Rigid Body Simulation Guide in Blender 2.8 | Stephen Pearson | Skillshare

Rigid Body Simulation Guide in Blender 2.8

Stephen Pearson

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30 Lessons (2h 28m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:17
    • 2. Downloading Blender

      0:41
    • 3. Blender Basics

      13:36
    • 4. Saving Your Blender File

      1:24
    • 5. Rigid Body Basics

      7:28
    • 6. Collision Shapes

      6:35
    • 7. Rigid Body Source

      3:26
    • 8. Surface Sensitivity Collections

      5:23
    • 9. Rigid Body Dynamics

      3:09
    • 10. Rigid Body Panel

      4:29
    • 11. Rigid Body Constraints P1

      9:02
    • 12. Rigid Body Constraints P2

      4:42
    • 13. The Motor Constraint

      4:51
    • 14. Rigid Body World

      7:13
    • 15. 1 Falling Cubes Array Modifier

      4:05
    • 16. 2 Falling Cubes Simulating

      3:16
    • 17. 3 Falling Cubes Rendering

      4:35
    • 18. Obstacle Course P1 Modeling

      11:19
    • 19. Obstacle Course P2 Simulating

      9:24
    • 20. Obstacle Course P3 More Simulating

      7:00
    • 21. Obstacle Course P3 Final Simulating

      3:14
    • 22. Obstacle Course P4 Materials

      4:07
    • 23. Obstacle Course P6 Animating the Camera

      3:52
    • 24. Obstacle Course P7 Rendering

      1:56
    • 25. Monkey Crashing P1 Cell Fracture

      3:40
    • 26. Monkey Crashing P2 Animating

      2:46
    • 27. Monkey Crashing P3 Simulating

      4:29
    • 28. Monkey Crashing P4 Materials and Lighting

      3:19
    • 29. Monkey Crashing P5 Rendering

      4:17
    • 30. Crashing Monkey P6 Fixing the Shaking

      3:40

About This Class

Hello everyone and welcome to the Rigid Body Simulation Guide in Blender 2.8. In this course you will learn everything there is to know about the rigid body.


We will first start out by understand what the simulation is and how to use it properly. After that we will jump into Blender and learn all about the different settings and values and how they effect the simulation. We will also learn about rigid body constraints and exactly how to use them. Other things you will learn about include rigid body world, rigid body dynamics, collision groups and more.


There are 3 different tutorials that we go through to demostrate the simulation. The first one is a the render you see on screen. We will be using an array modifier and simulating every single cube to get this effect.
The next one is an obstacle course for a sphere to go through. This section we will be using different rigid body constraints and techniques to push the sphere where we want it to go.


Finally the last section we will be exploding a wall with a monkey head. You will learn about animation and keyframes and more. Every tutorial in this course we use the Eevee to render! 


If you want to learn all about the Rigid Body simulation and all its features hit that enroll button and lets get started!

Programs used in this course: Blender 3D

Outro Song provided by Tasty:
Title: VOIID - Azure
Label Channel: TastyNetwork

Thanks!

Stephen

Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hello, everyone, and welcome to the rigid Body Simulation guide for Blender 2.8. In this course, you will learn everything there is to know about the rigid body Well. First, start out by understanding what the stimulation is and how to use it properly. After that, we will jump into blender and learn all about the different settings and values and how they affect the simulation. We will also learn about rigid body constraints and exactly how to use them. Other things that you will learn about include rigid body world, rigid body dynamics, collision groups and more. There are three different tutorials that we go through to demonstrate the simulation. The 1st 1 is the render that you see on screen. Right now we'll be using an array modifier and simulating every cube to get this effect. The next one is an obstacle course for the sphere to go through. In this section will be using different rigid body constraints and techniques to push the sphere where we wanted to go. Finally, the last section we will be exploding the wall with a monkey head. You will learn about animation, key frames, cell fracture and all sorts of different things. If you want to learn all about the rigid body simulation and its features, hit that enroll button and let's get started. 2. Downloading Blender: in this video, I'll be showing you how to download Blender 2.8. Now what you need to do is go over to blender dot org's and you should see a big down the button right in the middle of your page. Go ahead and click on that button, and it will take you to a download page. You can come over here and change which version that you need. If you need a Lennix Mac windows, all the different versions go ahead and do that. You can also link your steam account if you want it to go to your steam. Once you figure that out, go ahead and click. Download a blender 2.8 and then we'll take you to this page and there should be a download that happens right here, and we can see it download. Once that is done, just go ahead and install it and you'll be ready to go 3. Blender Basics: hell over one and welcome to another video in this one. We're going to learn about Blender 2.8, and I'll be going through the basics of how blender works. If you are completely new to Blender, this is the video for you. Let's first start out by going over to the bright side under the render panel, we'll look at the different render engines. Right now, my render engine is in cycles. If we click on this weekend, switch over to E V or workbench. Workbench is just for sculpting or modeling. Usually this one is not for rendering cycle's right here, which everyone should be already used to. This one is for rendering realistic materials, render lighting and all that stuff. It calculates it very well. And then, of course, TV is the new real time render engine in blender 2.8. In this course, though, we will be focusing on cycles will be learning how that works and rendering our final revenge using cycles. And in the next section. After that, we will render are seen using E V and blender to panicked. But for the main course, we're gonna be using cycles. So the first thing that will do when getting started with 2.8 is we need to open up our preferences, so go over to edit and then click on preferences and then open up the key map underneath came out. We can see that the select with is currently set to right. I think the default is actually left. But since I am used to right click, I'm going to be staying with right click. If you want to change it to left, you can go ahead and do that. But I'm gonna be sticking with right over here on the space bar actions. I have this on play. What if I was to hit Space bar? The timeline will play down here. I think it used to be on search. If you want to go back to that, you can. The new default for search is F three and then over here we want to make sure excruciating pie menu is turned on and I'll show you exactly how this works. So once you have all of your settings the way that you want, you can go ahead and exit out, and then we can start working in blender so to select an object, you can go ahead and right click or left click. Depending on which one you have selected. I have right click selected, so whenever I right click on an object, it will highlight it in the orange outlined so far, right? Click on the camera. You can see it selected right click on my lamp. You have it selected. So to move around the three D space in Blender, you're going to hit the middle mouse button and then click and drag in. This will rotate your view all the way around and so you can look underneath over top and just rotate around the object that you're focused on to change the focus of an object. You can just right click on it and then hit the period key on your number pad, and it will focus in on that object. So now you can see if I rotate the view. It's focused on this object rather than the Cube. I'm going to select the Cube and then press period on my never pad to zoom back anoint. If you don't have a minimal spot, you can go up to edit, go to preferences and underneath input you can turn on emulate a three button mouse if you click on that and hit exit. If you hold down the altar key and left click, it'll act like a middle mouse button. Right now I'm holding Ault and left, click and moving around. I'm not hitting the middle mouse button, and it's rotating the view. Since I have a middle mouse button. I'm gonna go ahead and disabled is, though, So I'm gonna go over to input and then turn off and emulate three button mouse to scale and object in blender. You can go ahead and hit the S key on your keyboard, and it will scale it up. You can see if I bring my mouth in. It'll skillet down. If I bring it up, it'll skillet up. You can also put in different numbers for this. So let's say I wanted to scale this at exactly five times its current current size. I can hit the five key, and it will scale it up five times Now. If I move my mouse, it's not gonna do anything since I put in a manual number, you can also scale down objects by going scale than 0.5, and it will scale down half of what it currently is to rotate and objects. You can hit the R key, and it will rotate to wherever you are looking. So right now I'm looking at this angle and it's gonna rotate at the angle, which I'm looking at. If I was to go into front view by pressing one on the number pad and rotating it this way, you can see it's rotating straight now rather than at an angle to move an object. You can hit the G key on your keyboard, and you can move it to wherever you like. You can also hit the different axes. So let's say I wanted to move it along the y axes, which is the green line right here. If I had G and then why, it'll walk it to that. Why access? So now if I try to move it over along the X, it's not working. It's stuck to that. Why, since I put in the UAE, if I change it to X, I could move it along the X, but that's the only way I can move it. The X is the red line. And then, of course, the Z, which is the blue line, is up and down. If you accidentally move something by accident and you didn't want to move it, you can right click to cancel that movement, and it will snap back to wherever you are wherever it originally. Once so, let's say accidentally clicked are to rotate my object. But I don't want to do that. I can go ahead and right click, and it will snap it back towards the original position. Now, I showed you how to go into front view, which is number pad one on his front view right here to go and do side view, which is on this side of the Cube. I can hit three on my number pad and we are now viewing it from this side to go into top view. I can hit seven on my never pad and now I'm facing the top of our cube right here. You can also hit control seven or command seven and it will go to the bottom view. The same thing works for a number pad one. So if I go into front view, if I hit control one, it will go into the back view. If you don't have a number pad, you can go up to edit, go down to preferences underneath input you can turn on emulate numb pad. What this will do is it will take the top row of your keyboard, which has the numbers, and use those for the views. So if I hit one, you can see it goes into front view. If I hit three, it'll go into side of you, and then seven will go into top you. Since I have a number pad, though, I'm gonna turn this off. So go over to Preferences and then I'm going to turn off emulate Numb pat. Now let's talk about edit Edit mode is the mode that we use to model objects to change in the shape of, UM, toe add geometry and all that to get into edit mode. The shortcut you can do is tab, and that will bring whatever you have selected into edit mode. Or you can come up to this menu here, click on object mode, and then there's in edit mode option here. The only modes that will be going through in this course is object mode, edit mode and wait. Paint all the other ones, such as Vertex sculpt mode. Those are a little bit different. Sculpt mode is for creating characters and molding the mesh. We're not gonna be using that one. The only ones we're gonna be using his edit mode object mode and wait paint select edit mode. And we can see that this is what it looks like on are cute On every corner of our cube, there's going to be a Verdecia or Vertex. Vertex is just a point in three D space on we can see it right there. I can press a G and move the Vertex around and it will go with me and I can also right click to snap it back. There are three different modes to selecting things in edit mode. Verdecia Vertex Select Mode, which is the one that we're on. We can see it up top here. This is Vertex mood and I can select different Virgie Vergis is right here. Just like that edged looked mode will select only the edges. So if I right click on this edge, we can see it selected this edge I can select and just like that. The last one is face select mode. So if I click on the face select mode, I could select the entire face of our cute. So I click on that. I constructed it. I construct this one all the way around from here. We can do a couple things if I extrude this by pressing E weaken. See, it adds some more geometry. Now there are to almost two cubes. We can see that there are faces up top here, and there's also faces down here. If you look on the bottom right, you can see how many Vergis is you have selected. And also how many edges and faces are in the scene. We can see I have four. Vergis is selected out of 12. We can see here. There's one versi right there, there and there. We can see that there are 20 edges on this cube and then 10 faces, and we only have one selected. If I press a once or twice, we can see that now we have all of the verte sees all of the edges and all of the faces selected. You can press tab to go back out of any mode, and now we are in object mode. Now let's talk about the different views. So to change the view to, let's say, wire frame or rendered view, you can go over to the top right corner and click on which only want this one is wire frame . This one is solid view, which is the one we have selected. This one is material view. So let's say we added, in a texture to this material, you'll be able to see that in the material view. And then we also have rendered view, and this will display what will render once we actually produce an image. I'm gonna go back to solid view. Now, the shortcut to change between these is set to Z, So if I process the we can see a pie menu come up. In our view, now we have a couple of different options here. The top corner right is rendered view. So if I just move my mouse over there, it'll change it to the rendered view. If you want to go back to solid Aiken Ghozi and then move my cursor over to the solid view , it will change it Z I can go over to the left, which is wire frame look, Dev and all that. You might be wondering what taco overlays does and toggle extra overlays will toggle the grid. So if I go z talk or relation, we can see that the grid disappears. If I do it again, it re enables the grid. This has changed in Blender 2.8. If I go into rendered view, we can still see the grid in our seen even though we're in rendered view. So if I want to just look at our model without the grid, I can go see talk overlays and it will change it. I'm gonna go back into solid view and then I'm gonna go total or relates to bring the grid back. Toggle X ray will enable us to see through our model. So if I look on the corner and might be hard to see in the video, But I can see that corner right there and I can see through our model and it's a little bit transparent. This can be useful if you have a lot of vergis ease and you're trying to select the ones in the back without selecting the ones in the front and you don't want to go into wire frame. This can be very useful. I'm gonna talk overlays again and get rid of that. To get into the properties panel, you can press the end key and you can see that there's a couple different tabs right here. The item tab shows the dimensions the location of your current selected object so we can see right here are dimensions over Cuba are two meters by two by two. If I change this along the X, it'll scale it up just like that same thing here on the scale. If I want to scale it up along the X, I could just scale it up just like that to add or delete objects. You can do that by hitting the X key to delete, and you can see that the option comes up to delete our cube so quick that the cube will now be deleted to undo something. You can press control Z and it will bring back our cube. You can also press the delete key on your keyboard and that will get rid of it as well. Toe Add in an object you confront shift a and then we can see that there's a lot of different options here, Tad and a mesh object. We could go mesh and then add in, Let's say a UV sphere and weaken crud sphere has now been added to our scene. I can press g X and move it along the X axes and then add in another object surprise shipped A. Maybe I want to add in some text. We can see our text now appears in our scene. I'm gonna go ahead and delete both of these objects, so I'm going to select him, press the X key and delete. Um you can also add different objects by going up to ad and click and on mesh and then adding them from here. And you can also do late objects by going over to object and then going down here and clicking on delete. So there you go, guys. That was a basic overview of blender 2.8. Thank you for watching. In the next video, we will start creating our modern house scene 4. Saving Your Blender File: to save your blender file, you can go up to file and click on Save As or save. If you've already saved your blender file, you can go ahead and click save. But if you are saving a new blender file, go save and it's If you do this, you can save it to wherever you like. You can click on this option here and name your blender file, so I'm just gonna call it saving. And then I can go over here and click on Save as Blender File. Let's say, for example, you want multiple blender files saved to show the progression of your scene. You can do that by hitting control shift s and then hitting the plus sign, and that will add a one next to saving. So if I do that, it'll saving new blender file. If I do it again, I can hit the blessed sign again and we can see it's now at saving to dot blend. So now let's say you did a couple things. You deleted that cube you press shipped, AU added in a sphere, and now you just want to save that blender file all you have to do is hit control s or command s and you can see down here it's saved That blender file lender will also warn you about closing the program if you've done some changes without saving. So let's say at it in a new object and I hit the exit button, we can see that blender says save or discard changes or cancel. If I had saved, it'll save our project, then we can go ahead and close the program. 5. Rigid Body Basics: Hello, everyone. And welcome to a new section in this one. We're going to discuss the rigid body simulation, how it works, what you need to do to get started and all of the different values and settings that go with that simulation. Right now, we're in a fresh blender file and I'll be going through a couple of the settings for the rigid body simulation. The first thing that we need to do is find where the rigid body simulation is to access that you have to make sure you have your object selected. So go ahead and make sure the default cube is selected. Then come down here and you can see a little button right here. And this is the physics panel. Once you click on this, you can go ahead and check the rigid body right here underneath physics. And now we have a simulation. So next, what Weaken Dio is come down here to the play button, and if we play this, you'll notice our cube falls straight down. This is what happens when you apply the rigid body to whatever object you have selected. It basically adds physics to it over on the right side. We can see there's a couple different types and will be going through these in just a second. But I wanted to make sure that we understand that the rigid body simulation and adds physics. And so if we play this, you'll see it falls straight down. If we add in anything underneath it, it will interact with that as well. Let's go ahead and add in a plane so R Cube doesn't fall straight down forever. So let's press shift a go to mesh and then play. I'm gonna press us to scale up the plane, and then I'm going to drag it below the cube right here. So I'm gonna price G Benzie and drag it down. So it's underneath the queue, and actually, I'm gonna hold shift and drag everything up, surprised G and Z and drag everything up and so we can actually see it next. All select the plane right here and make sure you're on the physics panel and turn on rigid body. Now, if we come down here and press the play button, you'll notice that they both fall to fix this so that the plan right here stays. We need to change the type from active over to passive well passive does is it enables whatever object that you said it too passive to remain static but still interact with the simulation. So now once we play this, we hit the play button. You'll see the cube falls down, but the plane stays where it's at. So those are the different types of rigid body. We have the active, which has physics, which has gravity. And then we have the passive, which stays exactly where it is next. Let's go ahead and select our cube right here and move on to the settings. The first option that we have here is the mess. This is basically the weight of the Cube. Right now it's set to one kilogram. If you want to change this, you can go ahead and click on this value and change it to whatever you like. If you're from the US and you want to use pounds instead of ah, the metric system, you can go over to this option here. This is the scene panel, and underneath units, you can set the unit from metric over to Imperial. Now, if we go back over to the physics settings. You can see that this cube weighs £2.2. I'm gonna go ahead and switch back over to the metric system. Since that is the default in blunder, and now we can see that it's back to one kilogram. Let's go ahead and duplicate this cube and see how the weight interacts with the different objects. So what I'm gonna do is press ship D, then Z in drag it upwards, and then I'll move it over to the right just a little bit. So breast g and the axe and move it over to the right for this one. I'm going to set the weight to a value of 10. And now, once we play this, we can see it goes like that, and it pushes that other cube out of the way because this one weighs a lot more. Let's go ahead and drive this up to, let's say 30 and then we play this and you can see it completely crushes that cube and just forces it underneath the plane. So that is how the weight value interacts with the different scenes sends. This one weighs only one, and this one weighs 30 this one is a lot heavier. It's 30 times heavier, so it just completely crutches the one underneath. I'm going to go ahead and delete this cube and then select this one underneath the mess we have dynamic and then animated. Let's talk about dynamic first. What this will do is it will enable the active object to remain static, just like it was impassive. The differences between passive and dynamic dynamic You'll be able to animate this value, So if you want your object to remain still for a couple frames and then have physics after that, you can do that here. If this was set to passive, you wouldn't be able to do that. It would just remain passive for the entire animation. So let's go ahead and I'll drive this cube up in the uncheck dynamic. And then I'll hit the play button. You'll see. Nothing happens, but if I turn this on, you can see it falls down. So that is what dynamic does. It just enables you to stop the animation or a resume it wherever you like to animate different values, you can hover your mouse over them and hit the I key. Let's go ahead and do that real quick. So I'm going to uncheck dynamic. I'm gonna hit I. Then I'm going to play this for a little bit. Then after 50 I'm gonna hit the I key one more time, then go to the next frame. So come down here, go to the next rain frame 51 hit that check box and then hit I. And so now, over one frame, it's gonna have physics. So let's go back and then we'll press play, and then you'll see. Once it reaches 50 it falls down. So that is what you can do with Dynamic. And that's just a very basic way to use this option. And underneath that we have the animated option. If your cube or whatever object you have selected has some animated values, this will enable you to use that in your rigid body simulation. Let's go ahead and delete the cube and then pressure. They will add in another fresh que and then all shifty this press X and move it along. So we have two different cubes right here. I also liked this one and go to the region. Bonnie, turn it on next. All selected this one. And also turn this on for the rigid body simulation. Now, with this cube over here, I'm gonna hit the I key and click on location. So now we inserted a location key frame to this. Cute. Now, if we go to frame 20 so it's come down here and go to frame 20 by typing that in, then I'm going to brush G and then X and move it along. And you might notice that you can't do that. It just snaps back to its original position. That is because we need to turn on Animated first before you can move it. So make sure that is on, and now we can move this to wherever we like, So I'm gonna go right about there. Then I'm gonna hit I and go location. So now if we play this by hitting the space bar, you'll notice it has physics. It has animated values, and it hits this cube out of the way. So that is what the animated value does. It enables you to have physics on your object, but still being able to animate where it's at and with key frames. So there we go, guys. That is the first video. In the next video, we will talk about the collisions 6. Collision Shapes: Hello, everybody. And welcome to another video. In this video, we're going to be talking about collisions with the rigid body simulation. Right now, I've created a lot of different objects right here. And each of these objects have a different collision collision box. So basically, you can see that the one over here which has a box collision. This is going to be the collisions for this object. Let's go ahead and select this cube up here. And this is the one that will be testing underneath the settings. We've talked about this in the last video. We have the collisions. Here is where we set the collision bounding box of the rigid body simulation or in other terms where the objects will actually interact with the rigid body. We can see a lot of different options right here. The defoe one that is selected is Convex hole and we'll talk about that in just a second. The 1st 1 will go through is box over on the right, we can see what the box collision is doing. It's basically taking whatever mess that you have selected. If you change this to a box mess, it'll apply a virtual box around your mesh. So if you have a complex much like this, this is the monkey head. It's going to take a cube, go along the top, go along the bottom, just it'll surround it in a box and it will be as close to the mesh as possible. So let's go ahead and grab this cube over here. I'll press G and X and move it over. I'll go into front view by pressing one on my number, pad and all. Just place it right about there. So even though this is a pretty complicated mesh, it's going to act like a box around it. So if I press play, you'll notice it hits that that edge right there and just folds over. It doesn't even touch the mess. This is just to represent the collision over on this one. I went ahead and switched it around. So this object is actually the rigid body, and this object is acting as the collision. So I'm gonna go back, go to top view. So, like, this object here and place it over top. I did this so you can actually see what the collision is doing. So if I select this object right here, which has the rigid body simulation. We can see the shape and set to capsule. If I play this, you'll notice it doesn't interact with the Cuba at all. It just falls down and then hits that capsule just like that. So this object, even though it doesn't have any physics, it's just representing what the bounding box is looking like. Don't think that this is actually interacting with the mess. It's only a representation of the bounding box. So there you go, even though this is a cube with four birdies and underneath. Since we set it to capsule, it's taking the average safe and applying a capsule inside it. The next one is Sphere, so I'm going to bring Monk you over here, and this one is pretty self explanatory. I select this cube right here. We can see that it's set to sphere, so it's basically just applying a sphere inside it just like this. And if we play this, you'll see it goes through the mesh but interacts with the sphere underneath. If I select this fear, you'll notice it has no physics. It's only this one right here. The rest are pretty similar. We can see here the cylinder. So this is our rigid body simulation, but the the but the bounding box will be just like this object. Here. It's going to interact with this cube as a cylinder. The one over here is basically the same thing, except it's a cone. So here we have the rigid body simulation object. But since we said this to a cone shape rather than a cube shaped is going to interact like this Cube is actually a cone. The next one we have to talk about is the convex hole. This one is the default whenever you apply rigid body simulation. Basically, you can think of the convex hole as shrink wrap or wrapping paper going around an object. So if it's a pretty complicated object like this monkey head, I'm gonna go into front view. It's going to basically wrapped around the mess right here, so I'm going to scale this out until it reaches the ears right about there. So basically it's going to wrap around the object, and once it reaches the ears, is going to cut across right about here, or so come down, come over, cut across here up and just like that shape, and it's going to do that around the entire mesh. So I kind of did it along the edges right here. You can see it kind of wrapped around this way underneath here. You can see it's not going to interact with this. It's just gonna go across. So this is just basically a very rough draft of what the collision box will look like again . You can think of it as a shrink, Gramps. So it's just wrapping around the mesh. And finally, we have the mesh. So if I come over to the shape we can see the last one under here is mesh. You're going to want to be careful when using a mess for the shape of the collision object , because it will take a lot to calculate exactly what it is you can get away with. Using a cube as just convex, whole or box. Those air, the simplest to calculate, and it would be really fast. So whenever you can use convex, whole or use box. But if you need to use mess just like this object here, it's pretty complicated. Whenever you have a complicated object. Definitely use mesh, or it's gonna interact with the simulation a little bit weird. So what mesh does is it takes the exact size of your mesh. It takes the edge is the faces and everything calculates it to be exactly the same. So here we can see this is the representation of the collision box. It's exactly the same as the mesh. If we select our cube, come over here and then we press the space bar or click on play. You'll notice it interacts with the monkey had exactly how it would in real life. So it comes down. It hits right there. It hits the i r the eyebrow and then goes down. So there you go, guys. That is all of the different collision boxes we can see here. Box capsules for your cylinder, cone, convex hole and mesh. Those are all of the ones that you will need whenever working with rigid body simulations. Again, keep in mind that messed. It takes the longest to calculate, so whenever you can try to use convex Hole or the box, and those will be good in the next video, we will go through the rest of the settings 7. Rigid Body Source: Hello, everyone. And welcome to a new video. In this video, we're going to be talking about the source. Basically, the source is how the rigid body simulation interacts with armatures with modifiers and anything that deforms the mess. Right now it's set to deform. So it's gonna take any modifiers that we've added in the deformed category and apply that to the simulation. If you don't know what I mean. I will show you if we go over to the modifier tab, which is this little wrench icon? Weaken, Select this Right now, I've applied a displacement modifier to our object here. Before we get into this, though, I wanna show you guys that this one here is set to passive This object here and the one above it is set to active, so it's going to interact with this queue. But this cube is not going to move next. Let's go back over to the modifier tab and open up the ad modifier menu. Here we can see all of the different deformed modifiers that we comply. We can see armature, cast curve, displacement. All of these will interact with this simulation. If your source is set to deform. If I cook on this, you can see there's three different types of sources we have the base, the deformed and then final. Deformed is the default one, and so we'll talk about that one first. So with this one selected, if I hit play, nothing's going to really change. This is gonna fall straight down, right on the Cube. If I enable this modifier that I've added this displacement modifier, I turned that on. You can see it totally makes the mesh like crazy, and I hit the play button. You'll see it interacts with the mesh and it falls straight down. So that is what deformed does. It takes the modifier that we've applied and applies that to the rigid body simulation. Now, if we change this back to base, it's going to take that original base mesh and use that as the collision object. So if I go back and I hit play, you'll see it interacts with the cube. But it doesn't interact with the modifier. It actually just goes right through it. So it's taking this base cube right here and applying that as the collision, the last one that we have to talk about is the final. So what I'm gonna do to show that one? I'm going to delete this cube and then I'll go back hit, shift a adding another cube and then go rigid body. I'm going to set the type two passive so it stays where it's at. Then I'm going to set the source to final. Now, over in the modifiers have I'm going to set this to a subdivision service modifier, and I'm going to set the view up to two. So now we have a sphere like cube. And now if we press play, you'll see it interacts with the cube quote unquote cube or sphere, just like it would if this was applied. So that is what the source does. It takes all of the modifiers, all of the deformed, whatever, anything you've replied to your mesh and uses that as the collision. If I set this back to deform, it's gonna just interact with this cube just like it would with without the modifier. So I press play, you can see it just falls down and doesn't interact with it. But if I set this to final, it's gonna take into account that modifier and then use it as the collision. So now if I play this, it wraps around this fear just like that. 8. Surface Sensitivity Collections: Hello, everybody. And in this video, we're going to be talking about the surface response, sensitivity and collections. The last three settings that we have down here. Let's go ahead and open up the surface responses and check out what these options are. We have friction and we have bounciness. You can already kind of figure out exactly what these things do. The friction is just how slippery the mesh is, and then the bouncing. This, of course, is how how bouncy it is whenever something falls on it. So here I'm going to set the mountainous all the way up to one on both of these objects. This plane is just a passive plane. This cube is the active object with the bounciness set to one. So if I play this, you can see it hits hits, the plane starts bouncing around and they're Rico. We can actually see it. It looks pretty funny. So that is what the bounciness does. It's pretty pretty easy to understand. It just makes the mash bounce. I'm going to set this back 2.5 for both of these. So I'm just like this 1.5 and then for the friction I'm gonna turn that all the way up to one, and then I'm gonna turn this one all the way up to one as well. Next to really demonstrate this, I'm going to select the plane hit are then why? And rotate it a little bit. Then hit the back so it the cube is at the top. So now we're at an angle. If I play this, you can see the Cube is right there and it sticks to the plane just like that. If I go back and I set the friction all the way to zero on both of these objects, the cube will hit and then just slide all the way down like it was on ice. So that is what the friction does. It just enables you to ah, have friction on your mesh so it can stick to it or slide around the sensitivity. What this will do, isn't it enables you to set an exact margin of how close you want the objects to interact with each other. So if I turn this on weaken, set the margin right here. If I go with something crazy like a one, for example, so one meter and I hit the play button. You can see this cube has a very, very large collision margin. So it's It's all the way down here. You can see how big it is. It's one meter, and how you can figure that out is the in blender, you can see the green units. This grid unit here, all the way down is one. And so if I said that, too, one is gonna interact with this as one, and you can't go any higher than one. So if I try to set this to two meters, it's going to snap back to one. If I go 0.5, so it's 1/2 a meter is going to stop right about here. So if I press play, you can see it stops right where my cursor is. Halfway down one grid unit, the lowest you can go with the margin is zero meters. So if I said this to zero and I play this, you can see it comes down and then it's exactly where the plane is. It's just right up against it, and you might be wondering why you would never use this at zero. That's because blender sometimes has a hard time calculating exactly where the mesh is. So you wanna be careful if you said this to you zero because you might have some clipping or there might be some other issues with your simulation, you always want a small gap between every object. So my recommendation is that this 2.1 our 0.4 somewhere around there. So let's go with 0.1 or so and then go back and play this and you can see this actually might be a little too much. So let's go at 0.4 and enter. I think that's actually the default margin, and if we play this, we can see it's very close. But if we zoom in here, you can see there's a small gap between the plane and the cube. The last settings that we'll discuss in this video is the collections. Here is where you can set where you want the objects to interact with each other. If you only want them toe, interact with collection one or two or three or four, you can set groups of rigid body simulations. Here we can see a rigid body simulation. This plane and this cube right here are on collection one. This cube right here is in collection to and this cube is in collection three. So if I play this, you can see they all interact with each other. And that's because they're all on collection one. If I grab this cube here and changed the collision group to collection to it's not gonna interact with anything because that is the only object in collection too. So if I play this, you can see it goes right through and just fall straight down. If I select this plane right here, change the collision group to two. Now this cube will interact with this plane since they're both on the collection to on our collision. If I play this, you'll see that cube falls underneath. This cube will also fall underneath, but this one will stay where it is. And there you go. So that is the basics of the collection. You consent groups that you want to interact with each other if you want. One group of rigid body simulations didn't interact. But you don't want them to interact with another group. You can do that here in the collections 9. Rigid Body Dynamics: Hello, everybody. And in this video, we're going be talking about the rigid body dynamics over on the right side. You can access the dynamics by opening up this panel right here. And there are a couple different options that will go through. The personal is that will do is the deactivation. So if I click on this deactivation, what this will do is it will deactivate the objects once they stop moving. This will help, especially if you have a ton of objects in your scene. You don't want them to be. You don't want all of them to be simulating. So turn this on to help give your computer a little bit more memory to work with. Underneath that, we have the start activation. What this will do is it will enable an object to not activate during a rigid body simulation unless another object touches it. So, for example, I'm going to select this cube here and turn on start the activation. So now, once I play this by hitting the space bar, you can see it doesn't move until this cube touches it. I'll play that one more time, so this one stays where it's at and then once it hits it, it falls down. So that is what the start the activation does. Underneath that we have two different values, and I could not figure out exactly how these work. But basically what I read online is the linear velocity. If the object is going slower than the velocity that you set here, it will remain deactivated. Same for the angler, which is the rotation. So if an object is spinning and it's going slower than this value here, it will deactivate the object. I could not get this to work in a scene, though, but from what I read online, that is what it does next. We're going to talk about the dampening, translation and rotation. Here. I created a basic scene where this cube comes over and hits this one and sends it flying across the plain. Now what the dampening does is it will dampen the velocity and the rotation of an object. Let's go ahead and play this real quick and see what it looks like so you can see the cube kind of flies out this way and comes to a stop. Now if I select this cube and turn the dampening of the translation, which is the movement all the way to one. And then we play it one more time. You can see it just barely moves at all and just completely stops. I'll go maybe a little bit lower. Let's go like 0.8 or so. I play it and then you can see it comes to a stop very quickly. Same for the rotation. So let's go back 2.5 on the translation and the rotation. I'll drag all the way up to a value of one. Then what I'll do is I'll go. I'll hit back. So it restarts animation and I'll move this cube along the Y just a little bit. So this this cube hits it and makes it rotate. So now if I play this, you can see and barely rotated at all. That's because the dampening is all the way up. Let's bring it all the way down to zero and see what happens. And there you go. You can see it spins around, so that is what the dampening does. 10. Rigid Body Panel: Hello, everyone. And in this video, I wanted to talk about the rigid body panel underneath the object menu. If you don't know where this is, it's up by this menu here, underneath object rigid body, and there's a lot of different options that we can apply. The 1st 1 is on active and add passive. So this means if you have multiple objects selected and you click on that, every single object that is selected will now have an active or a passive rigid body simulation. So I'll just duplicate this cube a couple times just by hitting shifty and then also like every one of them. Click on object, rigid body and then I'll click on Add Passive. Now, as you can see here, every object now has the active active settings over the physics. Now Vice elect passive. It will do the exact same thing, except it will change it too passive. Over here, we have removed, so this will remove every physics that you have. Click on that now. Each of these cubes do not have the rigid body simulation. The other options that we have is changed shape right here. And so if I select a couple of these cubes right here and I go rigid body and active. And then we can see the shape here is convex whole. If I come up here and go rigid body change shape, I can. Then so life with shape, I want to be the collision. So if I click on Sphere, these will now have a sphere collision shape and you can see it's changed over there. This one also has fear. And then this one has this fear as well. The next one that we have here is calculate mass. And if I select this you'll see a huge menu with a lot of different materials. Concrete, charcoal, grass, gold right here. Granite, gravel. All of these different materials that come from the real world. It will calculate the size and then applying the mass or the weight to that object. So, for example, if I still like the gold, gold is very heavy. If I click on this, you can see that this cube right here now weighs quite a bit. If I press end, you can see the dimensions. So this is a two meter by two meter by two meter solid block of gold, and you can see how much it weighs right there. It will also apply that same weight to this object here and this one Over here, you can see they're all that same gigantic weight copy from Active. This will copy the settings that you have for every single object and apply it to your active object. So you're active. Object is the one that has the yellow outline around it. If I still like this one, you can see this one now has an orange outline. It's still selected, but this object here is our active object. So if I select this one and I can change like the sensitivity margin, maybe I want to change it to mesh all change it to collection five for the collisions. And then if I go over to object, rigid body copy from active, this object should now have exactly the same settings as the one over here. Underneath that we have applied transformation. What this will do here. I'll play this role, click and I'll show you. So if I played a little bit thes objects fall down. Now, with this one selected, I'll go up to object rigid body applying transformation and it will take that location into account and actually place that cube there for the start of the next animation. It keeps the rigid body a simulation, implying, So if I play this, you can see it started from down there rather than up there. And finally we have baked two key frames, and in a later video we talked about this a little bit more. But basically it will take your objects animation data and then apply a key frame for every location. So if I click bait to key frames and I just go with, let's say 40 just be evil but smaller hit OK, It will apply every single location on a key frame down here, and now we can use different simulations, like the fluid or the smoke, or something like that, and it will work a little bit better some of the time. The rigid body simulation doesn't work with other simulations like fluid or smoke, so doing this will allow you to have your key frames and to allow you to interact with the other simulations. And finally we have down here connect. You can connect to different objects together using a constraint. And in a later video we will actually go into depth what the connect button does and how constraints work. But that's it for this video. This panel right here is very useful, and I highly recommend you use it if you're using a lot of objects in your seat. 11. Rigid Body Constraints P1: Hello, everyone. And in this video we're going to be talking about rigid body constraints. Now, rigid body constraints are a way to limit the motion or rotation of your rigid body simulation. And if you're familiar with object constraints that's located here, you can limit the location, rotation, all that stuff. It's very similar to that. And in this video will be going through the 1st 4 different rigid body constraints. And in the next video, we'll finish them out to add a rigid body constraint to your simulation. What you need to do is select one of the objects that you want to add it to. In this case, I wanted to add in this case, I want to add it to this cube right here. Then, after you have applied your rigid body simulation, all you have to do is cook on Richard body constraint and then set the type that you want. And like I said in this video, we're gonna be talking about the 1st 4 And in the next video, we'll talk about the last four. The 1st 1 that we have here is fixed, and it's basically exactly how's it how it sounds an object is fixed to another object and it won't separate. They'll be just stuck together. In this case, we have two different cubes right here. And I want this cube to be stuck to this one. So to do that with this one selected, I'm gonna go underneath the objects, click on the eyedropper tool and select this first cube, which is the one that we applied. And then the second Cube is this one right here? So you can see there is a small line that was just added between these two cubes. That means that they're now fixed together. Now, if I play this by hitting the space bar, you'll notice that they stay exactly together just like that, and they fall down. If I undo this second cube here and I play it, you can see it doesn't work. It just fall straight down. But if the constraint is applying to both of the objects, then they'll be stuck together. Looks like I need to actually apply it to you. This one. There we go. And then I played again and they're stuck together. Above that, we have a couple different options enable you can disable a constraint. If you want a like halfway through a simulation, you want their constraint to break. You can do that by animating this value here, disable collisions. Basically just how it sounds. It'll disable the collisions in the rigid body constraints. Breakable is an interesting one. What this will do is if enough pressure is applied to the constraint, it'll break. So, for example, I'm just gonna lower this plane here a little bit. And so this cube will fall down and I'm going to select this. I'm going to turn on breakable and set the brake threshold. You can set that here to one, so just a small amount of force will break the constraint. So now if I play this boat, it breaks a constraint. And now this one falls down below that we have the override iterations. What this will do is it will give your simulation a couple more steps so that it will process a little bit better and the animation looks smoother and there won't be any issues with clipping. This just helps to get a more accurate simulation. The next constraint that we have to talk about is the point, constraint and here. I've created a very similar scene where we have two cubes. I'm going to select this cube, and I'm going to apply a rigid body constraint with the types. At two points Point is just basically a rope tied between two different objects. And now, if I still like this first Q by clicking on the eyedropper tool, Select that Cube then selected this cube and then I hit the play button. You'll notice that it's falls down and it's acting like a rope between the two objects. Then, of course, over here we have the same options. The enable the disabled collisions in the breakable. These options here are for every single constraint, so we don't need to talk about them every single time. The next one that we have to talk about is the hinge and the hints you could basically think of that as a door. So here I have to set up a quick basic seen. I have two cubes and then I have a cube right here, which is animated. This cube from frame one goes to frame 20 and it moves across as you can see there. So now what? We're going to do is set up a rigid body constraint between these two cubes right here, and it will be a hinge. So the 1st 1 I will select is this one. Here I'll go rigid body constraint and set the type over to hinge. Next. I'll just select the first cubes so quick on the eyedropper tool. So like cubes years, therefore, then I was like this cube right here. Now, if we play this, you'll see that it moves over just like that. But it's sliding all over the place so you can constrain the rotation by clicking on this Z angle, and here is where you can set it up. Currently it's at negative 45. So this cube or probably end up being around this angle. So if I play it, you can see it stops right about there. If I said this to negative 90 it's going to go 90 degrees. So if I play this year 90 degrees just like that and then it stops and then the same thing is for the upper, which is in the positive direction. So if this cube is coming from this way, it would stop around here at the 45 then it would stop at the 90 degree angle here if it was moving this way. If we go up to negative 3 60 it's gonna go all the way around and then end up back here. So we'll play this and you can see it goes all the way around and then stops right there Now, using the hinge with these two objects, There's not a lot of control we can't really set where we want the hinge to be at. And that's just not very good. So what we can do to fix this is add in an empty object. So I'm going to go ahead and get rid of this rigid body constraint. Then I'm gonna press shift a an ad inning empty, and then I'm going to go arrows so we can see the direction. And I've put it right in between these two cubes and this is going to be our hinge now. So I'm going to make sure it selected go rigid body constraint set the type over to hinge. And now I will select both the cubes. So the 1st 1 also like this and 2nd 1 right there and If we play this, you can see that it goes all the way around just like that. And this is where our hinges. Now, currently, it's just going through the other objects. So we fix that we can select R Z empty right here, click on Z angle and set the rotation. Maybe we can go with negative 1 70 and then if we play this, you can see it stops right about there. Now, using an empty is a lot better. So now you can rotate the objects. So if you want a hinge to go along the x access or the why you can do that So I'm gonna select all of our objects right here, go into front view by pressing one. Then I'm just gonna hit our and rotate it 90 degrees. You can snap the rotation by holding command or control, and I'm going to snap it to 90 degrees. Then if I move it right into place and then I hit the space bar, we can see the angle of it is now going up rather than going to the side. So using an empty is a lot better when using the hinge constraints so make sure you do that whenever you use this. The last one we have to talk about in this video is the slider. Now the slider is basically exactly how it sounds. It takes one object and slides it across a certain access. So here we have a scene where this Cuba's animated once again, and it hits this one and flies off, as you can see there. So let's go ahead and add in the rigid body constraint. So I'm gonna come over to the right side, added in and set the type over to slider. The 1st 1 is going to be this cube here, and the 2nd 1 is going to be this other cute. Now, if we play this weaken, see, nothing is really happening, and that is because we need to turn on the X access. Once we do this, we can see that it slides over just like that and it's going across the X. These two values control where the interaction is. Currently it's at negative one meter. So if we bring this lower to like negative three, it should come a little closer, as you can see There, it actually hit the Cube like that, and then this one is for how far it will go out. So if I also set this to three meters, it should go a lot further. There we go. Let's try, let's go with actually 10 meters and then we'll play this one more time. And there you go. You can see it went out a lot farther. Doing it this way, though, does not give us a lot of control over the direction and where it actually hits. So my recommendation is to use an empty object once again, just like we did with the hinge and so you can rotate it if you wanted it to go along the Y access or the easy access. You can do that with the empty object just by rotating it. So that's it for this video. In the next video, we will take a look at the rest of the constraints the piston generic generic spring and motor 12. Rigid Body Constraints P2: Hello, everyone. And in this video we're going to be finishing out talking about the rigid body constraints . There's four left, and in this video we'll talk about the rest of us. The next one that we have to talk about is piston. So how to enable the piston is we need to select both of our cues right here and a fast way to connect them to add an average of body constraint is to go up to object down, too rigid body and then click on connect. This will connect both of them. And if we select the empty that has been added, we can see the first and second cube already in place and the type we can change over to piston Piston is basically the slider constraint. But you can also rotate it while you're sliding it. So here I've created a simple animation. This cube comes down this way and hits this one. So if I play it, you can see it rotate, but it also moves around. So if we take a look at the options here we have the X angle here we can limit the rotation . So if we only Ron, it to rotate to, like, 90 degrees or something. We can set that here. And just like the slider, we can change how far this object here will slide around. So if I click on this button, we can change it to be closer to this cube or if this one hits this one, we can set the amount that it will slide out. The next one we have to talk about is the generic. So to demonstrate this, I'm going to select both of these cubes, go up to object down to Richard body and then connect. Once we do that, we can select are empty here, change the type over too generic, and then we can see a lot of different options. You're probably familiar with these options here, Weaken. Set the limit of the X angle, the Y and the Z. And then, of course, we can set the limit to the linear as well, which is the movement. So I'm gonna turn on the X and the Y and set both of these two. Let's say to So this is not going to go two meters away from this constraint right here. It's going to stay within a two meter radius. So now if I play the animation, we can see that it's stuck and you can see it. Just hit the edge right there despite one more time, and it can't go past a certain point since we set those constraints over here. If I turn both of these off and play it, you can see it has no constraints, and it's just gonna fly off. You can also set the X angle, of course, just like I was talking about. We can turn these on now. If I play this, you can see that it rotated out of 45. And it's not going past that because that is the limit that we set over here. So you can think of the generic as basically just a movement constraint. You can set it to go a certain distance or rotate a certain distance. You can do that over here. The next one is generic spring, and this one is very similar to the one that we previously discussed the generic. But there's also another cool feature that the generic spring has. We have the basic settings over here with the constraints for the X, the wind, dizzy angle and the movement on the X and Y and Z. Let's go ahead and close that off. And the cool feature with the generic spring is this option Down here, the springs. This will enable you to have a spring on your cute and it acts just like a real spring in. Real life would act. So if I play this, you won't see anything at the moment, and that's because we need to enable it. So let's scroll down to the linear down here and turn on the easy access. Right now, the stiffness is at 10 and the dampening is at 100.5. If I play this, you can see what the effect is doing. It's just bouncing like this like it's on a spring. If I lower the stiffness down to a value of two, it will go a lot further. As you can see here, it's going all the way down, and then coming up, the dampening here just slows down the spring. If I turn this 20 it's going to constantly go up and down almost forever. So as you can see there it goes up and then it goes down just like that, and it's constantly doing this. If I turn the dampening all the way up, it's going to just, like, barely even move it all, as you can see here, so a value of 0.5 is pretty good for most scenes. You can also set a spring for the angular velocity if you want to. Let's say you have an object over on the slope side. Come hit this. You can have the spring rotate a little bit and then come back the other way. This option here allows you to switch between using blender 2.8 springs or blender 2.7. The differences between these two, as you can see there is the dampening, is capped at a value of one. Here, I can turn up the values way past one and go as high as I want to, so that is basically it for the spring. Let's go ahead and move on to the motor 13. The Motor Constraint: The last constraint that we have to talk about in this video is the motor. The motor is basically an engine that you can apply into two different objects. And one of those objects will go in a constant rate flowing in one direction. Or you can set it to rotate an object. It'll just constantly repeat emotion that you specify. So how to do this is we're going to select both of these cubes here. This cube is set to active, and it's basically just like a platform. This is a passive cube down here in this gear over here is active. What I want to do is I want this platform to move up at a constant rate, and then I want this gear right here to spin. So to do that, I'm going to select this cube holding shift, all select this platform, go up to object down too rigid body, and then click on connect with the empty selected. I'm going to set the type over to motor. And now if we play this, nothing happens. That is because we need to set up the linear and angular down here. I'm gonna be turning on linear and now if we play this, you can see it's moving that way. That's not where I want it to go Currently is going in the X access. So what we need to do is going to front view by pressing one on your number pad. Then you compress our and rotate the empty so the X is going straight up. Now, if we play this again, you can see it wants to go up. But since gravity is affecting it, it's going this way. So to fix that, we're gonna press end while making sure that our Cube is selected going over to the item and we're gonna lock the location of the X and the Y, and then locked the rotation of the X, Y and Z. So now the only motion that it can go is straight up. So now if we play this, you can see our platform is now rising straight into the air because that's the only location that it could go. So now that that is set up, let's go ahead and set up the gear. So I'm going to select the gear holding shift. I'll select that cube and then I'm going to go up to object down, too rigid body and connect. Select your empty over here and then set the type over to motor. And then since we're not gonna be using the movement, we go. We can go ahead and close that off. We're gonna be using the angular. So if we turn that on and see what this does, you can see it follows. And now it's moving at that angle. I don't want it to be going that way. So what I'm going to do is hit our and rotate the eggs, so it's going to straight up. So now it will move along the X going in a circle. Now we play this, we can see what it does. I don't want it to move. So what I'm gonna do is select the gear hit end and turn off the location for all of these objects. So it's locked. Then if I play this, you can see it's rotating exactly how I want it, Teoh. And while this is rotating, this platform is rising. So there you go. And now let's go ahead and look at the settings for the motor. Let's go ahead and still like this one for the platform and open up the linear. And here we can set the tangent velocity. This is the speed of how fast this will rise. If we set this up to a value of four and then play this, you can see it's rising and lot faster underneath the tangent velocity. We have a option for Max Impulse. Now, it took me a while to figure out exactly what this does, but I figured it out. It is correlated with weight. So if this object weighs more than what is set over here, it's not gonna be able to move it. It's just gonna be stuck. It's gonna fall down. The motor is not strong enough to lift it up. To demonstrate this. I'm going to lower this to a value of point to. And then I play. You can see it started out a lot slower, but it's still a too light for it. Teoh to break. If I lower this 2.1 now, if I play this, you can see it weighs too much. So it breaks the engine and it's not powerful enough to lift it. If I select my cube and I lower the weight by coming over to the mass. Let's go with half of the weight. Let's go 0.5 and then I play this You can see now it is strong enough to lift it up. So that is what the max impulse does. It controls how strong the motor is with the weight and all of that. You can do some interesting stuff with this. So, for example, you can have an elevator going up. If you keep adding different boxes or something inside the elevator, it will slowly, it will slowly lose its strength. And then when you add another box, hits it and then it falls down. That is what you can do with his option here. Same thing goes for the angular. If this Max impulses lower and this weighs a lot, it's just basically the exact same thing. So there you go, guys. Those are all of the constraints for the rigid body simulation 14. Rigid Body World: the last thing we'll talk about in this section is the rigid body world. What the Richard body world is is it enables you to bacon the simulation so you can go through every single frame that you have and just select them without having to replay the animation. Let's go ahead and do that real quick, so I'm gonna go to object and just add in an active object. Then we'll pressure day at in a plane will scale up the plane and just lower it. And then this will be just a passive plane right here. Just a basic simulation. Now, if we go over to this panel here, which is the scene panel, we can open up the rigid body world and see all of this stuff here. The first thing that will talk about is the collection rigid body world. Whenever you add in physics to an object, it adds it to a collection called rigid Body World. Now you can't see that in the outline. Er, but it is there to view it. You can go over to the object panel, which is this one right here. It has a little square. Open up the collections, and you can see this object has the rigid body world collection applied to it. You can add multiple collections and do different baking. And then if you go over to your seen panel, you can change the collection that you want. So if you have, like three different collections, but you only want to bake in the 1st 1 you can go ahead and select that here. Same thing for the constraints as well. If you have multiple constraints in multiple collections, you can bake a certain collection and leave the other ones unbaked. Or if you just want to bake everything whenever you add in a constraint, it will automatically put it into this. So, for example, if I just go rigid body, connect both of these, we can see that if I select this constraint, it's already applied a constraint rigid body collection right here. Underneath that, we have the speed, and this is the speed of the simulation. You can turn it up. You can slow it down. Do that with this option. I'll just demonstrate it real quick. So I'm just going to delete that constraint since we're not going to need it and then if I play this, you can see it falls down a very simple animation. But if I lower this beat, let's go with a value of 0.2. Then I play this. You can see it's falling down a lot slower. Sometimes when working with rigid bodies, you need very big objects. So blender treats it like very big objects, so it slows down. It makes it almost look like it's going in slow motion. So here, if you wanted it to be more realistic, you can turn this up to, like three. And the rigid body animation will go a lot faster and look more like real life. I'm going to send that back to one. The next option we have is split impulse. Sometimes when two objects collide, they almost go inside each other, and then when they separate, they just fly out into the void, never to be seen again. This helps with that issue, So if you turn this on and two objects collide and then they separate, it's going to really help to try to the limit the velocity when it flies out. If I hover over this, you can see exactly what it does. It reduces the extra velocity buildup when objects collide. This also lowers the simulation stability, and it slows down the simulation as well. So only use this when absolutely necessary, the steps per second. What this will do is it will just enable the simulation to be a little bit more accurate. Right now, it's currently at 60 steps for a second. If you set this higher, this simulation will be more accurate. But then again, it will slow down. Same thing for the silver if you have any constraints and you have some issues with colliding or they're the rigid body simulation is not working correctly turned this up, and hopefully that will fix your issue. Underneath that, we have the bacon cash, so if you want to baking your simulations, you can select any frame. You can do that. Here. You can set the end frame as well. Currently, it's a 250 long animation. If you want this to be higher, go ahead and set that here. But then you will also need to set that down here is well, bake that will just bake in the simulation, calculate to frame. So if you're at a certain frame over here, let's say 180 I go calculate to frame. It will calculate all of the bacon cash up to that frame that I selected current cash to bake Whatever is in your current baking cash that will bake in. So even if you change something like the speed, you can go current cash to bake, and it will bacon this cashier without taking that speed into account. Baykal Dynamics. If you have other simulations particle system load simulations, you click that every single simulation in your blender file will bake. Delete all bakes pretty easy to understand. It will just delete everything and then update all to frame. If you have multiple simulations, it will update all of them to the frame that you have selected. Update all the frame boom. We can see what it looks like underneath that, we have the field waits, weaken set a collection of fuel, dates that we want to if we have multiple scenes, multiple simulations and you only want one collection to interact with this scene that we have here, you can set that up here. The gravity if you turn that really low weaken. See that our cube is just kind of floating there. Turn it up. It falls down. Same thing for all of the other options here. If you have force fields, you can turn how strong those force fields are. You can turn all of them off and you consent them up. Exactly how you want down here. Another. The cool thing that I will describe in this video is the baking two key frames. So if we go up to object down too rigid body, we can see there's an option to bake key frames. What this will do is it will take your simulation and apply key frames for every single frame down here all the way to the end of the animation. I'm gonna be setting this and animation just to 50 to demonstrate this. And then I'm going to go up to object down, too rigid body and bake two key frames, then hit. Okay, If I do this, you can see our Cube now has 50 different key frames All along. Our timeline down here. If I select this plane here, we can see that it still has the rigid body simulation and there's no key frames, so it only applies it to the objects that you have selected. Now, if I play this, we can see it falls down and then hits this. Now you might be asking yourself why you would ever bake this two key frames. And that could be because if you use other simulations, it might not work together. The rigid body simulation works with some other simulations and dynamics and stuff, but a lot. A lot of the time it doesn't. So if you want your rigid body to actually work correctly with other simulations like the fire one, the fluid particle systems, you would bake your object to key frames. And then you will apply your other simulations so it actually interacts with it. So there you go, guys. That is the rigid body world. Thank you for watching. In the next video, we will create an obstacle course. 15. 1 Falling Cubes Array Modifier: Hello, everybody. And welcome to a new section in this section. We're going to be creating the render that you see on screen. Right now I'll be showing you how to add in Honore modifier. Do some simulating with the rigid body simulation and then will render it out in the Render Engine E V. This tutorial is pretty simple, so let's go ahead and get started. The first thing that we're going to do is scale this cube down, because if we were to add in Honore modifier right now, this scene would be very, very large. So let's scale it down To be about 1/4 of its size. Somewhere around there is perfectly fine. Next, let's go ahead and add in and around modifier. To do that, go over to this little wrench icon here and then click Add modifier and you should see the 1st 1 is a wreck. What array does is it just duplicates the object and pushes it in a direction that you set over on the right side. We have three different values here. This one is for the X. So if I drag this up, you can see the Cube is now further away. And then if I go to the count of three, you can see it just like that. This one is for the y, so it will move it along the y access, and then this one is for the Z. We need to first set this to 1.2 The reason we're doing a small gap in between each of these cubes is because we're going to be separating them into their own objects after we apply it. All of the array modifiers, if they were close together, is going to be a lot harder to separate them. So just having a small gap makes it much easier in just a few minutes. Now that we've done that, let's go ahead and drag this up to about nine or 10. Actually, let's go a little bit more. Let's go with 13 and then you're gonna hit. Apply now. We need to do that two more times, so let's go ahead and go. Add modifier and array now is going in the X access again. So we're gonna be setting that to zero, and then we'll set the wide down here to 1.2 in that enter here. We don't have to set the count to 13. Weaken. Go with something like nine. Let's go. Yeah, let's go with nine regard that looks pretty good And then one more time we can hit, apply and then array modifier just like this, said the X 20 And then you can hit tab a couple times to go to the Z one and then same thing 1.2 and then enter here. I'll drive this up to a value of seven. I think that is a lot of cubes and then hit. Apply. All right, so there we go. We have all of our cubes in our scene, but currently, if we go into edit mode, you can see they're all one object. So now we need to separate them To do this. I'm going to go over to the outline, er right, click and go new collection. Because once we separate these into its own objects, there's going to be hundreds of different cubes, and I want to make sure that they're in their own collection. Then I'm just gonna drag the cube over to collection, too. Now what we need to do is go into edit mode, and if you hit the shortcut P, you should see selection material or by loose parts. And since we separated them just slightly, we go by loose parts and they should all separate into their own objects. And as you can see here, we have a lot of different cubes. Now. Another thing to note is when we select one of the cubes, you can see the origin point is down at the bottom. And when we're working with simulations or rigid body simulations, having the origin point somewhere else is not really what you want. It might mess up the rotation, and when it falls down, it's going to look a little bit weird. So to fix that, I'm gonna go to collection to by hitting two on my keyboard. I'm gonna press a to select everything, and then you can right click or present W. If your selection is right, click, then go set origin origin to geometry. Once you do that, all of the cubes should now have their origin point at the center of each of these objects , which they do, and there we go. In the next video, we will create the simulation 16. 2 Falling Cubes Simulating: Now that we have all of our cubes and are seen, we're ready to start simulating to do this. I'm gonna hold shift and then one to bring back my first collection. There we go. And then I'm going to add in a plane for the ground surprise ship Day will add in a mesh and then plane scale the plane up pretty big. So it fills up the entire scene, and now we'll add a passive rigid body A to this plane, go over to the physics time down here, click on rigid Body and set the type over to passive. Now we'll do the same thing for all of these cubes. So I'm gonna go into front view crazy and go into wire frame, and then I'm just going to box, select all of the cubes de select the plane, and then de select the lamp. I'm gonna press G and move them up above and then are to rotate. You can rotate it at this sort of angle, double tap are and give it a random mutation, something like this. And so once they fall down, they're just going to scatter all over the place. Now that we've done that. We need to have an active object because currently, we still have the plane settings over here. So I'm just gonna hold shift and then select one of the cubes. Then click on rigid body and everything else should be good. We don't need to change the weight if you want to. You can change the friction down here, but I'm just gonna leave everything at its default settings. Once you do that, though, if we select another cube, you can see the rigid body has not applied to the rest of them. So to fix that, I'll just select him all one more time. Do you select the lamp? I'm gonna go rigid body. And then if you press f three to bring in the search bar, you can type in the word copy, and you should see copy rigid body settings. Once you click on this, every single cube that we have selected will have the rigid body simulation that we just created are the rigid body settings that we just created. And as you can see, blunder has stopped responding. So just give it a couple of seconds and it should work. Okay, We're back in Blender has stopped not responding. So now if we press play, you can see it starts to simulate, But it's going extremely slow. And if we wanted to skip to a certain frame, it just wouldn't work. So what we're gonna do is bacon this simulation so we don't have to sit here and wait for the whole thing to simulate. To do that, I'm gonna go over to this scene panel right here and open up the rigid body world And underneath the cash, we have an option to bacon the scene. Now, we don't need to Bacon 250 frames. We probably only need to bake in about 100. So I'm just gonna go with 120 just to be safe. Once you do that, you can hit bake, and it should bake in your scene just like this. And you can see it baked pretty fast. And now we can play this in real time and you can see all of the cubes just spread out just like that. And that looks pretty cool. So let's go back and view that one more time and not too bad. And I think I like how this looks at frame 52. Maybe a little bit more. Yeah. So 57 I think, will be the frame that we render our image in. So now that we've done that, let's go ahead and go to the next video where we will create the lighting and materials. 17. 3 Falling Cubes Rendering: in this video, we will finish out, are seen here by adding some materials lighting and then rendering out in E V. The first thing that we need to do is apply a material to this cube. And since we have them selected, we can go over to the material tab and they should already have the basic material in place . If you don't see this, what you can do is make sure all your cubes are selected hit control l and then click on materials and they will share all of the materials that you have next over. And this principled Shader you can change the base color to whatever you like. I'm probably going to go with a blue color, something like this or so and then to see what that looks like. I'm gonna president and go into rendered view. Make sure you're in TV. So come over to this scene panel and make sure the render engine is set to TV and you should be able to see what it looks like. Now it's set up the lighting, so select your land that you have in your scene. Go over to the lamp settings and change it to a sunlight. Right now, the strength is way too high. So I'm going to set the strength of this to a value of four. Then we can find the rotation that we like. I might just rotate it a little bit. Something like this. I think that will give us some nice, cool shadows. And now let's position the camera so you can actually see where we want to focus on. So I'm probably going to position the camera right about here and then to snap the camera to where I'm looking. I'm gonna hit control. Also in the num pad zero or command option zero on the Mac. Then what you can do is select the camera by clicking on the outline G Middle mouse button and then just drag it back. You can place this wherever you like, but I think probably around here will look pretty good. And now what we need to do is go over to the E V settings and change a couple things. First up, I'm gonna turn on Ambien inclusion. So we get some nice shadows in the corners. I'm gonna turn on. Let's see here. Color management underneath the Look, I'm going to go high. Contrast. I'm gonna turn on screen space reflections. We can actually see the reflections in the scene properly, and I think that's all we really need to do for these e v settings. Next, let's select the land that we have. Right here are the sun lamp. Go over to the lamp settings, open up the shadow and turn on contact shadows. And this will give us some really cool shadows underneath the cubes, as we can see here. Now, let's give the plane and material. So select the plane, go over to the material tab right here, and then click new for the base color. You can changes to whatever you like. I'm just gonna leave it as white and then I'm gonna turn down the roughness. So we get a nice reflection of the cuse. Something about a 0.1 or so that looks pretty good. And you can see the reflection there. Not too bad. And now, if you want to, you can add some depth of field to do this. I'm just going to select one of the cubes that I want to focus on. And then if you look over here. The cube is cube 10.776 And now if we select our camera, go over to the camera settings, Turn on depth of field now underneath the focus object. If we type in the word 776 we should see the Cube right here. If we click on this now, our camera will be focused on that. Cute. The F stop right here controls how much depth of field there is. If you go all the way down 2.1, you can see what that looks like. And then the higher you go, the more sharp your camera will look. I'm probably going to go with a value of one. So we do get some nice step that feel down here. But it's focused on this middle part, maybe even a little bit more. Something like that will look pretty good. Now that we've done that, we can go ahead and save our project, but hitting control us, then go up to render and then click on render and render image. Or you can see the shortcut is F 12. Once you do that, the render will pop up and it will run to pretty fast senses is Evie. And here we can see our scene. Now to save your image. What we need to do is go up to image and click on Save as or the shortcut is shift s. All right. There you go. That is the end of this section. Thank you for watching. If you learn something new or created your own image, I'd love to see it to make sure you post it in the assignment after this video. Thanks again for watching, and I'll see you guys in the next section. 18. Obstacle Course P1 Modeling: whole over. But And in this video, we're going to be creating the animation that you see on screen right now will be going through the modeling of the opposite, of course will be simulating it, adding in different constraints materials lighting. And then we will render it out. With this default cube selected, I'm gonna press s then see and scale it down Pretty small. As you can see right about there looks pretty good. And then we will go into edit mode, go into face Select mood. You can also do that by hitting three on your keyboard. One is for Verdecia select mode to is for edge and then three is for face select. So press three on your keyboard and then select this top base hit I to inset and dragon and a little bit then press you to extrude. This is going to be the platform which the sphere hits and then goes up. The next thing that will do is duplicate this going into front view by pressing one and then shifty on this cube and will place it up above, rotate to about a 30 degree angle or so somewhere around there and then what we'll do is delete this face so that this year will hit and then slide off. Go into edit mode and you can select this face holding shift. I'm going to select this one and then underneath that one as well. Press X and then delete the faces, then one on your keyboard to go into Verdecia select mode. And I will select all of those vortices right there. Make sure you have them selected. Make sure that when a stock that as well and I want to make sure that this is completely flat to do that, I'm gonna breast s x x twice. So it's going along the normal than zero and then enter then f to fill in the face Perfect . So we now we have a open spot for the sphere to fall out of. Let's go ahead and go back into front of you all rotated a little bit more. Then I will all dear place it down here and the difference between Alty and Shifty Alte will actually link it. So now if I go into edit mode, you can see these are both legs. If I do any changes over here, it'll do the same thing to this one. Press are than Z thin type in 1 80 enter. There you go. I'll place it right about there. And you can imagine this fear hitting coming down here and then falling again. The next thing that will add is a platform for the sphere to fall through. I'm gonna be adding in a plane, So shift a at in a plane g to move and will place it right about there with this plane selected, I'm gonna go ahead and go into edit mode, press e to extrude right about there. Looks pretty good. Then I'm gonna press shift e right click to make sure it's in the exact same spot, then asked to scale. I want to make this a pretty decent size somewhere around there. Looks pretty good. Then we'll go into edit mode and now we need to delete the middle To do this. I'm just going to go into face elect mode. So, like this face in the middle, I tiu inset and we'll drag it so that it's a little bit bigger than the original plane that we added. And then I'll press X and delete the face. Now, we could do the same thing at the bottom. But an easier way is just to delete this face. Actually, delete thes vergis. Ease down here, then press a and extrude. This will just go a little bit faster than actually trying to match the size. We can just delete it and then extrude the whole thing down. Double check that you have a small gap in between this plane and this plane and which we do . So we don't need to mess with that. Next, let's create the ramp to do this will be adding in a circle. Surprise shipped a go to mesh and circle. We need to rotate the circle 90 degrees along the X, suppress our x 90 and then enter. Move the plane over to the left right about there. Then go into edit mode. We could go into Verdecia select mode and delete 3/4 of this cute suppress B for bak. Select draw blocks around that Have and then draw a box around this quarter X and delete the vergis ease. We also need to scale this up right about there and then move it into place. Probably about that looks good. If we can imagine this, we're hitting and sliding out. I'm going to select this bottom Versi press E than X and drag it across. And I'm also gonna drag this up so it actually falls onto this platform now. Currently, it's just a completely flat plane to fix that, we need to add in some more geometry. So we'll go into edit mode, press A to select everything, then you to extrude. Then why toe lock it to the UAE access, and then we'll just drag it out a little bit to match the size of our platform. Then just move it back. There we go. That looks pretty good to me. Now it's completely flat as well. So to fix that, we're going to go into edit mode, select everything, then just extruded down. There we go. We have some thickness perfect. Now over on this right side, I want there to be a gear that spinning and then the platform will rise. But we need to actually have the gear be attached to something. We'll just do a basic you. So shift a out in a cube will move it along the Y drag it up. That looks pretty good right about there. And you can add some detail to this cube if you want to. But what I'll do just for the so you can go a little bit faster in this tutorial is I'll just select that top face Peter extrude than scale in words. Or you could just hit I and then e to make sure it again will drag it up than hit E right click skill outwards. Then e one more time. Just something like this. Just adding a little bit of detail in the middle. And finally I will go into three, which is the face select mode. So, like this front face I to inset and then e and we'll extruded backwards. Make sure you don't go past this back based, but just a little bit of a hole somewhere around there looks good. So when we add in the other cube, it's gonna be inside this one, and it's going to shoot out. Hit this fear and it's gonna fly and hit all of the boxes or the cubes over here. And I think that will look pretty good now that we've added in this basic course, Let's go ahead and create the tower. To do that, we're going to go to a new collection just to make sure everything is quite organized. Go ahead and collapsed this first collection, then right, click and click on new. We can name this collection tower because we now know that this is gonna be our tower collection and then press two to go to that layer. Now, you can have really long cubes, short cubes, whatever cubes that you want. I think I'm just going to go with a medium size. So I'm gonna add in a cube and scale it down, going to front view. And what I'll do now is scale this along the sea access, surprises S and NZ and skill it out. Probably around that size is pretty good. Since I want there to be a lot of different cubes falling all over the place, the next thing that we need to do is add in an array modifier. So to do that with the Cube selected, go to add modifier and array, let's go ahead and set the count to a value of three and then will drive this up to about eight make sure you have an even number or you're gonna have one extra, so make sure it's an even number. Then you can hit. Apply now. We need to do that again. So click add modifier array, said the X, which is that top value to zero and then the why? Which is the middle one to a value of three as well. And, of course, you can drive this up to a value of eight, so it has a square, then hit. Apply now to give this some variation. Let's go ahead and duplicate one row of these and place it on top while it's rotated. So to do that, I'll just go into edit mode. Ze wire frame B for Bak Select, and I'll draw a box around those those cubes right there. Then go in to front view shifty. Bring it up hard to rotate, and I'll rotate it 90 degrees and then just place it right on top. Make sure there is a small gap in between these two pieces, so about their looks pretty good. Then what we need to do is just duplicate this cell press shift e. X, and move it over now a fast way to duplicate what you just did. You can hold. Are you compress shift our and that will duplicate it two more times. That saves you sometimes. So if you're doing a task over and over and over again, just hit shift are in that will fix it. Next. Let's go ahead and box select all these but like that and it looks like we didn't select the under faces. So to fix that, I can hit control and then l and that will select all of the faces. Go back into front view and all shifty this. Drag it out along the Z, and then we'll rotate it 90 degrees. So hit our then Z than 90 and then enter. We'll go on the top you and just make sure it looks good and which it does. And then you can also just drive this down until there's a small gap in between these two. Cute. So drag it up a little bit right about there. Looks good now will press a to select everything Shifty Z will drag it up. So there is a small gap in between these two right about there looks good. Then we can do that one more time. So breast shift D Z and drag it up. You know what? I do want a couple more floors, So what I'll do is I'll just select it shifty and dragged the whole thing up, going to front view and just make sure that there is that it's even right there. It looks good. All right, There we go. We have our big giant tower now to make them all into their own individual objects will select both of them, go into edit mode, and in 2.8 you can actually go into edit mode with multiple objects, press A to select everything, go pee and then click on by loose parts. And then, of course, we need to set the origin as well. Some going to right click go to set origin origin to geometry, and there we go. Now let's bring back our first collection and put this in the right spot, so I'm going to press a to select everything. Then we'll go to collection one by holding shift and one. Right now it's way too big, so I'm going to scale it down and then move it over to about here. Okay, That was a long video. I know, but we have all over objects in our scene now, and in the next video, we can start simulating. 19. Obstacle Course P2 Simulating: Hello, everyone. And welcome to another video In this one, we're going to be adding in all of the rigid body physics, the constraints and doing all of the simulating with our obstacle course. So the first thing that we need is a sphere to actually go through this. So let's go ahead and add Bennett. Pressure Day will add in a mesh, and then it's Nuvi sphere. You can scale the UV sphere down to about 8.5, maybe a little bit lower, and then drag it up to the start of our course. So go into front view by pressing one on your number Bad G to move, and I'll just place it right above this first platform, and that looks pretty good. Now what we need to do is add physics to everything. I'm gonna go ahead and add physics to the tower in a later video because it's going to slow down our simulation. So I'm just going to go to collection one by hitting one on the top of our keyboard to get rid of that. Now, let's go ahead and add in all of the settings, so I'm going to select this first ramp, go up to object down too rigid body. And then I'm going to click. Add passive. Then I'm gonna hold shift, select everything that I want to be passive. So I want this ramped, impassive. I want this Teoh right here. I also want this one and I want this ring as well. So I think that's all the objects that I want to be passive. So then go back up to object in town, to Richard body and then add passive. We could have done that at the beginning, but it's okay. So now if we go over to the settings, each one of these should have the passive, uh, setting applied to it, as we can see here. But there's another thing that we need to do. We want to make sure the shape is set to mesh because on this one there's a little in dent . If it's set to convex hole, it's not going to take that into account. So we need to make sure this is also set to mesh. And an easy way to do that is to select all of your objects that you want to be mesh. Then make sure you have your active objects that has the shape as a mesh go up to object. Rigid body copy from active. Now, each of these should have the setting. As you can see here, shape is set to match, and that saves us some time. All right, there we go. Now I'm going to tweak some individual settings. First, off this ramp right here, I'm going to set the surface. Response the friction. I'm going to go down to a value of 0.3. So one, the ubi sphere actually hits it. It's gonna slide a little bit in land in this next. I'm going to select this plane right here. Click rigid body and make sure the it's an active type, which it is. Then I'm also going to do the same for this one. So make sure you have this object selected. Click on rigid body and make sure it's set to active. Now let's do the same for the UV sphere. So select Levi Sphere rigid body and then make sure it's just set too active. Perfect. Now let's set up the constraints. The first constrained that will do is this plane right here. So go ahead and select both of these objects. Go up to object down too rigid body and click on connect. Now, what I want is for this to be a hinge. So I'm going to select this empty right here, change the type from fixed over to hinge. Now, I think we also need to rotate it along so that the Z is pointing in this direction. So going to front view by putting hitting one on your keyboard and then are to rotate, I'm gonna hold control and snap it to 90 degrees. Now let's play this and see what happens. So I'm gonna hit the space bar to play our simulation, and we can see how this works. And you might get that it's stuck right there. So what you need to do is actually move your ramp up. Because, as you can see here, this is actually connecting with this ramp. So I'm going to move both of these up. So it's out of the way and then I'm going to restart, comes down, hits and slides through. You also might need to change the size of your ubi sphere if it's a little bit too big and might get stuck and but that is looking pretty good. Hits here comes down, slides through and then hits the ramp. Now another thing that I might want to do is add in a little bit of a railing to our ramp right here, because, as you can see, it just slides off. So what I'll do is I'll go into edit mode. I'll hit control are and I'll add in to look cuts, use the scroll wheel to add in multiple Lou cuts, Donald Press s and then why? And scale it outwards. And then what I'll do is also like those that ring right there. So I'm gonna select this face and just go up and I'm not hitting Alter because I don't want us like the underside. I only want to select that top and then I'll do the same thing on this side as well. Once you've selected it, go ahead and press e to extrude and then just extruded outwards. Perfect. So now let's go ahead and play this again and see if are you. The sphere slides off, so hits goes through and it stays in the in the rampart here, which is perfect. Now let's set up the constraints over here. To do that, I'm going to select this platform. Hold shift. And then I was like, this cube right here, go up to object down too quick effects, and then click on a wait, No rigid body. Then click on connect. Now the type is going to be motor, so let's go ahead and switch over to motor. Make sure you have the empty selected and then turn on the linear for the motion. Let's also add in a plane to Philip are seen. So I'm gonna press shift day at in a plane and I can't see it. And that's because I have this collection selected. So I'm gonna go ahead and delete that I'm gonna open this up, hit the period key to find where our plane is. It's this right here and just delete it by hitting the delete key. And then you can go ahead and hit minus two. Close all of your collections, then make sure this collection is selected. Shift a and add any plane. There we go. Now we can see it in our scene. I'm going to scale this up pretty big, then make sure that it's lower than our platform right here, which it is perfect. Maybe drag it up a little bit more right there. It looks good. Click on rigid body and set the type over to passive. And that's basically all we need to do now for the constraint. I'm going to select my platform right here, hit the n key and go underneath item, and I'm going to lock the location of the X and the Y and also the rotation, just in case it rotates by accident. Then, if we had the space bar, we can see what happens, and it just falls down and it's not moving. So what we need to do is have the X pointed upwards, and then it will move up so going to front view it are to rotate and then we'll rotate it upwards. Now, if we hit the space bar, it should looks like it actually went down. So it's actually invert this. It are and will rotate it all the way around. So the excess pointing downwards. Then, if we restart the animation hit play, we can see it goes up, but it's actually hitting this ramp, so I'll just move it over a little bit. And there we go. Now it moves upwards. Perfect. But I don't want it to move up when At the start of the animation I want this ups were to actually go inside before it moves up. So let's find out where it actually hits. So once it follows, goes through and right there. So at frame 1 50 let's go with 1 53 Then I wanted to start moving. So to do that, we're gonna be animating this tension value. So go ahead and select the empty set the tangent over 20 and then hit I on your keyboard to add in a key friend. Then go over to frame 1 54 Down here, you can click on that era, set the tangent up to one and then hit I one more time. Let's see what happens when we play this so it has a zero next to it. And once it reaches this, it should start going up and perfect. There we go. But it looked like, Yeah, this is set to convex. Also, make sure that is set to mesh. Let's restart the animation one more time. Perfect and then it goes straight up and then I want it to stop. At a certain point, it might be going a little bit slow so you can select the empty go over to frame. 1 54 will bring this up to two and then hit I one more time to add in a key frame. Let's restart the animation, see what it looks like whenever you're working with the rigid body simulations. A lot of it is just tweaking it and then playing it again. And so you find what you're looking for. So that is a good speed. And then I want it to stop at around 1 29 So right here. So I'm gonna go to 1 28 hit I while hovering over this value. Go to the next frame frame. 1 29 said this to zero and then hit I one more time, so it will stop right there. Let's check this out, and it should stop right there. Perfect. That's exactly what I wanted it to do. 20. Obstacle Course P3 More Simulating: there's a couple more things I want to add to our course. The 1st 1 is a gear down at the bottom right here. I want this to start spinning once this platform starts to rise. So to do that, I'm gonna press shift. They will add in a circle. And before you do anything, make sure the birdies account right here is set to 16 and you can open that up, click in on that little era, said it to 16. Then you can also said, the X rotation, which is this first value up to 90 and that is good to go. We'll scale this down, then go into edit mode and press F to fill in the face, press e to extrude, and we'll extruded outwards just a little bit. Then I'm going to select every other face going along this loop right here. So I'm gonna hold Ault and then select one of the faces right there and it will select the entire loop, then go up to select and then click on Checker de Select. And as you can see here, it selected every other one. Then what we need to do is come up to here and make sure it's on individual origins. What this will do is it will enable us to extrude our scale individually. If this was set to medium point and we press, you can see they're all extruding in one direction on gun control. See that. But if this is set to individual origins, it'll take each individual face and extruded out on the normals. So if I burst, you can see that effect. So I'm going to extrude it out just a little bit right there. Looks pretty good. And that looks like a gear to me. Then I'll scale it down. So I'm going to select the gear and then hold shift, select this cube here, go up to object, rigid body and connect. And we can see that right? Then we can see the empty is inside, which is perfect. Will set the type over to motor and then turn on the angular velocity right here. Go ahead and select your cube right here and then hit N and I'm going to lock it along the location. So lock all the locations and rotation except for the why. Because I wanted to rotate along the y just like this. And also you can turn on rigid body and just said it too. Yeah, we can leave the default settings. Let's see what happens if we play this and nothing is working and that's because we need to rotate this empty 90 degrees. So I'm gonna go see 90 and then enter. Then if we restart the animation and hit the space bar, you can see it is working. Now I want to animate this. So once the ups were hits right here and then starts to move up, let's actually figure out the key frames for our first empty right here. So it starts at 1 54 and then ends at 2 28 So what we need to do is go to the frame before it. 1 53 set the tangent to zero and then hit I while hovering over this next go to frame 1 54 Set the tangent up to one and then hit I again go to to 27 are to 28 right here. Hit I then go to to 20 to 29. Set this to zero and then hit I one more time. Let's see this in real time. So once it hits, comes down, falls through, hits here and then starts to move up. And then once it stops perfect, just like that. Now let's create a box to come out of here and hit the UV sphere. So I'm just going to add in another cube. We'll bring it up, scale it in a little bit, and just make sure that it fits inside this cube. It's skilled accordingly. Click on rigid body and make sure animated is turned on. Let's play this and see what happens. So once we once this goes up, we configure out when we need to keep running this and it stops right there. We also need to set the end frame up a little bit, so I'm going to go to 400 frames. And then we also need to do that for the rigid body world to go over to the rigid body world. Here in the scene panel underneath cash set the end frame to a value of 400 so let's go to frame to 50 will play it again, and at around 2 60 I want this cube to fly out, so I'm gonna hit I location go 20 frames ahead. So at to 80 I'm gonna hit G. Then why bring it out a little bit? I location. So now let's play this and see how that looks. We might need to tweak the key frames just a little bit, but let's check it out. That actually looks pretty good. But I also want this cube to look like it just full out, and then it crashes to the floor. So at frame to 80 when I'm going to do is turn off the animate. So at to 80 I'm gonna hit I while hovering over the animate value. Go to the next frame, uncheck this and hit I. Let's see how that looks. That does not look that good at all. So what we're going to do is actually fix this a little bit. First off, you can see that it's it's slow at the start, speeds up and then slows down right at the end. So let's go ahead and actually delete these key frames so we'll select our cube here, go to frame to 80 hit multi while hovering over the animate value, and then all tie it right there. So what we need to do first is actually fixed the movement of our cube. So open up a new window by clicking in the corner. We'll go over to the graph editor hit a to select everything click t include on linear. So now this will move at a constant rate. If we play this, you can see that it starts and ends the same speed. And that's what we want. Next. I'm going to actually uncheck animated at a certain point. So probably around. Let's go with, like to 78. I'm gonna hit. I will hovering over the animate Go one frame ahead. Uncheck this and hit I again. So now if we play this, it might look a little bit better and it shoots out and then falls down and you can see it crashes a little bit just like that, and that looks a little bit better. Let's go ahead and close those off. And in the next video we will work on the tower 21. Obstacle Course P3 Final Simulating: now that we've almost completed or course, let's go ahead and bring in the tower, which has all of the other cubes, and then explode the building. I'm gonna hold shift and to to bring in our second collection. So shift into their ago, and now it's at a rigid body simulation to all of these. Go into wire frame by pressing Z and click on wire frame and then box. Select every single cube here and make sure you have one as your active object. Do you select the plane, then click on rigid body? I'm going to set the weight of this to a value of 0.1. Then underneath the dynamics, I'm gonna turn on deactivation and then also start the activation. This means that these cubes will will not move until something hits it, which is what we want. If we were to play this right now, I think the cubes would actually fall down. Eso I'm going to turn this on so it won't move until the UV sphere and the Cube actually hit it. Next. We're going to go up to object down too rigid body and then click on copy from active and this might take a second to calculates. But now, once that is finished, every single object here will have the settings that we just put in. All rights were back, and blender is now responding. And we can see that every single object here and now has those settings. Now, let's find a good spot to put our tower. I'm gonna go into top. You busy going to wire frame and then box, Select all of them. Go into front view now and make sure they're sitting on the ground. Cell friends G and Z move them down a little bit right there. Looks pretty good. And I might move them back Somewhere around here, I think will be good. Now, let's play this and see what happens. And there we go. We can see them all crashing down. And that looks pretty cool for some reason, though. Like around. Yeah, right here. They all start to move, and I don't know why that happened. Okay? So after a little bit of time, I figured out why it was moving before the UPS were actually hits it. And it's because of the scale. So what we need to do is box. Select all of the cubes goingto wire framed by pressing Z and box locked them all and then hit control A and apply the scale since we scaled them down in the previous videos blunder things that it's still that big swinging to apply the scale. So we actually so blender knows where it is in the scene. I also selected the UV spear and changed it to three kilograms. So now if we play this, we can see what it looks like. Goes through, slides down. And once it reaches the top, these should not move until Thievy Sphere actually hits it. And there we go. That looks a lot better and they come crashing to the floor. Okay, there we go. We've created our simulation. In the next video, we will set up the materials and lighting 22. Obstacle Course P4 Materials: Hello, everybody. And in this video, we will set up the materials and the lighting. Now you can use whatever colors that you want for the materials. But I think I'm just going to go with, like, a colorful like blues and reds and maybe a couple of grains. Eso this ball right here. I think I'm just gonna go with a nice white color. I'll just go with the principal. Jader will turn the roughness down to a value of point to so that it has a nice, glossy look for the two rams. I'm gonna go with a blue color, so I'm going to delete that first color hit new. And whenever you're working with a lot of materials, it's always good to name them. So I'm just gonna call this one blue and set the base color to a nice blue somewhere around here. And then I will lower the roughness down to a value appoint one. So here we can see a nice glossy look. Then I'll just apply it to this one, which had already has also liked this ramp here. And I'll give it a red color. So hit new will type in the word red and then said the base color to a nice red color, something like this. And then, of course, the roughness will bring down to a value of 10.1. So, like this middle part, click the drop down menu and select the red material for the ramp. I think I will go with a great color. So click new set the base color to a grey somewhere around here and bring the roughness down to a value 0.1 again for the gear. I'll go with a black color. So select new, set the base color to black and then the roughness down once again. And we're gonna just keep doing this for the rest of the materials. For this one, I think I'll go with the white color, which is let me select my sphere and check which material is its material. 001 I'll just name this one white and then also like this cube here, Drop down menu, select white and for this one are here. I'll just use the gray color. So click the drop down menu. Select the gray color, and I also forgot to name this one. Soldiers type in gray and for the plane will use a white color souls like the drop down menu White then finally for the tower also liked one of them. I'll click on New and I'll give them a nice yellow tan color somewhere around here, something like that. And then, of course, the roughness. I'll drive 2.1. That looks pretty good. But if we select another one, you can see that this one does not have the material. So what you're gonna want to do is select someone that does have the material go into wire frame by pressing the Z. Then press B for bak select. Draw a box around all of the cubes, then hit control L. And then you'll see an option for materials. Once you click on this, every single cube will now have that material go over to the render engine and make sure you're using the E V render engine. Since we're gonna be rendering 400 frames, I want this to render pretty fast so we'll use the E v render engine. Let's see what this looks like if we go into render view to do that crazy and go into rendered view and here is our seen. Currently there's only one light source, so let's go ahead and select it, then go over to the settings and let's change it to a sunlight. Currently, the strength is way too high, so let's drag that down to a value of four that looks a little bit better. You can open up the shadow and turn on contact shadows. That looks pretty good. And then you can rotate this to wherever you like, so probably rotate it somewhere around here. Place is something like that I think will look pretty good. The strength might be a little high. Let's go with a value of three. And for the world settings, you can go over to the world sightings. Here. I'm going to drag this up to be like a a little bit of, ah, lighter color that looks pretty good. Then go over to the E V settings. Let's turn on and being inclusion, you can turn on screen space reflections, open up the color management and set the look too high. Contrast. There we go. That is looking pretty good. All right. I am happy with that result. In the next video, we will animate the camera 23. Obstacle Course P6 Animating the Camera: right. When this animation starts, I want the camera to be facing the ubi sphere. So let's go into front view, then press control Ault and zero on your number pad to snap the camera to be. Then you can select it, presage, eat a move and then we'll move it up. G Middle mouse button to drag it forward, and we'll place it somewhere around here. Let's go ahead and select our UV sphere and right click and go shade smooth. And then that's also add in a subdivision service modifier to do smooth it out even more. So go over to the modifier tab. Add modifier, subdivision surface and you can set both of you and the render to to. Now let's play the animation and see what we need to do so right about here. I want the Cameron to start moving down. So actually, all do a key frame right at the start, so I'll select the camera it I and go location rotation. Then we'll play the animation a little bit, and then deposit right about there will drag the camera a little bit lower. Then go I location rotation played a little bit more deposit there. We'll go even further right about there. It looks good. I location rotation and we'll play it even more once it reaches this part. I actually want the camera to snap to a different angle. So I'm gonna hit I location rotation, go to the next frame and then I'm going to G X, move it over this way a little bit, do Z, and then move it up Somewhere around here, you can double tap our and rotate it so that it's viewing this part. That looks good. Then hit I location rotation. You can play this a little bit until it reaches the top and I'll drag the camera up until it is in view with it. You know, double tap are and just move it a little bit. Something like that. I location rotation, then come down here and go to the next room, which is 2 45 in all. Position the camera so that it actually can see the tower so I'll press are twice. Actually, I'll just go into side view by pressing three. Then hit control old and zero to snap the camera. A side view G Middle mouse button annulled just dragged us back so we can view the entire scene just like this double tap are a little bit. Bring it up. Something like this, I think, will look good. Then hit I location rotation and then we can just leave it for the rest of the frames, and that looks pretty good. So now let's go ahead and view. The entire thing will hit space bar and you can see it follows. The UV sphere comes down here. That transition, I don't really like too much. So what I'll do is I'll bring the camera to that location at around this frame, so we'll drag this out. We can select these key friends by just box, electing him and move them back a little bit, so we'll check that transition out. It's still moving a little too fast, so what I'll do is I'll wait to about here to start moving the camera, so I'll drag this down, then hit I location rotation and then play it, and that looks a little bit better. Let's go ahead and view the whole thing, and that looks pretty good. I'm happy with that result, and so in the next video, we'll render it out 24. Obstacle Course P7 Rendering: So now that we have our entire animation done, let's go ahead and do some render settings. Go over to the render panel, which is this one right here. And I'm gonna be setting the render to a value of 50 so it renders just a little bit faster . I'm also going to go over to the output settings said an output right here. Make sure you do this. This is really important. You can set it to the folder that you have your blender file saved or wherever you like. You can name this by just typing in this bar right here, and I'm just going to call it obstacle course. Go. And then I'm going to change the file over to a movie file, open up the encoding and set the container to MP four. Once you've done that, you can go ahead and go up to render include on render animation. Also, make sure that you save your project before you do this. So hit control s then go up to render and then down to render animation. This will bring up a new window and it will start to render out our entire animation and put that movie file into the folder that you specify. Once this is done, we'll take a look at it. All right. Our render has finished. And to view it, you can go ahead and open up that folder and you the animation there or in Blender, you can go up to render and click on view animation. I want to do that. A window will pop up and will be able to see it. So there we go, guys, that is the end of this section. Thank you for watching. If you made it all the way to the end and created your own obstacle course, I'd love to see it. So make sure to post it in the assignment. You can link me a YouTube video or do whatever you want. Thanks again for watching and I'll see you guys in the next one. 25. Monkey Crashing P1 Cell Fracture: Hello, everybody. And welcome to a new section in this section. We're going to be creating the animation that you see on screen. Right now, I'll be showing you how to animate the monkey head, crashing through the wall, throwing the different parts of the cube all over the place, and it's gonna be a fun one. Let's go ahead and get right into it. This key right here is going to be our wall. So what we're gonna do is press s than why and scale it down to be a little bit thinner or somewhere around there. And then we're going to scale it along the X axis, suppress s, then acts and scale it out. You can scale the whole thing up to and then drag it. So it's sitting right on the grid floor. Something like that looks pretty good. Maybe a little bit thinner. And there we go. The next thing that we're going to do is enable a add on and then we're gonna be using that Add on to chop up are cute. So what we need to do is go up to edit underneath preferences in underneath add ons. You're gonna type in the word cell, and you should see a cell fracture at on right here. Go ahead and check that box and then exit. Now, if we breast f three and type in the word sell, you should see a cell fracture at on right here. Don't click on it yet, though. We still need to do a couple more things. The next thing that will do is use the grease pencil to determine where we want the cracks and the pieces to be so going to front view. And then if you hold the D key on your keyboard, you can start drawing on your on your three D c. And just like this, what we're gonna be doing is drawing a circle, drawing a smaller circle, maybe one more in the middle and then drawing some lines, like on the edges, something like this and kind of making it look like a son. And then maybe a couple of dots here and there. It doesn't have to be perfect to something like this. And then we'll be good to go once you're happy with what it looks like. You go ahead and press F three in type and sell and then click on Sal Fracture selected mesh. Also, make sure you have your mess elected, so select your cube Go F three and there we go. Once you cook on it, you'll see this man, you pop up and there's a lot of different options toe work with. Make sure you're using an imitation pencil when we do this because we're gonna be using the grease pencil that we just created. So said it to annotation pencil. Set the source limit to 400. Basically, this is the amount of pieces that Cuba will be broken up into. So said that to 400. The noise. We're gonna be setting that to one. This just help gives the piece is a little bit more randomness and everything else is good . The Rikers in this is the smaller pieces were gonna be setting this value to one, so there's going to be the big pieces. Then there's gonna be one level of smaller pieces. If you said this hired to there's going to be even more smaller pieces. But I don't think we need that for this scene. So I'm going to set that to one. The material I'm gonna be setting that to one. So the outside is gonna have one material than the inside where the pieces are is going to be another material. So set that to one and then underneath the collection, we're gonna type in one. So basically that means that all of the pieces are going to go into its own collection rather than the collection that we have set up here. This will just make sure everything is a little bit more organized. So once you do that, hit OK and it will start working. And as you can see here are Cube is getting broken up into, and blunder has stopped responding. So just give it a couple of seconds and then it will start to work. 26. Monkey Crashing P2 Animating: Okay. The cell fracture Adam has finished, and as you can see in the top right corner, it's put it into its own collection. Would go ahead and collapse that collection to make things a little bit more organized. And now I'll get rid of the grease pencil that we added. So to do that, you compress end and go underneath of you annotations and then just hit that little X icon right there and that will get rid of it. Okay, so now the next thing that will do is organize our collection just a little bit. So I'm gonna grab this collection here, this one, and drag it up to the scene, and then I'll drag this one above. So it's on the 1st 1 And so now if I press one, it will go to the collection, which has the cube, the camera and the light, and then two has our collection with all of the different pieces. Next, let's go ahead and add in the monkey head and the plane. Let's do the plane first. Suppress shift eight will add in a plane and then press s and will scale up the plane. Pretty big pressure day will added a monkey head next and will drive this up, then move it over to the right. So it's behind the wall. I might skill it up just a tiny bit. And somewhere around here is pretty good about two grid units from the wall. And now we're going to animate this monkey head crashing through the wall. To do that, I'm going to go to frame 20. So on this black line, I'm going to click the 20 to snap my timeline to there. Then I'm gonna hit I and go location rotation. Next, go to frame 35. So click right there, then pressured G. Then why will drag it through the wall all double tap our to give it a random rotation, then hit I location rotation. So now when we play this, you can see it crashes through the wall and stops right there. Now you might notice if you play this that it starts out slow, speeds up and slows down. That's because Blender has the default of using animation data and has it as Acre, and we can see that curve by opening up a new window. Coming up to the graph editor right here. And we can see what this looks like. So here's our animation data. We can see it starts out slow speeds up than at the end. It has another curve which slows it down. I don't want this for our animation. I wanted to be a consistent rate. So to fix this, I'm gonna hit t and click on a linear. So now we have a consistent motion all the way to the end. So now if we play this one more time, you can see it starts out the same and ends the same speed. And there we go. In the next video, we'll start working on the simulation. 27. Monkey Crashing P3 Simulating: now that we've created are seen, let's go ahead and start adding in the rigid body simulation. To do this, I'm going to Brozi and go into wire frame. And then I'm going to press a to de select B for Bak Select and draw a box around the entire thing. And it looks like we have some weird object here, so I'm just gonna go ahead and delete that, and I'll do that one more time. So select everything and then shift. Click on something so you have it as your active object. Next, go over to the physics settings and click on rigid body simulation. You can change the mass down here 2.5 so it weighs a little bit more and then underneath the shape, I'm going to set this to mesh. Since we have a lot of complicated pieces, make sure the shape is set to mess. So it actually so it accurately displays the hit box. Next, underneath the sensitivity, I'm going to set the margin down 2.1 This will just make sure that the collision boxes very , very close to the pieces and finally underneath the dynamics, I'm gonna turn on deactivation and then start the activation. Basically, what this does is it will enable the simulation to not start until something actually touches it. Now that we've done that, we're going to apply this simulation to every single object to do that hit F three and type in the word copy, and you should see copy rigid body settings. Once you cook on this, every single object that we have selected will have the same settings that we just set up over here. Next, go ahead and select your monkey head and click on Richard Body. Set this to animated and then turn the shape to mesh. Now, once we play this, you should see if we play it real quick. The wall explodes and all of the pieces go flying everywhere. Just like that. We also need to make sure that the plane has a rigid body set to passive right here and now . Once we played this one more time, it'll crash through and then the pieces will fly everywhere, and that looks pretty neat. Now, another thing that I want to do is I want to make the sides of our wall right here. Stay where they are, and only have the middle part explode. To do that, I'm gonna go into front view by pressing one. And it looks like our cube right here is a little bit above the plane. So I'm gonna press G, then Z and drag us up till it's resting right there. I'm gonna leave a small gap just so it doesn't mess up the simulation. Now, what we're going to do is press see for circle, select and just draw your circle around the edges of your wall right here. So something like this, I think, will be not that one. Something like that. You don't want to grab like a big piece that's sticking out. But I think this probably is good. And there we go. Next, I'm gonna hold shift and select one to be my active object. Then I'm gonna set the type from active over to passive. Then, of course, we need to press F three, including on copy rigid body settings. So now all of the edges should have the passive type. Let's see what happens now Once we play this surprise, the space bar And there we go. That looks pretty neat. Another thing that we need to fix is the monkey head, because currently it's just floating. We can animate this animate value over here on this check box. So once it reaches this, this part right here, it will stop animating, and it will just act like it's part of the simulation. To do that, I'm gonna go to frame 33 hovering over this check box. I'm gonna hit the I key, then go to the next rain frame of 34 uncheck this box and then hit the I key one more time . So now, once we play this, it should crash through and then just fall into a natural position. As you can see there, I do think the pieces fly out a little too much. So I'm going to select the plane and open up the surface response and turn up the friction to, like 0.7 or 0.8. Let's go 0.75 So now the pieces should slow down a little bit faster than what they were doing. And there we go. I think that looks better. Okay, so now we have created the simulation. In the next video, we will do a couple more tweaks at the materials and the lighting 28. Monkey Crashing P4 Materials and Lighting: Now that we've created this simulation, let's go ahead and apply in some materials with the bland selected. I'm gonna go over to the material tab and then click new on the material. We can leave everything at the default values, maybe bring the roughness down 2.3 and for the monkey head. I'm also gonna get this a new material and I'm going to set the base color to a darker gray somewhere around here. Now for the bricks, they should already have a material in place. I'm going to set this to a red color, something like that. And now if we press Z and going to look death and then we press space bar, we should be able to see what this looks like. That is looking pretty good. But if you can remember, once we did the cell fracture and on, we set the material to one rather than zero. So if we apply a new material and click on new, it should apply a new material to the inside of our wall right here. Now, Currently, we can't see anything, and that's because we need to go back, go into top view crazy and go into wire frame box, select all of the cubes and just selecting one of them. Hit the plus sign new and we'll call this material Gray. Then if we hit control l and go materials, every single one of these pieces should have to materials which they dio. Now, if we go into looked at, we hit play We can see the inside of our wall right here now has that white material And if we select it, we can change it to whatever we want. If you want a darker red a blue whatever you want I think I'm just gonna go with a darker ray something like this. If you want black, you can do that. I'm probably gonna go somewhere around here with the monkey had selected I might change this to be a little bit of a lighter grade. Just so we have some variation between the colors and I think that looks pretty good. Next, go over to the render settings and change the render engine from cycles over to E V. If that's not already selected, I'm gonna turn on Ambien. Inclusion screens based reflections in underneath color management. I'm going to set the look too high. Contrast. Let's go ahead and bring back Layer one by holding shift and then one, and then still like the lamp that's already in the scene. I'm going to change this to a sun lamp and set the strength of this to a value of four. Let's go into our interview to see what this looks like. Surprises E and go into rendered beer that's looking pretty good so far. But the world settings is a little bit dark, so go over to the rotating tear and drag the color up a little bit. Do you get a nice light shadow? Something like that. The next thing that will do is set up the camera, so I'm gonna place my camera right about here, facing the wall hit control Ault and zero to snap that into place. Then you can right click on her camera, double tap are and then rotated up to your facing the wall and move it around a little bit , too. You get the angle that you like once you're happy with the angle. Go ahead and hit the space bar to see where our monkey had lends and to see if we can see all of the pieces that is looking pretty good. In the next video, we will do a couple more tweaks to the wall and then we'll render out an animation. 29. Monkey Crashing P5 Rendering: if we play our animation right now, you'll see that the wall explodes and everything is looking pretty good. But the original wall is still here. Now, that is because over in the first collection weaken. See, it's still enabled. We could delete it if we want to. But if we hide it real quick and go back, we can see the cracks are in the wall already. And I don't really like how this looks. I would rather have the Cube look hole, and then the cracks show up once the monkey had actually crashes into it. To do this, we're gonna be animated in this camera icon right here. So once the monkey had actually touches the wall will make the Cube disappear, and then the cracked wall will show up. So let's find where the monkey and had actually touches the wall. So about frame 26 or so. So we'll go to frame 25 and then hovering over the camera icon. And if you can't see this, open up this menu in turn on the camera icon right there. So, at frame 25 I'm gonna hit the I key on my keyboard hovering over that camera icon. Next, I'm gonna go to frame 26 uncheck this and then hit I one more time so it will hide it in the rendered view. Now, you might not be able to see it at the moment, but once we actually do a render, this cube will disappear. Let's go ahead and go back into camera view and do some depth of field. So I'm going to select my camera right here and then I'm gonna play this real quick, then go over to the camera settings. I'm gonna turn on depth of field and then open this up and make sure my focus is on the monkey head. So close the eyedropper tool and then click on the Suzanne head right here for the f stop. This is the amount of blurriness. I'm going to set this down to one, and I think that will give us a nice, shallow depth of field. Let's go ahead and play the animation to see what it looks like. And that looks pretty neat. Now here is where we set the end frame. Since we don't really need this to be 250 frames long weaken set this value to like 1 50 Now we're ready to do a render. So to render this into an animation, what we need to do is go over to the output settings and set a folder where we want the animation to go to. So click on this little button here and navigate to where you want your folder to be. You can name the file that you want right here. Crashing Monkey had tutorial and then click accept. So once this renders into an animation, it will go into that folder. Next, we need to set the final type over to MPEG underneath the encoding. I'm going to set this to MP four. You can set it to whatever movie file that you want. I like using them before, so I'm going to set it to that, Then finally, underneath the sampling, we don't need 64 samples. We can actually bring this down to 50 so it renders just a little bit faster. Now that we've done that, let's go ahead and hit control us to save our blender file once again, and now we need to go up to render and click on render animation and it will start to render that into a movie file and put it into the folder that you specified. And as you can see over on the top, it's only taking 1.5 seconds to render each frame, so this should be done in just a couple minutes. Okay, the animation has finished. Now, if you want to view your animation, you can go ahead and open up that folder, or you can come over to Blender, go over to render and click on view animation. Once you do this, a window will pop up and you can see what your animation looks like. And that looks pretty neat. The depth of field looks good, the wall crashing and, as you can see once right at the beginning of the animation, there's no cracks, but that wall disappears. Once the monk, it actually touches it. So there you go, guys, that is the end of this section. Thank you for watching. If you create your own animation, I'd love to see it, so make sure it a post it in the assignment. After this video, send me a link to a YouTube video. Whatever. You want to do things again for watching, and I'll see you guys in the next one 30. Crashing Monkey P6 Fixing the Shaking: If you just completed this section, you might notice that your pieces of the Cube are shaking quite a bit. Once you play the animation, as we can see here, once all of the pieces come to the ground, they're just kind of vibrating and shaking a little bit. And I found the reason for that. It's because of the collusion margin. So what we're going to do in this video is fixed, that shaking. So let's go ahead and jump into blender, and I'll be showing you exactly how to do that. Right now we have this scene that we just created in this last section. We have our first collection, which has the cube camera and the light. The first thing I want to do with the sun lamp is just turn on contact shadows. This will just make everything look a little bit better. Next, let's go to collection to and actually fix the collision. So it's going to wire frame, and what we need to do is Box select all of our Q pieces right here and then holding shift . I'm just going to select one of them, so that is our active object. Next go over to the physics tab. And then, underneath the sensitivity, you'll notice that the collision margin is very, very low. We're gonna be setting this 2.4 and then enter and then press F three and type in the word copy, and you should see a copy. Rigid body settings click on that, and now every single object should have the collision margin set 2.4 which it does now. The unfortunate thing about doing that method is all of our objects are now active, and I want some of them to be passive. So we need to do the exact same thing that we did in the previous video, or we press one to go in front of you, then see for our circle select, and you can use the scroll wheel to drive your circle up and down and then just click on the edges just like this, and then just come over here and set the type two passive, then same thing. F three Copy rigid body settings. Once you do that, the edges should be passive and the middle part should be active, which they are. Now. It's going to camera view by pressing 01 more time. And then if we hit the space bar and play this, we should see what it looks like. Now you can see that the pieces aren't others. A couple like that one shaking a little bit. But most of them are not shaking you more like this. One is not moving. That one's not moving. There's only just like one or two that are shaking. Now doing this, you can see our pieces are flying way farther out than I want them to. I want them to be a little bit closer. So to fix that, we're gonna be slowing down the motion of our monkey head. So select it. Click on this key frame down here and press G and then just move it over to about frame 10 . This will enable the monkey had to crash through it a lot slower, as you can see there and then, the pieces are a lot closer together, and that looks a lot better so you can see there is still a little bit of shaking like this one, a sheikh in just a little bit. But most of them are just still, which is what we want. So now that we fix that, let's go ahead and do another render and see what this looks like. All right? The render has finished. And to view it, we can go ahead and exit out of this window and go up to render and click on view animation . And as we can see there, the rocks are barely moving at all. And it looks a lot better. So there you go, guys. That is how you fix the shaking issue that we had in the last video. Thanks for watching, and I'll see you guys in the next one.