Soft Body Physics Simulation Guide in Blender 2.9 | Stephen Pearson | Skillshare

Soft Body Physics Simulation Guide in Blender 2.9

Stephen Pearson

Soft Body Physics Simulation Guide in Blender 2.9

Stephen Pearson

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28 Lessons (2h 24m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:24
    • 2. Blender Basics Overview

      16:21
    • 3. What is the Soft Body Simulation

      2:12
    • 4. How the Soft Body Works

      4:41
    • 5. Object Simulation

      6:18
    • 6. Baking Cache

      8:16
    • 7. Soft Body Goal

      5:06
    • 8. Soft Body Edges

      5:40
    • 9. Aerodynamics and Stiffness

      3:43
    • 10. Self Collision

      5:05
    • 11. Soft Body Solver

      3:36
    • 12. Collision Objects

      5:02
    • 13. Field Weights

      3:00
    • 14. Cloth Simulation + Soft Body Simulation

      5:12
    • 15. Interacting 2 Soft Bodies

      2:38
    • 16. Soft Body Following a Curve

      3:36
    • 17. Can Crushed Animation P1 Modeling

      3:45
    • 18. Can Crushed Animation P2 Adding Textures

      3:22
    • 19. Can Crushed Animation P3 Simulating

      5:06
    • 20. Can Crushed Animation P4 Rendering

      2:55
    • 21. Tetris Animation P1 Modeling

      7:29
    • 22. Tetris Animation P2 Simulating

      5:18
    • 23. Tetris Animation P3 Materials & Rendering

      4:53
    • 24. Obstacle Course P1 Modeling

      6:40
    • 25. Obstacle Course P2 Simulating

      4:54
    • 26. Obstacle Course P3 Dynamic Hair

      7:01
    • 27. Obstacle Course P4 Camera Animation

      4:59
    • 28. Obstacle Course P5 Rendering

      5:49
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About This Class

Do you find simulations to be hard to understand? Or have trouble learning them? Learning Blender simulations is quite daunting and can be very frustrating at times. That is why I created this course.  In this course you will learn all about the soft body simulation in Blender! Basically, if you don't know, the soft body simulation is a way to add physics to your objects. It allows you to create flags, clothing, cushions, bouncing balls, and about anything you can think of.  We will be going into detail on each setting and how it all works. In the first couple sections we discuss the different options and values and how they effect the simulation.

After that we will be creating 3 different complete scenes using the soft body simulation. The first one is a soda can getting crushed. We will first start out by modeling the soda can adding a texture to it and then using the soft body simulation we will crush it. 

The second tutorial we will be creating Tetris in Blender. After modeling the pieces I will describe how to add the soft body simulation to each one and render it out.

Finally the last section we will be learning how to create an obstacle course for a sphere to go through. In this section you will learn about modeling, animating materials, hair dynamics and much more!

 If you are wanting to learn more about Blender's Soft body Simulation or if you just want to improve your skills in Blender this course is for you! 

Programs that are used in this course: Blender

I hope you are excited to jump into this course and create your own simulations!

Can't wait to see what you create.

Thanks

Stephen

Meet Your Teacher

Hello! My name is Stephen!  Thank you for stopping by and reviewing my Blender course.   My goal is to help you become the 3D artist you've always dreamed of becoming AND -  have a blast doing it.   Working with Blender and creating amazing 3D graphics is amazing and anyone can learn it.  

I really enjoy teaching others what I know.  I appreciate each and every one of my students.  Please let me know if I can help you perfect your Blender graphics!   

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hello everyone and welcome to the soft body physics simulation guide in blender t 0.9. In this course, you will learn all about the soft body simulation and how it works. In the first three sections, we will discuss the different settings and values and how they affect the simulation. We will also learn about collision objects, field weights, force fields, interacting to soft bodies together and much more. After that, we'll create three different complete scenes using the soft body simulation. The first one is a soda can and getting crushed. I will show you how to model the can, texture it and simulate it getting crushed with a cubed. The second tutorial is how to create this Tetris animation using the soft body simulation. We will learn how to model the pieces, simulate them interacting with each other, and create a really satisfying animation. Finally, the last tutorial is an obstacle course for the soft body to go through it. In this section, we will model out the entire course, learn how to animate materials, add dynamic hair simulations, and much more. Simulations can be very difficult to understand. And that is why I've created this course for all levels from beginner to advanced users. If you want to learn more about the soft body simulation, or just want you to improve your skills and blunder. This course is for you. So hit that enrolment button and let's get started. 2. Blender Basics Overview: Hello everyone. In this video we're gonna go over the basics of Blender. And so if you are completely new, this is the video for you. I'll be going through step-by-step on the different render engines, the shortcuts that we're going to be using, all of that in this video, right? When you open up Blender, this is the default scene. You have a camera, you have a cube in the middle, and then you have a lamp on the right side. If you ever get stuck on what button I press throughout this course, just look on the bottom right corner and you will see what I press. For example, if I left-click, you can see here it says left mouse and it will also highlight the mouse button on this sign right here. Same for the right-click, same for the middle mouse button. All of that will be displayed at this point. So if you ever get stuck, just look down on the bottom right. Let's first talk about the render engines that Blender has to offer. Over on the right side, there is a lot of different panels. And if we select this one right here, this is called the scene panel. We'll see that our render engine is currently on EV. There are three different render engines that we can pick in Blender, EV, workbench, and cycles. Ev is a real time render engine, and this allows you to actually view a scene in real time. It will calculate the lighting, almost instantly. Display it for you in your rendered view. Workbench, on the other hand, is basically just for modelling and sculpting your object. You don't really use this render engine for rendering because it doesn't really display materials that well. And the last one is Cycles. Cycles is blenders, a physically-based rendering engine. And this will provide very realistic results. It will calculate the lighting all that pretty accurately before we get into anything else in Blender. And let's go up to our user preferences and change a couple of settings there. To do this, we can go over to the Edit menu. Down at the bottom, we can go into our preferences. Underneath the key map tab right here. Here is a couple of things that we're going to want to check. First off, we have the selective mouse button right here. You can either select with your left-click or your right-click. In Blender version 2.79 and below, the default was set to right-click. Now with 2.8 and above, it is set to left-click as the default. I recommend staying with left-click because that will help you with a lot of other applications outside of Blender. The Spacebar button down here allows you to pick what the spacebar will do. Currently it is on play and that is what I'm going to leave it on. So what happens is if I hit the space bar over here, it's going to play the timeline down at the bottom. Underneath that we have a couple of view options which I'm just going to leave at the defaults. The other thing that we're going to want to change is extra shading pine many items, make sure that is enabled. This will allow you to actually see the different views. So if I exit out of this window and press Z, we can see here we have a couple of different views. Material view is one of the ones that's added when you select the extra shading pie menu items. This will allow you to see what the material looks like without having to render it. We'll go over that in just a little bit. Next up on our list is selecting objects. To select an object that you can left-click on the object that you want to select. In this case, I selected the camera and you can see it's highlighted in that yellow outline. If I select the cube, It's the same thing. And then the lamp up top, it also highlights it. You can select multiple objects by holding the Shift key on your keyboard and selecting it. You'll notice that once we do this, the other selections have an orange outline and not a yellow one. This means that it's not the active object. The active object will be highlighted in the yellow outline, as you can see here with the camera. And if you want to deselect everything, you can hold Alt and then press a to deselect everything. You can also select everything back by hitting a and double tapping a will do the exact same thing. So a to select Alt, a to deselect, or you can press a and then double-tap a2, de-select. Now let's learn about moving around the 3D view. If I hit the middle mouse button on my mouse, I can move around and rotate the view around the object that I have selected. As you can see here, our view is orientated around this cube. Let's say for example, I wanted to orientate my view to the camera. I can select it and hit the period key on my numpad, not the period key on the keyboard, the period key on the numpad. And it will zoom in on the object that we have selected. And now we are rotating our view around the camera instead of the cube. If we select the cube, hit the period key on my number pan, I can zoom in on the cube, and now our view is back to the original. You can also zoom in by using the scroll wheel. Zoom in and zoom out with the scroll wheel. You can also do like a pan or zoom. So if you hold Control middle mouse button to pen backwards, as you can see here, holding the Shift key and middle mouse button will pan the view to the side. If you don't have a middle mouse button, what you can do is go over to the preferences and emulate it by going over to the preferences. Underneath the input tab, you can turn on emulate three button mouse. What this will allow you to do is hold the Alt key and then left-click to Panda view. You can see here it's displaying I'm using my middle mouse, but I'm not. I'm using the Alt key and the left mouse button to actually rotate the view around. So just in case you don't have a middle mouse button, you can turn that on. Since I do have one though, I'm going to leave that off because I find it's much easier with the middle mouse button. Now let's learn about scaling, rotating and moving objects around. To scale an object up, you can press the Esc key on your keyboard to scale it up. As you can see here, it's scaling up my cube. And if you want to see how much you've scaled it up, look on the top left over here on the top-left corner, you can see I've scaled it up five times. You can also set a manual number n. So let's say I wanted to scale the cube up three times. I can hit three on my keyboard, and that will scale it up by three times. And now I can't scale it up anymore even though I'm moving my mouse because we set in a manual number, it's locked to that scale. I can hit the Backspace twice and that will get rid of that selection. And now I can scale it up or down, as you can see here, to rotate an object, you can hit the R key on your keyboard and that will rotate it around as you can see here. And it's going to rotate it depending on the view that you are looking at it. So let's say I move my view over to this angle and I hit R to rotate. You can see it's rotating at that angle. If we go into the front view by pressing one on my number pad, it will put us into this view. And now if we rotate, It's going to be rotating it along this view. So if we rotate it like this, I can go look at the side. You can see it's perfectly rotated along the y-axis. I'm going to press Control Z to undo that. And now let's learn about moving an object. If I press it G, you can move your object around and you can place it anywhere that you want. You can also lock the movement to a certain axis. So let's say I hit G and then y. And you can see here it's locked to the y-axis and I can't move it outside of that if I wanted to move it up and down along the x, which is the red line. I can't do that because it's a locked to the y-axis. I can also backspace that and then hit the X key and you can see it's going to move it along the x now instead of the y. Just like that. And I can also right-click to cancel the movement. What I just did there is I cancel the movement. So if I press R to rotate, I can right-click to cancel that action and it will snap back to its original position. This works with everything. So if I press S to scale, I can right-click and it will snap it back to that original position. This is very useful in case you want to look at a certain part of your scene. I can just move my object out of the way, view what I want to see, and then right-click and it will snap it back to its original position. Now let's learn about the different views we already discussed front view by pressing one on the number pad, it will bring us into the front view. And if we wanted to view the R object on the right side, which is this side over here, I can press a three on my number pad in. It will move me into the side view. Now we're looking at our cube from the side. Let's say I wanted to look at the top view. I can press seven on my number pad and it will view from the top. And we can see our camera is right there. And now we're looking at our object from the top of it. Control 1 on the number pad will bring us to the back view. Now we're looking at the back. Control three will look on the left side. So you can see here, this is the right side. Now this is the left side and we were looking at it from this angle. If you don't have a number pad, what you can do is also emulated by going over to your user preferences. Underneath the input tab, you can enable emulate a numpad. And this will allow you to use the top row of numbers on your keyboard. So let's say I press 1 on the top of my keyboard. I'm now looking in the front view. Same thing for the side view, the top view and all of that. Since I have a number pad though, I'm going to disable this just like that and then exit out to save it. Now let's talk about edit mode. Edit mode is the mode that you're going to be using to model anything in blunder. To access edit mode. You can press Tab on your keyboard, or you can come up to this menu and select Edit Mode. Once we do this, you can see our object has turned into a orange color, and now we can select the different points on our cube. This point that I have selected right here is called a vertex. Every single mesh is consisted of many vertices. As you can see here, with our cube, we have eight different points, four on top and four on the bottom. You can select multiple vertices by holding the Shift key and then selecting them as you can see here. Once I've selected four of them, you can see the inside of that has turned into an orange color. And this means we have a face, select it. Let's talk about the different selection types. Over in the top left corner you can see we are on vertex select mode, which means that I can select the different points. If I switch it over to the edge select mode, I can select the edges instead of the vertices. And then finally, the face select mode will allow you to select an entire phase, as you can see here. You can also extrude faces outward. If I select this top face and press E to extrude, I can extrude it upwards. Now we have basically two cubes on top of each other. Down on the bottom, you will see all of your scene details. And if you don't see this, you can right-click and then enable the scene that statistics right there. We can see here we have four vertices out of 12 selected. And then if I press a to select everything, we can see here we had 12 out of 12 selected. You can also see the edges, the faces, and the objects in your scene. This is a pretty useful setting in case you want to check how many objects that you have in your seat. There are many different ways to add objects or delete objects in Blender. To add an object, you can press the shortcut Shift and a, and you can add an a mesh and you can see all of the default meshes right here. Or you can come over to the Edit menu, then click on Mesh, and then add in and mesh over here. So let's say I press Shift a and I add in an icon sphere. From here I can move it over to the left side by pressing G and X and dragging it over. If I want to delete this object, I can press the X key and select Delete. Or you can hit the Delete key on your keyboard or go up to object and then down to delete right here. If I want to undo that and bring that object back, I can press Control Z to bring it back. And this will undo the last action. If I want to redo the action, I can press Control Shift and z and that will redo the action. You can also do this by coming over to the Edit menu and selecting undo or redo right here. So once again it to add an object, you can press Shift a and to delete an object, make sure you have it selected the X key or the delete key or any of the other ways to delete objects. And then you can select it and there it's gone. Now let's talk about the different views. If we come up to the top right, you will see there is four different views, solid view, and that's the one that we have selected wireframe. And this will allow you to see inside of your mesh, as you can see here, it's a now a wireframe. Next to that we have in the material view. So let's say we've added in a new material, it will display exactly what it looks like. And then we also have a rendered view. This will be what it looks like in the final render. When we render out an animation or an image, it calculates the lighting and does everything else. As you can see. You can also press the Z key on your keyboard and switch to the different views. Most of the time, this is how I use it because it's very fast. I can just press Z, go into wire-frame, z go into rendered view, and then material view like that. There's also toggle overlays and toggle x-ray. Toggle overlays two, get rid of the grid and the outline around the object. So if I select Toggle overlays, it will just display what the model looks like without any of the extra details. If we go back into solid view, we can press Z and then toggle x-ray. And this will allow us to see inside of our mesh. You can see by looking at this view, we can see the ear right there. And then on the other side we can see the eyes. And you can also select the vertices on the opposite side. If, if toggle or relays is turned off, we can't do that. We can only select the faces that are visible. Finally, let's press the Enter key on our keyboard and look at the properties. Here we can see a couple other details, the location of our object. And you can also change this and you will move the object as you can see, the rotation value, the scale value, and the dimensions. The dimensions currently say two by two by two. And we can change it depending on what we type here. We can make a completely flat, stretch it out a little bit, and you can do all of that. Finally, the last thing that we will talk about in this video is the timeline. Down here we have a timeline and this is the amount of frames in our animation. Currently we have 250 frames. Now the default frame rate in Blender is 24. So that means if we play our animation, it's going to travel 24 frames every single seconds. On the bottom right here we have a skip, a forward, and a play option. If we click this button to play it, you can see our timeline is now moving. So if we had any animation data, it would play once we play the timeline. You can also press the spacebar to play it automatically as you can see there. And that is very useful. You can also press Shift and then left arrow or right arrow to skip to the end or the beginning of the timeline, as you can see on the bottom. And then the spacebar to play it once again. You can also add an keyframes. So let's say I added in a keyframe by hitting the I key on my keyboard. And we can add in a keyframe to any of these different properties. Let's say I added it to the location value. What we can do then is drag this upwards and then skip to a different part of the animation and move the queue. If I skip to frame 80, and then I can press G and then x2 move it along. I can move it to this location. Then I can hit the I key one more time and add an another location keyframe. So over 80 frames, it's going to travel from this position to this position that we just added. So what we have to do now is hold Shift Left Arrow to skip to the beginning. Or you can click the backspace button. And then we can hit the space bar to play. And you can see it moves over to that location over 80 frames. So that is basically how animation works. You can also add keyframes, do almost anything in Blender. If you hover over a certain value and had the icky, it will add in a keyframe to that value. So there you go. That is a full basic overview of Blender. I hope this is useful if you're completely new and now that you have a basic understanding of how blender works, let's jump straight into the course. 3. What is the Soft Body Simulation: Hello everybody. And in this video I wanted to describe what the soft body simulation is and some of the things that you can do with it. The soft body simulation is located in the physics panel. All you have to do is click on soft body and now your object has physics. What are some of the things that you can do? While soft body simulation is mostly used for soft, deformable objects. And its main purpose is to add a secondary motion to your animation. Elastic objects like rubber or gelatin, flags fabric reacting the forces. Animations of swinging ropes are trees and the like. Certain modeling task like a cushion or a tablecloth. The soft body simulation will make it very easy to do. If you had to model a tablecloth all by itself, it would take a very long time and it wouldn't really look right. So the soft body simulation is perfect for this scenario. Blender has another simulation system for clothing, and I actually already created of course on that. If you want to check that out, a lot of the things that you can do with clouds, you can also do a soft body simulation. Soft bodies work a little bit better for bigger and thicker objects. But you can still do things like flags. This simulation works for all objects that have control points or vertices, a mash curve or a lattice. All of these work perfectly fine. Soft bodies work extremely well if you have even a vertex distribution. For example, if your mesh looks like this, it's not going to work too well. When deforming the mesh, it will look very off and it won't look event. You also need to have enough vertices in your mess for a good collision. If you don't have enough vertices in your mesh, your object will kinda mess up and won't look good at all. But if you have too many vertices, it will really slow down the simulation and take a long time to calculate. You can also change the stiffness of a certain part of the mesh by adding more geometry to it. This simulation is super cool and it allows you to create some really awesome scenes. Be careful though, because the simulation is time-consuming. Don't add it to everything. Only do it where it makes sense. If this will save you time for modelling, go ahead and do it. 4. How the Soft Body Works: Hello everybody. In this video, I wanted to do a quick overview of the soft body simulation and where it's located and how it works. The soft body simulation is located in the physics tab. The physics have is this one right here. It looks like a circle with a dot in the middle. If we select it, we can enable soft body by clicking in the top right corner. If we select a soft body and come down at to the timeline and hit the Play button. Now we can see our soft body. Now currently it's just floating in the 3D space. The reason for that is because a goal is turned on. In a later video, we'll go through what goal is. But if we turn this off and then restart the simulation and hit the spacebar to play. Now our object will fall straight down. Let's go ahead and restart this. What if we wanted our object to actually hit the ground will in order to do that, we need to add the ground. I'll press shift a, an ad in a plane. Will scale this plane up so it's a little bit bigger than the cube. And then all select the Cube, press G, N, Z and bring it up a little bit to actually have our object interact with the plane. And we need to add a collision of modifier to the plane. So if we select it and click on collision, now this cube will actually interact with the plane. If I hit the space bar now, you will see our cube bounces just like this. Pretty cool. Now let's talk about geometry in the soft body simulation. We currently have eight vertices on r cube. This means that there's not that many vertices for the soft body simulation to work properly. If I play this, you'll see it's not really deforming, it's only moving where the vertices are to actually get it to deform a lot more. If we go into edit mode, we can press a to select everything. Right-click and click on a sub-divide. Over in the bottom left. If we opened up this panel, we can change the number of cuts right here. If we go up to five, for example, now we have a lot more geometry and now the soft body will actually deform the mesh a lot better. We then go into object mode by pressing Tab. Make sure we restart the timeline and hit the spacebar. Now you can see it's deforming the mesh just like that because we have a lot more geometry to work with. One thing to note though, is if we play this once again, you'll see it just crumbles in on itself and just collapses. If we open up the edges panel, all of these values change how the soft body interacts. The one that we're mostly going to be using is the bending option. If we bring this up to a value of one and hit the spacebar, you can see it's actually enabling the soft body to keep its structure without collapsing in on itself. Will be going through all of these settings in later videos. I just wanted to do a quick overview on how it works. So again, the soft body simulation works on what geometry you have on your mesh. One thing to note is if we go over to the Modifier Tab, click add modifier and add a subdivision surface modifier is going to add more geometry to your mesh, but it's not really going to change the simulation. You might think to bring the soft body below the subdivisions so it actually takes into account, but you can see we get an error code down at the bottom. The soft body can't really go below because it is a deformed modifier. So even though we added more geometry to r cubed, it's not really going to change the simulation. It's only going to change how the geometry looks. You can see it looks a lot more smooth, but it's not really changing how the simulation operates. If we wanted to change, we would have to apply the subdivision surface modifier. If we do this right now about halfway through that simulation, you'll notice something a little bit weird. The simulation almost breaks because there was a lump or geometry for the simulation to calculate and it breaks like this. In order to fix that, all we have to do is just restart the simulation and hit the spacebar again. Since we added more geometry though, it's actually way in a lot more so it's collapsing in on itself. So then we would have to go back to the soft body simulation and turn up the bending even more. If we go up to ten, then restart ends play this once again. Now you can see it's keeping its structure just like that. So again, soft body deals with geometry. If you have a lot of it, your simulation will slow down and take a lot longer to calculate n, your object will weigh a lot more. So there you go. That is a basic introduction to the soft body simulation. And in the next section we're going to be jumping into all these settings and learning exactly what they do. 5. Object Simulation: Hello everyone, welcome to a new section. In this section we're gonna go through everything in the soft body simulation setting into and you'll figure out exactly what they do, the goal, the edges, all of these we will go through in the next couple of videos. This first video is all about the object. And at this simulation, there are five different things that we will take a look at and I'll be describing each one individually. Let's start out with the first one. Collision collections. This allows you to limit the amount of collisions in your soft body simulation. To test this out, we need to actually add in a collision object. I'll press shift a and add in a plane. I'll select to mind cube, drag it up a little bit, and then scale up this plane. And then of course, if you watched the previous video, we need to add in a collision modifier for this to actually work properly. If we click on collision, now we have a collision object. I'm going to drag this a little bit lower and then press shift D and drag a new one up like this. So now we have two different collision objects. This one right here, I'm going to press the M key and move it to a new collection. If we click on New, leave it at Collection to and then hit OK. So now if we look in the top right, we have this first collection and then we have a second collection. Both of these have a collision object inside that. If we then select r cube and I'm also going to turn off a soft body goals. It will actually collide. If I turn this off and then hit the space bar, we can see it collides with this object. If we restart, then over on the right in the collision collection, I can select which collection I want the collisions to actually be in. If I click on this and I do the first one which has this bottom plane in it. You can see this plane is in the second collection. If we then restart and play this, it'll actually pass through this object but collide with the one underneath. That's because we limited the amount of collision with this collection. This allows you to do some interesting things with different collections and collisions if you have a lot of objects in your scene. Next up, we'll talk about the friction. This is very easy to understand. And if you look at the animation on screen, you will notice that the higher the friction, the more sticky it will be two a collision. You can see that the object was 0 is sliding a lot faster than the object with the value of 50. Now let's talk about the mass. This is the weight of your object. Let's first player simulations. We can get a baseline of what it looks like. If I hit the space bar, we can see it just collides with the object and then just floats right there. If I was to bring the mass up and this is the weight of the overall object. I'm going to bring this up to, let's say ten. So it weighs ten times what it currently is. If we then restart and play this, you'll notice it just collapses in on itself because it weighs so much. To counteract this, we would have to open up the edges and bring up the bending amount. I'm going to restart employee that one more time so you can see it. So basically the mass is just the weight of the object. And the more ways, the more it will crush in on itself at a certain point, I'm going to bring the mass back down to one. And then for the control point, this allows you to add in a vertex group for the mass. So you can have different parts of your mesh way different values. And the maximum value is set right here. With a vertex group. What we need to do to actually enable this is go over to the object data panel and then create a new vertex group right here. You can name this by double clicking on it. And with a vertex group, how this works is we need to go over to the weight Paint mode over in the top-left. If we switch this over to weight paints, we can see here we have a couple of different tools and values that we can change with a weight of one, it's going to paint it red and this means it's going to be a mass of one. So with my brush tool, if I press F, I can change the size of it. I can click and drag here. And now this part of the mesh will weigh one, and then this part over here, which has 0 weight will weigh 0. So let's paint all along this edge and see what the simulation looks like with half of it way in one. So I'll go over on this side, I'll paint all of this. I'll go into wireframe and pressing Z and then paint down there. If you accidentally painted over here on the right and you didn't wanna do that and you can't really control Z that what you can do is switch the weight down to 0. So it's actually painting and blue now. And then I can click and drag and paint over top of that, just like that. So with a weight of 0, it will paint blue, and then with a weight of one, it'll paint red and anything in between, let's say about halfway through, it'll paint like a green color. With that done, let's go back into object mode and test out the wait, I'll press Z and go back into solid view, then jump over to the Physics panel, the control point, we will select the group that we just created. Now if I hit the Spacebar, you'll notice that this sideways a lot more, so it's actually tilting over to the right. I'll play that one more time and you can see what's happening. Just like that. And then it just falls over because this side weighs much more than this side up here. You can see this even better if I turn up the mess. Let's go up to three. If we play this now, you'll see it just crushes on this side and then tips over. Finally, the speed of the simulation is very easy to understand. It's just the overall speed. The higher you turn this up, the faster the simulation will operate. It's set to one. It's just going to look like this. And you can see it just crushes the soft body. If we bring the speed up to, let's say three. So it's three times as fast or restart and play this. And you'll notice the simulation is moving much, much faster. You can also go lower. So if you wanted to do the simulation to be slower, you can go with a decimal value. Let's try 0.5. So it's going at 50% slower, will play this now. And you can see it's, it's falling a much slower, and then it crashes into the plane at the bottom. So there you go. That is a basic overview of object and the simulation. In the next video, we'll take a look at the cache settings. 6. Baking Cache: Hello everyone. In this video we're going to look at the cash panel in the soft body simulation. And I'll be describing each of these settings and how they change the simulation. The cache is where you bake in your simulation so you can save it into your blend file. You can see here in the bottom left corner, I've played my simulation a little bit and it has created this orange outline. This is a cache. This means it's only a temporary cash. If we do any changes, it will disappear. For example, if I open up the object and change the friction up to 0.6, and then we restart. You'll notice that cash is now gone because that's only temporary until we actually bake it in. Over in the cast setting, we have an option to name our cast. You can double-click on this and you can call it whatever you want. You can also have multiple caches by hitting that plus sign right there or deleting them by hitting this button. If we add in a new cache, we can name this a different name. Let's go with test two. And we can change some of the settings here. For example, if I want it to weigh more, I can go up to two. And then I can bring the friction down to 0.4. And then I can bake this in by clicking on the button right here. If we click on this, you will see it becomes a red outline. This means the cash is now baked and all of the settings now are grayed out. These settings are locked in and in order to change them, we would have to delete the bake. Before we do this though, we can play this and see exactly what it looks like. And this is with a mass of two and we can see that. So now if we wanted to go back to the first test, we can bring it the mass down to one, and then click on bake, and we can see a baked in. Now we have two different caches that we can go between and see the differences. This one is set to one and we can play it. And we can see it looks like that. And then we can restart and selected the other cash played this one. And we can see here this one looks like it weighs more. So this is a very easy way to figure out the differences in the different settings. And you can do this very quickly just by switching between the two. Over on the buttons down here we have delete all bakes in. This will delete all of the bakes in your scene. If we select a test too, though, you'll notice it's still hasn't deleted this bake and that's because it's a different cache. It will delete all the other bakes in the scene except for the duplicate ones. So in order to delete this one, we would have to go delete bake. And then I can get rid of it by hitting that minus 6y over n of the simulation start and end, we have the frame number. So if you wanted it to start at a different number or you wanted it to end at a certain point, you can do that here. So let's say I wanted the simulation to last a 100 frames rather than 250. I can switch that over to 100. The cache step here is the amount of frames per cache step. This means that if I set this up to five, it'll be at the start and then it will skip five frames, calculate that frame, skip another five, calculate that frame, and then so on. And you want to be careful with this value because if you go too high in my look a little bit weird. If we jump over to collection to, I've created a simple simulation and we're gonna go ahead and hide this other collection. This one on the right has a cache step of one which is the normal and it will cache in every single frame. This one on the left has a cache of ten. So at skip me in at ten frames. Let's see what happens if we play this. You'll notice the one on the left. It looks very strange. It's not really interacting the way it's supposed to. And that's because it's skipping frames. It's not being very accurate because it has to skip over certain frame numbers. So that is why it looks very strange. Sometimes this is a good option to save on memory and the baking time. So I would probably only go up to a value of two. If we switch this over to two, will restart and play it. It does look pretty similar. There is a slight difference, but it looks much better. Underneath the cache step, we have three options that are currently grayed out. The reason they're grayed out is because we haven't saved our file yet. So if we press control S to save our Blend file, once you've found the folder, you can click as, save as, and it will save that blender file. Now you can see these options are turned on. The discuss what this will do is it will actually save a folder of the cache in the spot where you saved your blend file. So if I turn that on and then we click on Bake, we can see here it baked out. Now if we open up that folder, you'll notice there is a folder for the baking cash right here and it has all of that data stored in. So normally if this is turned off, it will just save it inside at the blender file. But if this is turned on, it will actually be an external cash. Sometimes that this is good if you want to send it over to a render farm and they need that sort of data. You can turn that on. The US Library of Path option allows you to link this object into other scenes and it will keep its soft body simulation data stored in. In order to test this out, we need to create a new blender file. Make sure though that you name your object that you want to import into another scene. In this case, I've called my cube test for this example. Once we have baked in our simulation, Make sure you save your project one more time and then hit Control N. And this will create a new blender file. I'll click on it general. I'm going to press x to delete the default cube. And then before we added in, we need to actually save our blender file in the same folder that the other blender file is in. So I'm going to press control S to save it. And we can see here, this is the scene that we were just in, and this is the cached data. I'm going to call this test and then enter to save the blender file. From there, we can go over to File down to link if we select this. Once we do this, navigate to where the blender file is. Mine is under here and it's this blender file. I'll select it then o, then go over to the object folder and then select the object that I want. In this case, R cubed that we named test is the one that we want. So I'm going to select this one and then click on a link. Now we have this object in our scene. If we restart the timeline and hit the spacebar, you'll notice it's now playing at the simulation and it's keeping all that data stored in. We can see here all of these settings are grayed out and is keeping all of the soft body simulation data that we created in the other blender file. In this new one. There we go. So that is what the US path library does. It allows you to import the objects from your other blended vol into a new one. And it keeps all of the simulation data stored in. The compression value allows you to compress all of the simulation data to make it much smaller for your storage, we have three different options here, none, light and heavy and it's basically exactly how it sounds. Non we'll knock compress the simulation at all. Light it will do it a little bit and then heavy it. We'll do it a lot. The heavy option though will take a long time do calculate. So especially if your scene is quite big, this may take much longer to bake. I've had simulations where they are up to almost a three gigabytes. So sometimes the compression is a good idea. Now let's talk about these six buttons down here before we end this video, bake, Of course, we'll bake in the simulation, calculate to frame. What this will do is it will calculate whichever frame you're on. I'm gonna go ahead and clear the temporary cast by switching to a different setting. And then I'll skip to, let's say frame 84, and then I'll click on Calculate to frame. What that will do is it will calculate all the way up to the frame that I selected current cash to bake. This will take your current temporary cash and turn that into a bake. You can see our orange line is here. I click on current cash to bake. Now this is baked in. I'm gonna go ahead and delete that bagel dynamics. If you have multiple simulations, multiple particle systems, things like that, this will make an everything all at once. Delete all banks of course will delete all of the Bakes, the update, alter, reframe. This will calculate all of your simulations in your scene and update them at once. Calculate the frame will only deal with the object that you have selected, but update all do frame will deal with everything. So I can skip over to frame 95, update all to frame, and we can see both of these objects are now updated. So there you go. That is the cash panel in the soft body simulation. 7. Soft Body Goal: Hello everyone. In this video we are going to take a look at these soft bodied goal in the simulation settings. This off buddy goal allows you to pin at vertices in place so they don't move in your simulation. You can do this with a vertex group. If we open up these two panels, it gives us a couple more options to fine tune the settings that we want. Stiffness, dampening, and all of these values will go through in just a second. We first need to apply a vertex group. What is a vertex group? Well, it deals with weight paint. In order to add one n, we can go over to the object data panel and add in a new vertex group right here. If we click on this plus sign, you can name the group by double-clicking on it. And how this works is it deals with white paint. If we go over to object down to weight Paint mode, we can then start painting on our plane where we want, where we want the painting to be. Over in the top left we have a weight of one. This means it's going to be 100% weight. And then with a weight of 0 is going to be 0, which is this blue color right here. We also have a radius and this is the size of your brush. If you press the f key, you can also change the size. If you have a graphics tablet, you can enable this pen button here, and this will allow you to actually use your graphic tablet as your painting on your mesh. Same thing with the strength as well. So for example, if I just start painting that like this, we can just create like a weird shape. What this will do is it will pin those vertices in once we assign that. The weight pain also deals with vertices. If I go into edit mode with my plane, you'll notice we have a lot of vertices on our plane. If there was only a four vertices on each of the corners, this would not work. You need geometry in order to paint in the wait. Let's go back into object mode and assign that vertex group that we just created. So over in the physics tab, if we click on a vertex group and select the group that we just created, then if we restart and then play this, we can see we're getting this sort of effect. I'm gonna go ahead and restart this and play that one more time so you can see it. So were these vertices are where we painted or actually almost getting pinned. The strength of it though, is not too high. You can see the default is 0.7. So that means it's only doing a 70% pinning. If we drag this all the way up to 100%, those vertices will stay in the exact same position. So now once we play this, you can see it looks like this. The stiffness value here controls the amount of stiffness and springiness the vertices hat. If this is all the way up to 0.999, the vertices will be very stiff, as you can see here, they're not really stretching that much. But if the stiffness is very low, let's try a value of 0.2. Will play this now. And you can see there are a lot more just very loose and they're not as stiff as you can see there. The dampening controls the overall speed of the simulation. So if we restart, I'm going to bring the stiffness backup 2.5. will bring the damping pretty high. Let's go with a value of five. And you can see here it slows down the simulation. You'll notice right away that these parts of the plane don't like go all the way over here and back it. They kind of stop once they reach that point. And the higher you set this to, the slower it will be. As you can see there. It just dampens the effect of the motion. Now we get on to the strength values. And of course, if this is all the way up to one at the vertices will be stuck in place. I'm gonna bring the damping back down to 0. So we can see this. If we bring the default really low, like a point to the vertex group is barely going to have an effect. You'll notice there they're just all falling down. You can see it does have a little bit of an effect right here. But since the strength is so load, the whole thing is just falling down. The minimum and maximum values that let you control the range a little bit better. If you take a look on screen and this is the look of the weight paint, 0 is the blue color and red is one. So you can think of the minimum and maximum values as the, as the blue and the red color. If we bring the minimum up to a value of 0.4, wherever there is blue on your weights, that will have a strength of 0.4. wherever there is red on our plane, that will have a strength of one. Now if we restart and play this, you can see this is the effect that it's doing. Even though if we go into weight Paint mode, you can see all of this is blue. This has a strength of 0.4 rather than a 0.2 because the minimum is set to 0.4. So that is basically how the minimum and maximum values work. The minimum is the blue color, the backs of them is the red color, and you can fine tune the strength that each of them have. And then at the default, of course, is just the overall strength. So there you go. That is a basic overview of the goal. And in the next video we will take a look at the edges. 8. Soft Body Edges: Hello everybody. In this video we're gonna take a look at the edges in the South body simulation. This is where we get into the fun stuff and where we can really customize how our soft body looks and how it reacts to physics and other collisions. The first thing that we have here is a spring vertex group. Before we talk about that though, let's go over the pole and the push values. The pole value is basically the amount of force that it takes to stretch the object. You can think of it as a rubber band. The higher you set this to, the more strong the rubber band will be. And the lower you set this to, the more it will spring out very easily. In this demonstration, I've set up two different cubes with a pin group at the top here so they don't move. Both of them have a mass of two. This one on the left has a pole of 0.1. This one on the right has a pole of 0.8. Let's go ahead and view this simulation to see what it looks like. As you can see here, this one is stretching a lot more because the pull is set to a lower value, 0.1. And this one is not stretching as much because it's set to 0.8. So again, the pole value controls the strength of the streakiness. The higher you set this to, the more it will keep its structure. The push value is basically the opposite. Instead of trying to not stretch, it will actually try to not collapse in on itself. Here we have two different cubes. This one on the left has a push of 0.2. This one on the right has a push of 0.9. If we play our simulation, you'll notice the one on the right doesn't really collapse in on itself because the push is set to 0.9. The one on the left does collapse in on itself because it's set to a lower value, it doesn't have enough strength to keep its structure, will play that one more time. And you can see the effect that the push has. Now before we go on, let's talk about these springs value. If we go to collection three, I've set up another simulation for us to view. Both of these objects have a vertex nature. If we go into weight Paint mode, you'll notice this one is completely read, so that means it's 100%. The one on the right is completely blue. You can see it has 0%. And how this works is it takes the vertex group and applies the push and pull values. So with it's set to 0, the push and pull aren't going to have any effect. The one on the left is going to have an effect because it's set to, because it set to 100. So it's going to have 0.7.7 throughout the entire match. And so what this allows you to do is customize different parts of your mesh to have different Push and Pull values. Let's go ahead and view this. So if I play my simulation, you'll notice the one on the left that doesn't collapse because of the push and pull are set to 0.7. The one on the right though, does collapse because the vertex group is set to 01 more time, we'll do that and we can see exactly what it looks like. The dampening value controls the motion of the simulation. With it set to 0. I'm going to zoom in on this ecosphere and play this. You can see there's a lot of movement all throughout the ICA sphere. If we turn up the dampening all the way up to a value of 50, that's the highest you can go. And we play this. You'll notice there is barely any motion in the ecosphere. It just bounces and then comes to a complete stop. So the damping value will dampen the effect of all the overall bounciness. The plastic value is also pretty cool. This will allow you to deform the mesh permanently. You can see with the animations on screen with its set to 0, it will just hit the collision and then resume its original shape with it's set to 100 though it will permanently have that shape because it deforms it with a value of about 50 or 25, it will slowly regained its shape over time. The bending option controls how much bending there will be in your simulation. You'll notice the animation on screen with its set to 0. It'll just collapse in on itself. With it's set to ten, it will try to retain its shape all throughout the bounciness. The length is the next thing that we will talk about. This is pretty cool and this will basically expanded the mesh outwards and it deals with a percentage value. Right now we have to tourists is in our scene and the one on the left has a length of 70. This means that it will actually shrink to 70%. It's original size. The one on the right has a value of 130. So this means it'll be 100% plus another 30% on top of that. So it will actually expand outwards. This one will shrink 30% and this one will expand 30%. If we restart the simulation and then play this, you'll notice it freaks out for a second. And you can see this one on the right has become a lot bigger and the one on the left has shrunk it down. So that's basically what the length does is it will just shrink your mesh according to the percentage that you set here. Finally, the last thing that we will talk about is the collision edge and faces. The collision Agile will allow you to actually collide the edges of your mesh. Because at the moment with just both of these turned off, it will only use the vertices to actually collide with a mesh. So for this example, we only have four vertices on our plane. If we play this, it'll pass right through this collision object. If we were to turn on at collision along the edges. Now it will actually collide because the edges are touching the collision object. The faces value does the exact same thing except for the faces. If I turn that on and turn off the edges, we can see the effect that does it collides with the face of the plane. The base value though, is a lot slower to calculate. So if you have a very large simulation with lots of geometry, I would avoid turning this on because your simulation will last a lot longer. In the next video, we will take a look at aerodynamics and a stiffness. 9. Aerodynamics and Stiffness: Hello everyone. In this video we're gonna take a look at aerodynamics and stiffness in the soft body simulation. The aerodynamics allow you to add in some air drag to your objects. This'll make it so that it falls more slowly through the air and the air can distort how it looks. Right now it's currently set to a factor of 0. The factor value is the strength of the air. So the higher you set this to, the more dense the air will be and the slower the object will fall through. In order to test this out, we need to set the factor amount. Let's go up to something crazy like 2 thousand. This object on the right has a factor of 2 thousand. And this object on the left, we'll set this to 200, so it's ten times less the air drag. So now if we restart the simulation and hit the spacebar, you'll notice that this is what it looks like. In order to get a baseline that's actually set the factor of this two to 0. So this one will have 0 and this one will have 2 thousand. Now if we play this, you'll notice this one is not getting distorted at all and it's falling straight down. This one on the other hand, is falling much slower and it's starting to collapse in on itself because of the air around it. So again, the aerodynamics allowing you to add in some air drag to your simulation. And there's also two different types, simple and lift force. The differences between its simple and lift force. Simple is a little bit masters you calculate but less accurate. And a lift force takes a little bit longer to calculate, but it is more accurate to the real world. And then of course again, the vector value controls the strength of the air drag around the object. I'll play this one more time so you can see it. So this one is set to 2 thousand and this one is set to 0. And we can see here this one doesn't get affected. This one does and it collapses in as it's falling down. To enable stiffness, you need to turn on at the stiffness, a checkbox in the soft body edges. Once we do this and this will add in some stiffness to the quads of an object. What is a quad? Well, what a quad is, is it deals with four vertices for a face, I'm going to select both of these objects and go into edit mode. This one on the left has quad faces. So that means there is a vertices on each side. So four vertices and total equals a face. You can see this one here, 1234. So this is a quad. The cube on the right, on the other hand has triangle faces, 1233 vertices for a single face. So if we turn on a stiffness for this cube, it's not going to have an effect because the stiffness value only deals with quad faces. I'm going to select this cube and turn it off just so we can see what this looks like without the stiffness. And I will play it. And you can see this is what it looks like. Now if we restart and turn this on and for both of them. And then we play this one's again. You'll notice that this one is a lot more stiff, but this one does not have an effect because it has triangle faces and not quad faces. So again, if you have triangle faces, the stiffness value will not do anything for your simulation. You need to have quad faces. The sheer amount controls the strength. So if I was to bring this down to, let's say 0.1, it's going to have very little of an effect as you can see here. If I bring it all the way up to one and you can't go past one even if you type in a number manually, it'll just snap back to one. Now we can play this and this is the effect. So there you go. That is the stiffness and aerodynamics. In the next video, we will take a look at self collisions. 10. Self Collision: Hello everyone. In this video we're going to look at a self collision in the soft body simulation. How to turn on self collision is you come over to the Physics panel and the soft body simulation, and there is a checkbox next to self collision. Before we turn this on, let's go ahead and play this simulation that I've created right here. We have a cylinder with a plane on top. And if a self collision is turned off, here is what happens. I'll hit the space bar on my keyboard and you'll notice the plane goes right through itself, and then it collapses and goes right through. So it's not colliding with itself. If we restart the same relation and turn on self collision. Now, if we play this, you can see it actually collides with itself and bounces off. Let's open up this panel and you can see a couple of different settings, that Calculation Type, and there's three different values down here. Before we get into the different calculation types, let's learn how the self collision actually works. Here we have a plane with a bunch of different Ico spheres. So how the self collision works is it will take every single vertex on your mesh and add a virtual ball around it. And that is going to be the collision. So here if I select my plane and go into edit mode, every single vertex here has a virtual ball around it. And you can control the size of the ball by changing this value. So basically what's going to happen if we turn up the ball size, the size of the atmospheres is going to scale up like this. Now that we know how self collision works, let's take a look at these different calculation types. The average one is normally the one that you want to use in averages the signs of the ball for each collision on the vertex, and it calculates it accurately. The manual one will allow you to change the size manually, but it's a little bit more complicated. And then we play this, you'll notice the plan expands really far outwards. And the reason for that is because the signs right here is so large. So what we need to do is bring down the size. Let's go with a value of 0.05. And then we can restart and play this. And now you can see it's working properly. So with the manual one, it will actually display the number that we set here. So before it was 0.49, which is half a meter. So that's going to be a very large collision surface. So setting it lower to a value of about 0.05 would be about five centimeters. We also have the min and max. And what this will do is it will take the length of your edge and if it set to the minimum, it will display the size of the collision as the smallest edge. So if I was to go into edit mode on this one which is set to minimal, it's going to take the length of this edge right here. And that is going to be the size of the, and that is going to be the size of the collision. On the other hand, if it's set over two max is going to take the longest edge would be probably around this one right here. And that is going to be the size. So let's take a look at the maximum real quick, since the size is so large and these are very close together, this part of the mesh is actually going to extend itself. If I play this, you can see that happens. It expands because the collision is bigger than the actual edge, and then it collapses like this. Let's go ahead and play this both at the same time. And then we'll pause right about there, and then I'll go into front view. You can see here that this is much closer together and it's actually clipping through itself. And then on the other hand, this one over here is further apart because the collision is bigger because it's set to maxima. The last collision type is average min and max. And what this will do is it will take the longest length and the smallest length, add them together and divide by two, and that is going to be the size of the collision. Now that we know about the different calculation types, let's learn about stiffness and a dampening. The stiffness value controls how elastic the collision will beat. So if this is set to a very low number, it's going to be very elastic and it might actually click through itself. I'm going to set that to 0 and then I'll play this. And you'll notice that the plane actually goes through itself and it almost sticks to each other as it passes back through. Whole play that one more time. And then with a very high stiffness, you can go up to a value of 100. What this will do is it will just bounce off each other just like that. And the collision is very, very stiff. So it doesn't click through, it hits and bounces straight off. I'm going to set that back over to one. The damping effect will slow down the collision as it collides. So if this is set to a very high number, one is the highest that you can go. It's going to collide with itself and almost instantly stop. I'll play this and you can see it collides and then stops just like that. On the other hand, if damping is set to a very low number like 0, for example, I'll play this and you'll notice it hits and bounces off so there's no dampening and it will just keep colliding and bouncing off just like that. So if you want the collision to slow down once it actually collides with itself, said the damping into a little bit of a higher value. But there you go. That is the self collision in the soft body simulation. In the next video, we will take a look at these solver. 11. Soft Body Solver: Next up on our list is the Solver in the soft body simulation. This allows you to solve any errors or collisions that you have in your simulation. And in the first two values that we hear is the step size, minimum, and maximum values. This is how many times it's going to calculate every single frame, especially for very fast moving objects. In this simulation, I've created a basic animation where this plane, it shoots up and hits the vSphere. Let's go ahead and play it and you can see it bounces up just like that. This is a very fast moving object. So if the step size is set to a very low number like one for both of these will restart and play this. And you can see it passes right through it and actually almost explodes the UV sphere. So I'll play that one more time just like that and you can see it's gone. To solve that issue, we would have to turn the stepsize backup. So normally a value of ten and then a maximum of 300 works pretty well. So the minimum times is going to calculate every single frame is ten and the maximum amount of times is 300. Auto step will automatically calculate depending on the velocity of each object. For example, if this plane right here was to start moving up slowly and then speed up in the middle. It would only calculate a lot of frames when it's speeding up. It doesn't really need to calculate when it's slowing down because it's much easier to just see what's going on. The air. Lemon is similar to the step size and this deals with the amount of errors in your collision. So if you have a lot of errors, we can play this and you can see this is working just fine. But if, for example your object exploded or something, you would have to turn it down the error limit to a lower value, and hopefully that would fix your issue. So if you are having a lot of errors or your object is flying out or exploiting somehow, the error limit is what you're going to want to change. So maybe you would set this lower to a value of 0.005 or something like this. And that would help. Next up, we have the print performance to the console. And to locate the console, what you have to do is go over to the window panel and then turn on Toggle system console. Once we do this, and then if we turn on it printed performance to console, we'll restart and play this. We'll pause it right about there and then open up the console. You can see it needed ten frames steps per frame, just like that. Now make sure you don't exit out of this console because it will also close the blender program as well. Where you have to do is go over to window and then toggle system console, and that will get rid of it. And then finally the two values down here, choke and fuzzy what these do, the toke value will slow down the simulation once an object penetrates a collision. So if this is set up to a value of three or restart and play this, you can see it's slowed down at the object. Instead of having that fly upwards. We'll review that one more time. But if the joke is set to 0 and it hits, it'll just fly straight upwards without slowing down at all. The fuzzy value also deals with collisions, and this will help speed up the simulation if your simulation is moving very slowly. If I was to drive this up to a value of three, we can play it. We don't see too much of a difference because this scene is pretty simple. It's not that complicated. But if your frame rate is slowing down a lot, you might want to turn up the fuzzy, but the negative side effect of this is that the collisions will be less accurate. So if you want more accurate collisions, leave it at 0. If you want faster collisions, leave it up a little bit. And there you go. That is the Solver in the soft body simulation. 12. Collision Objects: Hello everyone and welcome to a new section. This section is all about collisions, force fields, and all of the interesting things that you can do with the soft body simulation. In this video, we're going to be covering collision objects. To add a collision modifier to your objects, you probably already know exactly what to do. Head over to the Physics tab and then select Collision. There are a couple of different values here that you can change to make this all body simulation act differently. Will talk about damping. And just a second, I first want to talk about the thickness inner and the outer. Both of these value controls where the bounding box of your collision is on your object. The thickness outer, if this was a very, very high, what's going to happen is that this UV sphere will probably solve it right around here or so before it collides with the mesh. Before we do that though, I'm going to Control Z that and we'll just view this in real time. I'll hit the spacebar to play my simulation. And this is what it looks like. Now if we pause that restart and I'll go into front view by pressing one on my never pad. And I'll turn up the thickness outer all the way up to one. Now if I play my simulation, you'll notice it stops way up here. So that is the effect of the thickness outer it expands the bounding box of your collision. And you also might notice that it slows down the simulation as well. I'm going to set that back down to 0.02. How the collision works is it deals with normals to view where the direction of your normals are. You can go into edit mode with the objects that you have selected, come up to this menu, turn on at normals, and then bring up the size a little bit. I'll press Z and go into wireframes so you can see where it's at. And you can see that this line right here, this is the direction of the normal. If we were to invert this. So if we were to flip this all the way around, so it's upside down. Now the normal is pointing in this direction. We'll restart and then play this. And you can see it passes right through our objects because the normals are inverted. So make sure if your object is passing it through your collision that the normals are pointing in the right direction. The inner value also has an interesting effect, but this will do is if you're soft body gets close to the area that it's set right here, it will actually push the object through and then land on top of a collision to see what I mean, I'm going to restart selected this bottom plane right here and hit the spacebar to play. I'm going to press G and drag this up until it hits the object. And you can see it passes right through it entered that inner zone and then passes up through the object. So now if we select this object and bring the inner all the way up to one, the zone where it gets sucked in is much, much bigger. Now if we research and then I'll hit the spacebar and press g to move and I'll drag this up just slightly. You can see once it entered that zone, it's shot straight through the collision object and ended up on top. So that is what the inner value do. It expands where the object gets pushed through the friction value and the single-sided and override it normals that do not work with the soft body simulation. These values that deal with the cloth simulation. And if we want to learn more about the cluster simulation, I do have a course on that. You can check out. Now let's talk about the dampening value. Over here on the left, I have a dampening and set to 0, and this one on the right has a dampening of one. The dampening will slow down the simulation. If I play this now, you can see the one on the right is slowing down much faster than the one on the left because it's set to a higher number, will restart and play that one more time. And you can see the effect that it's doing. This one is stopping way before this one is. That is the effect of damping. It just slows down the bounciness of the soft body simulation. Finally, the last thing I wanted to talk about in this video is how to get a soft body inside a object or a collision object. Right now we can see I've added in a UV sphere and then I've added a cube around it. If we add a collision object to this and then hit the spacebar, you'll notice it just passes right through. The reason for that is because the normals are messed up again. If we go into edit mode, we can see the normals are pointed in this direction. We want them to be inverted so they're actually on the inside. To do this, we can press Shift N. And then in this panel here, if we open up this and turn it on the inside, now the normals are pointed in the inside instead of the outside. Now this should work properly. If we go out of edit mode, restart and then hit the spacebar to play, you'll notice our object is colliding on the inside of our queue. Just like that. And then we can bounce around perfectly fine just like that. So that is how you add an object on the inside of a collision, makes sure the normals are appointed on the inside and it will work properly. 13. Field Weights: In this video, we're going to look at the field weights in the soft body simulation. The field awaits allow you to control which force fields in your scene effect, which soft body? For example, we have two soft bodies right here and they're exactly the same with all of the settings down here set to one. If we play our simulation, you can see they're both flying off to the right because there is a wind force field with this strength of five. If I select one of the force fields and then I can mess around with the settings here. And the first one that we have is a gravity. So if I don't want the object to fall down, I can turn a gravity all the way off and then it will just float to the right, just like that, there is no gravity and the C now, so it's not falling down, it's just moving to the right because of the wind force field underneath the gravity, we have the All option here. And if I turn this all the way down, if there are any force fields of this type in the scene, it will have no effect on the simulation. So now if I play this, you can see this one is still flying off to the right, but this one is falling straight down because I turned to all, all the way off. You can also do specific force fields to end. Since this is a wind of force field, I can turn off the wind option. If I turn this all the way down, it will do the exact same thing. It will just fall straight down without being affected by the wind as you can see here. You can also go with percentages. So if I wanted the wind to have 50% strength, I could turn that 2.5 and then it would slowly fly off in this direction. Up top here we have an effector collection and this will limit the amount of effectors that will interact with this soft body. So for example, if I select this effector and then I press the key and move it to a new collection. I'll go collection at two, just like this and hit OK. We can see here it's in this collection. So now if I select this one and then I select the effector collection to the first collection which has no force fields. Now this one will not affect this one on the right at all because it is in a different collection than the one that we specified here. If I select this one and I switch it over to collection two, this one will now have an effect from the wind, but this one will not. So now if we restart our simulation and hit the spacebar to play it, we can see it interacting just like this, but this one is not moving at all. To actually add in a force field. You can press shift a and then go underneath it force field and then add in the one that you want. There are a bunch of different ones that aren't here that you can play around with. For example, this one right here is called a force. And this will just give a force in all directions. So if I place this over here now and I set the strength of it up to four, since it's in collection one. And we specified that this one is going to affect collection one. I play this now and you can see it's flying off in that direction because this force field is in collection one. So there you go. That is how field weights work in the soft body simulation. 14. Cloth Simulation + Soft Body Simulation: In this video, I'll be showing you how you can interact, a claw stimulation and the sulfide assimilation together. To do this, we're gonna go ahead and delete the default cube. And if you want to follow along, I'm gonna go step-by-step on how to do this so you can create your own animation in the process, I'm going to press shift a and go underneath mesh and add in a plane. This is going to be our Claude simulation. I'm going to scale it up a little bit, right about. There is probably good. And just like the soft body simulation, cloth simulation also requires geometry to work properly. So you probably guessed it. We need to subdivide this plane. I'm going to go into edit mode, right-click and subdivide. If we open up this bottom panel, we can set the number of cuts that we want. Let's try a value of 25. That looks pretty good. I think I wanna go a little bit more though. Let's try and 35. And I think I'm happy with how that looks. So 35 cuts would be pretty good. Now what we're gonna do is add in the cloth simulation. So over in the physics tab, I'm going to click on cloth. And that's all we really need to do. If I played this though, you'll notice that the cloth falls straight down and that's not what we want. So we're going to pin at the edges so they stay where they're at. To do this, it's very similar to the soft body. We need to create a vertex group. So over into the object data panel, we're going to create a new vertex group by clicking that plus sign and then going into edit mode. If you hold the ALT key and select that that ring right there, it will select that edge. Then holding Alt on shift, I'll select this edge, this edge, and then finally the other edge in the back. Then we can assign this vertex group, make sure the weight is set to one. So now if we go into weight Paint mode, you can see that the edges now have this red outline and the inside is blue, and that is what we want. We can go over to the Physics tab now and then scroll down to the collisions are actually the shape. And then select the pin group right here. If we select the group that we just created, now we play this. You'll notice the cloth is now staying exactly where it's at, but the middle is still going down. To make this a little bit more dramatic, I'm going to scroll up to the mass right here. And I'm going to set this up to 0.8. Now if we play this, you can see it just weighs a little bit more. And that will give us some more bounciness with soft body stimulation, i might actually go all the way up to one, will restart, imply that. And that looks pretty good. Now for the soft body, we're going to use a cube for this demonstration. I'll press shift a and add an eight Q, drag it up a little bit, and then of course we need to subdivide it. So I'm gonna go into edit mode, right-click and sub-divide. We'll do this again, right-click subdivide. And I think that's good right there. So just two cuts is perfectly fine. Then we'll click on soft body. I'm going to turn off a goal, so it actually falls straight down. And now if we play our simulation, you can see they're not interacting. So what we need to do is actually add in a collision modifier to both of these objects. I'll select the plane first and click on collision. Then I'll select the Cube and go collision. Another thing I'm gonna do is in this cube soft body settings, I'm going to set the bending amount to three. I think that will look pretty good. Now if we restart and play this, you can see the object actually interacts with the cloth. That looks pretty good and you can also give it a random rotation. So if I wanted to, I can double-tap, are given a random rotation like that. And then we can play this and it looks something like that and that looks pretty cool. One thing to note with this simulation is that the modifier stack is very important. So for example, if this, if I select my cloth and go over to the Modifier tab, we can see that the collision is below the cloth. And that's very important. If the collision is above the cloth simulation, it's not going to take into account the deformations at the costimulation is doing and it's just going to act like a regular plain. So if I restart this and I play this, you can see it stops right at the surface where the original plane would be. So make sure the collision is below the cloth simulation and then it should work properly. Same thing for the soft body as well. Makes sure the collision is below the soft body and you'll be good to go. You can also have multiple cubes interacting with the same simulation. So if I press Shift D on this cube, I'll place it right about their skill it down, double-tap R2, rotate it. I'll do it one more time. Scale it down, double-tap are something like this. If they all have the collision modifier attached to them, it should work properly. If one of them does not have the collision, it'll just pass through. So now if we press the spacebar to play, you can see our simulation is slowing down quite a bit, but they're interacting with each other and make it bend as you can see there. So there you go. That is how you interact. A cloth simulation and the soft body simulation. 15. Interacting 2 Soft Bodies: In this video, I'll be showing you how you can interact to soft body simulations together. To do this, I'm going to delete the default cube and add an a plane at for demonstration. I'll scale this plane up and then I'll press shift a and add in an ecosphere. I'll drag this up as well. And then I'll duplicate this Ico sphere by hitting Shift d z to lock into the z-axis and drag it up slightly. So now what we're gonna do is apply the collision to these plane so the soft bodies actually interact with it. So over N The Physics tab, I'm going to select Collision. I'll select our ecosphere right here. Click on soft body and then turn off soft body goal, open up the edges and set the bending amount to one. So now if I play my simulation, you can see it's interacting with the plane just like that. Let's go ahead and do the same thing for the top ecosphere. Click on soft body, turn off soft body goal and set the bending amount to one. Now if we play both of these, you can see they're hitting the plane just like that, but they're not interacting with each other. So in order to get them to interact with each other, we need to add a collision to both of them. I'm going to first selected this bottom one and add an, a collision. Just do this ecosphere so you can see what happens. Now if we play our simulation. You can see it is interacting with it, but this object is not affecting the bottom Ico sphere at all. It's acting like it's a million pounds and is not moving, will restart and play that one more time. So in order to get both of them to interact with each other, we need to select the top one and add a collision modifier as well. So now if we restart, hit the spacebar to play or simulation, you can see they're interacting with each other just like that and they're actually moving the ecosphere is around. Pretty cool. Now keep in mind that the modifier stack is important, like we talked about in the last video. Make sure the collision is below the soft body or it's not going to work properly. This is above the soft body will restart and play this. You can see it doesn't interact with it at all. So make sure the collision is below the soft body. So then this object will actually act as a collision for this bottom ecosphere. And as you can see there, that looks much better. So make sure if your objects aren't interacting the way that you want. Double-check the modifier stack and double-check that each of the objects have a collision Modifier applied to them. So they're actually interacting with the simulation. But there you go. That is how you interact to soft bodies together. 16. Soft Body Following a Curve: In this video, I'll be showing you how you can have a soft body simulation follow a curve. To do this, we first need to add in the curve to our scene. So I'm going to delete the defaults Cube, press shift a and add in a mesh and a curve. We'll go with a b's here curve for now. I'll scale it up a little bit and then we can position this how we want. So what I'll do is I'll rotate this along the x 90 degrees. So type in RX and 90 will go into front view by pressing one and then go into edit mode. If we select one of the handles, we can move the curve around. We can also scale it up, add in multiple handles in-between it by selecting both of them, right-click and then subdivided and that will add an, a handle in the middle. So what you can do is just play around with this until you get the desired at curve that you want. I'll probably go with something like that I think would look pretty good. And now that we have our curve and arsine, we need to add an object to follow this curve. I'll use a UV sphere for this demonstration. So press shift a at an a1 UV sphere. And another thing to note is that the origin point is very important. You want to make sure both of the objects are at the same origin point. So you can see the UV sphere is right at the center and so is the curve. And that is what we want. Over in the Modifier tab with the UV sphere selected, I'm going to click add modifier, and you will see an option for a curve modifier. If we select this, the curve object of course is going to be the vizier occurred. Now what we can do is if we move the UV sphere along the x direction, it will actually follow the curve, as you can see. That is looking pretty good. So now let's add in the soft body simulation at to this UV sphere. If we go over to the Physics tab, we can select soft at body. And now let's play this and you can see it's just floating at that exact spot. So what we need to do now is actually animate this UV sphere. So on frame one, I'm going to hit the icky and click on location, will jump to frame 100, then press G and X and then move it along the x-direction until it's at the end of the curve, then hit I and go location. If we restart and play this, you can see it's following the curve and it's also interacting like the soft body would over in the soft body settings underneath a goal will open up this settings option. And also the strength. We can see the default strength is set to 0.7. This is the strength of how much it will stick to this curve. So if this was a really low, like let's say 0.1 or restart and play this. You can see it's not even touching the curve is just falling down. We'll restart that. So let's try about halfway. Let's go with like 0.6. And now if we play this, you can see it is a little bit loose. It's not following the curve exactly. And it's also interacting as a soft body would. If you set this all the way up to one, the soft body will have no effect. And you can see it's following the curve of very, very strongly. So again, this setting right here, this default setting determines how strong it will follow the curve. If we open up the edges, we can also add in some bending to this UV sphere. So let's try a value of three or restart and set the strength of the curve. Let's go with 0.6 again. Actually, let's try 0.5. I'll play this and you can see this is how it looks. So there you go. That is how you interact a soft body with a curve. 17. Can Crushed Animation P1 Modeling: Hello everyone and welcome to a new section. This section is all about modeling. This can right here at in a texture and simulating it getting crushed using the soft body stimulation. To get started with the section, we're first going to model the can and then apply a texture to it. This is going to be very easy. All we have to do is first delete the cubes since we're not going to need it. And now let's add in a background image. The image that we'll be using is in the resources. So make sure you go download them and then to add it in, you can press shift a, go over to image, reference image, and then navigate to the folder. Once you have found it, you can select this one on the right. It is the red can, and then click on load a reference image. You'll notice though that the orientation of this reference image is at a weird angle. It's at the angle that we were looking at when we added it in. To fix that we can press the ALT are on your keyboard or option are if you are on a Mac and it will rotate it like this. I'm going to press R, then x 90 and then enter in there. We can see it is now in the front view. The next step is to start modeling this. I'm going to press shift a and add an a cylinder right here. Whenever you start to model something, you, once you add it, the permanent object that best represents what you're trying to model. In this case, it's a very cylindrical objects. So as cylinder will work perfectly fine. I'll go into front view and then scale this up slightly to match the reference image. The next step is to go into edit mode and start extruding and scaling down until we create the point up here. So I'll zoom in and then hold the ALT key and select that top loop right there, then g and Z0 and drag it upwards. I'm going to press E to extrude and bring it up a little bit and scale it in slightly. I'll do this a couple times until it matches the reference image just like this, e to extrude skill inwards. E, Extrude. I'll zoom in a little bit so you can see it. E skillet in somewhere around here. And then at this part I'm going to press E. I'll stop right there, e one more time and scale it outwards. For this little lip, I'm going to press E to extrude right-click. So it snaps the vertices to that same spot. And then I'll scale it outwards. I'll press E to extrude and drag it straight upwards. Then at the top right here, I'll do it one more time. T0, right-click, and then scale inwards. And now we're going to extrude downwards. So I'll press E once again and drag it down just slightly so we have that little lip right there. And there we go. We've now created that side. So now let's work on the bottom side. I'll go back into front view by pressing one and then come down here. I'll go into edit mode, then holding the ALT key, I'll select that loop and drag it down along the z-axis. This part is pretty simple as well. We're just going to hit a to extrude skeleton wardens and just do this a couple times. A scale. A scale like this may be a little bit too much. Ii Scott in and just do this until it fits the entire thing, just like that one last time scale, all the way in. And there we go. We've now created the Cahn. I'm also going to add in a couple of loops right here because with the soft body, this is not enough geometry. I'll press control are, and then I'll use the scroll wheel until I get the appropriate amount. Probably around and there are so left-click and then right-click, and there we go. Now we have a lot more geometry to work with. I'm also going to add a subdivision surface. So over in the Modifier tab, I'm going to click add modifier subdivision surface. I'll set both the view and the render to one, and then I'll right-click and go shade smooth. There we go. I'm happy with how this looks. And now let's apply the texture. 18. Can Crushed Animation P2 Adding Textures: I'm gonna go ahead and select the reference image and delete it since we're not going to need it anymore. So you can press the X key and click on delete with this cylinder. What we're gonna do is split this view so we can see what our UV map looks like. So I'm going to split the V by grabbing that top left corner and Dragon outwards. I'll select this menu and switch it over to the UV image editor. If we go into edit mode, we can see this is our current UV map and this isn't really gonna work properly. It's not gonna look as good since we added a bunch of geometry. So to fix this, I'm going to press it you and click on cylinder projection. Once we did this though, you'll see our UV map looks terrible. So to fix that, we can select this menu. Then underneath the direction, select a line at two object. Once we do this, now our UV map looks much better. If we go over to the material tab, we can create a new material and I will call this texture. And then we'll create a new material, but hitting that plus sign, clicking on New. And this is going to be the silver where it's at the top and the bottom. We'll call this one glossy. This material is going to be a very simple, we're just going to switch this over to the glossy shader and then set the roughness down to 0.2. If we open up the Preview option here is what it looks like over in our soda cans right here. I'm gonna go into edit mode and select the parts I want to assign this glossy material. What I want is for the top right here, so I'm going to press Alt a to de-select everything. Be for box aloft. And I'll draw a box around the top right here, right where that flip is. Then down at the bottom, I'm going to select all of, Let's go with all of this right here, all of these ones. And then I will click assign with that glossy material. For the texture, we're going to select that material and switch this over to the shader editor. I'll press shift a and we're going to add an a texture, image texture. We'll place that here. Then take the color output and plug it into the base color of the principal shader. Select open and then navigate to where the folder is with all the textures. And the one that we'll be using is this one. So select it open image. Now if we press Z and go into rendered view, we should be able to see the texture applied to our object, but currently it's not in the right spot and the angle and the UV map is not looking correct. So let's go ahead and fix that. First though. I'm going to set the metallic up a little bit so it has a glossy look. The roughness I'll drag down. And that's basically all we really need to do. So on the telecom 0.8 and a roughness of 0.2. I'll switch this back over to the UV editor and then we'll go into edit mode. I only want to select the parts that have this texture material. So to do that I can press Alt a2, de-select. Then with this texture, material is selected, I will click on Select. And there we go. We can see it in our UV map. So currently it's way too tall for this. So we're going to select everything by hitting a, then S, y and scale it down until as the appropriate size, right about there. Then you can zoom in and place it how you want. I'll drag it up a little bit and place it right there. So now you can see our texture is in the correct spot and now we can create the simulation. 19. Can Crushed Animation P3 Simulating: Now that we've created all of our objects, I'm going to go ahead and close off this window. We're not going to need it anymore. So click and drag it in the top right corner to close out that window. I'm going to press shift a and add in a plane, and this is going to be our collision. I'll scale it up pretty big. And that'll grab our Can and drag it up along the z axis so it's a little bit taller and I might skill it down slightly as well. Let's place it right on top of this plane. So I'll go into front view by pressing one and then drag it until it's right in line with the grid floor. So right about there. That looks pretty good. And now the other object that we are going to need is an actual crusher. So in this case, I wanted to use a queue. You can use a cylinder or whatever object that you want. I'll stick with a cube. I'll drag it up along the z-axis and make it a little bit taller by hitting S, Z and dragging it out. And I'll place it right about there. That looks pretty good. We also need to animate this object. So on frame one, I'm going to hit the I key on my keyboard and click on location. All jumped to frame 50. So it has 50 frames to go down. And I'll drag this down until it's about halfway inside the can. Write about their looks good. Then I'll hit ie location once again, ten frames later, I'm going to move it up. So on this frame i'm going to hit eye location. And then we're going to have 50 frames of transits in time. So 50 frames would be at a 110. So I'm going to switch to a 110 and drag it back up to its original position, position right about there. Then I'll hit eye location. Let's go ahead and play this to see what it looks like. So I'll press Play. And you can see it crushes and then it goes back up. Perfect, that's all we really need. We also need to apply a collisions you both of these objects, the cube right here and the plane. So we'll go over to the Physics tab and click on collision. The dampening amount controls the damping of the soft body simulation. And I want this to be up. So I'm going to bring this up to a value of about 0.8. I'll do the same thing for the plane. So select it collision and set the dampening 2.8. Now for the soft body, I'm going to select my camera right here. Click on soft body. And then underneath the edges tab we're gonna open up this. I'm also going to turn off a soft body goal. Now here are some of the values that we want to change. First off, in the object tab, we can see the mass is one kilogram. Now normally an empty soda can weighs about 15 grams, and this is currently a lot more than that. So we're going to bring this down to 0.1. I noticed if you go any lower than this, sometimes this simulation breaks. So that's why we're going to stick with 0.1. Over in the edges tab here is a couple of settings that we want to change. The pole and the push options are the amount that it will resist being crushed. So for the poll, we're going to set this to 0.95. And then for the push value, we're going to bring it to 0.9. So very high in those values. The dampening, I'm gonna bring up to a value of 50. So it slows down the simulation and gets it to not move very much. And then of course, the plastic value, this will deform and keep the deformation after the simulation is done. I want this to be all the way up to 100. The bending. I'm going to set that to ten. And I think that's all we really need to do. For the self collision. I'm going to check that box and I'm just gonna leave it at the default settings. We don't really need to change any of this. For the solver. I'm going to open up this and set the step size and minimum, 250. This will just help the simulation work a little bit better. So evaluate fifties should work pretty good. Finally, we are ready to bake this in. So I'm gonna open up the cast setting and I'm going to set the end frame right here. There are two different things that we can do. You can either have the simulation, simulate after the crash has happened or you can make it stop. You can see in the animations on screen, the one on the left moves around a little bit after the cube has moved up. And you can see the one on the right does not move at all once the cube has moved up. That's because we ended the simulation after that happened. So that is what we're gonna do over here. We have to check when this cube actually moves back up. So if we play our simulation, we can see it ends at frame 60 and then moves up right here. So iframe 60, I want the soft body to stop simulating. So for the end frame, i'm going to select 60. Now that we've done that, we are ready to bake. So I'm gonna press control S to save our project and I will call it crushed can tutorial. Then I will select bake. If your simulation it looks something like this. And easy way to fix this is to delete the bake and change some of the settings in the edges. First off, I'm going to set the dampening down to 20. And then for the bending, I'm going to bring that down to eight. This should help with the collision now and this should look much better. Once you've done those settings, I'm going to save my project once again and then click on bake. 20. Can Crushed Animation P4 Rendering: The simulation has finished baking, and here is the result. If I hit the space bar on my keyboard, we can see the animation play. The can gets crushed and then it stays right there. And I think it looks pretty good to render this out into an animation. I'm first going to set the end frame down here to 150. I'm also going to jump over to the AV Settings and turn on a screen is space reflections, ambient inclusion. And then also underneath the color management, I'm going to set the look to high contrast. Over in the world settings. I'm going to bring the colour of the world up to somewhere around here, a light gray color. And then for the lighting, I'll select the lamp. I'll press Z and go into rendered view so we can see exactly what this looks like. And I actually think this looks pretty good. I'm going to position the camera at right about here, so we get the logo in the front and all of the ingredients on the side. Then I will hit Control Alt 0 to snap the camera to place, select it and drag it backwards. Something right here will look pretty good. And then for the material, for the cube right here, I'm going to go through the material tab and click on new. You can give this any code that you want. I think I'm gonna go with an orange color somewhere around here. And then for the plan, I will select it new. And all I'm really going to do is turn the roughness down to 0.1. So we get a nice reflection in the floor. From there we are ready to render. I'm gonna go over to the output section and set an output of where or what my movie file to go to. I will just select the folder right here, and I will call it can a crushing tutorial. For the file format, you can select which one you want. I'm gonna go with an mpeg. I'll select mpeg underneath the encoding. I'm going to set the container to mp4. Then the output quality I'm gonna go with high. Normally whenever you render an animation, you want to render it as an image sequence and then sequence it out later in the video editor. But since we are going to be using Av and this should go pretty fast, I don't see the need to render it as a PNG, so I'm just gonna go with an MP4. Now that I've done that, I'm going to save my project once again and then go over to render and then Render Animation. This will bring up a new window and it will start to render out. The render has finished. That only took about a minute or so. I'm gonna go ahead and exit out of this window, go or to render and then view animation. Once we do this, a new window will pop up and you'll be able to see your animation in real time. The animations would also be in the folder that you specified in the output section. So if I open up this folder, we can see it right here. So there you go. That is how you create an animation of a kin getting crushed in Blender using the soft body simulation. Thank you for watching this tutorial. If you want to learn how to create this Tetris animation and go ahead and view the next section. 21. Tetris Animation P1 Modeling: Hello everyone and welcome to a new section. This section is all about creating this Tetris animation that you see on screen. This first video, we will start by modelling the different pieces and then we'll start to simulate it. All the Tetris pieces are very simple. They're just a bunch of cubes extruded. So this should be pretty easy. Reverse going to select this default cube and then we're gonna go into edit mode and then switch over to the face select mode. The first piece that we will create is the one with the two sides and then one in the middle. So I'm going to select this face right here, hit e, And if you hold control, it'll snap it to that location, go out to grid units, do the same thing on the other side. Select that face e to extrude holding control. I will snap it to that location. And then finally, we'll select this top face right here, e to extrude holding control right there. This is our first tetris piece. Next I'm gonna go into front view so we can do this a little bit faster and I'm gonna move it over to the left. I'll press shift a at an another cube and go into edit mode. This one is going to be the very tall one. So I'm going to press at z and go into wireframe and select this top face right here. I'm going to hit ie to extrude holding control. I'll snap it to two grid units up. And an easy way to repeat the process that you just did is if you hit Shift R, If you do this twice, you can create this shape right here automatically. Then we go, I'm gonna move that over to the side and then press shift a will add an another cube. This one is going to be the L shapes. I'll, I'll go into edit mode, select this face e to extrude and holding control. Do this a couple more times up top here e to extrude and place it there. We need to do two more pieces. I'll press shift a at an a, another cube. This one is going to be the big square. I'll select this face e to extrude. And then I'll select both of these top phases, ie to extrude again, just like this. So we have in this cube, I'll move this over to the right. And then the last piece is going to be the one where it goes up to the sign-in up a little bit. This one's easy. I'm going to grab this face right here, e to extrude, select this face, E2 extruded outwards. Then select this face either true one more time, and there we go. I'm also going to duplicate a couple of these and then flip them. So what I want is for these two to be duplicated. So I'm going to select both of them. Shift D and then move it upwards. Then I'm going to press Control M and then mirror it along the x-axis. So that just flips them. And there we go. Now that we have all of the pieces, we get to decide where we want to place them in the simulation. I'm going to press at z and go back into solid View. And before we start doing that, we need to add in a couple of different things. First off, I'm going to select every single piece holding Shift. And then I'm gonna go into edit mode. I've had issues where the pieces are just morphing into each other and totally break in the simulation. So what we need to do is fix the normals and make sure the scale is correct. I'm going to press a to select everything and hit Shift N. This will recalculate the normals in case they are messed up. Next, I'm going to press Control a, an object mode and click on a scale. So now everything is the right scale and it should work properly. I'm also going to go into edit mode one more time. N subdivide this because currently there's not a lot of geometry to work with. So I'm going to right-click and subdivide. We'll do this one more time, right-click and subdivide. And now all of them have a lot of vertices and this should look pretty good. Next up I'm going to hit Control one and this will add in a subdivision surface modifier. And I'm also going to right-click and go shade smooth. If we go over to the Modifier tab, we can see the level of the viewport is set to one and the renderer is set to two. And that is perfectly fine. Now we get to place the pieces in the spot that we want. So what I want for this animation is I want this one to be on the left over here. So I'm gonna move it right to this location. I'm going to select this L, move it next to it. And then I want this cube right here to be next to the L. This is how big I want the Tetris 2B. So I wanted three pieces long. And then I'm going to select this one and I want it to fall right here next to this piece. So I'm just going to place it right here for now. And then this piece, I want it to fall here. This piece over here, I want it to fall like this. And then this one, I want it to be rotated. So I'm going to select it, press R and then holding control, I'm going to rotate it 90 degrees and then place it right here. So this is what our animation is going to look like. Now I'm going to add in the background so the pieces don't fall over a press shift a and add an eight another cube and then go into top view by pressing seven. I'll place this behind the Tetris pieces. So right about here, then press S and Y, skill it along this way, then S and X and scale it along this direction, right about here or so. And then we'll go into edit mode and select both of the faces on each end. I'll press Z and go into wireframe. Select this face, select this face, E, right-click, and then scale them outwards along the x axis, I'll press S and then x and scale it outwards. Then we'll select both of these spaces right here, e to extrude and drag it this way. So now we've created this bounding box so the Tetris pieces don't fall over. But it looks like we're really close to this edge. So what I'll do is I'll go into vertices select mode by hitting one, alt a 2D select, b for box select. And I'll just drag these outwards a little bit along the x direction. Same thing on this side, alt a to de-select B for buck select and also like that edge and move it over to the left so it's a little bit further away. And then I'll move this a little bit closer as well. There we go. And now let's go into front view and make sure it is the right height. So it'll go into edit mode, alt a to de-select. And then I'll select that top face right there and move it upwards along the z direction. So it's really tall. And then of course we need a front. So I'm going to press shift a and add an another queue. I'll go into top view once again, S y and make it a little bit thinner and then place it right in the front right here. I'm going to press S and X skill at along the x direction, so it's longer. And at this doesn't matter where it's at because this object is going to be hit in one than we do the final render. All this is, is just to make sure the pieces don't fall out. I'll go into front view and then I'll press tab to go back into edit mode. Select this top face right here. I'll box selected just like that. And then I'll drag it up so it's the same height over n, the outliner. I'm going to click on this menu and open up the camera icon and then make sure this is turned off in the render. I don't want this cube to show up in the render. This is only for the boundary box. I'm also going to go over to this panel right here, the object panel, open up the viewport display and set the display as textured over two wire. So now if we press Z and go into solid view, we should be able to see through our object just like this, but we can still select it. So there you go. One last piece that we will add is the plane for the ground is I'll press shift day and add in a plane and then scale it up pretty big. I'll go back into front view and make sure it is underneath all of the pieces, so right about there. And now that we've set up all of our objects, we are ready to start simulating. 22. Tetris Animation P2 Simulating: The next step in creating our animation is to apply physics to all of these objects. I'm first going to select this cube right here in the back and going over to the Physics tab, I'm going to enable collision. Same thing for this object in the front selected collision. And then the ground collision. I'm also going to turn up the dampening on the ground Suez slows down the simulation. I'm going to go up to 0.5. Now what we can do is select one of the pieces and start adding in the soft body simulation. I'm also going to go into front view by pressing one. And then I'll select all of the objects by holding Shift, and then move them upwards and then place them how I want. So I want him to be right about here when they start to fall down. I'll drag it up a little bit more. So this piece is going to fall first. I'll place it right there. This piece is going to fall second. And then this piece is third. I'll place it right there. And then over here, this piece is going to be the fourth piece that falls down. So I'll make sure that it's right about here. And you don't want these objects to be touching each other. You want to make sure there is a gap between them. Objects here, I might move it over to this way and then rotated slightly because I want it to fall right here. So I'll place it right about there, I think will be pretty good. This piece I might rotate this way. And so it bounces off this one and then falls into place. So right about there is probably good. And then finally, this piece, I'll move upwards. So it lands right in between here and then on top of this L. So right about, there is probably good. And once we start simulating and you can see what it looks like and then you can rotate the objects depending on how they fall. Alright, so now that we have all of our pieces setup in the correct position, we can start simulating. I'm first going to select this piece on the bottom and then click on a soft body underneath the object. We're going to set the weight of this to a little bit lower. Let's go with 0.5 of a kilogram. There we go. And then I'm going to turn off a soft body goal and then open up the edges panel right here. The push and the pull options. I'm going to set both of these up to 0.8, just like this. The damping value, I'm going to set up 24, so it makes sure it slows down the simulation. And then the bending amount I'm going to bring up to 8.5. I think that'll be pretty good. Underneath the solver. I wanna make sure this is working correctly. So I'm going to set the step size up to 50. And then the error limit. I'm going to bring that down so it's a little bit more accurate. I'm going to go 0.05. Finally, underneath the field weights, I want them to fall down a little bit slower just to make sure there's no issues with the collision. So I'm going to bring this down to 0.8. Now that we've set up all of our settings for the soft body, we can open up the cache setting and set the end frame to 500. What I want for this simulation is for each of these pieces to fall every 50 frames. So this one is going to be at the start. This one's going to be at 50 frames. This one's not going to be at a 100, and then so on. What we're gonna do next is select all of these objects holding shift just like this. Then we will select this one last and hit Control L and apply the modifiers. Now every single one of these objects has the exact same settings for our soft body as you can see here. And all we have to do is change the simulation startTime and this should work properly. I'm also going to make sure that in the Modifier tab, the subdivision surface is underneath the soft body. Next up we need to apply the collision. Now unfortunately, you can't do the Control L with the collision modifier for some reason I've That might be a bug right now, but what we have to do is just manually select each one at a collision. Collision and select each one of these. And this should work properly. Now. Finally, the last one up top, I will add in a collision. And then underneath the collision it makes sure that the dampening is a little bit higher. Let's go with 0.5 for all of these. Now, a quick way to actually add this number to each one of these is if I control C on this value, I can select any other piece, control V, and that will paste in the value right there, so we don't have to click on it. Control V, just like this control V. And this will save you some time with other things in Blender. And there we go. Now we are ready to start simulating. I'm going to select this second piece right here and then open up the cache setting and said this one at 250. Then I will select this object here, set the cache type to 100. This one on the left, I'm going to set to 150. And then you get the idea. This one right here is going to be 200. Actually, let's do this one. This one's going to be 200. And then this one is going to be 250. And then finally this one up top is going to be 300. Now that we've done that, let's save our project just in case this crashes. So I'll hit control S and then save my blender file. Once you have saved your blender file, you can set the end frame in the timeline to 500 to match the cash. And then we can click on it. Bake all dynamics. Make sure you click on bags all Dynamics and not bake because this one will do every object. 23. Tetris Animation P3 Materials & Rendering: Alright, so after a little bit of playing around with the simulation, I've got this one to work properly where the pieces don't float upwards. And what I did is I scaled up the entire thing. I applied the rotation to each of these objects and then just make sure the normals are working correctly. Once you have done that as should look like this. And we can players emulation to see exactly what this looks like. We can see all of the pieces fall down. They hit and then bounce around a little bit. And I'll just skip through here because it's going a little bit slow. And then they crash like that. And I think this looks pretty good. So now what we're going to do is just create a basic scene around all of these pieces, add some materials, and then render it out with an animation. To get started, I'm going to position the camera right about here. And I'm gonna hit control alt 0 on the number pad to snap it to view. I'll select it G, middle mouse button, and this will drag it backwards. I'll place it right about here. Next up, I'm going to restart and make sure that pieces are above the camera before they enter it and which they are. So this looks good. And now for the lighting, I'm going to just play this a little bit. I'll select the default lamp that's in our scene and go over to the lamps settings over here and switch it over to a sun lamp. I'm gonna set the strength of this up to, let's go with four. And then if we press Z and go into rendered view, we should be able to see what this looks like. I'm also going to rotate this along the z axis. So hit our z and then you can rotate it so it's actually facing the pieces like this. And we have a nice shadow on the side. If we open up the shadow, I'm going to turn on contact at shadows and set the angle up a little bit higher so we have softer shadows. Next up I'm going to add some materials. So we'll select that this piece on the left, go over to the material tab and create a new one. You can add in whatever colors that you want. I'm just gonna go with the basic Tetris colors, which is a nice red. I'll select a nother piece right here. And with this one, I'll just set the base color over to a nice blue. There's one on the right is going to have a green color. So click on New, switching over to a nice green, something like this. This one right here can use that same red. So I'm going to click on the drop down menu and select the red material. This one right here will have a yellow material, so I will click New underneath the surface. I'm going to set the base color over to a nice yellow somewhere around here. And then finally, this one, I will give it that same blue material. Alright, so there we go for the ground. Oh, select the plane, click New. And all I'm really going to do is bring the roughness down to 0.1. So we get a nice reflection. Now at the moment we can't see our reflection. And that's because we need to go over to the EV Settings and turn on at screen space reflections. I'm also gonna turn on ambient occlusion and set the look in the color management to high contrast right here. Now we're getting a lot more contrast and this is looking much better. The world settings, I'm going to drag up just a slightly, something like this. And now I think we are ready to render. It looks like we have one more piece appear, so I will select it. And for this one I think I'm gonna go with the green colour. So I will select the green material. And now that we've done that, we're ready to set up our render settings. Over in the output section, I'm going to set an output of where I want my file to go to. I'll click right here and then navigate to a folder. I will call it Tetris tutorial final, and then click Accept. And for the file format, since we are going to be rendering this in EV, It is gonna go pretty fast. So I'm going to switch this over to an mpeg underneath the encoding. I'm gonna set the container to mp4. The output quality I'm gonna go with hi. And I think that's all we really need to do. The frame rate. I'm also going to bring up to 30 FPS because I think this animation is running just a bit slow. So this should help with the speed. Now that we've set up everything, I'm going to save our project will once again and then go over to render and then click on Render Animation. A new window will pop up and you'll be able to see your animation getting rendered. And this shouldn't take too long because we're rendering with EV. And you can see it's under half of a second per frame. The render has finished. Now if you want to view your results, you can open up that folder where you specified in the output section and it'll be in there. Or you can go over to render and then click on view animation. The shortcut is Control F 11. If we select this, a new window will pop up and you'll be able to see your animation in real time. So there you go. That is how you create a Tetris animation using the soft body simulation. Thank you for watching this section. If you enjoyed our created your own animation, I would love to see it. So make sure to post it in the assignment or in the Q and a. That's gonna do it for this section. Thanks again for watching, and I will see you in the next one. 24. Obstacle Course P1 Modeling: Hello everyone and welcome to a new section. This section is about creating an obstacle course for a soft body simulation to go through. We'll be covering a variety of topics such as collisions, animations, particle hair simulations, and animation for materials. First off, we're going to start by modelling the entire course, adding in some objects and rotating them and placing them how we want. I'm gonna go ahead and delete the default cubes since we're not going to need it in our scene. And then I'll press Shift eight and now we'll add in an ecosphere. This is going to be our sphere that goes through the obstacle course. Before you do anything else, make sure you come over to the bottom-left, opened up this panel and set the subdivisions up to three. I want three layers of subdivision for the soft body. And so set that to three and you should be good. If for some reason you clicked away and that menu is now gone. All you have to do is just add in a new ecosphere, just like this, and then it will pop back up. Next up, we're going to drag this up along the z-axis, so it's pretty tall, somewhere around here. And then we'll go into front view by pressing one on the number pad. I'm going to press shift a and add in a cube. And this is going to be a platform for this sphere to fall onto. Drag it upwards and then scale it along the z-axis. But pressing S, Z and scaling it down. You don't wanna go too small with this because sometimes the soft body will actually click through on the other side of the cube and get stuck. So make sure it has a little bit of thickness. And then press S and then x and skill at all in this way. So it's a little bit longer, rotate it and then place it how you want. I think I'm gonna go somewhere around here and they'll drive the ecosphere over to the left. Just like this. I'm going to select this cube, shift D it and move it over here and rotate it this way. I'll place it at, around this angle so the ecosphere will fall down, roll over here, hit this, hit this side, and then fall down this way. Something like this will look pretty good. And then over here, I'm going to add in a cylinder, and this is where the ecosphere will go through and change colors. I'll place that right about here. At the moment, I don't really know exactly where to place the cylinder. We're going to need to play our animation to figure that out. But for now I'll just scale it up slightly, place it's somewhere around here and estimate. And then to actually create a hole in this, we need to go into edit mode. I'm going to press three on my keyboard to switch over to the face select mode. I'll selected this top face. Then also like the bottom phase by holding Shift and then ends at them by hitting I. And in setting it somewhere around here, to actually connect these two, we can press Control E. And then if we select bridge edge loops right here, it'll create a hole right in the middle. Now to correct the size of this, I'm gonna go into object mode, then into top view by pressing seven and then Z and go into wireframe. I'm going to place this right next to the atmosphere and scale it up how I need. So somewhere around here or so. And I don't want it to be too thick, so I'm gonna go into edit mode now. Then with this inner loop selected, I'll press S, shift Z, and this will scale it along the x and the y direction. And then I'll just drag it up till it fits right about there. And I think that will look pretty good at the ecosphere, will hit that. And then fall straight through. Then we'll place it back in the spot and write about their next up. There's going to be a couple of cylinders that the atmosphere will fall and then roll over top. To do this, I'm going to press shift a and add in a cylinder. And then I'll drag this cylinder up and then rotate it along the x direction. So hit our X 90 and then enter skeleton until it's the size that you want. And then to skill at along the wall, you need to press S y and scale it out this way. Now instead of duplicating this a bunch of times, we're actually going to add an array modifier to it. So over n, the Modifier tab, I'm going to click add modifier and select array. Bring up the count to somewhere around here. So maybe like eight. And I might skill him up a little bit and then place it right underneath this cylinder, rotated so the ecosphere will actually rotate down our fall down along the cylinders. Something like this will look pretty good. For the next obstacle, the ecosphere is going to roll down this way, fall into a cube, and then that cube is going to rotate, pushing the ecosphere over in this direction. So I'm going to press shift a and add in a another cube and place it over here. To do this, I'm gonna go into edit mode and select that top face, G, z and drag it down. And then I'm also going to inset this. So I'm gonna look over on the top just like this. Hit I to inset, drag it in, and then price ie to extrude and drag it down. So we have a hole like this. Now this is currently way too small, so I'm going to press S to scale and drag it up somewhere around here is probably good. After this cube rotates around, it's going to land on a plane. So we're going to add that in, press shift a ad in a plane. I'm gonna go into front view once again and just place this right about here or so skillet up slightly. So what's going to happen is this is going to rotate and the origin point is at the wrong spot. So I'm going to right-click set origin and then origin to geometry. And this'll place that orange dot in the middle. And now it's going to rotate like this. So if you can imagine, it rotates this way and this plane right here, it's going to catch it. So we'll place it here, something like this. And then I'm going to have it fall down this way. So S x, x and that will scale it along the x-direction. Somewhere around here or so is good. And this plane right here is going to have a lot of hair particles and it's going to look pretty good when the UV sphere goes through them. I'm going to select r cube right here and had Alt R2 snap the rotation back to its original spot. And I might scale this all on the y just slightly. Finally, the last thing that we're going to add is another cylinder for the ecosphere to fall into a prize, shift a and add an a cylinder, drag it over here, press S and then shift Z and skill it along this way. So it's really thick. Go into edit mode, select this top face eye to inset, and then just create a hole by extruding it downwards. So there we go. We've added in all of the obstacles for our icons for you to go through. Now before you watch the next video, I want you guys to add in two more obstacles of your choice. They can be stairs, they can be whatever you want. A tunnel for the, I guess we were to go through just that into more of your own designs. 25. Obstacle Course P2 Simulating: Now that we've finished and modeling all of our objects, let's go ahead and work on the simulation. I'm also going to add an a plane to be the ground. So I'm going to place the plane right there, skillet up pretty big and make sure it's below the cylinder right there, skillet up pretty big. And now for the soft body, I'm going to select our ICU sphere up here and go over to the Physics tab. Click on a soft body. And then underneath the object, we're going to set the weight of this 23. Right now if it's set to one, it might get stuck in this cylinder. I want to make sure it goes here and then falls through. So set that to three and we might need to play around with the friction, but for now we will leave it at 0.5. Underneath the cash. I'm going to set the end frame to 600. We are we are going to need to play around with this number as well depending on how fast our soft body goes through this. For now we will set it to 600. I'm going to turn off a soft body goal and then open up the edges panel for the push and pull. We're gonna leave those at 0.5. The dampening, I'm going to set that up to five. The bending, I'm also gonna set up two. Let's go with three For now. Actually, let's go with two. We'll see how that looks underneath of a solver. I'm going to set the minimum step size to 30, just so it calculates a couple more steps every single frame. And now for the collision, I'm going to select r cube and select Collision. The dampening, I'm going to drag up to 0.3. And that's all we really need to do. This one over here. I'm gonna do it as well. So like collision and the dampening of 2.3. Unfortunately, we can't do the control l where we select all the objects Control L and select at modifiers. And it copies every single. And it copies the modifiers from your active object. For some reason this does not work with the collision modifier, so we're just going to have to do it manually. This one I will select Collision and set the dampening up to 0.2. This one right here, collision and we're just going to leave the default settings here, collision. And then finally the one down here collision, and then actually this one here collision. So now that we've added all of the collisions to every object, let's play or simulation to see exactly what it looks like. I'm going to hit the space bar on my keyboard. And we can see it hits that, rolls over a little bit. It's that side rolls over and let's see if it gets stuck. Okay, it hits that side and then it falls through. Perfect. And it looks like we need to set the end frame a little bit longer. So in the timeline, I'm going to set this up to 600. Let's play our simulation again at to see exactly what it looks like. And if for some reason this object is not working, make sure the collision is below the array modifier. If it's above, it's not going to take into account these extra cylinders. So make sure that collision is below the array modifier. Let's go ahead and play this once again. And we can see it's still going down. And then it lands in this little cube right here at frame of 400. Let's say at 450, this cube is going to rotate. So now set up the rotation. I'm going to skip to frame 450 and select r cube. I'll go into front view so we can see this a little bit better than Z and go into wireframe on frame of 450, I'm going to hit the icky to add in a location and rotation key frame. And we can see here it added a little yellow dot. And then over 25 frames, I'm going to skip to frame 475. I'm going to rotate it like this. Then hit I and go location Rotation. I'm also going to drag this down a little bit more so it has a little bit more space to fall. And then this I'm going to drag right here. And then the plan, I'm going to drag a little bit lower as well. This should be pretty good. So now it's Restart and check this out. So I'm going to hit the space bar to play it. And we can see everything is working perfectly fine. And then it lands in the cylinder right at the end. So there we go. We've created the obstacle course and it looks really good. I think the end frame is slightly too short, so I'm going to set this over to 650 instead. And then for the soft body, I'm gonna go over to the Physics tab underneath cash. I'm also going to set this end frame to 650. So there you go. We've added in the simulation and it is looking pretty good for the last step in this video, I'm just going to add in a subdivision surface to this ecosphere. I'm also gonna right-click and go shade smooth. Over in the Modifier tab, I'm going to click add modifier subdivision surface. And I'm just going to leave the level of the viewport to one and the render to, to make sure this is below the soft body. We don't want this off body to act with the subdivision surface. So make sure it is below. 26. Obstacle Course P3 Dynamic Hair: In this video, we're going to set up the hair particle system, afford the plane at the bottom of the obstacle course. So what we're gonna do for this is we're going to play or simulation and figure out when at this ecosphere actually touches this plane. So I'm going to hit the spacebar to play it. And then I'm just going to watch it until it reaches the plane down here. So we can see at frame of 450 a rotate and then it hits right around 480. So what we're gonna do is keep this number in mind when we start to bake into particle system. Over in the particle system tab, it looks like this little icon here with a couple of dots. I'm going to hit the plus sign with the plane selected and switch it over to the hair. Right now we can see the hair is way too long. So for the hair length, I'm going to drag this down to lay. I'm happy with the length. Probably somewhere around there is good. Maybe a little bit shorter, just like this. And now to actually animate this hair, we need to turn on hair dynamics. If we select this and then restart and then hit the spacebar and you can see it's animated. Now currently the hair is just falling over. So we need to give this some structure. In the hemodynamic settings. I'm going to open up the collisions and the structure, the quality of the simulation. I'm going to set up to seven. And then the quality of the collisions, I'm going to set up 23. Underneath the structure here is where we want to change the stiffness. Right now it's at 0.5 and we're going to drag this all the way up to one, the dampening, I'm also going to drag up to four. This is going to give the hair some random stiffness. I'm going to set that up to 0.1. So some of the hair will fall over. Well, some of it stays up. If we restart and play this now, we can see the hair has a lot more structure. That is looking pretty good. Now what we wanna do is open up the cache setting and set the start and the end frame. We don't need to bake in a 650 frames for the hair because the ecosphere doesn't even reach it until frame 450. So what we're gonna do is set the frame to 650 and the start frame to 450. So it's not going to start simulating until 450 when the ecosphere lands in this little cube right here. Before we bake this in, we need to make sure the number of hair is correct. Now currently it's at 100000. In my final animation, I set this up to, I set this up to 25 thousand. Now that is a lot of particles and it does take a very long time to simulate. So you can probably get away with around 10 thousand if you have a slower computer, something like that should work perfectly fine. For this tutorial though I'm gonna go with 25 thousand because I think it looks pretty good. And now that we've set up the particle system, we also need to select our ecosphere up here and make sure it has a collision modifier. So select it over in the physics tab, makes sure collision is turned on. So it will actually interact with the particles down here. And, and now that we've set up that I think we are ready to bake this in. So I'm going to select that my particle system once again, scroll down at to the cast setting and I'm going to select it, bake all dynamics. This will also begun the soft body for us. So we only have to do one bake. So make sure you save your project just in case this crashes. I'm going to call it obstacle course tutorial and saved blender file. Now that we've saved it, we can select that bake all dynamics. The simulation has finished a baking. So nav, we play this, we can see exactly what it looks like. A crashes down and goes through the cylinder, animates down. And then over here we can see that it is interacting with all the hair and it is looking pretty cool. So there we go. We've created the simulation and now let's work on it. The materials. The first material that we will create is the one for the ecosphere. I'm going to have it selected, go over to the material tab and create a new one. What we're gonna do is bring the metallic up to 0.5 and the roughness all the way down to 0. This will create a really glossy looking material and I think it looks pretty good. From there. I'm going to drive this just slightly, so it's a little bit more of a grey color. And now let's animate this. So what I want is for it to be a grey color until it reaches the cylinder and then it turns into a blue color. I'm going to position the timeline until it's right in the middle, so right about here. So it's right in the middle of the cylinder. And then we're going to animate the base color. To animate it, you can hover your mouse over the color and then hit the I key on your keyboard. Go to the next frame, frame to a 137, and then change it over to a blue color. I'm gonna change it over to somewhere around here and then hit I one more time while hovering over that material. Next up we'll do the material for the cylinder. I'm going to copy this material by going over to the hex code, clicking on this and hitting control C to copy. Then we will select the cylinder Nu. We're gonna do the same thing. So bring the metallic up to 0.5 and the roughness all the way down to 0. And then the base color, I'm going to Control V, right, in that hex, and it's going to copy that exact color. Next up we're going to select the cubes, click on new. And for this one, we're just going to bring the roughness down to 0.1. Same thing for this one. We're going to select it and actually let's name this material. We will call it white glossy. I will select this cube here, change it over to the white glossy. Select the array of cylinders. White glossy. This one, we're going to go with the wind glossy as well. For the hare, I want to do a little bit of a different color. I'm going to select new and switch it over to a nicer green color, something like this. And then at the roughness, I'm also going to drag down to 0.1. Finally, the last one down here, I'm going to create a new material, and this one is just going to be a darker gray. So drag the color down and set the roughness to 0.1 and the metallic I'm going to drag up to 0.5. So there you go. We've created all of the materials. And now for the lighting, I'm going to select the lamp that's in our scene and get rid of it. We're not going to need it. For the background. I'm gonna use an HDR. To do this, select the yellow button on the side and click on environment texture. Then select open HDR that we're gonna be using in this tutorial is this one right here. Now you can get this HDR. The link is in the article in this section or in the resources. So make sure you go check those out and download it. Once you have it downloaded, select the EPA's Park Center for k and click open image. If we press Z and go into rendered view now, you should be able to see the HDR and everything is looking pretty good. The strength of the HDR, I'm gonna bring up to three. So it's everything. So everything is just a little bit brighter. And now that we've done that, we are almost ready to render. In the next video, we will set up the final details for our objects and the EB settings and render this out. 27. Obstacle Course P4 Camera Animation: In this video, we're going to finish out adding the small details to the rest of our scene. So for example, what we're gonna do here is I'm going to select this object here and add a little bit of Bevel to it. Over in the Modifier tab, I'm going to click add modifier and satellite that bevel. Right now the bevel is not working correctly and that's because the object is scaled in a weird way. So we need to apply the scale to get it to work. To do this, you can press Control or Command a and select a scale. For the amount of scale I'm going to hold Shift and then drag my mouse over this. And I'm going to set it somewhere around here or so. Once you're happy with this amount, I'm going to control C to copy that value. And I'm also going to bring the segments up to three. I'm gonna do the same thing for all of the objects. So select this object here, add modifier Bevel, and then of course we need to apply the scale. So hit control a. And actually, let's apply the scale for everything. I'm going to hold Shift, select this object here. This objects, all these objects control a and apply the scale. With this object selected, I'm gonna Control V in at this amount. So it does the exact same amount as this cube and bring the segments up to three, will select this one, add a modifier devil, control V, and then bring the segments up. When applying a bevel to a rounded object, you get these weird aligns in the center. So to fix that, we need to set the limit method over to angle so it doesn't apply a bevel to an angle that is less than 30 degrees. I'm also going to right-click and go shade at Smith. Once we do this, those lines disappear and it is looking really good. We're gonna do the same thing for this cylinder here. So selected add modifier, devil, control V in and the amount and bring the segments up to three. Right-click and go shade Smooth. Now of course we get those lines again. So under the limit method, we're going to switch it over to angle, and those lines disappear to more objects that we need to do. This one right here and Modifier bevel, Control V in and the amount and bring the segments up to three. Finally, the last one down here, select this one. I'm also going to right-click, shade, smooth, add modifier, level, control V, and bring the segments up to three to get rid of those lines. The last thing we'll do is set it to angle. So there we go. We've added in all of the detail to our objects. Now we need to animate the camera. I'm going to click on that Skip button to go to the first frame. And then I'm going to position the camera right about here, Control Alt 0 to snap into place. Selected double-tap are and I'm just going to rotate it. And then you can also press G middle mouse button to drag a backwards. I'm going to drag it back just slightly. Something like this is looking pretty good. Now what we're gonna do is just added some keyframes all along the timeline. I'm going to hit i and add in a location Rotation keyframe with the camera selected. Then I'll jump to frame 100, drag it down a little bit. I location rotation will jump to frame 200, drag it down even further. Right about there. Probably i location Rotation 300, drag it down even more. Something like this. I location and rotation. And you get the idea. So frame 400, drag it over here. I location rotation will go over to 500 dr this lower and we can see it's really starting to slow down. I'll place the camera right about here. I location rotation. And then finally I'm going to skip to the last ram, drive this even lower. I might actually rotate this as well and place it over here so we get an angle of all of the moving hair eye location rotation. Now to see this in real time, I'm going to restart the timeline and hit the spacebar to play it. And you wanna make sure the camera doesn't move out of frame of the ecosphere or it's going to look a little bit weird. I'm going to skip ahead because this is going a little bit slow. It changes color right there. We can see right about here it goes outside the camera just slightly. So what I'm gonna do is actually move this up a little bit. I'm going to skip to frame 500 right here and drag this up somewhere around here is probably good eye location rotation. And that should fix the issue of it almost going outside the camera. And then if we go all the way to the end, we can see this is looking pretty good. For some reason. If I go over to the hair particle system that this did not bake in correctly and you can see all the settings are still available to edit. So what we're gonna do is save our project and just bake this in for some reason it did not bake it in at the start. So I'm going to click on bake one more time and hopefully that will fix it. 28. Obstacle Course P5 Rendering: We are almost ready to start rendering out arsine, but there's a couple of things that we need to fix. First off, I don't want to be able to see the background. So over in the AV settings underneath film, we need to turn on at transparency. Once we do this, the background will be transparent and now we can add in whatever background that we want. Another thing that we're gonna do is turn on ambient inclusion, screen space reflections. And then underneath the color management, I'm gonna set the look to medium high contrast. Once we do this, I'm going to press F2 to render out an image. And then we're going to jump over to the compositor and add in a background. So with this image, we're going to exit out of this window and jump over to the compositing tab. If I select the US nodes, I'm going to press N to close off that panel. What we can do now is add in whatever background that we want. I'm going to press shift a and then underneath color we're going to add in an alpha over node if we place this right here and then control shift left-click on this node, this will bring in a viewer node so we can see what we're doing. I'm going to press V a couple of times when we need to switch this. So the image is gonna go into the bottom input. And now the background is whatever we want here. So I might try this a little bit lower, so it's more of a grayish color, something like that. That looks a little bit weird. So maybe up a little bit, something like that will look pretty good. I'm also going to create a small vignette so the edges are a little bit darker, so the focus is in the middle. To do this really easily, we can add an a filter and then a blur node, and then press shift a at an eight distort lens distortion. Take the image and plug that into the image and then set the distort of the London distortion to one. And also over in the blur, set this over to fast relative. And then underneath the x, I'm going to set both of the x and y percentages to 20. To combine this with our original image, we can press shift a and then underneath color at an a mix RGB will place that here, take the image, plug that into the composite, and then the image into the bottom image right here, we can see the edges are dark. Now to get rid of the white values, we need to set this over to multiply. The factor value now controls how dark the edges are. So if you want nothing, drag that all the way to 0. If you want a little bit, maybe up to a value of about 0.4, we'll look pretty good. Let's go a little bit higher. Let's try 0.5. And I'm happy with that result. One more material that I forgot to do is the ground. And so what we're gonna do is go over to the material tab, select the ground. Underneath the material tab. I'm going to click New and just bring the roughness down to 0.1 right here. That's all we really need. And that's basically it. And now that we've set up all of this, I think we are ready to render. So over in the output section, let's create a new folder of where we want this to go. I'm going to click on the plus sign right here and then navigate to a folder. Once you have found the folder, I'm going to click Accept. And now we can render this out as a PNG sequence. When rendering an animation, it is good to render it out as a PNG so you can sequence it later. This allows you to stop the render anytime and resume. And at that point, if overwrite is unchecked, what this will do is it will start out at frame one, and let's say you get 300 frames in. If overwrite is unchecked, it's going to start out at frame 301 and then go on. If overwrite is checked, it's going to restart and start back at one. So make sure if you do stop the render halfway through, overwrite is unchecked. I'm going to leave it unchecked for now. And just in case I do want to stop the render, i'm going to also save my project. And I think we are ready to render. So save it once again. Then go over to render and then Render Animation. This will bring up a new window and we can see the composite is working. And this is doing pretty good. And now I'm just going to let this render out and we'll see how it looks afterwards. The simulation has finished no rendering. Now if you open up that folder, you should see all of the images right there. And now what we're gonna do is learn how to sequence them out into a movie file. To do this, it's very easy. All we have to do is exit out of this window and then go over to this plus sign video editing and then video editing right here. Make sure you're on frame one by hitting that Skip button. And then I'm gonna go over to ad down to image sequence and then navigate to where the images are. Mine are right here. Then I'm going to press a2, select everything and double-check that and frame 0-0. 0-1 is at the start and the top left corner, if it's anything other than that, your time for the animation will look a little bit weird. For example, if this is set over to modified date and 650 is the beginning, it's going to play backwards. So make sure it's set to sort by name. Then you can press a add image strip. From here. All we have to do is go over to the output section once again and switch it over to a movie file. I'm gonna go with mpeg. And then underneath the encoding, I'm gonna set the container to mp4 and then the video codecs, H.264, the output quality. I'm going to go with Hi. And that's basically it. Now that it's going to do is grab all of those images and create a movie file with them. I'm going to save my project once again. And then I'm gonna go over to render, Render Animation. Once this has finished rendering it, you will see that movie file in the same folder as all the other images. So there you go. That is how you create an obstacle course using that soft body simulation, particles system, animation of materials and all that. Thank you for watching this section and making it all the way to the end of this course. I hope you enjoyed it. If you created your own, I would love to see it. So make sure to send me a link or post it in the assignment or questions. That's gonna do it though. Thank you again for enrolling in this class and I will see you in the next one.