SMART PHONE PHOTOGRAPHY: Take Creative PHOTOS with Your iPHONE | Alli Bartlett | Skillshare

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SMART PHONE PHOTOGRAPHY: Take Creative PHOTOS with Your iPHONE

teacher avatar Alli Bartlett, Filmmaker. Youtuber. Business Owner

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

28 Lessons (2h 2m)
    • 1. iPhone Photography: How To Take Amazing Photos Promo

      1:58
    • 2. 01 Get to Know Your Teacher and What You’ll Learn in This Course

      1:47
    • 3. 03 Make Sure You Capture Those Special Moments in the Nick of Time

      2:24
    • 4. 04 Setting Up Preserve Settings

      4:50
    • 5. 05 Turn That Camera Grid On

      1:48
    • 6. 06 Your iPhone Camera Format

      2:05
    • 7. 07 What is HDR anyway

      2:25
    • 8. 08 All About Your Camera App

      4:38
    • 9. 09 Why You NEED TO be Using AE and AF

      3:34
    • 10. 10 What is Composition and Why Does it Matter

      2:46
    • 11. 11 How to Use the Rule of Thirds

      3:26
    • 12. 12 Composing Your Photos Using Visual Weight Elements

      1:50
    • 13. 13 The Element of Color

      4:44
    • 14. 14 The Element of Size

      5:34
    • 15. 15 The Element of Texture

      5:05
    • 16. 16 The Element of Focus

      6:05
    • 17. 17 The Element of Position and Angles

      8:08
    • 18. 18 How to Use Negative Space in Your Photos

      2:40
    • 19. 19 How to Use Leading Lines

      4:04
    • 20. 20 Testing Your Knowledge on Well Composed Photos

      6:44
    • 21. 20 Testing Your Knowledge on Well Composed Photos

      6:44
    • 22. 21 Panoramic Photos

      3:51
    • 23. 22 How to Take Great Photos of People

      8:16
    • 24. 23 Using Portrait Mode for Shallow Depth of Field

      3:22
    • 25. 24 Editing a Photo of a Person2

      12:51
    • 26. 25 Editing a Landscape Photo

      5:00
    • 27. 26 Editing a Photo of an Animal

      4:12
    • 28. 27 Final Thoughts

      1:03
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About This Class

Welcome to our iPhone Photography: Take Amazing Photos with your iPhone Course!

In this iPhone Photography for Beginners course, you will learn:

  • How to take professional, stylized photos with your iPhone

  • How to compose a professional photo with your iPhone

  • How to use photography rules to take better iPhone photos

  • How to use your iPhones camera settings to take better photos

  • How to take professional looking photos of people and landscapes using your iPhone

  • How to edit your photos using the best free editing apps

  • How to make your photos visually engaging

  • Photography tips

  • Finding inspiration in photography

  • And more!

This course will walk you through everything you need to know to get started with iPhone Photography and much more! By the end of this course, you'll have a strong understanding of how to capture great iPhone photos and edit them professionally.

The instructor for this course is Alli Saunders. She is a Toronto based Cinematographer and Media Production Company Owner. Alli has been asked hundreds of times how she captured her iPhone photos so she decided it was about time she created a course on it to share with aspiring iPhone Photographers!

Enrol today to take your iPhone photography game to the next level!

Meet Your Teacher

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Alli Bartlett

Filmmaker. Youtuber. Business Owner

Teacher

Connect with me:

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Transcripts

1. iPhone Photography: How To Take Amazing Photos Promo: Hey, everyone, welcome to this iPhone photography course. My name is Ali Sanders, and I'm the owner of a creative content production company in Toronto, Canada. I learned how to take an edit, great photos on a DSLR camera back in college. But today, with the iPhones incredible capabilities to capture high quality photos, my iPhone has become my go to camera. I've jam packed this course with tons of information in an easy to absorb way about how to take better, more professional, more creative photos all on your iPhone. First will run through the basics of how to set up your iPhone to make sure that you're capturing the highest quality that's photos possible. Then we're gonna get the really good stuff where I teach you how to compose your photos. How to use visual. Wait, how do you use texture, color framing, how to take captivating landscape photos, how to take cans it and post photos of people so that they look and feel great and it really comfortable while you take photos with um, and how to edit your photos on a free act that all the pros used so that you can start sharing those beautiful photos on social media and with your friends and family. In this course, you're gonna learn the fundamentals of photographer. You're gonna learn the rules and photography, and you're gonna learn how and when to break those rules so that you can take awesome, amazing photos that you're really, really proud of. And I'm not just gonna teach you the generic cept I'm gonna teach you my tricks that I used to capture great photos. And I'm gonna provide you with some of my raw photos. So when we get editing, you can edit along with me so that you could really be hands on In this learning process, you can see and do exactly what I do when I edit my photos to take some staff pro level. So if you're ready to start learning how to take amazing professional looking photos on your iPhone now, then enroll on the course and I can't wait to start working with you. 2. 01 Get to Know Your Teacher and What You’ll Learn in This Course: Hey, everyone, welcome to this iPhone photography course where you're gonna learn how to take those professional looking beautiful photos that you see on Instagram and Social Media, all with your iPhone. As the owner of a media production company in Toronto, Canada, I have been in many situations where I've had to rely on my iPhone to capture those beautiful photos. And it has served me well over the years. Even though I've learned how to take professional photos back in college with a DSLR camera , my iPhone has become my go to camera. If you're like me, then you probably love taking beautiful landscape photos, candid fun photos of your friends and family and unique cool photos of objects around you. If you love taking photos and you know your photos could be better, but you're just not sure how to make them better. I'm so excited that you're here, and I'm so excited to teach you how to take your photos that next level, I believe that everyone can be a better photographer. They just need the right tools to do so. They need to think like pro photographers, think and feel like pro photographer, see and by the end of this course, that's exactly what you'll be doing in this course. I'm going to cover everything from the best settings to use to shock composition, how to create a style and feeling in your images and so much more. The best way to learn how to take great photos with your iPhone is a have your iPhone in hand. Throughout this course, I absolutely love taking photos in my home of family and friends and a beautiful scenery and the places that I traveled to. And I love the convenience of the iPhone because I always have my camera with me. So get your iPhone out, get ready to start learning, and I'll see you in the next lesson. 3. 03 Make Sure You Capture Those Special Moments in the Nick of Time: Okay, So first things first, we're gonna go over your I phones, camera settings. We're also gonna go over each of the tools available to you in your iPhones camera so that you can follow along for the rest of this course because we are going to be referencing these tools, and we are going to be using these settings throughout the course. So whether you know some of this stuff already or not, it's still worth following along. Most people always have their phones on them. And because you're taking this course, obviously you want to be using your phone to take and capture awesome photos. A lot of special moments happen in just that. Just a moment. So having your phone with you and having your camera app set up, so it's really, really easy to act us, makes it very likely that you're actually going to be able to capture that perfect moment as it happens. So first things first, make sure you have your iPhone in hand and make sure it's unlocked. We're gonna set up your iPhone for the best possible settings for your camera so you're ready and prepared for capturing any of those special moments. There are a few different ways to access your camera app on your phone. Tap the home button once. Now tap it again. Next, click on the camera app to open it. I don't ever use this way to access my camera app because the slowest way it takes three clicks to get into my camera. Another way to get to your camera app is to tap the home button once, swipe up and click on that camera app. So that's another way to access your camera. But it still took three clicks. Three actions to get there were all about efficiency, right? We want to get those pictures who want to take those shots as fast as we can. So the way I'm going to show you now to access your camera app, you can actually do right from the lock screen. So if your phone is walking, still captured those photos really, really quickly tap the home button once and swipe left. There you go. You're in your camera. Being able to quickly access my camera app on my phone this way has allowed me to capture these awesome photos in the nick of time 4. 04 Setting Up Preserve Settings: Let's take a look at preserve settings. Okay with your iPhone in hand, click on settings, then camera, then preserve settings. Okay, so let's start with camera mode. So if you have camera mode turned on that, it's going to preserve the last settings that your camera app used rather than defaulting to photo mode every time you use your camera. So let's test this out. Let's turn camera mode on and see exactly what it does well. Exit out of settings. Open up our camera. As you can see, it opens up into photo mode. Let's move it into panel on the far right. Okay, now that we have it in panel mode, let's exit out of our camera app. And now let's go back into our camera app and see what mode it starts as on as you'll see. Because we turned camera mode on that preserved the last camera mode that we used, which was panel. So until we change the camera mode, any time we go back into our camera up, it will start us out in panel. Okay, now let's go back into settings back into camera mode and turn it off. I prefer to keep camera mode off because when I am going in tow, access my camera in most cases pretty quickly. I want to know that it's going to begin in the photo option because the majority of the time I am gonna be taking photos rather than a time lapse or a video or so on. So let's keep camera mode off. Let's continue to explore preserve settings and now take a look at filter and lighting, just like when you turn camera mode on. Same goes with filter and lighting. So if you turned filter and lighting on and you went into your photo app, I took a photo using at specific filter and lighting. Let's say we were to use the studio lighting filter. Take a photo. Then, when you go back into your camera up at a later time and to take another photo, it's going to preserve the previous filter and lighting that you had on when you took your last photo. I like to keep this Modoff, and I suggest that you turned it off as well. So let's turn that off now. The reason that I keep the filter letting mode off is because I'm always in different environments. And those, of course, come with different lighting setups. And I imagine that you'll be in different environments as well when you're using your camera on your phone. So for the convenience of being able to use your phone on the go to capture great photos, it's best to keep this off. OK, now let's look at live photo and what it does, because you need to know what it does so that you can understand why you want to keep it off when life photo is on. What it does is it takes 1.5 seconds of video and audio before and after the photo is taken . So you get that one good frame that you intended to have by taking the photo and the rest of its the action. I find this annoying whenever I'm going through my photos because I just want to see the photo I captured. I don't care about the before and after action. It becomes quite knowing I highly recommend keeping it off. So in preserve settings, let's turn live photo on. We're gonna turn this on because you want life photo off, and I know that sounds confusing. But by having life photo on in the preserved settings like it says, it preserves the live photo setting rather than automatically resetting to having live photo turned on. When you're in your camera app, you can see the top left. Here. There are a few circles better in yellow. If this is the case for you as well, tap it so that live photo, as you can see, is turned off. And it's indicated beds off because the circles are now white and they have a cross through them by turning it off in the actual photo app. With that preserved setting on, you're going to preserve the setting, even chosen in your photo app to recap when you're in your camera settings and specifically the preserve settings, you want camera mode off. You want filter and lighting off and you want live photo on. Next. We're gonna look at some of the other settings available to us, so click on the camera tap to go back, and in the next lesson we're going to go over the rest of the setting options 5. 05 Turn That Camera Grid On: Hey, everyone Okay, so we're still in our camera settings. We've exit out of the preserve settings tab, so we're back in the main menu of the camera settings. Now you'll see that under preserve settings I have grid on. I like tohave the grid on when I'm taking photos because it helps me keep the horizon line straight. Basically, it helps me keep my photos straight instead of slightly crooked. But what I love is that it also makes it really easy to do a better job of composing your images. We're gonna talk about composition in an upcoming lesson, so you'll understand exactly why the grid is so valuable. So if you don't have it on, turn it on. Now I want to show you what happens with grid on. So let's go into our photo act quickly. And there you go. You see, when you have the grid on, you can use these lines to compose your image. They're not going to show up on your photo. They're more of a guideline for you. And you can see when your grades on it has three rows, three columns and this is honestly this helps a lot, so leave it on. Okay. We're gonna go back into our camera settings now. Next will quickly talk about scan QR codes. Basically, if you have this on, it allows you to scan digital barcodes. I keep it off cause I don't do that. Maybe in the future, I will. But it's up to you if you keep it on or off. If you're gonna use this function or not. I like to record my videos in four K at 24 frames per second. And I like to record my slo mo in 10. 80 at 1 20 frames per second. But that doesn't have anything to do with taking photos, so we can kind of scan over that, and next, we're gonna look a format. 6. 06 Your iPhone Camera Format: next, let's go into the format tap. You have the option to capture photos in either high efficiency, which is going to compress the photo slightly and make the file size smaller. So if you have a phone with maybe only 16 gigabytes worth of room on it, and you wanna store lots and lots of your photos on your phone and you don't regularly back them up to the cloud or take them off of your phone onto your computer or hard drive, then you probably want to use this high efficiency option when you're taking photos, because it does compress the photos to about half of the size of using the most compatible option. Because I have a phone that has more room on it for storing photos. And because I like the photos to be in a higher quality, I keep most compatible on. This makes the file size a little bit bigger, but I'm fine with that because I do back up to the cloud regularly and I take my photos off of my phone regularly and save them on a hard drive. Because of the fact that you're taking this iPhone photography course, I recommend that you choose most compatible because you do want a better while the photo and using most compatible will take better quality photos. Let's check out the size difference on an image that I took. This was taken using high efficiency mode, and it's 1.9 megabytes. The same image taken using the most compatible format is 2.3 megabytes. So keeping your format set to most compatible saves more information in the image, so it's gonna be a little bit bigger. But it's worth it. On a computer screen, you will notice a slight difference. So for the purpose of getting the best image possible invest quality possible. Let's keep most compatible text. Next, we're going to talk about one of my favorite features. It is auto X fear. 7. 07 What is HDR anyway : One of the many ways to make your iPhone photos better is to turn on HDR, which stands for high, dynamic range. What eight year does is when you snap a photo on your iPhone. It captures an under exposed photo so that it's collecting the data in the darker parts of your image. And then it captures the photo overexposed so that it's collecting the information from the highlights and the later parts of the image. And then it takes those images, presses them together and gives you one beautiful, high dynamic photo. This is great because you're photo is going toe look good. It's going to be full of detail. It's gonna capture those details that you can actually see with your eye in that scene. And it's gonna give you more options when you're editing your photo because it has more information in it than if you were just to snap a photo without eight here on. But let's say that you didn't have auto each year turned on, and you were to take a photo of a person and they're standing so that the sun is behind them. Well, if you take the photo of the person and the person in the photo is exposed well. The background of the photo is likely going to be overexposed and blown out, so you're gonna lose a lot of the detail in the sky. For example, like in this photo, this was actually taken on the day where there was a beautiful sunset in the background. But because we didn't have each year turned on, the background was completely blown out. Let's see another photo taken in the same location with the same person, same background with each deer on. As you can see the subject, the person is exposed properly and the background with beautiful sunset is also exposed properly. So you have more detail in this photo. The detail in the sky, the contrast in the dynamic range in the sky has been captured. The colors in the sky have been captured, the color in the grass has been captured, as well as the skin tone and the T shirt on the person. So for this reason, let's keep auto hdr turned on. You can also choose to keep the normal photo, which is a copy of that same photo just without H year being used. I choose to keep this off because obviously HDR captures a better photo 8. 08 All About Your Camera App: Now let's go into our actual camera app, and we're gonna look at the settings in here. Let's start at the top, left within the camera up, and we're gonna talk about the flash. The flash in your iPhone camera will produce artificial light to illuminate a dark scene. As you can see, the flash produces quite harsh lighting, and that's because the flesh on your iPhone is directional, meaning it's pointing forward so directly at whatever you're taking a photo op. And you also don't have any control over how bright your flashes. Whenever you go into the flash setting, you can either have auto on, which means the camera decides when to turn the flash on and off, which we don't want. You can also set your camera flash toe on so you would do that if you're in a dark setting and you want to light something up or you can have your flash off. In most cases, I don't use the flash at all in my iPhone camera because you have no ability to change the direction of it or the brightness of it. So the only time I recommend that you turn it on to use. It is if you're in a very dark setting and you want to light up your subject because you have no other option in terms of lighting. Next, let's go to this clock icon here and click on it. This little clock icon is your timer. So currently the timers off you can set it to a three second timer. Let's click it again, or you can set it to a 12th timer. Let's turn the timer off, because in most cases you'll probably want to snap your photos immediately without having a three second or 12th delay. So although it's very helpful in certain photos situations, let's keep it off. You can also click this icon on the right. Here. It's three overlapping circles. This allows you to take the photo with a filter already on it so you can scroll from the bottom and have your original camera settings. I like to do this because I rather work with an original photo and then, after the photos taken, decide how I'm gonna edit it, then having the filter on because having the filter on and then taking the photo gives you less options when you're editing, But let's just explore this. Anyway. As you scroll through, you can see you can make photo more dramatic, more warm or cool. You can shoot in a few black and white options school to know that there is this option. But let's keep it in Original. You will see down here that there is this one with an X beside it circled. What that means is that you are not zoomed in. Please avoid zooming in at all when you're taking a photo that means do not do the swipe in . You can zoom in Ah whole lot. The reason that I'm telling you not to zoom in is because this is a digital zoom which basically means the more you zoom in when you're taking a photo, the worst quality and more Pixley it's gonna look so never ever zoom in. If you're expecting to take a good photo rather, if he needs to be close upto your subject, step closer to them will scroll through these settings. So starting at the left here you have time lapse mode which takes a photo every few seconds . You have slo mo mode, which is a video format. You have regular video. You have photo, which we're going to use threat this course of portrait mode, which is pretty cool. It's not perfect, but it does give you some great options that we're going to explore. Coming up, you have square mode in case you want to take a photo. That is the same resolution as what you would be putting up on Instagram. I never use square and then you have Pano. Let's say you want to get a photo of a really, really tall building. You could use Pano Teoh, emphasize the height of the building. Or let's say you want to take a photo of Ayers Rock in Australia and you need to show the length of it. You could use panel for bats. I use panna once in a while. Not to too often. When I was in Iceland, I use Pan a lot because I plan on printing some of these photos and putting them in panoramic frames. But other than that, I don't use panel very much, but again we will explore PanAm or after. So there you go. Those are the best settings you can use to take photos on your iPhone And now you know what all of the functions on your camera app do. Next. We're gonna look at one really important tool that I use almost all the time when I'm taking photos on my iPhone and you should as well. 9. 09 Why You NEED TO be Using AE and AF: everyone. So with your iPhone in hand, follow along and let's go over the auto focus and auto exposure tool that's in your iPhone . In this lesson, I'm gonna show you an example of using auto focus and auto exposure in an outdoor setting on a bright day with some shade. So because likely you're watching this lesson in your house or at your office and you're not outdoors, I still love you to follow along. The point of this lesson is to teach you the capabilities of auto focus and auto exposure. So in this lesson, you're not gonna come out of it with an amazing photo. But you are gonna come out of it with a much better understanding of how to use this feature to your advantage. So grab yourself a mug or bind your book something that you can take a photo up so that you can follow along. As you can see in this example, we have a person as her subject. So when you framed your subject, you want to press and hold down on the area that the person's face is shown because that's going to walk the focus on that person's face And whenever you're taking a photo of a person, you want to ensure that their face isn't focused if you intend for them to be the focal point of the photo, and when you see a e slash a. F, which A. F stands for autofocus lock now your focus is locked on that subject. This same feature also allows you to walk the exposure. So as you can see, once you tapped and held down on your subject, you are locking exposure on the area that you tapped on screen. So when you walk auto exposure, the iPhone camera is deciding what the correct exposure is based on the area that you have tapped and locked. That means that the camera is doing its best to expose for that specific area of your image . If you want to make your exposure a little bit brighter, as you'll see, there's a little sun icon on the right here so you can push down on this slider and then slide it up toe. Add more brightness to your image fee. Brighter. You make your image, the more exposed you're making it. So if you really push the slider, you're going to overexpose your image, and same goes with, if you will, the slider down too far, so the farther you start to move it down, the more under exposed the image is going to be. The auto exposure lock is also fantastic if you have mixed lighting and your subjects moving around or your moving around, as you can see in this example, it's a bright day, but there is some shade. So as you move around to find the right angle to capture some shots of your subject, if you haven't auto lock your exposure on your subject, your cameras going to not know what it should be exposing for. So as you can see the cameras trying to expose for the person in the photo and as you move , it's also trying to expose for the son in the background. If you lock your exposure on your subject and you move slightly or subject, move slightly. Your camera is still going to have the exposure locked but suits your subjects. It will prioritise your subject as the part of the scene that needs to be exposed properly and not the background, for example, So by locking your exposure, you're letting your camera know that the part of your scene that you have chosen toe lock your exposure on is the area that you would like to have correctly exposed. 10. 10 What is Composition and Why Does it Matter : Let's talk about composition because understanding, composition and how to use it, your advantage will help Take your photo game to that next level. Composition is Theoren jma int of elements in an image and the photographers ability to arrange these elements in a way that's pleasing to a viewer's eye. If you've taken a photo that's composed, well, that means that you're in charge. You're in the driver seat. You decided how you wanted that viewer to see that image, how you wanted them to feel. That's the mark of a good photographer. You've set up your scenes that you know where the viewer is going to look first and how their eye is going to move around the scene. Ah, well composed photo can also evoke certain emotions in the viewer. If you don't know how to compose a photo, well, then you're pretty much just getting coverage, just getting a snap of the moment, so to speak. But when you learn how to compose your photos, well, you're creating art. Composition is one of the most important parts of photography. When you decide how to compose an image, you want to think about what your focal point is going to be in that image. What is it in that image that you want to emphasize? You don't want the viewer to be confused when they see the image, because then they're just gonna swipe by it or move on to something else. You want the viewer to understand, to know, without even realizing it, what they're supposed to be looking at, what they're supposed to be focusing on in the image. You can make something in your scene. Stand out by using color, tiered vantage or vibrates or saturation by taking the photo from a certain angle by framing it in a certain way by taking your photo really, really close to your subject are really, really far away using leading lines, using focus using sizing and your image using symmetry to your advantage or repetitions. So on now I know this is a lot to wrap your head around, and I know it might be a bit confusing at first. But as you go through this course and you start soaking this information up and you start to become aware of how a photographer with a photo intense you to see that photo, you will start taking better photos yourself once you know the stuff you can't unknowing, and the more you know about composition, the more you understand it, the more you can start following these photography rules. But once you know these rules, you can also break them. Because photography is art, it is subjective. It's great to know these rules as a guideline, but as you continue your photography journey, you're going to learn how to take great photos and also had to bend thes photography rules . 11. 11 How to Use the Rule of Thirds: So one of the most important rules, when it comes to composing an image is the rule of thirds. This grid here is the rule of thirds grid horizontally there three sections and vertically there, three sections. So using the rule of thirds and the grade that the iPhone photo provides you with is a great way to start composing your photos better. So what you want to do is keep the grid on when you're taking photos. And don't just snap a photo. Think about used this grid. Look at your camera and think about where you want the subject to be in the frame. You can choose to have the focal point of your photo be positioned in one of these four quadrants. Here, you can choose to use this grid as a way to help you center a subject. If you'd like toe have your subject perfectly in the center of the frame. You can position your subject on this left line in the rule of thirds cred or on the right line. If you had several subjects in the frame, you could use one quadrant to show one of your subjects. You could use another quadrant the rule of thirds. For your second subject, Teoh the positions as a nice indication of where you should put your subjects. Look at these photos and pay attention to where this subject is in relation to the rule of thirds grid, where the back ground visuals lay where the horizon line lays or the sky lays. You can choose to frame your subject in the center of frame on the left or the right, and you can use the rule of third grids as a guideline. Choosing where to put your subject within the frame and the rule of thirds grid really does depend on what you want to show in this example. As you can see, we have our subject in the center of the frame, right in the center of the rule of thirds Brit. This creates more balanced feeling. If we were to reframe so that the subject was in the left rule of thirds quadrant or on their left rule of thirds line, then this photo tells a bit of a different story. You can see more of the mountain in the fog that the subject is looking in the distance to , and it creates more intrigue. If you were to frame your subject on the right quadrant of the rule of thirds of the right line. With this particular photo, you can see that you have thes leading lines from this Greenhill here that leads your eye directly to the subject. Personally, my opinion is, the best composition is to have the subject on the left side of the frame, because to me this tells the most captivating story. You see the subject, you see what he's looking at. You know there's mawr be on the frame beyond the photo itself, but you are able to see what the subject is looking off to that he's looking at that mountain through the fog. So remember, when you're using your rule of thirds grid on the iPhone, you have many options. Move around, get different angles and put your subject in different areas in the photo. As we go through this course, we will be using this grid and the rule of thirds as a guide when we're taking photos in the upcoming workshops 12. 12 Composing Your Photos Using Visual Weight Elements: over the next few lessons, we're going to talk about visual weight and negative space. In many ways, they work hand in hand, and they play a huge part in the composition of your photos. In most cases, when you look at a good photo without even realizing it, you're I will be directed to the focal point of the folio, the place that the photographer intended you to care about most ah, great tool that you can use to start taking better photos. And establishing a focal point is to use visual wait understanding and using visual waiting . A photo allows you as the photographer toe, have better control of your composition and an ability to further demonstrate and evoke a certain feeling in your viewer. You can use visual wait to create a feeling off balance. You can use visual wait to create a feeling of anxiety or tension. So what is visual weight anyway? Well, there are several different elements involved in visual weight. They are color, size, texture, focus and position. You can find one some or all of these visual elements around you in your home, out in nature and speaking of nature in the upcoming lessons at the end of each lesson, I'm going to demonstrate this because I'm gonna go out into a forced with my iPhone. This is unplanned. I don't know what I'm gonna find, but I do want to show you that day today, no matter where you are, you can find these visual elements, and you can get some really, really cool photos. 13. 13 The Element of Color: Now let's talk about the visual element of color and how using color can add weight to a photo. Here's a photo of a beautiful red flower, right? That's probably how you describe it, rather than describing it as, Ah, photo with hundreds of white small flowers, perhaps without even realizing it, you know that the focal point of this image is the red flower. The heavier weight of this image is the red flower. It's a brighter color than every other part of the photo. It's bold in contrast to the rest of the photo, it stands out because it's bright red compared to the dollar, more neutral whites in the rest of the photo. So now I'm outside with my camera phone and let's see how we can use the visual element of color to get some cool photos. We have some beautiful pinkish red leaves amongst green leaves in a forest. As you can see, I've used the grid to choose where I'm going to place the more colorful leaves in my photo snap. A picture of that. Okay, let's move around, get different angle, move back a little bit more to the left here, and I just want to show you where I am. There is a path, and here we're back at the more colorful leaves. Now, I'm intentionally thinking about not only the colors that I want to stand out in the photo and how wanna frame believes within the photo. But I'm also thinking about what's going on in the background. If I were standing more to the right, you see some of the path and I'm not going for that. I want it to look more natural, more organic, really wanna emphasize that were in the forest. So I've chosen to take the photo from this angle. So now I've gone from holding my cellphone vertically to take a photo to horizontally because I really want to emphasize the length of this stone wall. And I really like that we have this purple graffiti here on the stone wall amongst the sort of natural green leaves framing the graffiti. So again, I'm gonna line up my grid. Yeah, I'm happy with where the graffiti sits. Salting a photo crutch down, lower another photo, different angle. I've stepped in a few feet closer to the graffiti and let's capture another shop again in this photo, although it's more settled. The focal point is the Purple Graffiti. It's the brightest color in the image, and it stands out nicely against TheStreet own wall and the green leaves. This is a photo that I would definitely spend a little bit more time editing. I want to bring up the vibrancy and maybe the saturation a little bit to really make the Purple Graffiti pop. And we're gonna learn more about editing your photos coming up as you become a better photographer and you learn more about editing your photos, you'll learn which photos maybe look good when you've taken them, but can really be enhanced by editing like this one. Okay, let's get one more example of the use of color as a visual element. As I continued walking down the path, I spotted these beautiful, bright red Berries amongst these Green Leafs. I really like the contrast of the red on a bed of green Leafs. I don't really like that at the end of this leaf here. They're sort of like a dried up. It's only get really close, so we don't see that now. You can get pretty close to your subject with the iPhone. But if you're too close like I am here, you might not be able to get focused. So I'm holding down on the screen to lock auto. Focus on those Berries. Okay, let's snap a photo. Gonna go above the Berries here to get a different angle. Bird's eye view angle of the Berries and we'll stop another photo here. I highly recommend that you look around your house or wherever you are right now and start thinking about or even pull out your iPhone camera and take some photos where you're choosing to emphasize color in a photo. This is a great exercise to get yourself to start, really noticing how you can use this type of visual weight in your photo to get creative and make your father is better. In the next lesson, we're gonna learn how to use the visual element of size 14. 14 The Element of Size: you can use size in your photos to better composer image and use visual. Wait your advantage. Larger objects in a photo will feel heavier than smaller objects. For example, having many small objects in one part of your frame and one large object on the other part of your frame can make your photo field balanced well, putting emphasis on the bigger object, which would be your focal point. Let's look at this. Photo size is used in this photo to emphasize the focal point because, as you can see, the father's hand underneath. The baby's hand is so large that it actually goes out of frame, but you can see the entire baby's hands. Although it's smaller, it is both positioned well in this composition because of where it sits on the rule of third Squadron. It's also brighter than the rest of the photo, and it's at the front of the composition. The father's hand is underneath the baby's hand. This is a great example of using sizing and comparing the size of these two hands to really emphasize the focal point in this picture. Okay, so again, just like in the element of color lesson, I'm out with my camera on a path in the forest. And now I'm looking for some great photo opportunities to really emphasize size in my photo . So here we go. OK, let's see what I can do with this. So I have these yellow their weeds, but they're pretty leads. They're fairly tall there, few feet off the ground from the move in closer to them to make them look smaller within the photo in comparison to the tree behind them. I do like that. They're a nice, bright yellow. That's a great color that stands out. And I like that from this angle. The darker color of the bark of the tree sits behind that nice yellow as you can see him pretty low to the ground. I'm coaching down here to get this photo reposition and get even lower to the ground. I'm now resting my hand and the iPhone on the ground and angling and upwards. As you can see in doing so, the exposure has really, really changed. So we'll read just that and lock that exposure and focus on the yellow parts of this plant . Take a photo and really like that, actually. So we're gonna reposition and stand up, OK? A little bit of a wider shot. Snap a photo and Yeah, After taking a few different photos from a few different angles, I really like the closer upshot of these yellow flowers. Really? Call them flowers because that sounds better than weeds. And I like this low angle with the tall tree behind these flowers to emphasize the size of them. There are nice pop of color. They're much smaller than the tree behind them. And they are the focal point of this image. Again, I used my grid to position then on the lower right quadrant of the grid. Okay, so here is I continued walking through the path. I noticed this awesome leafless tree amongst attended trees with leaves. So it stood out to me. I thought it was pretty cool. It's actually up quite a steep hill in sort of tell house. Keep it is so Okay, I'm gonna walk up lo, sir, to the tree. And I wanted to feel big. I wanted to stand out. I'm standing at a much lower angle than it, tilting my iPhone slightly up to make it feel large. I'm centering it right in the middle of my frame because I do like this natural organic framing of the Green Leafs on either side of this particular tree. And I really want to give this tree that heroic feeling that presence I want to make sure it's really obvious that this tree is the focal point. This leafless tree amongst all these trees with leaves is the focal point. So I've centered in my frame and it appears as the biggest tree amongst all of the trees in the background. Okay, so now that I'm happy with my frame, I'm going to walk the exposure and the focus. I also really like that There's these green leaves in the foreground that lead your eye up to the street. OK, there we go. Happy with that? Okay, One more example. I found this really, really tiny leaf here As I walked around, I also saw tons of huge leaves. So much to stage this photo a little, but I'm gonna place this tiny leaf in the center of this huge relief to really emphasize the difference in size here. As you can see, that tiny yellow leaf is way smaller than the big green leaf. Let's snap a photo, Get in a little closer. I really want that Greenleaf to fill the frame. I want to show that it's such a big leaf. It actually continues out of the frame, and your imagination can fill in what the rest of this big green leaf looks at. You know it's a leaf you know, continues past the frame. Those are some examples of how you can create visual weight in your photos. Using size as a tool toe, bring your viewers I to the subject of the photo. And the next lesson we're gonna talk about texture. See there. 15. 15 The Element of Texture: texture is another great way to draw viewers. I toe a certain part of your composition and to make that subject feel heavier in this photo, your eye is drawn to the mosque on this tree. Some peer because of the texture in comparison to the lack of texture everywhere else in the photo, and you can really see the details of the mosque in this photo. As your eye looks at the mosque, it's also guided toothy texture in the mushroom. Here, the texture on the moss and the mushroom stand out compared to the lack of texture in the rest of the frame, emphasizing this part of the photo subjects with mawr texture, with more detail shown in the texture, feel heavier in a photo and have more visual weights than smoother, softer textures. All right, so let's explore the visual element of texture, and I think a perfect starting point is this tree here, right When you look at it, you can see that there's a definite difference in texture between the bark and the bear part of the tree. The heavier texture of the bark itself is very nicely framing the bear part of the tree which I think is really, really cool. Finding those natural frames when you take photos is definitely a good go to for getting those creative shots will take a photo of that, and I really like the look of this photo, but I'm gonna move a little bit closer to see what else I can get now, being closer to the tree and focusing on the bear part of the tree, you're really able to see the softer texture on the bear part of the tree and the markings within it. I'm going to take a photo. I'm gonna move back a little bit because I do like the angle and the framing mawr standing a little bit farther away from the tree. What's really cool about this particular tree, and taking photos of it is that there's a definite heaviness in the bark of the photo. Visually, this is the heavy is part of the photo. It's very nicely balanced with the smoother part of the tree and then the space behind the tree itself. So naturally, because of where I've chosen to show the bark within this photo, your eye does go to that heavier texture first and is very naturally directed to the bear part of the tree. You do have the very heavy texture of the bark and the weight of that if you were to think about it in pound. So let's just say the visual weight of the bark shown in this composition is £50 and very dense. The remaining weight in the rest of the image could also add up to £50 visually, but it's spread out more evenly. So although the texture part of this photo takes up less space, the heaviness of it is quite strong compared to the bear part of the tree and the green leaves behind the tree. The take up more space within the frame, but or less heavy. All right, so I found another tree here being in a forest. There are tons of coal trees on. What drew me to this tree is thes cool, really heavy looking knots on the tree. I like that. I kind of am seeing steps going up the tree there, sort of evenly dispersed up the tree. The weight of these knots is even heavier than the bark on the rest of the tree. Because of the heaviness of the texture of these knots. Your I very easily follows these knots up the tree. If he's not, weren't on the tree, you'd probably look at the tree as a whole. But because of these knots on the street, looking at this composition, there's more intention. Your eyes go directly to these knots and follow up the tree, stepping back a little bit to show the length of the tree and to allow these knots the opportunity to guide your eye up the tree. They're pretty cool. They're pretty unique. So now you can see more of this unique natural visual line guiding your eye up the tree. The more textured and the more detail you can see in texture, the heavier that texture is going to feel in a composition. Working with texture is a really fun way to make. Your composition is better, because when a viewer season they can imagine what that texture would feel like to touch. You can have a lot of fun with texture in your photos, so that's a look at finding some cool textures out in nature. And in the next lesson, we're gonna look at using focus to your advantage when you're taking photos 16. 16 The Element of Focus: Now let's talk about the visual element of focus when you're taking a photo. As you can see in this wide shot, everything is in focus. The flowers in the foreground in middle ground, the pink tree on the left side of the frames and focus the mountains. Aaron focused everything sharp when things were focused, their considered sharp in photography terms. In this lesson, we're gonna be talking about how we can use focus and a shallower depth of field to add visual weight to your photo and bring your viewers I to the subject in your photo. So first I want to show you this wide shot with everything and focus to talk about why this photo is good. What makes this photo creative and interesting is that all of the pink flowers in the four brown lead your eye towards the pink tree in the background. The highlights in the grass are really gently leaving your eye towards the tree as well, and the photo was taken in a way that the position of the tree is directly in front of a very bright white mountain. So it really stands out. This photo is composed while it's in a very cool location. Color and position have been used to make this photo creative and cool. So in this case, because other visually creative elements have been used, even though everything the photo is in focus, you still know as a viewer what's the most interesting element of this photo? If this pink tree here and then your eyes naturally carried around to the mountain behind it the sky, the field. But because of the use of color and positioning, it's quite obvious as to where the focal point in the image is. Let's look at this next photo, and this photo is a great example of using focus and challenge up the field as a viewer, your eyes going to automatically go to the most detailed part of this photo, which is this flower here. It also happens to be the only thing in the photo that is in focus. This will has a really shallow depth of field, and focus has been used as the visual element to emphasize the subject. We also have the pop of color, which is quite nice. And if everything in this photo weren't focused, all of the piano keys and the back of the piano in the background. It would still be a decent photo. But you're I would take longer to figure out where the subject is because you have more details to process everything around this flowers blurry and the flower is the only thing in focus. So this is a great example of using focus to your advantage when you're taking photos. So let's take a look at this Rose here. As you can see, I'm very close up to the Rose. I've positioned it on the left quadrant of the rule of thirds, locking the focus on it, gonna stamp a photo. Okay. And let's just see how close I can get to this Rose while keeping the focus. So now I'm really close, and I'm gonna lock my focus to the center of the rose here, the center of the roses in focus, which is naturally gonna lead your eye to the center. As you can see, if you look around the center of this flower, the petals start to fall. Other focus will snap a photo of that. Now, in this rose garden, I'm going to show you what it would look like if I took a photo and I wasn't using shallow depth of field to my advantage. So I've moved back a little bit. I'll frame this flower on the upper left quadrant of the rule of thirds, and, as you can see the photos not as interesting. There's a lot in focus. All of the leaves are and focus. So it takes your I'm or time to figure out what you're supposed to be looking at. Well, that a bird's eye view will get really close to the rose here. Lock that focus, and in getting close to your subject and locking focus, the other areas of the photo that are positioned behind or in front of where you've locked your focus are going to be a little bit blurry. This is one of my favorite ways to make my close up photos more creative and high end looking. When you're using focused your advantage, you have to consider focal distance. If you were to take a photo of a couple, for example, and the distance that their face is from your lens is the same as in, Let's say you're standing three feet away from the woman and the man both of these subjects will be in focus. You need to consider focal distance when you're utilizing showered up the field so that you can really make your subject pop. So in this example, you can see I'm taking a photo of a mug. Follow along with me if you have among two. I've put the mug as close to the wall as I can and I'm going to try and get on Lee the mother focus. This is sort of hard to do because the mug is really, really close to the wall. So the front of my mug is gonna be in focus. And because the wall is so close, it's only maybe 1/4 of a foot further back from the mug. It's gonna be pretty unfocused, too. But if I take that same mug and I move it to the front of my desk here so that it's about 2.5 3 feet away from the wall because there's more focal distance between what I want in focus and the background, the background becomes blurrier. So remember, if you're wanting to use focus and shallow up the field to your advanced when you're taking photos. You'll wanna have your subjects staff right in front of and close up to a wall. You wanna have distance between your subject and the background so that that background falls out of focus, More focus and positioning go hand in hand. So in the next lesson, we're gonna learn about just that positioning. We'll see you there. 17. 17 The Element of Position and Angles: Now let's talk about the element of position and angles. First, we'll start off with this photo and talk about the positioning of this first mountain that's closest to the camera. It is the mountain with the white snow on top, as well as the green trees here. This would be considered the foreground. The middle ground is the lake on the right side of the frame that you know, is viewer is behind this white lower mountain here and then in the background, we have theme mountain that runs across the frame with white snow on top as well as the sky . When you're taking your photos, you want to think about the position of your subject in regards to the foreground, middle ground and background. What you gonna have in the foreground? In this example, we have some out of focus grass in the foreground. We have our subject, the bunny in the middle ground, and we have yellow bushes in the background. This photo's interesting because the money is in the middle ground with the out of focus graph in front of the bunny and because the grass is out of focus and the bunny is in focus . Your eye naturally looks at the bunny first. This bunny is surrounded by the beautiful yellow, out of focus, background and positions very nicely. Now let's talk about the different angles or vantage points that you could take your photo from. You can take your photo from a high angle, looking down at your subject from a low angle, looking up your subject or from eye level. Ah, high angle or bird's eye view Photo of your subject can show what's beneath your subject. It's a creative and nique vantage point because it's quite hard to get a folio from a bird's eye view like this photo. For example, taking a photo from a high angle looking down at your subject can also make your subject feel smaller. Feel less significant in the grand scheme of things. This photo was taken that I level rather than above, pointing down the subject or below, pointing up the subject. This is the most natural feeling. Vantage point. This is a photo taken at a low angle, with the camera pointing up to the subject. This makes thesis objects in the photo feel a little bit more superior, and the viewer feel a little bit smaller, So taking your photo from a low angle pointing up at your subject can create a feeling of importance with your subject. This photo was taken at a high angle with a camera pointing down at the subject. This can make the subject feel small and can give of your more of a sense of authority. This photo was taken at eye level with the camera pointing straight towards the subject. I level captures the most natural type of photo, as in, this is how you would see your subject if you're looking at him or her in real life, let's take a look at the positioning in this photo. So obviously the focal point in this photo are the two women in the foreground here. This is quite obvious because they're the only elements in this photo better in focus, and they have been positioned on the right half of the frame, and they take up most of the space in the frame. I don't love this photo because on the left of frame, the people who are up farther ahead on this path that are out of focus kind of stack with the person in the center of frame walking. This photo would have been better if the photo were taken a little bit more to the left to create a little bit of space in between the focal point, these two women in the foreground here and the people in the background. This is another example of positioning. Where, if thesis subject had moved this sparkler here slightly below her face or slightly above her face, you would have actually been able to see her full face instead of having the sparks cover her face. The photo also could have been taken out a little bit of a lower angle looking up at these two women so that sparkler wouldn't be right in the woman's face or the photo could have been taken a little bit of a higher angle looking down because right now, with this exact photo, the positioning of the sparkler isn't ideal. This is a great example of positioning. This photo also uses the element of color, so the flour is this bright white, and the two hands holding it are almost in the center of frame. The photo was captured in a great position and angle because the white of the flower stands up very nicely against the black in the mountain. If the flower were positioned mawr toe left and were directly in front of the white fog in the mountain, you wouldn't be able to notice it as well. So it was deliberately placed and positioned with the dark background so that it really stood out more. This is another photo of poor positioning and angling because the subject was this gentleman on the right here has a lamp running right across his face, so that's not pleasing to the eye. In this case, if the flu were taken at a lower angled pointing up at the subject, it would have been a better photo or at a higher angle, pointing down to subject, because then the lamp would also be lower or higher and wouldn't interfere with the subject's face. Now I am out at a park, and I'm going to get some photos of this shed here. I really like this shed. I like that. It's pretty symmetrical, so I'm going to choose to position this first photo with the shed directly in the center of the frame. I'm going to use my grid and I'm taking it at eye level from where I'm standing. So this isn't a high angle photo or low angle photo. This is an eye level photo. Now I'm going to move my position so that I'm standing much farther back from the shed and I'm going to take another photo. I do like it in the center of frame. Now I will crouched down, and I'll bring this shrub here in the foreground of my photo. I'll put it within the bottom right quadrant of the rule of thirds and position the shed more on the left of the rule of thirds. And although the positioning is okay because of the heavy texture of the shrub here, I actually first goes to the shrub. It's a bright color. It has a lot of detail in a lot of texture. That's not what we want. We want this shed to be the focal point of this photo, So by having the shrub in the foreground, it's not really doing the shed, which is the subject that we want justice. Now let's look at one more photo. This is a photo of me, and this is an okay photo. The positioning in terms of where I am on the rule of third grid is great, but I'm stacked with the tree to the left of me behind me. So the positioning of this photo is okay. It would be better if I were standing slightly more to the right of frame so that I had the white sky in the background naturally framed in my head rather than having this tree interfere here. If, however, this photo of me had a very shallow depth of field and I were the only element in focus, then having that tree in the background stack behind me would be a lot more forgiving because it wouldn't compete so much with the subject. Which is me in this case, whenever you're taking photos, if you have some time, capture your subject from different angles, different positions because in the moment you may like one position, one angle a lot. And when you look back in your photos at a later time, you might realize that you got some really cool shots from other angles and positions. In the next lesson, we're gonna talk about negative space and how you can use it to your advantage in your photos 18. 18 How to Use Negative Space in Your Photos: You can also use negative space to really emphasize the subject or the focal point in your image. In this photo. This flower here is the focal point. It's very obvious because it is surrounded by negative space that's out of focus in the background. This flower is the Onley part of the image that isn't focused, and it's a brighter color than the negative space in the background, which is darker greens and blacks. In this image. The negative space of the Clear Lake makes it very obvious as to where you, as the viewer, supposed to be focusing the canoe here. Although not ah, very bright color stands out nicely against the very bright white background and the smoothness of the negative space and lack of texture in the lake here also really helped bring your eyes to the more textures canoe with the two people in it. In this photo again, negative space is used more dramatically this time the entire background of this image it is black. The circular light is very bright and very textured, making quite obvious that this is the focal point, and the negative space is the darker shade with the focal point being very, very textured and much brighter than the surrounding part of the image. This photo isn't evenly balanced at all, but it's very obvious where your eye is supposed to go. In this image, the subject is the girl sitting on the bench. She really stands out because she's the darkest part of the image, and the negative space all around her is very light. It's like whites, and it's like grace. So negative space has been used well here, as well as the contrast in the darks and lights. Parts of this image, using visual weight and negative space, are two very cool techniques that can really help new decide how you want a viewer to feel and how you want a viewer to see your image, as well as making your photos more pleasing to the eye. So as you start to take photos as you start to see other photographers, photos start thinking about what their intentions were when they were taking those photos. Where did they choose to put the visual waiting? A photo? Where did they choose toe really emphasize the subject by using negative space to their advantage in the next lesson? we're gonna look at how to use leading lines and all of these techniques that you're learning you can use hand in hand with each other. You can use them separately. They're really, really cool techniques that are really going up your photo game. And so we will see you in the next lesson about leading lines. 19. 19 How to Use Leading Lines: Let's talk about leading lines. Leaving lines are great tool to guide your viewers I to something in the photo. Think of leading lines as really subtle arrows that, ideally will lead your viewer to something awesome. These lines could be curvy or straight, leaving lines create a visual pathway. Keep in mind when you're using leading lines to your advantage to take better photos, it's best toe. Lead your viewers I into the photo rather than out of the photo. You can use reflections as leading lines. You can use shadows or highlights as leading lines. You can use organic lines, whether natural ones, or you can use architectural lines of buildings for more obvious lines. Let's look at some photos and talk about the leading lines used in this first photo. As you can see the leading lines, take your eye into the center of the frames. The repetition used in the trees on this pathway also guide your eye towards the center of the frame. This isn't a great photo because the 1st 2 lines of the canal horizontally go across the composition, taking your eyes out of the photo before the third curving line continues. Our I to the center of frame and into the photo towards the sun setting. There is a nice highlight that does make up a little bit for these 1st 2 canal leading lines leading your eye out of the frame and that is the highlight from this son. This is a more subtle leading line, but as you can see, the highlight carries your eye towards the sun. The shadows and the clouds also direct your eye towards the sun. This is a really interesting image. There are a lot of leading lines, and this is also great use of using contrast of different shades and colors within image. So, as you can see, this image is quite dark in the foreground, and the first denser leading line guides your eye up towards thes trees here as bullying lines continue to guide your eye, zigzagging throughout the image, the colors become softer and lighter all the way to the top. So this is an image you're going to spend a little bit more time looking at because of the way that the leading ones were guiding your I slowly up the image, looking at all of the details within the landscape as they appear. This photo is a very cool use of leading lines is quite obvious, as you can see here in the sand and the reflections in the water that your eyes are being guided towards this tree here in the center of frame, organic leading lines naturally carrier I towards the tree and the highlights in the water also carrier I towards the tree. And then as you look up at the sky, all of the clouds are guiding and leaving your eyes towards that Trias well, if you look over here at the horizon, line it God's right towards this tree. Also in the background here, it looks like I would have focused. Mountain is guiding your eye gently towards the tree in the photo in this photo the bridge , the bars here, the sides of the bridge, the buildings on either side all leader I very directly into the center of the photo. Here. The focal point of this image is the bridge, and it does carry your eye using the leading lines in the frame, which is really cool. So whether you're outdoor in a very natural setting and you use organic, curvy lines to guide your viewers. I when you're taking photos or use straight lines that you may find in buildings or man made structures, using leading lines to your advantage is another great step in taking better photos and understanding composition better and using leading lines is a really fun way to make your photos more interesting. 20. 20 Testing Your Knowledge on Well Composed Photos: Now let's take a look at some photos that have been composed very well. And as we look at them, I'm gonna ask you some questions to get you thinking about the composition of the photo. So let's start with this 1st 1 here. Where did your eye go first? What was the first thing that you looked at? Likely it was the woman here. She's framed in the lower center, part of the composition. This photo is perfectly balanced with visual weight. She's framed very nicely in between these rocks, the mountain, the trees and the sky. The lighting falls on her very nicely as well. It's brighter in the area that she's sitting. We have leading lines on the rock here, leading towards her the mountain. The lines lead towards her. Even these branches here point in towards her. She also has blonde hair that's writer and more saturated than the other areas of yellow in the photo. But these yellow parts of the trees do help the photo coming together very nicely with her long blonde hair as the focal point. This is a great photo because it also evokes a lot of feelings. How does this photo make you feel when you look at it? Can you imagine being where this woman is? As you're looking at it, Maybe you're wondering what she's thinking about, what she's doing up there, how she got up there. It feels peaceful and adventurous at the same time. This image does a great job at telling a story that's very powerful. That is the power of composing an image beautifully like this and using different elements in the scene, like this piece of wood here that also has these branches pointing towards her. If this photo were taken a little bit higher, you wouldn't see this wood here. These were all creative choices that were made so that this image would be composed very nicely. Next, we have a very different image of a peacock. Where did your eye go when you looked at this image? First probably went to the center of the frame. The peacocks face just like the image before. Now, although this is a very vibrant image, the peacocks face has this very, very vibrant blue above its beak. And although there's a little bit of bright white throughout the image, the brightest white is around the peacocks. I so naturally your eyes going to go there and again, all of the's leading lines in the feathers, as well as the peacocks neck lead towards its face. This is also a really nice angle of the peacock. It's a 3/4 view of peacocks. They're seeing 3/4 of its face. The feathers frame the peacock very beautifully and as you'll see the peacocks faces and focus. But the feathers behind the peacock are slightly out of focus, which also emphasizes the peacocks. Face. This peacocks face is in the center of the frame, and although the background is very busy because it's mostly out of focus, this makes it very easy for you as a viewer to know where your intended toe look, which is at the peacocks face first. Next we have a silhouette photograph of a dear and to baby boars walking through a forest. This photo was composed with a lot of light coming through and the contrast of the darks and the lights go very nicely together. Your I naturally probably went to the dear first, and then you continue to look at the animals behind following the deer. If one of these animals were facing the other way. It wouldn't feel is good toe look at so the fact that they're both smaller than the deer and they're following behind as the deer's looking off into the distance far ahead makes this a very interesting image. How does this image make you feel? It almost looks like these animals are tiptoeing through the forest very quietly. They don't want to be heard. It's a peaceful day. It's foggy. This was also photographed at a slightly lower angle, so you can imagine as the photographer crouching down, taking this photo. This is a photo of Toronto at night. What's the first thing you look at? Here? You're I probably first goes to the sea and tower the red in the lake, leads your eye towards the CN Tower and continues up to the very top of the CN Tower. The colors work very well together. Their bright reds, bright blues, bright purples, yellows and oranges. The water is out of focus, and the city skates is all in focus. Lit up nicely. The Horizon line sits on the lower thirds horizon line. This photo is another photo that is composed very nicely. Where does your I go first? You're I probably first went to this island with these trees on it and then towards the lightning here and the mountains lead your eyes to the center of the frame. With these trees, the visual wait is almost perfectly symmetrical. You have the buildings in the background to the visual weight on the other side of this photo is evenly weighed by the lightning up here. That's also the brighter light, and the mountains on the right side are lower and less visually heavy than they are on the left, and the tree here on the right is smaller and thinner than the one on the left. But the great cloud upon the right here makes this image almost perfectly balanced visually , and the beautiful thing about composition and learning, all of these photography rules is that you can break them. Once you know them. You can play with them. You can use them to your advantage. You don't always have to have the focal point of the image on one of the rule of thirds quadrants or sitting perfectly on one of the rule of thirds lines. You don't always have to have leading lines leading your eyes to the focal point or perfectly even visual weight. But understanding what makes an image pleasing to the eye gives you a lot more power when you're taking photos, because you begin to be able to make the decision as to how you want the viewer to feel when year she looks at your photos. 21. 20 Testing Your Knowledge on Well Composed Photos: Now let's take a look at some photos that have been composed very well. And as we look at them, I'm gonna ask you some questions to get you thinking about the composition of the photo. So let's start with this 1st 1 here. Where did your eye go first? What was the first thing that you looked at? Likely it was the woman here. She's framed in the lower center, part of the composition. This photo is perfectly balanced with visual weight. She's framed very nicely in between these rocks, the mountain, the trees and the sky. The lighting falls on her very nicely as well. It's brighter in the area that she's sitting. We have leading lines on the rock here, leading towards her the mountain. The lines lead towards her. Even these branches here point in towards her. She also has blonde hair that's writer and more saturated than the other areas of yellow in the photo. But these yellow parts of the trees do help the photo coming together very nicely with her long blonde hair as the focal point. This is a great photo because it also evokes a lot of feelings. How does this photo make you feel when you look at it? Can you imagine being where this woman is? As you're looking at it, Maybe you're wondering what she's thinking about, what she's doing up there, how she got up there. It feels peaceful and adventurous at the same time. This image does a great job at telling a story that's very powerful. That is the power of composing an image beautifully like this and using different elements in the scene, like this piece of wood here that also has these branches pointing towards her. If this photo were taken a little bit higher, you wouldn't see this wood here. These were all creative choices that were made so that this image would be composed very nicely. Next, we have a very different image of a peacock. Where did your eye go when you looked at this image? First probably went to the center of the frame. The peacocks face just like the image before. Now, although this is a very vibrant image, the peacocks face has this very, very vibrant blue above its beak. And although there's a little bit of bright white throughout the image, the brightest white is around the peacocks. I so naturally your eyes going to go there and again, all of the's leading lines in the feathers, as well as the peacocks neck lead towards its face. This is also a really nice angle of the peacock. It's a 3/4 view of peacocks. They're seeing 3/4 of its face. The feathers frame the peacock very beautifully and as you'll see the peacocks faces and focus. But the feathers behind the peacock are slightly out of focus, which also emphasizes the peacocks. Face. This peacocks face is in the center of the frame, and although the background is very busy because it's mostly out of focus, this makes it very easy for you as a viewer to know where your intended toe look, which is at the peacocks face first. Next we have a silhouette photograph of a dear and to baby boars walking through a forest. This photo was composed with a lot of light coming through and the contrast of the darks and the lights go very nicely together. Your I naturally probably went to the dear first, and then you continue to look at the animals behind following the deer. If one of these animals were facing the other way. It wouldn't feel is good toe look at so the fact that they're both smaller than the deer and they're following behind as the deer's looking off into the distance far ahead makes this a very interesting image. How does this image make you feel? It almost looks like these animals are tiptoeing through the forest very quietly. They don't want to be heard. It's a peaceful day. It's foggy. This was also photographed at a slightly lower angle, so you can imagine as the photographer crouching down, taking this photo. This is a photo of Toronto at night. What's the first thing you look at? Here? You're I probably first goes to the sea and tower the red in the lake, leads your eye towards the CN Tower and continues up to the very top of the CN Tower. The colors work very well together. Their bright reds, bright blues, bright purples, yellows and oranges. The water is out of focus, and the city skates is all in focus. Lit up nicely. The Horizon line sits on the lower thirds horizon line. This photo is another photo that is composed very nicely. Where does your I go first? You're I probably first went to this island with these trees on it and then towards the lightning here and the mountains lead your eyes to the center of the frame. With these trees, the visual wait is almost perfectly symmetrical. You have the buildings in the background to the visual weight on the other side of this photo is evenly weighed by the lightning up here. That's also the brighter light, and the mountains on the right side are lower and less visually heavy than they are on the left, and the tree here on the right is smaller and thinner than the one on the left. But the great cloud upon the right here makes this image almost perfectly balanced visually , and the beautiful thing about composition and learning, all of these photography rules is that you can break them. Once you know them. You can play with them. You can use them to your advantage. You don't always have to have the focal point of the image on one of the rule of thirds quadrants or sitting perfectly on one of the rule of thirds lines. You don't always have to have leading lines leading your eyes to the focal point or perfectly even visual weight. But understanding what makes an image pleasing to the eye gives you a lot more power when you're taking photos, because you begin to be able to make the decision as to how you want the viewer to feel when year she looks at your photos. 22. 21 Panoramic Photos: Let's talk about the panoramic option on your iPhone. Panoramic shots are very wide shots, but come in handy when you want to capture a large, vast landscape like this photo. This photo was taken in Iceland. It was just a huge landscape with the tongue of beauty, so I took a panoramic shot. When you take panoramic shots on your iPhone, they can create a bit of a slightly warped image, as you can see in this image, the horizon lines not perfectly straight. It kind of angle slightly up to the right. If you look at the line between the waves and the sand, are little bit rounder than they would be. This is kind of like what eight fish I professional fish islands would capture that lightly warped view. It has kind of a cool effected in some cases. Looks pretty. Me. Let's test out taking a panoramic shock. So you want to decide where you're going to take your photo, what the subject is gonna be so we'll go into panel here, will swipe to the right to get into Pano, and once you know what you want, you're subject to be you want to actually begin taking the photo a little bit more in this case to the left so that you have well, call them handles on either side of your subject. So I've angled my camera more to the left of the barn here, push the shutter button and I'm slowly handing to the right, trying my best to keep the white arrow lined up with that yellow line there. And as you can see, I'm almost going all the way around my body to capture this photo before the iPhone stops me. And this image is not exactly what I was going for. Didn't turn out too great. The Barnes way far on one side of the image, you can see the house. I don't even want to see that in the image and the photos pretty warped. So let's try that again. Will begin a little bit further to the left, push the shutter button down and slowly go to the right. I'm gonna push each other button here to stop the photo from continuing, and you can do that. You don't have to take your Pano as long as the iPhone allows you. Let's take a bad photo and much happier with that. It doesn't have that war effect that the original image had, and it captured what I was hoping to capture. Another cool thing you could do in panic mode is you can while you're panna mode, tap the right side of your screen where the way, our ways and it will flip the arrow so that you can actually take your photo from right to left. So let's do that now and again. I'll push the shutter button to stop where I'm happy with the photo ending And there you go . You can also take your photos vertically, so starting at the bottom here, I will push the shutter button and go up thes trees. And this has created a pretty warped kind of creepy, kinda cool effect of the trees here. If you want to have someone in your panel photo, you have to ask them to stand pretty still. Because if they start moving across fring, then the photos not gonna look good. So as long as they're standing kind of still, you can capture them in your pay. No shop like so I don't use panel to too often. I always make sure that first and foremost, I'm using the photo app to capture photos. But if I have time and I'm in a beautiful scenery that has a lot of length to it like this , then I'll capture Panelas. Well, mainly, panel is great for capturing beautiful landscape photos. But again, I do recommend that you start off with your regular photo before you news panel. In the next lesson, we're gonna look at taking great photos of people. We will see you in there. 23. 22 How to Take Great Photos of People: Let's look at how to take great photos of people in this first photo. This is a staged shot. The model knows that the photos being taken of her and this is a close up of most of the models face. What makes this photo really cool is that the models faces naturally framed and even a little bit hidden by these flowers and leaves in the foreground and beside her. This photo was taken at eye level, and it has sort of a mysterious feel because of the flowers covering part of her face and because of her facial expression. This photo is of another model, and it's a medium shot when you're talking about taking a photo of a person. A medium shot is considered to show from the person's face to around their hips or elbow area. So this is a medium shot, and this is another post photo. The model is looking directly at the camera lens, and what I like about this photo is that her body isn't positioned perfectly parallel to the camera lens. Her left shoulder on the right side of the frame is back more. You can't even really see it because her hair is covering it. It almost has a bit of his story. It's almost as if she turned into the photo to have the photo taken as if she were in deep thought. This is a subtle and interesting way to have a person positioned in a photo where it looks like they've turned towards the camera. It's after the photo taken, but the photo isn't taken directly straight on of the subject. This nice highlight on the right side of frame in your hair also helped separate her from the background, which is very nice when you're working with people. If they aren't professional models, you can ask them to stare at the lens or stare beyond the lens and think about something. If you're trying to create a feeling of hope, asked them to think about something they're excited for hoping for. If you're trying to create a feeling of fear, asked him to think about something that they're afraid of. And so one. A lot of great photos of people are photos where the person in the photo isn't smiling, but rather evoking an emotion. This is a wide shot of a person. It's considered a wide shot because it shows all of the person's body and more of the surrounding area that the person is standing at. This is another great idea. If you're taking a photo of someone and they're a little bit shy, get a photo off them from behind. And if you're in a cool area like this example photo here. This photo country tells a cool story. This person is not raining shoes. He's obviously walked up and stepped on this rock here to get the best seat in the house, so to speak off this beautiful sunset. This is a photo taken from a bird's eye view of a person laying in a bed of leaves. So, of course we want to make sure if you're taking a photo of someone like this, you want to make sure that they're comfortable with you standing over them, holding the camera over them to take the photo, because that's what you have to do. And if you are gonna take a photo of someone ling on the ground like this looking up at your lens than maybe bring a towel or a cold or something, they could put under the body because especially if you're working outdoors in grass and leaves and might be a little damp. Another great way to help people get comfortable on camera if you're trying to take some awesome photos of them is to introduce a prop. So, for example, I love tea and I love this photo is a woman, and she is sipping tea or coffee. It's a great photo tells a story. You could imagine that feeling of drinking your morning coffee or tea and having a prop that the person is comfortable with especially, makes it really easy for them to get into their natural element personally, because I take a lot of photos and video. I love taking photos where I have my camera in hand. On days where I don't think I look too great. I capture photo with my camera in front of my face at, Like this one that's still cool, creative. It's fun, and you can tell that's me. But the emphasis of the photo really is that Cameron that camera lens there also used the weather to your advantage. If you're getting some outdoor photos of a person, helped create that feeling that story of the day in the weather by getting them to incorporate the weather, like in this photo with the snow into the photo. So this is a really cool photo. It's a closer up photo of this model blowing snow. What the cameras fund. Interesting. You could almost put yourself into this moment and makes the photo more intriguing and captivating. If you're taking a photo of someone and you don't want them looking directly at the lens like this photo, where the models staring off into the distance, give them a target? Don't tell them. Just stare off into the distance somewhere because usually people will dart your eyes around when they're given this lack of direction. And then you're going to get the photo you want because the island actually matters a lot, especially in closer produce of people when they're staring off. So before you start snapping, ask her model to stare at a brick on the wall of the tents, break up on the wall, tell them to hold their stare, see if you're happy with that. If not a just tell them to stare a little bit higher at the 11th brick on the wall, for example, give them a very specific place to stare so that that's where they can rest their eyes and their days when you're snapping that photo. This is a great, candid photo of a person laughing. One trick I do when I'm taking photos of people and I want to capture their true riel happy wife is okay. This doesn't always work. It kind of depends on the person. But I'll say Okay, just give me the goofiest life you can and usually Bell fake a laugh, and that's not what I want to capture. I don't want to capture the fake laugh just after that Fake laugh, though, feels so awkward. That will actually give you a real genuine laugh. And that's the fully want to capture. As you start taking photos more and more, you'll get better at anticipating that moment where you can capture that through laughter in a person. OK, so now let's look at some photos that my fiance took of me. So here we are. We're getting a wide shot of me standing in a pathway here. It's Nok Photo chose. My outfit tells a little bit of a story. It's a rainy day or cloudy day that probably some wearing a raincoat, and you can tell that it's an overcast day because the lighting let's try changing the orientation of our phone to a horizontal view Walk. Focus on me is subject and see here I'm standing beside the tree. But I'm not fact, right up against the trip, moving in to more of a medium shot here, and I am not standing perfectly parallel to the iPhone camera. I have my left shoulder closer to the lens and you actually can't even see my right shoulder. I also had my hair to one side of the photo. I find, Ah, flattering. Look, if you're posing someone with longer hair is to show they're neckline and have their hair to one side of the shoulder. See what works with the people that you're taking photos up, of course, but this seems to be really flattering. Go twos is having longer hair to one side of the shoulder. Cable snapped before the there. Go back to the vertical view and this is okay framing. I'm on the rule of thirds braid looking at the lens. One thing that you want to do if you're working with someone who is not a professional model, and you want them to look happy, not not forced, happy but naturally happy. Ask them to smile with your eyes will get what it means. You want to get them to have that glow in their eyes, have their eyes rest in that happy way and have that subtle smile. Not a forced smile, just a little bit of a happy smile on their face. But one thing that's my go to when I'm taking photos of people if you ask them to smile with your eyes. And there you go those air some ways that you can take better photos of people and get them mawr comfortable on camera. 24. 23 Using Portrait Mode for Shallow Depth of Field: Let's talk about portrait mode, which is a great feature that the iPhone has. Portrait mode basically allows you to get shallow depth of field. So when you're taking the photo of a subject, portrait mode will blur the background, which makes your photo look higher. End first before shape portrait mode. I want to show you what regular photo mode looks like. So this photo was taken in regular photo mode in our iPhone. Swipe the right to get into portrait mode. We're gonna stay with natural light for this particular photo because it's a beautiful, overcast day, which is really nice when you're taking photos of people because overcast days create really soft lighting on people so you won't have those harsh shadows that the sunny bright they will give you When you were using portrait mode, you need to stand fairly close to your subject in order to get that shallow depth of field look. So we will take this vote of fear. Worse, we're going to make sure that our auto exposure and focuses locked on the subject's eyes, and there we go. Let's take another photo so you can see here that the background is blurry. This is very pool. It's a more creative look than if you were to just take this photo with regular photo mode . It crops in a lot onto your subject. It's great. Four closer up shops. If you try to take a wide shot of your subject like we're doing now in portrait mode, you're gonna get a notification at the top. That doesn't move closer because you need to be fairly close to your subject within about two meters or so in order to utilize portrait mode and get the benefit of that shallow depth of field. Look where the backgrounds nice and blurry as you can see. We've taken this photo anyway in portrait mode, this wide shot and nothing really is out of focus and blurry. So we're gonna move closer and you can see this notification the tops, Phil says. Move closer. Let's take another photo, OK? And you can also use portrait mode when you're taking photos of objects like this. So we're gonna take a photo of this while here using portrait mode, natural lighting in a line it up on different areas of the rule of thirds quadrants, and I really love using portrait mode when you're getting beautiful, close up of objects or people because it just has this really sort of like buttering background. Everything around your subject that has a farther focal distance just falls out of focus. It's really, really nice. Let's try a few different filters here just to see what portrait mode filters give us so we'll go to studio lighting. Kind of makes the food more Brighton Contrast. E contour lighting. Let's go over to stage lighting. You have some black and white options as well. I prefer the natural lighting most and let's look through the photos so portrait mode I always use. It's my go to. Whenever I'm taking a closer shot of a person, I will go into portrait mode, and whenever I want culture up shots of cool objects, I will hop into portrait mode. I love portrait mode. Get used to it. It's a little bit different than regular photo mode, but when you start using it, you're not gonna want to stop. It's a lot of fun, and it really produces beautiful photos 25. 24 Editing a Photo of a Person2: editing your photos can really take your photos to the next level. And then in your photos can be the difference between an amateur photo and a professional looking photo. I love editing. My photos actually find editing my photos. Justus Fun as I do taking my photos, and I'm sure you will a swell. So I'm really, really excited to dive into these editing lessons with you. I've provided you with three downloadable photos that I've taken. You can follow along and edit these photos as well. What you want to do after you download them is put them into your camera. Roll on your iPhone so that you can easily access them. Let's talk about editing. First off, a big mistake that I see people who are new to photography doing is really, really punching the colors of the contractor, the sharpness in their photos. And for the most part, as you're figuring out what your style of photography and you're editing, Silas, start off by not going to to dramatic. You want to make the photo more intriguing, more appealing. You want the photo to pull in your viewer, but you don't want to push any editing tools to too far. So let's get right into everything. We have a few different examples that you can follow along with out of all of the free iPhone photography. Editing APS. My absolute favorite is Adobe Light Room. This app is phenomenal, especially considering it's free. This app is the go to for professional photographers. When they're editing any iPhone photos before you continue with this lesson, go to the apple App store and download light room for free. Pause this lesson. Do it now and come back as soon as you've got it downloaded. So first thing we're gonna do is open adobe light room by clicking on it once. So what we're gonna do is import a new photo into adobe light Room that I have taken on my iPhone camera. So we're going to press this icon here once, and that will take us right into our iPhone camera roll where we can see all of our photos . And I am going to choose to edit this photo here. So I have pressed on it, and now it's gonna open up into a light room. You wanna press the Czech market the top here perfect and Now we can begin editing, so I'm going to show you all of the tools and effects that I use when I edit my photos, starting with the crop tool. So press on the crop tool and by holding down one of the corners of this box that's just shown up, you can change the sizing and framing up your photo like so good to know you have the option. In this particular case, I am not going to crop the photo because I, like the framing adds, is just wanted to show you what you can do with the crop tool. You can also rotate your image if you need Teoh. If you've messed around with this a bit, you just want to go back to the original orientation double attack on the screen, and it will take you back perfect. Since we haven't actually done any adjustments with the crop tool, I'm just going to press the X on the bottom left here to exit out of this particular tool. And I always like to just out of curiosity, see what the auto settings tool will do to my photo before I read it it. So let's push auto and just see what sort of adjustments your iPhone would choose to make with your photo. Okay, to undo that click on this arrow that's curving to the left here, and it will undo those auto settings. Next, let's press this light icon at the top. Here you have exposure so you can slide your exposure to the right. Add more light into your phone brightness. I've overdone it here to show you what this sliders capable of you can slide this slider far to the left to make the image much darker and under exposed. You can see the top here. How much I'm under exposing the photo. I'm gonna stick for the most part, somewhere in the middle of the slider here, Somewhere around the zero mark, I brought the exposure up just ever so slightly to 00.11. Next, we're gonna go to the contrast slider, sliding really far to the right as a lot of contrast into your photo sliding, it's the left. Takes away a lot of contrast. I don't like to push contrast one way or the other to too far, because it starts to make your photo look unnatural and especially because We're editing a photo of a person. We don't want to make them look you too unnatural. In this case, I've pushed contrast to plus 15 here to make a little bit punchier and looking at this photo, it's still a little too punchy for me. In this case, I'm not going to use contrast it also to bring your contrast slider back to its original setting, which in this case was zero. You could just double tap on the circular part of the slider. There we go. It's brought it back to zero. In most cases, I like to bring my highlights way down. Bring your highlights down is usually pretty subtle. It helps the photo appear to be exposed better. It shows more detail in ah person's face, for example, for highlights or down, and it lets you really concentrate on the more important parts of the photo. You can push your highlights really far to the right and bring them up. This will start to make your photo look over exposed and unnatural. So for the most part, I like to keep my highlights in the minuses. Moving along. Let's bring our shadows down to the left As you can see, this makes the shadows in the subject's neck area and in the background darker by bringing them all the way the right. It makes the shadows a lot more dull for this photo. Let's keep the shadows at plus 16 so that they're a little less dramatic. You can move your whites all the way to the left, can see this doesn't mean to too much of a difference. If you were to slide them all the way, the right it would really make the whites in the photo stand out. The whites in the shirt, the background, the face I'm gonna bring them down just a little bit to minus eight. Okay. With the black flips, push the slider far to the right. As you can see, the blacks in the photo get dolar. If we were to push the slider far to the left, the blackberries in the photo would be much more pronounced. I want this photo look a little bit brighter. I find photos of people, let her a little bit brighter, feel happier. They're more interesting to people. They catch people's eyes. So I'm gonna bring the blacks up a little bit too, plus 21. All right, that's it for the light tool. Let's move over to the color tool. This is another tool I use often. This is the temperature slider. You can slide it far to the right, making the photo a lot warmer. Obviously, this is too, too warm, or you can slide your temperature to the left to make it feel cooler and more blue. It was a bit of a gloomier day. It was a bit of a cooler day. That's obvious. So I've ever so slightly brought the temperature to the cooler side. We've brought the temperature down just a bit, so it's not noticeable to minus four below temp. We have tent. I don't Houston, but let me show you what it does. You can either push the tint far to the magenta is on the right, or you can push it to the green on the left. I'm gonna double tap on this circle in the middle of the slider here to bring it back to zero, which is the original setting for the slider. Vibrance is another option. I use often. Let fly vibrance to the right. If you really, really push it, it becomes too vibrant to unnatural. If you push it to the left, the colors becomes very dull. In most cases, when I have photos with color, I like to add vibrancy to the photos because I want the red and the jacket to pot more. I'm going to push the vibrance to plus 35. Saturation pushes the colors a lot as well. By pushing saturation parts the right, it really makes the colors in a subject's face, hair, wardrobe and so on. Really very intense, too intense that looks completely unnatural. Let's push it far to the left. That will really make the colors dollars. Well, overall, I don't do saturation too much. I may push it by plus 10 or minus 10 but I prefer to use vibrance. Using vibrancy to enhance your photos overall creates a more natural effect, so I'm going to double tap on the circle on the saturation slider to bring back to zero. Next, let's go into effects. Let's press on effects and we will push clarity to the right. You can see all of the details in the photo, the skin, the hair, the wrinkles on the jacket are becoming more visible. And if you were to push clarity all the way, the left your photo becomes really, really moved out and dreamlike qualities. Another one I do like to use. But I don't push it too far because I don't want the folder to seem on natural, so I brought it up to plus 14. I don't use D Haze often, but I'll show you what it does if you add a lot of D. Hayes to your photo punches all the colors more. And if you push the slider farts the left, it makes everything sort of look like Thursday's Hayes. See kind of cloudy, seen thing going on over your photo. I'm not a fan of it, but that's what it does, just so you know. So let's double tap that D Hey circle to bring it back to zero. Now let's work with the vignette. In some cases, I will use been yet ever so slightly. The reason I do like Finn yet is because in some cases I like to gently guide your I'm or towards the center of the frame. So let me show you what it does if you push your light room slide really far to the right as white sort of cloud, even yet don't like that. If you push the slider to the left, it adds a black vignette, so I'm gonna keep it to minus 15. You can barely see it there just started, darkens the edges of the frame so that, without realizing it, you're eyes naturally are even more drawn to the brighter parts of the frame. In this case, the person in the center let's go to midpoint midpoint is defaulted to being set at 50. Let's push it far to the left. As you can see, it affects the midpoint of the vignettes. Let's push it far to the right. That pretty much takes away. The vignette will leave the midpoint. At 38 the feather slider is also defaulted to 50. Let's push it parts the left. This, basically by pushing its the left, makes your vignette more dramatic, like so so it's very apparent. There's a vignette now, even though it's a settled in yet because the circle where the frame of the vignette ends is very pronounced. If you were to push the slider far to the right, it becomes a lot less pronouncing blends more with the background. In this case, I'm not going to use feather all double top. The slider on the center to bring it back to its default, which is 50 around the slider, also affects the vignette. If you push it to the left, it makes it more round. If you push it to the right less round, let's double tap that and bring it back to zero. I never use highlights for the vignette, so let's skip that. Let's go to grain. You can choose to add grain to your photos. I'm gonna really push it to the right and then zoom in here to show you what adding green does your photo. I don't like using grain because I don't want my full distal greeny. So let's bring that green back down to zero. You can sharpen your image. This is it, sharpened very much so. I've got it up to 45 just to sharpen the eyes. Noise reduction. This is a slider I use often because it reduces the noise in your photos and makes it look more professional. Let's zoom into the photo even more to show you what happens if you push noise reduction all the way, the right it's moves out the pixels. So in this case, pushing noise reduction to 96 is too much. It's made the skin look fake, so we'll bring it down to 25. Okay, so for the most part, that's what I do with effects. When I am editing a person, let's check out the before and after to see what the difference is. My intention with this photo was just to make the photo look more professional and to make the colors pop a little bit more so you can check out the original photo by simply pressing down on your iPhone screen on this photo. So when you press down, there we go. That's the original. The colors are a little bit more dull. The highlights or a lot more emphasized. So, yes, I am happy with that edit to save this photo in light room, but also in my camera roll on my iPhone. I am now going to quick on this box with the arrow in it here, and it will ask me if I'd like to save this in the maximum available size. Yes, you always want to save your photo in the maximum size available, so push maximum. This will give you a better quality photo. If you go for the smaller photo, there's gonna be less information in the photo and it's not gonna look a good great. So now that folio has been saved into your camera roll. Awesome. 26. 25 Editing a Landscape Photo: all right. Now let's look at editing a landscape. For though this is a photo I took a few weeks ago. The sunset was really, really beautiful. And I just loved the peaceful look and feel of this lake here. So I took this photo. I knew it had some potential, and I know with editing it's going to take it to the next level. So first off, I'm going to go into light and I am going Teoh, push. The exposure to left under exposing this photo shows more of the detail in the sky, which is kind of cool, but it also makes the rest of the photo very dark. So let's push that exposure to the right a little bit. That's too bright. I'll bring it back down. I'm just ever so slightly gonna under expose If I minus 14 and you know what? Now let's just double tap on the slider here, bring it back to zero. Next, I'm going into contrast. I'm gonna push the contrast. Far left really makes the foot dull. Let's push it a little bit to the right toe at plus 12. We'll leave it there. We're gonna bring the highlights down a lot to minus 96 to bring back as much of the details we can in the sky and in the Reflections in the Lake. I'm happy with that. In the majority of cases, I always bring down my highlights, so we'll keep it at minus 96. I want to adjust the contrast a little bit. Mawr After seeing the highlights brought down, I'm gonna move it two plus seven. Let's look at the shadows will put them all the way. The left that's too dark. Let's bring them over to the right here. That's too bright, and I'm happy with bringing more light into the shadowed areas, So let's keep that at plus 37. Next, let's bring the white up, sliding it far to the right. That's way too white. Let's bring the weight down a little bit a little bit more, okay, and I like the white somewhere around minus 31 year. Next, let's bring the blacks up just a little bit too. Plus 16. I'm happy with that. Next, we'll go into color and we will move the temperature slider a little bit to the right two plus six. Let's work on fi brings will push Vibrance really, really far right. Lost 58 looks good. Look at that sky. Look at those colors. The oranges, the yellows, pinks, blues, purples. By adding more vibrant, the grass even looks beautiful. I want to make it a little less orangey, so I'm going to bring the temperature back to neutral. So 20 Let's press on the screen on her photo here to see the before just to check the progress we've made so far. And wow, what a difference. Okay, let's bring the saturation down just a little bit to minus 10. Next, we will go into effects. And let's bring clarity down far to the left here that makes this photo two dreamy. I kind of do like the dreamy feel, but that's pushing it too far. So we'll move the right minus 45 to move the slider to the right a little bit farther. Everything's to detail now. I'm not liking that for this particular photo, so we'll set clarity to plus 25. Let's zoom in here, see how that looks. You know what I think? I do want to push the clarity more to the left. Here So let's bring it down to minus 40. Yeah, I'm happier with that. It gives it more of a dreamy, smooth out feel. I like that will push the vignettes lighter just slightly to the left. So it has a very settled in yet in the corners of the frame. Let's bring the noise reduction up. Let's slide the sliders far to the right, and we will zoom in, see what kind of effect that had. OK, that's a little bit too smoothed out for me. We'll bring it back down to find a happy spot. Okay, 54 looks pretty good for noise reduction. Let's check the before in the after again by pressing down on the photo. Wow, Look at that difference. Say the original photos kind of by comparison, is dull. There are a lot of whites in it. You can't really see the beautiful colors in the sky or in the reflections the way that you can with this edit applied. So I'm happy with that. Now I'm gonna save the photo by clicking this box with the arrow pointing up on the right here. We're gonna save this photo to our camera roll and of course, we will save this photo with the maximum size available. So that's how I like to add it. Most of my landscape photos when I'm working with landscapes of a sunset or where I have a lot of detail in the clouds and a lot of different colors a swells when I'm working with dreamy like places like this one. So I suggest in any landscape stunts, that sort of photo that you're working with. You bring your highlights down and you pump the vibrance and see how you like it. In the next lesson, we're going to edit a photo of an animal. We'll see you there. 27. 26 Editing a Photo of an Animal: All right, So now let's edit this photo of a horse. This is a photo. I took a nice line. I absolutely loved the orangy gold color of the horse and the grace blue clouds in the background. But when I took this photo, everything turned out dull, as you can see. So we're gonna edit this and enhance the beauty of the colors. Then I saw in real life on this day, So first things first, we're going to go into light, and we're gonna bring the highlights down, okay? And we've brought the highlights would be down to minus 97. Next, let's work on the contrast. I'm gonna push it far to the left. Nope, for its the ray. That's way too far. Okay, I want to bring the contrast down in this photo because I know later on I'm gonna be enhancing author aspects like clarity and vibrance and too much contrast with too much clarity and too much vibrant doesn't work well together, especially in this case with the beautiful details of courses for So let's keep the contrast in minds. 47. Let's bring those shadows way down, way up. And I like the shadows looking dull. So let's keep the shadows of plus 47 so they're pretty dull. Let's check out the whites. Let's bring them way up, way down. Know what? I'm not really liking the whites upper down. So let's double tap on the slider to bring the white back to the default of zero. Let's work on the blacks. Dried the cider way to the left and OK minus 40 for the blacks is good. Next, let's go into color will bring the vibrance up, pushing it to the right. Look at those colors. Come out. This photo already looks way richer and color. Let's have the vibrant sit for now at plus 75. Let's bring the saturation down. Weighing Mawr can't wait up. You know what I like that at plus 20. So if I'm enhancing the color in a photo, I'll always focus more on vibrance than they will in saturation. I'll tweak saturation a little bit, but vibrance is really where you want to focus. Let's hold down on our screen on the photo itself to see the before and after said before. Wow, look how much dolar that looks. The skies a lot whiter the horses. Face doesn't have that beautiful colors that it does when you push the vibrance. So I'm really happy with it so far. We'll go over now to a fax and will go into clarity. Let's push clarity to the bright all the way up, up, up. That's too far there, too many details showing now it doesn't look natural. So let's push it far to the left. Okay? And I'm happy with clarity at plus 13 just slightly, giving the photo more clarity. Let's bring the vignette far to the left. That's too far. Let's have it sit at minus 16. We'll bring the midpoint to the left, not liking Matt. Let's bring it far to the right to 82. Let's feather all with left, all the way, the right. Okay, I like the feather at 79. Let's bring sharpening up, up up to 1 20 Let's bring the radius down just a little bit. 2.6 and now we'll just sharpening again to 63. Okay, so I'm really happy with that. Let's check out the before and after again. Wow, what a difference. As you continue getting better with editing, you're gonna find your own style. My go to is adding vibrance, lowering the highlights and working with clarity either to add more clarity or toe less. I really like my photos to still have the natural feel, but also looking hands I really like when the colors pop. So there you go. That's editing. Have fun with this. You can do so much with editing your photos. And now that you're familiar with how to use the light room app, the possibilities really are endless. So have fun adding your photos and playing with this light room act. 28. 27 Final Thoughts: congratulations on completing this course on iPhone photography. You have learned so much about composition, about angles, framing visual wait and how to edit your photos to take them to the next level. Now that you have all the tools you need to take your photo game to the next level, you want to start applying them when you're taking photos. And remember, you can always come back to this course and rewatch lessons to go over some stuff, and you can also reach out to me. If you have any questions, please ask me. I'm here and I'm happy to answer them. Remember, photography's all about expression. It's a process. It's a journey. And as you continue your photography journey, your style is going to evolve and change and what's really, really awesome With the technology in iPhones today, when it comes to the camera, you're going to be able to compete at a professional level with these photos and this knowledge. Thank you so much for taking this course and all the very best to you on your iPhone photography journey