technique. And it's very interesting. Please keep watching. So since we are only talking about the basics of wet-on-wet, we're going to need to know only one thing that should we shouldn't be doing while going for wet-on-wet. One basic thing. So I'm going to tell you water days. So one thing that you shouldn't be doing while going for wet-on-wet technique. Is that not to let the paper dry? That's right. It's very simple. You should not, in any case, let the paper dry. So that loses only with one choice. Are if you're not a beginner or advanced level, you will have two choices. The first choice would be to walk faster. And the second choice would be, you know, like I said, if you are not a big enough, you will have one more choice studies. You can read the paper. But that very complicated if you are just starting out with wet-on-wet. So here I'm going to show you what happens if your paper is getting dried up. Our paper dries up while you are still working on it. So here I'm just going for easy and simple clouds. And I'm going to deliberately wait for a few seconds or a few minutes. Until my buddies around dying, dying. Oh, it's raining very heavily right now. So that's why my paper is holding up so much water and it's not drying up so fast. So to pass the time, I'm gonna, you know, just add one more layer of clouds. This time I'm going to use pines gray. So what happens when the paper is paper dries up lightly are going for wet-on-wet. Is that as you can see right here, it's going to have hard edges instead of soft edges. So in the above section, the clouds that we have painted, you can hardly see your brushstrokes. But here you can clearly see your brushstrokes that are very hard, very hard to ignore as well. So that just means the painting, right? Like I said before, there are only two ways you can avoid getting the hard edges are you can avoid, you know, messing up the wet-on-wet technique. First thing is you need to work faster. And the second thing is you need to learn riveting. So today I'm going to briefly discuss about a riveting as well. So I'm going to choose a simple topic. That is first, I'm going to paint the sky letter. I'm going to add clouds to it. So the first layer would be the sky. So you have to only reverse once your paper completely dries up. So I'm going to wait, didn't the first layer is dried? Later? I'm going to add the Cloud. So as you can see, the paper is still wet. So we're going to wait until it's completely dried up before we start with our next step. Okay, it's completely dried up so we can start with our next step that is riveting. So take your pick a brush that you're comfortable with and just slowly add water. Later. Again, slowly. Add the paint as well. Be very gentle. Wildly are riveting. So do not put pressure on the paper with your brush or else you're going to lose both of the layers, the previous one as well. So this is a very brief and a very simple explanation for riveting using wet on wet technique. So I hope you guys liked this simple techniques that I have described today. And these are ideal if you are going for wet-on-wet for the first time. And these are the techniques that you should be learning as basics. So yeah, that's it for today's basics in northern red technique. Let's move on to the next video. 5. Wet On Wet - Trees & Reflections: Now that we're done with learning wet-on-wet techniques and its basics, it's time to go a little deeper on learn a few more things. For example, you can see these blurry backgrounds that I have painted in these two landscapes. So these are done entirely on wet-on-wet. And I'm going to show you guys how to paint these blurry backgrounds, blurry trees. So, yeah, First, let's get started with that. Obviously, we're gonna get started by reading the paper. Like I said, I'm going to show how I have painted the blurry trees in one of my class projects. You can see it right here. So take a brush full of paint and just let the paint spread over the paper. Once the paint has completely spread over the paper, It's time to take a damp brush. You can clearly see there is no water hanging around on the brush, It's just done. So taking this brush, you can manipulate the shape of the subject. I want us to look like a forest in the background. So I'm just going to drag the paint up port. So it gets kind of like a bunch of trees or bushes. You can clearly see the shape that's forming over here. All of this has to be done while the paper is still wet. Remember my previous tip, walk faster while you are going for wet on wet technique. So you can clearly see the similarity between the background trees of one of my class projects and the one we have vendor just now. But before we finish with this one, you can add a few details as well. I'm going to add a few pine trees. As you guys can see, this is done entirely on wet-on-wet. So like I said, this is also one of the manipulations that you can do using wet-on-wet technique. But you're going to need a lot of practice and a lot of control over the water, as well as the brush in your hand or practice. Well, it's going to be intimidating at the beginning, but it's not as difficult as it look. So yeah, let's move on to the next topic. The next topic would be about painting the reflections using wet-on-wet technique. And let's get started by wetting the paper. Of course. I'm going to use pines gray and I will apply the paint on the paper. And I'm just going to drag the Bane down using my brush. And using a damp brush, I'm going to adjust the shape of this reflections. Let me add the land on top of the reflection. So it gives kind of like a perspective to what we are painting. For that I'm going to use sponsor piano. And with that, we are done with painting wet on retro reflections. So yeah guys, it's that easy. But do you need to have like I said, you need to control the water underpin and the direction of the flow. It's going to take a little bit of practice, but it's never impossible. So I hope you like this techniques. Let's move on to the next video. 6. Wet On Wet - Water & Ripples: As you guys can see, that is one technique that is the most common in all of the class projects that he is painting the loose water and repulse. As you can see it is there in almost all of the Class Projects, be two Onto R3. So these are what I'm talking about, water with repulse. You can clearly see it in this class project right here. So I'm going to quickly show you guys how you can paint them using wet on wet technique. So read the paper thoroughly. Quickly paint a single wash dark and bottom part of the lake because that is where the reflections will be and that will be very dark. And later, you can take a small brush and using the same color, just draw horizontal lines. So the paper being wet, lines that you have drawn will be blended in perfectly. Which in turn gives you the effect of Soft daughter and soft triples. Oh yeah. This is how you can paint water under repulse using the wet-on-wet technique. So this felt very quick. So just to make sure you guys understand this concept, I'm going to show you one more time on how to paint these lose water and repulsed using wet-on-wet technique. The first step would be to read the paper. Later. You can add a single wash of the color of your choice. You can darken the bottom part of the paper. And using a smaller brush, you can draw a few lines here and there. It gives the effect of a repulse. And that's it. That's how you can paint water and repulsion wet-on-wet. So I hope you guys liked this video. Thank you for watching. We can move on to the next one. 7. Soft Details: In our final video, before we start our class projects, we are going to learn how to paint this soft details. They are not wet on wet, wet on dry, sterile. We can make it look softer. All you need is a one small number brush and a very damp brush. To get started. We're going to see how to paint rocks and how to blend the edges to make them solved. So first I'm painting these semicircle shape of rocks, and then I'm taking a damn brush. You can see how damp it is. And then I'm just going to blend the edge point is to make the edge softer. It was previously hard, hard edge. So that I have painted these rocks in all of the three class projects. Now let's see how I have been dead these dried-up branches. So take a very thin and sharp brush and very loosely paint a few branches, branches, and softly blend them with their fingers. Now repeat the process once more. This is such a small and tiny detail that we are going to be using in all of the class projects. I believe this small and soft edges actually helps to bring everything together in a landscape. So that's it. Let's move on to the next video. 8. Class Project 1 - Dusk Walk - Part 1: Hello guys. Welcome to Class Project 1. This is the reference from which we are going to be painting the class project. And let's get started with the very light sketching. I'm going to just draw a couple lines where the background should be and where the foreground should be. Just two lines. Now you can see the trees here in the foreground. I'm going to draw that line on this paper right here. And that is on the sketching the need for today's class project. Let's move on to the colors. And the good news is there are only two colors. Finds gray and burnt sienna. Both of these colors are from White Nights. Now let's get started with the first step that is wetting your paper with clean water. And now I'm going to use the masking tape to keep it under the board, which really helps the paint and water to come down easily. As you can already see Hill. And I forgot to mention, keep your tissues ready before we actually get started. I'm going to continue to read the paper using my brush stroma brush. Once I'm done writing the paper, I'm going to take a light shade of gray and I'm going to first add it on the top of the paper. And gradually I'm going to bring the color down with just using my brush strokes. As you can see, having the masking tape under the board really helps the paint to come down. And when I'm at the edge, I'm going to darken the color because that is where water is and that the reflections will be. And now that I got the basics right, I'm going to remove the masking tape under the board, and I'm going to just paint the reflections using a small brush. This is number 2, round brush. And I'm going to just take fine screen. And I've lightly add a few lines which will later look like reflections because the paper is still wet and those lines will be blended so well together with the background. We're going to have to act quickly and paint the background. So I'm taking my brush trauma brush now and I'm going to take very light shade of gray. And I'm going to paint the background trees using this exact color. It's very light. Do not use the dark color. As you can see, I'm not going for a very detailed trace here. Just a few brushstrokes because these trees are in the background and they're not going to be in focus. Now I'm going to take a little bit of darker color and the same brush. And I'm going to draw a line in the middle of this background trees. This is the line and it also acts as a border between subject and the reflections below. All this is done when the paper is still wet. So you have to walk faster. Arles, the paper will be dried up. I'm just going to take a small brush and I will draw a few lines. And the land as well as a few reflections using dark shade of gray. A few reflections using a small brush. I'm gonna keep this for drying. And let's move on to the next video where we can proceed with foreground of this landscape. 9. Class Project 1 - Dusk Walk - Part 2: Check carefully and see whether your February straight out not mine has dried. So I'm gonna take my brochure number four, brush and with burnt sienna, I'm going to paint. The foreground. Finds gravity here and there. It goes. More depth when you use more colors instead of just one. So I'm just going to continue painting the land area in the foreground using bonds piano and a little bit as well. Once I'm done with that, I'm going to change the brush. I'm going to pick up my number 2 round brush and dark shade of gray. And I'm going to start painting the pine trees on the line. I'm just bending the binds in a very simplistic manner. I'm just going to draw a straight line. And I'm going to move my brush and this exact manner. And there I have a pine tree. And once you are done with the pine trees, you have to, you know, blended with the land area that is in burnt sienna. Again, you have to walk faster because the area the land area in burnt sienna is going to dry up quicker. So we have to blend the bind screen with warranty and our violet is still wet but not soaking wet. Just damp. Paper is enough. I'm going to take a small number 1 brush and using fines gray, I'm going to paint smaller branches, branches, and small finds in between these, you know, Bush bushes. Because I want to give it more character and more depth to those bushes. Now, we are done with the foreground. Make sure to keep this one for drying. In the next video, we're going to talk about how to paint the details, which are very important. So yeah, see you in the next video. 10. Class Project 1 - Dusk Walk - Part 3: Um, study dealing part. I am just going to go for a few simple ones. So I choose to paint a few rocks, mistake rocks. So the technique is simple. I'm going to take my number one synthetic brush and binds gray and paint a few rocks. Don't paint too many of them. For the first time. I'm going for only three. And before the rock dries up, you have to take a damn softer brush and blend the edges of these rocks with the lake here. We're going to go for our next set of rocks. The reason why I did not paint all the rocks at the same time is because I want them to be read for a long time. So if I paint them in batches, I can easily blend them while they're still wet. Once I'm done with the rocks, I'm going to splatter some pain using my number one brush and binds gray. And with that, we are done with the class project one. And I chose a very simple and very easy landscape for the class project 1. As we move along, we're going to have to pain, feel complicated subjects. I will guide you throughout. So let's get started with the next video. 11. Class Project 2 - Gloomy Lake - Part 1: Hello guys. Welcome to Class Project 2. It's going to be slightly different. Dan, the class project one, but not difficult. So here I am using one of my reference paintings to paint the class project. So, yeah, let's get started. So I'm going to quickly start with a sketch. It's a simple sketch. There is a line in between and then there'll be some line on my left side. So the land that you see here will be in burnt sienna color. The rest of the painting, we'll be fine. Scrape the above, it'll be the subject, I'm thinking to cover it with loose trees. And of course, below it will be loose reflections. Almost 80 percent of this landscape will be wet on wet technique. So I'm very excited to get started. So please sketch only after I have finished sketching because I keep making these changes to the sketches. So after I finished it, pause your screen. Take a screenshot. Are just pause the screen and continue with sketching. And then later we can get started with painting. And now that I'm done with the sketching, let's say the scholars. So like I mentioned before, this is a very limited palette and all colors will be similar in all of the landscapes. So binds gray and burnt sienna. Both of these colors are from White Nights. Please ignore that yellow color. I just don't have anywhere to keep that, so I just kept it there. And just like previous painting, I'm going to keep my masking tape under the board. And I'm going to start with wetting the paper with clean water. And I'm using my brush trauma brush number 4. And I'm going to first paint the sky area using the pines gray. And once we are done with the sky, Let's start with the reflections and not the subject. So the reflections will be, you know, in darker color. So I'm using dark shade of gray and my paper is still wet. So I'm just going to drag the pain downward to create these lose reflections. So the reflection will be only on the left side of the paper because a remaining part everywhere, it all, even on the subject, the address will be very lighter in color and there'll be very far away so they can't be reflected on the lake. So that is the concept that I'm going with. So yeah, less reflections, hand less work for us. And while the paper is still wet, I'm going to proceed with the lake, as well as a repulse. Almost done with first layer background. Part of this class project. I'm just adjusting until it feels right for me. But if you get the reflection, sky as well as Lake and repulse part, right? You can just leave it there. I'm just messing around and to be honest, I don't know when to stop. I should blood ran to stop. Actually. I think it's time for me to stop. So see you in the next video. But the next step ahead. 12. Class Project 2 - Gloomy Lake - Part 2: So I have good news and bad news to, you know, paint this class project. Goodness is that we are going to be using one very cool technique. That is, we're going to have to flip the board and paint the background trees. And the bad news is we're going to have to use when ready to get technique. That is a riveting. So yeah, make sure the layer, whatever the pain that you have painted is completely dry before you read the paper. So after re-wetting the sky area, I'm going to proceed with painting the background trees. So I'm just going to drag my brush down. Just like we have painted the reflections. This is loose background, trees. Painter large trees on the right side. And as we go down towards the left, the size of the tree should be small because we did not paint the reflections of those. It shows that, that in the background and are very small to be reflected into the lake. Remember, we only painted a very small section of this trees in the reflections. So we need to highlight which part of that is reflected in the lake, which part of these trees are reflected in delay. So I'm going to do just that. So I'm highlighting this part that is somewhere slightly in the middle with darker. This is the one that is refracted into the lake. After I'm done, I'm going to use punchy Yana. And I'm going to paint the land area which is just below these trees. Take bandana and just go over the sketch that we have made before of the line. We can worry about the details later. Now, I'm just going to spread the paint on this white space. Once I'm done painting the entire area with burnt sienna, I'm going to take a smaller brush and I'm going to take burnt sienna mixed with pines gray to paint the details. The same brush, same pain. And you're not just smart, dark lines under the line. On the right side as well. It shows the depth of the line. And I'm going to keep this for drying. So see you guys in the next video. 13. Class Project 2 - Gloomy Lake - Part 3: So we are at the last part of the painting that is adding the details. So let's get started. Basically, I'm going to draw a few rocks and then I'm going to blend the edges of these rocks with the damp brush, like we have done in previous class project. To not paint all the rocks at once. Just paint to our NO2 and then blend. You can move on to painting rocks because if your paint all at once, the edges of these rocks will be dried up and Yukon plan this. I'm done with painting the rocks. I'm just gonna, you know, draft you, dry it up. Trees are fine branches. So for some reason they are not visible here because I'm using the same color, same shared. I mean, so you can skip this step if you wish. So I'm going to paint a few dried-up branches in the lake as well. So for this, I'm using a very thin brush. I'm going to conclude this class project. I hope you guys like this in all very moody and gloomy landscape. Actually, this is my personal favorite of all the class projects in today's class. I hope you guys liked it to. Thank you for watching. On to the next video. 14. Class Project 3 - Murky River - Part 1: Hello guys, welcome to Class Project 3. And today we're going to paint a full-on withdrawn direct reflections and subjects for the class, for this class project. And this is the reference that I'm going to be using for this. This is one of my practice runs. And this class project will be a tad bit difficult than the previous two of the projects that we have painted, but I hope you guys give it a try anyway. Now of course, I'll be guiding you throughout the process. And one of the first steps is to sketch. So I'm going to be, you know, going for a very light sketch. I mean, really light. Just three lines. Three lines guys. So over these three lines, there's gonna be no binds and a little bit of land. I'll show you as we go for the same old, same old colors, pines, gray and burnt sienna. And these two colors are from White Knight. So after main important step is to keep your masking tape or any small box under the board so you can easily get that flowy paint. First step would be letting the paper with clean water and I'm using my brush number 4, my brush. And once I'm done with that, I'm going to take a very light shade of gray or this is not it. It's how it has to be still lighter. They shall lose it. So I'm going to paint the sky area and I'm going to slowly drag the paint down. You guys can see I'm not taking any extra paint here. Just whatever is there on the paper. I'm just gonna, you know, drag it down. Once I reach the very bottom of the paper, I'm going to take. Lots and lots of paint. And I'm going to paint the bottom part with a dark Python script because that is where the reflections will be. It's time to add just a few reflections. I'm going to take a damp brush and I'm going to just create a few repulse. I had to remove that masking tape under the board, but I'm going to have to keep it again to paint the reflections. And while the paper is still wet, I'm going to add reflections. So wherever we have drawn the lines, we have to draw the reflections as well. But keep in mind, I'm going to use dark shades on the first two lines, and later in the background, I'm going to be using lighter shade. This is a very tricky part. That's why I have said in the beginning that to turn off difficult class projects that we are going to be painting. So that all of these things that we're doing, you know, dragging the reflections, painting the reflections, these are all should be done when the paper is still wet. Okay, now I think I'm good with reflections. It's time to paint a few repulse while the paper is still wet. So just take a brush and casually draw a few lines with pines gray. But it's starting to dry up. As you can clearly see, this particular line, it's not blended in our standing straight up. So that's when, you know, you should stop. So I will stop and I will let this one for drying. So see you guys in the next video. 15. Class Project 3 - Murky River - Part 2: So I showed you guys start to enough to repel, see is an old painted while the paper was drying. So all of the ripples are blended except that one. So yeah, I just wanted to show you guys a when to stop when you see the sharp edges. So that is the time to, you know, just stop working on the paper because the paper will be drying. Let's get started with the next step. And I'm using burnt sienna. And I'm going to paint the land area on my left side, right here. I'm taking generous amount of the paint and also dark shade of Sienna. After briefly drying the sienna, I'm using Payne's gray and I'm going to paint pine trees just about another sienna pain. So the point is the CNAs, the land, the Cenacolo, and the pine trees are there. Let me show you how easy it is to paint a pine tree is just have to draw a straight line and just move your brush in a zigzag manner. And they go. Once you're done filling up the pine trees on the land area, you just have to blend it with the burnt sienna. See using the extra paint of warranty and other is already present on my brush in order to sort of blended into the tree is it gives kind of like an all blended look. Now we're going to cover the background area. So for that, we're going to need the light shade of pines gray, and lighter shade of burnt sienna. To get the light shared. Add more water to the paint. The shadow it. Just like we have painted the previous land and pine trees, we're going to paint the same, but with lighter shared. So first, I'm going to proceed with light shade of burnt sienna, the land. Later, I'm going to use a light shade of Payne's gray to paint the pine trees. We are using a very light shade of pines gray here. So you need not have to be very detail in painting these pine trees because they're going to dry up even lighter. So I'm done with the pine trees. I'm just going to blend it with light shade of a bond sienna, which is a land area. I'm going to take a very small brush. This is number one and a dark shade of gray. I'm going to paint a few pine trees here. And I'm going to blend it with burnt sienna. So after that, we are done with the path. So I'm going to keep this for drying. And I'm gonna see you guys in the next video where we're going to be painting the details. 16. Class Project 3 - Murky River - Part 3: Now it's time to paint the details. And these details that we have already painted in Class Project 1 and 2, the usual rocks as well as dried-up branches in the middle of the lake. So I'm going to get started with painting the rocks and then blending them with a damp brush. So the difficult part of this landscape is already behind us. That D and all the flow downwards reflection that we have painted on wet-on-wet. So right now we are just painting a very simple details. So I have decided to paint a lot of rocks because, you know, this is kinda like a complicated landscape. And I want to make it look as realistic as possible. When I say realistic in this kind of, you know, moody landscapes, it means more math. We're gonna just take a thin brush and I'm going to borrow these land areas with the screen in order to create a subtle shadow under the land. Hello Today looking great, isn't it? But I decided to paint a few dried-up branches as well. So let's get started with them. In order to make it look realistic, you have to make it messy in this kind of moody landscapes. So paint as many as you can, but not too many. So I'm just going to stop. This is looking kind of phenol as similar as it can be to my other friends. It's not an exact replica, but yeah. So I'm gonna just add a little bit of burnt sienna here and there to make the color. So there you have it. We are done with the class project three. So this is a bit complicated compared to Class Project 1 and 2. But once you get the hang of wet-on-wet techniques, it's going to be very easy. And yeah, thank you guys for watching. I hope you liked it. 17. Final Thoughts: Well, that is all. For today's class. We have learned all the basics of wet-on-wet technique and how to use the same technique to our advantage. And Payne, 3, beautiful landscapes. I hope you guys found this class in comedy as well as fun. And I'll be getting to see all your projects in Project Gallery section. Thank you for watching and see you in the next class.