Rigging and Animating Vectors in Moho Pro | Chad Troftgruben | Skillshare

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Rigging and Animating Vectors in Moho Pro

teacher avatar Chad Troftgruben, Freelance Animator and Screencaster

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

44 Lessons (5h 49m)
    • 1. Intro to Moho Vector Rigging

      4:24
    • 2. Overview of Character Design

      3:42
    • 3. Separating Hair Strands from Main Hair Layer

      10:21
    • 4. Drawing the Bones

      5:41
    • 5. Labeling the Bones

      10:42
    • 6. Layer Binding to Bones

      6:10
    • 7. Connecting Arms with Point Binding

      7:59
    • 8. Connecting Legs with Point Binding

      5:48
    • 9. Connecting the Coat with Point Binding

      6:58
    • 10. Binding the Shirt

      5:53
    • 11. Binding the Hair

      7:20
    • 12. Anchoring with Target Bones

      8:23
    • 13. 402

      7:21
    • 14. Correcting First Front Arm Bend with Smart Bone Actions

      9:57
    • 15. Correcting Second Front Arm Bend with Smart Bone Actions

      9:58
    • 16. Correcting Back Arm Bends with Smart Actions

      8:27
    • 17. Correcting Legs with Smart Bone Actions

      9:39
    • 18. Adjusting for Bottom Torso Bends with Smart Bone Actions

      15:42
    • 19. Adjusting for Top Torso Bends with Smart Bone Actions

      12:08
    • 20. Finishing Corrections on Torso Bends

      10:16
    • 21. Correcting Leg Pop in on Pelvis

      5:01
    • 22. Adding Smart Pin Bone for Pupils

      4:02
    • 23. Controlling Eyebrows with a Smart Bone

      8:25
    • 24. Creating Blink Smart Bone

      10:32
    • 25. Building an Interpolated Mouth

      13:48
    • 26. Triangulating a Mesh and Linking Layers

      10:21
    • 27. Creating Left Head Turn with Smart Dial

      9:33
    • 28. Creating Right Head Turn with Smart Dial

      6:01
    • 29. Adding Upward Head Tilts

      5:58
    • 30. Adding Downward Head Tilts

      6:26
    • 31. Polishing Mesh Actions

      10:25
    • 32. Animating Mouth and Hair Strands for Head Tilts

      10:21
    • 33. Animating Ponytail for Head Tilts

      3:40
    • 34. Correcting Bone Connection Issues

      6:42
    • 35. Cleaning Up Misplaced Bone Keyframes

      4:42
    • 36. Adding in Bone Dynamics and IK Stretching

      11:56
    • 37. Creating Switches for Hands

      5:00
    • 38. Laying Out Canvas and Character Starting Position

      6:25
    • 39. Laying Out First Phase of Jump Animation

      6:21
    • 40. Lip Syncing Dialogue

      6:59
    • 41. Animating Body to Dialogue

      10:03
    • 42. Implementing Blinks, Eyebrow Movements and Head Tilts

      15:50
    • 43. Exporting Your Animation

      2:45
    • 44. Final Thoughts

      1:22
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About This Class

With Moho Pro, you can animate vector based characters in a variety of ways. This course aims to teach the basics of rigging vector characters using a combination of layer and point binding. Along the way you will also learn how to:

  • Properly create a bone structure capable of complex actions like clothing and hair movements

  • Animate using bones and layer tools

  • Correct animations with Smart Bones

  • Create an interpolated mouth that animates between poses

  • Assign Smart Bones as dials for basic functions like blinking eyes

  • Animate head turns with help from a Smart Warp Mesh

  • Use target bones for anchoring in parts of the rig

  • Other techniques to help with polishing and refining animations

Meet Your Teacher

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Chad Troftgruben

Freelance Animator and Screencaster

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Transcripts

1. Intro to Moho Vector Rigging: Hi guys. My name is Chad trough carbon. And you are watching how to rig and animate vector-based characters inside of MOHO Pro. By default, when you go in and start designing in MOHO, you can create vector shapes and points. And these can easily be animated and morphed in a variety of ways. However, there are certain things we need to keep in mind as we go this route. It's different compared to rigging in animating image-based characters, which is another course I touched on in. So if you're looking to take image-based characters, such as characters designed in Photoshop. You may want to jump over to that course and check that one out instead. And I'll leave a link to that in this lecture just in case that's what you're looking for. However, if you're looking to rig up an animate vector-based characters designed in MOHO Illustrator or other vector-based software. Then this is the course for you. To get started. We will first overview the character design so that way everyone is up to speed. Again, this character was created in a previous course, but you don't need to view that course in order to jump into all of this. Then we'll draw up the main bones and organize all of those, and then jump over to binding the character to these bones. This will involve layer binding, which is probably the easiest. And then point binding, which requires us to go in and select certain bones and bind points to it. So that way we can create bends appropriately for our limbs, torso and more. And we'll go through and bind all of this, including the arms and legs, shirt, hair, and coat. Just because we bound our layers in our points to bones doesn't mean it's all going to work automatically. Typically, Moho need some help. And we can create what are called smart bones to correct actions caused by these new bones. In addition to going in and creating smart bones to correct all of these errors, will also be implementing anchor bones as well as constraints. So that way we can help rein everything in. When it comes to moving the rig around. Then we can jump over to adding some face controls. This will include being able to adjust the dials with a bone. We can control our eyebrows with a dial, as well as create a blink using a smart bone and building an intercalated mouth using switch layers. Then it's on to adding head tilts. We can triangulate a vector mesh in link our vectors to it, which will then allow us to implement a smart bone to create a left head-turn as well as a right head-turn. And then we can create a second dial to add up and down head tilts as well. Once we implement all this, we'll spend some time polishing it up. And then we'll animate the other layers required to complete the head turn. Then it's onto polishing the rig. No matter how careful we are, sometimes certain errors slip through the cracks or certain things can be adjusted to make it even better. And that's what this section is all about. We'll take a look at some bone issues that we missed, as well as cleaning up keyframes, adding in bone dynamics and squash and stretch scaling, as well as creating switches for the hands. Then it's over 2, animating the rig. We will bring the rig onto a scene, play with the bones, get some animation in place such as a jump. We will implement the intercalated mouth and add in some lip sinking. Animate the body to the dialogue. Implement blinks, eyebrows and head movements. And then we will polish everything up and then export it for the world to see. By the time you're done with this course, you should have a strong understanding of how to rig up and animate a vector-based character inside of MOHO Pro. I hope you're ready because we're about to get started. 2. Overview of Character Design: For this video, I'm working off of 0, 1, Chad vector rig, and I'm inside of MOHO. We're first going to take a look at the design of the character. This character was brought over from another course where I went through the process of designing the character using vector points. And it was all done inside of Moho. So here we're going to go to the next step and start adding bones. But first, I feel it's important to overview how the character is set up. Because like most things in life, when using MOHO, there are certain things that you can do differently depending on how you want to animate. And that all comes down to how you set the character up. So if you look over on the right, you'll see we have the layers panel. And we have it divided into a head and body group. First, if we drop the head group, you'll see we have access to all these layers. And the group layers such as the eyes, the hair strand, and anything that has the mask symbol is being masked so that we can include shading, highlights or in the case of the eyes, we can mask the pupils. So that way we have an easier time moving the pupils for animation. And then the same goes for the body. You drop the body down. And here we have access to all of the body pieces, for the most part, divided into different groups. When it comes to the design of the limbs. If we were to go to the front arm and click on the front arm layer, you'll see it's fairly simple. And when it comes to bending the arms, you can see right here in the center, I have four points. And this allows us to easily bend the arms when creating smart actions. And so I will be reminding you of this as we go through the process. But I just wanted to note this in case this wasn't exactly included in the last course. Throughout the process, we did go through and add four points so that it's easier to bend the arm. And you'll find that goes with the legs as well. And we'll double-check on all of that if we find that we need to add more or do different details throughout this, we will definitely do that. The only thing I'm going to do in this video is just come up here to the head and let's just collapse that along with the body. In order to do anything with this, we're going to create a bone layer. So first, let's click on the body group, holding the Shift key on your keyboard and click on head. Right-click and go down to group with selection. Here, we can name this new group. I'll call it Chad, and then hit Enter. Now this is a group. However, if we right-click, you'll see we have the ability to convert to bone. It's the third option down. Click on that. And we now have a bone layer ready to go. So with all that in place, we can pause the video here and up next, move on to adding bones for the character. 3. Separating Hair Strands from Main Hair Layer: For this video, we are working off of O2, Chad vector, rig dot Moho. Feel free to open up this file. We're going to keep going building up this rig. And with the bone layer now established, we can dive in and start drawing up our bones. So the first thing we'll do is just collapse this layer so that way it's easier to look at. We want to make sure we are on the chat bone layer. And also make sure you're on frame 0. You won't be able to add bones if you move past frame 0. Always remember that frame 0 is your workspace, essentially. Using a on the keyboard, we can select the Add bone tool. And we're going to come in and get started. First. We want to establish the pelvis bone. And this is going to be where everything centers in. It's basically going to be the main bone. And you can do this a number of different ways. I used to come in and draw it like this, attaching it to the pelvis and extending it out so that way you could grab it if you wanted to. In my PSD rigging course, I believe I just went in and added the pin like this. And just by clicking once you can add pin bones versus dragging to create traditional bones. But this time around, what I want to do is place a bone outside just like this. It's going to be the same thing as adding a pin bone to the pelvis, except we're offsetting it. So that way we can easily grab the pelvis and move it around when it comes time to animate. When we have the pin bone inside the pelvis, it can be easy to accidentally grab other bones. And you might have witnessed that if you saw me animating in that previous course. So for my preference, the pelvis bones gonna go out there. Now we need to pretend it's here so that we can build up the structure appropriately. And the next step with that pelvis bone selected because we want to link these bones together, is to come in and starting near the belt buckle, little bit offset, command and holding Shift and click and drag and draw a bone up to about the middle of the yellow shirt design and release. Still holding Shift, click and drag and move up again to the bottom of the neck and release. Click and drag to go up to the neck. And then click and drag to go up to the head. Now, each time we drew out a bone we were referencing the previous, you know, you are referencing a bone when that bone is red. So if I were to now draw an arm bone going down, it would actually be linked to the head bone, which doesn't make sense. We want to make sure that the arm bone is linked to the chest bone as that is the most logical next location. And while using the add bone tool, we can hold in the alt key and click on that top torso bone to select it. Now we can come over here to the front arm and keep moving. So click and drag and move down to establish the bone close to the middle of the arm like so. And then click and drag again to move down to the bottom of the arm and release. Then you have your hand. So does come in, draw it out and establish the bone. We're going to repeat the steps for the back arm. So just click on that top torso bone by using the Alt key on your keyboard. And at this point, if it's easier to view the body, we can come in here and just hide the entire torso group. So that way we're focusing right here. And I can come in and draw down just like this. And then draw down one more time. And then just come in and draw out that hand bone. And we should be good to go. We might have to make some minor modifications to this as we move along. But for right now, this should work just fine. Now, we want to continue along here to the bottom part of the body. Let's hold Alt and click on the pelvis bone. Since we're going to connect the legs to the pelvis, that makes the most sense. So with the pelvis bone selected, we're going to come in and starting at the top of the front leg holding Shift to make sure we can do a perfectly straight bone and just click and drag to move down again near the center of the leg. And release. Click and drag and move down again near the center of the leg and release. And you might have to alter this as you go, but this should work for the most part. Now, I'm going to come in here and draw in a bone for the foot. And this is going to be modified a little bit later. But for right now, we will establish it right down here. And it's going to click and drag holding Shift and then just move to the left this time to establish the foot bone. Now let's Alt click on the pelvis one more time to draw out the other set of bones on the other side. So starting right about here, I can click and drag to move down to establish that bone. Click and drag again. And as you can see, it's a little bit offset because this leg is actually up higher. And then we can come in and just draw out that last bone. You can see it's a little bit offset. If that happens to you, it's okay. Just grab the transform bone tool, click and drag and just move it up, put it into place, and we should be good to go. So now we can bring the torso back and things are starting to shape up. There are a few more bones I want to add. So right now we have added the main body bones. And that is going to be useful for controlling the body, of course. But there are some other things I would like to do, such as adding some physics to the hair. Or perhaps I wanted to control the hair myself with bones to simulate wind or whatever else I'm thinking of doing. And since we designed it, this body to have multiple layers for the torso, you have the coach and then you have the shirt. We can come in and add bones to control the coat as well. Again, adding more realism or just dynamic movement to the character. And adding bones for these functions is just as easy as adding it for the actual body parts. And you just need to think of it as you would that way. What will be connected to what logically, and then just draw in the bones. So we're going to start right here coming in. I wanted to Alt click on the head because we're going to draw in some hair bones. And we'll focus on this large strand right here first. Using the add bone tool. I'm just going to come in and click and drag to create a bone like this. And then I'm just going to keep drawing some bones down. So there's one, there's one. We can do this and then perhaps something like that. You can add as many bones as you wish. The more bones you have, obviously the more control and the more smooth the effect will look. However, it does require more binding the more bones you have. But I feel that trade off of work is worth it. So let's add some bones for the other strand of hair. Remember we need to reset the origin. So let's Alt click on the head bone to select it. And I can come in now and just draw in these hair pieces just like that. And we want to do the same thing down here. So coming down to the head, I can Alt click. Here we have the pony tail. And this time we'll just add it in two bones. So one right there, close to the middle. And then we can do another like this. And again, we could even do something like that if you really wanted to get that detailed with the movement. But I think just adding two should be fine. Then we have the CO2 as I was discussing before. So if we come in and Alt click, we can select the top torso bone. And then starting where this diamond is, I'm just going to come in and draw a bone down like so about two where that third button is. And then I can draw the second bone down like this. And we will Alt click on that top torso bone one more time. And just come in and repeat these steps on the other side. Just like that. So now all of the bones should be in place except for the target bones, but we'll get there. And don't expect this to work. So like if I were to come in here and let's animate, you're going to see it's like, no, we're not going to animate, we're going to break instead. Don't worry about that. We have a long ways to go in terms of how this is going to function. Right now we're just drawing the main bones in so we can begin the binding process. 4. Drawing the Bones: For this video, we are working off of 03 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. In this video, we're just going to go in and label the bones. So that way it's easier for you to understand what's going on. And also, it's just good to organize by making sure all of your bones and your layers are named appropriately. So naming bones is pretty simple. Let's select the select bone tool, which is B on the keyboard, making sure of course you are on the bone layer on frame 0. Come in here by zooming in. And we want to click once on the head bone. And you'll notice at the top we have a field that says B5. This is where we can enter in the name for the bone. And in this case, we're just going to keep it simple by typing in head and then hit Enter. And we can go through this process by labeling the main bones. We can go through and label all the hair strands if you wish. It probably isn't necessary to do so because just kinda some repetitive work there. But I think by going in and doing the main bones, it'll help especially more wood working with constraints and targets and all that. So there's your head. We can come down and let's just name the ponytail really quick. So I could come in and do pony tail. We could also come in and do this one as ponytail to. You could also come in and try to name two bones at once. I'm not sure if that actually works. So let me see. So if I click that, you have this one and you have that one and it actually does. So you could, if you wanted to go in and just highlight all of these in, you can just name it hair strand. Large because it's the largest one. You can see now it comes into names all that appropriately. And we could come in then and name this one, hair strand small. Then you have ponytail right down here. And then we can come in and just keep naming. So we have the neck. And then you have your torso right here. I can just select both of those torso bones and just type in torso. And the same goes for the jacket. So we'll select the two front jacket bones and I'll just name it front jacket. And then we have back jacket. If I can spell. And we have, of course, the arm up here. Now, depending on how you want to go about this, we could select both of these, even going up to the hand if you wish, and just label them all front arm. Or we could do something like for the first one, front bicep. And then for the second one, front forearm. And then down here we have front hand. And you'll notice I'm using f dot, F dot forearm just to abbreviate front, but you could type in front hand if you really wanted to. And we're just gonna do the same thing back here. So b dot Bicep and B dot forearm. It's also important to keep it the same in terms of naming conventions. So you probably wouldn't want to go over here and name this B dot bottom part of arm. And then this one would be front forearm. Both of them should probably be labeled forearm, so that way it's just easier to identify. So type in backhand. And I think we're now down to Pell this. So come down here to the pelvis. Pelvis in, and then we can come down here to the legs. And the same applies here. We can type in just front leg and have front like 12 or we could do front thigh and then front calf. So like that. And then you have your front foot, back thigh, and then back calf. And then you have your back foot. And I believe that takes care of labeling all of these. Now again, this mostly will help with smart actions. But if at anytime you want to reveal the label of a bone, if you're like, I really don't know what this is off hand. And I don't want to keep looking up here to remind myself. You can click on any bone or you can select multiple bones and then just click on Show label. And it's hard to see, but it's actually right here. If I zoom out more, you'll actually probably see it better. You can see it's popping up right there. If I were to highlight all the bones and click Show label, you'll definitely see we have something going on here. And the reason why I also don't show this as it can become kind of a mess if you have all the labels, as you can see with that hair strand stuff, especially it's like, oh boy. So I usually keep these turned off but feel free to turn it on if you feel the need. 5. Labeling the Bones: After posting this course, it came to my attention that there is a slight discrepancy between the rig I designed in the vector design course and the rig that we're using now to set up the animation. And let me show you what I mean by this. When I originally designed this character. If we come in here to the group and let's just go into the head. You'll see that I put all of the hair pieces on one layer or within one group. So we have the highlights, the shading and the hair itself, including the strands, these two big strands all on one layer. However, when it comes time to rig and animate, I used a slightly different version of that character. And without realizing it, I actually went in and isolated these two strands. And when I go to the rigging and animation process, I use these isolated groups as part of that process. And so if you went through the design course and you set up your hair all on one layer, but you're looking to separate it out. That's what this video is all about. And it's actually a pretty quick process. And this is also a good opportunity to show that sometimes things don't quite work out the way you want. So you have to go in and make modifications. To begin the process. We are going to go inside of the hair group and locate the hair layer where we put down all of the points for the main shape of the hair. And now we're going to focus in on this first strand. We can grab the selected points tool or G on the keyboard. And just come in and we're going to lasso around. And if you can't last, so make sure you have lasso enabled on the top. Otherwise you'll do a rectangle selection. But I'm just going to come in here and last. So all the way around these points, just like this and release. So now we have that strand selected. I'm going to use Command X or Control X if you're on Windows to cut. Next, I'm going to back out here on my layers and go to the head and then make a new vector. Make sure that's inside the head. I can click once and name this hair strand small. Or you can name it something that to you signifies what this is. Now, we can use Command V or Control V to paste this new shape back in place. Now, this isn't going to be a perfect transition because we are breaking the shape. So we will have to go back and closing the shape here and do a couple of things with the highlights and such as well. But let's just come over here and grab the big strand while we're doing this. So we can click on the hair layer once again, making sure that we can see everything here. We just want to grab that strand with the select Points tool. So does come in, try to lasso around and select your points like that. Then Command X. Make a new vector. I'll just name this one hair strand big. And then we can paste that into place. So now starting with hair strand big, I'm just going to come in here with the add points tool and add in some points here to close this shape off. So we can just come in like this and add a point like that. And this is going to enclose the shape. And you can see now that we have white as the fill color. But we just want to come in here with IRR dropper and select the actual hair color to change that back. Now, you'll see I also accidentally adjusted the line width when doing this. Not a big deal. We can just come in here and reduce the line width to two, or is it three? It's one of those. There we go. That's looking a bit better. And then we also want to remove this boundary here for the hair because that doesn't look right. Coming over here we can grab the hide edge tool and just come in here and hide the edges just like that. So we are enclosing the shape, but now we have simply hidden that boundary. And we can do the same now for the small strand. Just come in here and close your shape. And I have my color and my line width set up this time. So we should have no issues there. Now, I can come in and just hide that boundary and we're looking pretty good. Now of course, we need to transfer the shading and highlighting over. So let's right-click on hair strand big and group that into a selection. And we can just rename this one then two hair strand, big once again. Next, go back here to your hair group. We can start with the highlights. And let's hide this strands of hair just for a moment. So we can see the different highlights and such. And we want the highlights for the big strand of hair. So this one, so basically any highlights starting here and going down is what we want to select. And again, you can just bring this back just to take a look to make sure that everything is looking good. So on highlights, hit G on the keyboard. And we're just going to come in and select those highlighted points just like that. And then we can use Command X to cut. Let's come back here to the big hair strand and make a new vector inside of the big hair strand group. We can name it highlights. And then we're just going to paste those in. Same for the shading. Go back here to the hair, come down here to your shades. And we're just going to once again Lasso what we need here. So just coming in. I'm going to lasso this chunk right here. And you might have to zoom in, but you can see, I got it. You can see that we have some shapes kind of colliding here, but that should work. And we're just going to use Command X. Come over here to your new group, name it shading. And then just paste that in. And we're going to deal with the masking here in a moment because we masked the hair and we're going to have to do the same for the strands. Now if we go to shading too, you can see that we actually have no vectors on that layer where the big strand of hair is. So we should be fine there. So now coming back here to the big strand of hair, we can just reveal that to make sure that we can see it. It's right here. We're just going to now double-click on that group, come over here to masking and then choose Hide All, and then hit, Apply, and then hit Okay. So now the masking has been reapplied to this. Also makes sure you can see that we have our highlights clashing with the line work. Make sure you come down here and double-click on hair strand big. Go to your masking and then choose to exclude your strokes. And then click Okay. So now you have that re-established looking pretty good. And then the last step is just to go in and do the same for the small hair strand. So I'll just do that really quick repeating these steps. I'm not going to be as deliberate. I'm just going to do it so that way you can see it. So small, hair strand or hair strand, small, however you wish to designate it. Come back here to your hair, will start with the highlights. In this case, we only really have one highlight that we have to worry about. So we're just going to grab that one, cut it out, come over here to the small hair strand, make a new vector named this one highlights. Paste this in, come over here to your shading for hair. And once again, this can be kinda hard to distinguish, but we have just this big piece right here on the right side of the strand. So we're just going to come in here and grab that piece. Just like this. There we are. We can cut that over here to your shading. And then making sure of course we're on these small strand and we make that shading layer. We can just paste that in. Finally, double-click on hair strand small. The group that is go to your masking. Choose to hide all, apply it. Come down here to your hair strand small and make sure you exclude the strokes and then hit Okay. So now we have the hair pieces separated into their own groups. So again, if you followed my design course and you put the hair on one layer, like this was originally set up to be. So you might want to set it up so you can follow along with the exact steps in the rigging and animation course. But just note, if you did put the hair on one layer, you can still make this work. It's more of a matter of personal preference. And there is more control when you group things together, so it is recommended but not necessary. So hopefully by me recording this video, you're not too confused by those steps. I just wanted to come in here and fix something since I wasn't clear and forgot a step. And one more thing you might need to do once you finish all this, you'll see that some of the hair pieces might be a little bit off. You can come in here and rectify that by coming in hearing news as adjusting the way the hair looks. And again, you can use your reference in your sketch. And you might even need to come in here and add an extra point or two just to kinda get it back to its original shape. But that should be the only real worry you have here. Just coming in here and we can modify it and get it back to where it needs to be. And there you go. So hopefully that helps you understand the process. We're going to pause here and up next, move back over to rigging and animating. 6. Layer Binding to Bones: For this video, we are working off of 04 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. The time has come to start the binding process. And we will begin by binding layers that really don't need a whole lot of attention. We're going to be doing more point binding then layer binding. But in cases where we have the hands or the head, layer binding is useful. So first, let's drop down the chat bone layer so we can see the head. And one thing I want to note, you can bind groups using the layer bind tool. So I'm on frame 0. We are selecting that head group and I'm going to click on the bind layer tool, which is at the top here. And if I come in here and I bind the head to that bone and come over here to the bone layer and then move it around to test. You'll see that the head is moving along with the bone and so it bound to that bone and everything's great, right? Well, not exactly. It depends on what you're doing. And in my case, I'm going to need more control. If you bind a group to a bone like we did here, you can go into any of these sub-layers and do any other bone modifications. You'll see I actually have no bone tools when I click on any of these. And that's because it removes that functionality the minute you take that master layer and bind it to a bone. And so if you want to have individual controls, you know, the ability to go in and fix things easier and just have overall more functionality. You don't want to bind that group. So in this case, we're just going to click on the head and come in and click off using the bind layer tool to deselect that bone. And we'll go inside that head group and start buying these individually. So with front eyebrow, I can now have access to the bind layer tool. I can come in and click it to bind it. The eyebrows and the eyes will all be bound differently eventually. But for right now we're just going to do this as sort of a place holder. So your eyes we can bind the hair, is going to also be the same thing. We're going to come in here in binded to all of this stuff. But for right now, let's just put it to that head bone just to make things a little bit more organized and then we can rip it apart as we continue along. So every single layer can be layer bound to the head bone inside of that head group. So now, once we have that, we can close it and come down here and focus on the other areas. So you have your front arm which will be point bound. But the hand, we can layer bind that because we really don't need it to do anything other than rotate. And so with front hand selected, I can come in and click on the bind layer tool and select that bone to bind it. You're going to have the same issue with your foot. Now again, with the fluid, you have some different things you can do here depending on how you wish to approach the rigging process. So for right now, we're just going to click on foot, which actually should be front foot. And just realized that's okay. Just go in really quick and make that correction that way it's a little bit more explicit. Click on front foot and we will just lock it to that foot. Again. We might modify this later, but that's okay. And we can take a look at some of these other things. The neck could probably be layer bound. It's only one piece in it, only has that one bone. So I'm just going to click on that neck bone to bind it. You have the color which will also be bound to the neck. And we can play around with that as we move. But I think that's going to be the most logical thing for it to do. The coat will be point bound along with your shirt. But the belt, we can attach that to the bottom torso bone. So that way it's there and we have it and we're good to go. Coming down here. We have the pelvis which will also be layer bound. So we can click on the pelvis, the entire thing. And then using that layer bind tool, click on the pelvis bone to establish it. The backhand will also be layer bound and so will the back foot, which once again, pardon my inability to name things I guess properly. Let's come in here and just enter that really quick. So for back foot, we can layer bind it and you are now set and good to go for the layer binding process. Ultimately, we might make some modifications as we continue to work. But now, if we come in on frame 0 using the manipulate bones tool on the bone layer, you can see if I rotate this, it actually just rotates that layer. Now the arm, of course his not working the way it should because nothing is bound in terms of the arm bones. But you can see here if I also move the pelvis, everything that's layer bound is moving along with it, which is what it's supposed to do. You're should be able to grab that pelvis and move the entire character around once it's all properly bound. But for right now, we just have what's layer bound. And this is actually looking good in acting how it should. And so with that, we can pause the video here and up next, start taking steps to do more complicated point binding. 7. Connecting Arms with Point Binding: For this video, I'm working off of 05 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. We're going to dive in now and start with the arms and point bind. So that way, we actually have some connections to the arm bones. First, let's jump over here to our Layers panel and drop the body layer down. And we want to go inside the front arm group. So dropping front arm down all the way at the bottom of the group we will find front arm. So let's go ahead and click on that to start. I can zoom in by holding down Shift, holding in the right mouse button, and moving to the right, zooming out. You can move to the left. But I'm just going to come in here and get situated. The first thing I want to do is bind the top points that make up this graphic to the top bone. End. To do this, you'll see that while on frame 0, we have what is called the bind points tool located on the toolbar. And you can use AI to access this as well. Once you do this, your bones are going to change colors. This is just to help you with the binding process, which I'll show you here in a moment. So looking at this, it's pretty obvious where we can create these boundaries and set up the functionality for the arm. You see we have some points here on top. Those will naturally belong to the top bone. And to do this, let's first alt click on that top bone to select it. You'll know you've done this when it's highlighted in red. Next, with lasso mode enabled on the top bar next to bind points. I'm just going to come in and drag a lasso down and just covered those top points right on the bottom here and move back like so. So everything is selected those four points on the shoulder as well as these two points right here, but not the bottom two points. Then we can come up to the top where it says Bind points and click on bind points. Now if I click off and if we select the bind points tool, you'll see that these points are now Orange, indicating that this bone is what's connected and what is controlling those points. And to repeat this process, Let's Alt click on the bottom bone and just come in and lasso around those points. Select the points we want to attribute to it, and just bind those points. And now you're good. We need to make sure that every single part of this group is bound appropriately. So let's click on front arm details next. And again, it's pretty easy to see where we want to bind all this. Starting at the top. Let's Alt click on that top arm bone and then lasso around the top designs just like that. And then I can bind the points. Go down here, alt click on the bottom bone, lasso around those two triangles and bind your points. Then you have the shading, which will act similar to how the arm was set up. You can see we have those four points in the middle. Now this is a little bit offset compared to how I would like it. You'll see that these points don't quite match with the bones are at. This bottom row should be matching closer to the green bone. And so I can come in and just move these points down a little bit to kind of match that up. And it won't require much, just a little bit of moving like that. There we go. Now, hitting eye again to go back to the bind points tool, I can Alt click on that top orange bone, lasso, the top points for the shade, and then bind those points. Come down here to the bottom bone, Alt click, lasso the four remaining points for the shade and then bind those points. We're going to do the same thing for the highlights. And this is looking pretty close in terms of where the bend should be. So let's just Alt click and lasso the top four points and bind Alt click, lasso all of this stuff down here. And I didn't include it, everything. I couldn't get down there and if that ever happens, don't worry. Just holding Shift and continue to lasso. And you'll be able to include those points within the original selection that you made. And once you're good there, you can bind your points. So now the front arm should be appropriately bound. Let's quickly move down to the back arm and repeat these steps. And this is going to be basically exactly the same. And I'll start with that bottom layer where we have the back arm shape, just like we did before. And you might find it helpful at this point to hide the torso. So that way you can see all the points clearly. So starting with the back arm layer, I'm just going to come in in alt click. And we will select that top bone. Hit I on the keyboard and make sure we have the bind points tool selected. And we can come in and select those top points and bind it. Moved down here to the bottom part of the arm. Lasso, making sure that the bottom part is selected. And we are good to go. Moving over here now to back our details. Alt click on the top bone, lasso those shapes and bind. And we can select that bottom bone and bind those shapes. For shading, Alt click on the top bone, come in and select all of your top points and bind. And the same goes for the bottom bone right down here. Just select those and bind. And then you have your highlights. I'll click on your top bone. Select those four top points and bind Alt click on the bottom bone and come in. And did it again where I wasn't able to select everything. But if I hold Shift and lasso, I can include it. And then I can bind those points. So we should now have the arms appropriately bound. If we come back here to frame 0 and click on the bone layer and select the manipulate bone tool. Come in and start to play with this. You can see things are actually moving along now. Even if we do have this weird issue where the arms are bending and they're not bending appropriately. And so our goal here will be to eventually fix that with smart actions. What's important is right now everything is lining up and at least working on some level. So we have something to work with. So up next we're going to move over and do the same thing for the legs. 8. Connecting Legs with Point Binding: For this video, I'm working off of 06 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. We're going to resume binding the limbs by moving down to the legs. And the process is going to be similar to the arms, except we have a little bit less, uh, deal with. So it should be easier to manage. Let's first go into the body group and locate front leg. Click on the leg layer. And I'm just going to come in with the bind points tool. Alt click on that top leg bone. And we're just going to lasso those top points. And another thing you can do as well, and you'll probably see me doing this both ways, is instead of going through the process of last sewing those top points, you could actually just use Command a or Control a if you're on Windows to select all of those points and then bind everything to the top leg bone. And then Alt Click on what would be then your front calf and then come down and then just lasso those bottom pieces. It's just a little time-saver you can implement. It also ensures that everything is accounted for. So that way you're not forgetting a point, but that's all you need to do for this. Let's move over here to the shading and we're going to repeat these steps. Alt click on the top one. I'll just use Command a to select everything in buying the points. Alt click to come down here to the bottom. And it looks like these points could probably move up a little bit. But first, let's just bind them. So that way we have that set can bind these points. And then coming over here to the transform points tool, I can hold down Command and drag to lasso these points and then use the command key or control if you're on Windows. And then the up arrow to move this up so that the bottom set of points match the top part of the bottom bone in the tops of the points match the bottom part of the top bone? I think I said that right. Pretty sure I did. Anyway. So that right there. And we should be good to go now. And if we come over here and just make sure everything's bound correctly, it looks like it is. So let's go over here to the highlights. And we have a similar situation here where the points could be moved. Once again, taking the transform points tool and holding and command, you can select points. And you could also just use the select Points tool if you wish, but this is just a shortcut, if you will. I'm just going to Command and move up with the arrow. Get it where I need it to be. Then using I on the keyboard, I can Alt click on this top bone. Come down and lasso around these top points. Or you can select all the points however you want to do it, and then bind the points. And then just come in in, lasso all of these and bind the points. So now your front leg should be taken care of. You're going to move down here to the back leg and repeat the steps. And by repeat, it's basically just going to be the same stuff. You want to make sure your points are matching the bones as close as we can get it. And again, I can just move some of the stuff up to make sure it's looking the way it should. And then we can begin the binding process by hitting I on the keyboard. Holding Alt. We can bind every point to that top leg bone, come down here and all to click on the bottom one. And then lasso the bottom points over and bind it. Go to your shading. Alt click on the top leg bone. Select all the points and bind them. Come down to the bottom. And we can wrap around and just bind that. And we could also stand to come in and move these points just up a little bit like that. And then we can, while still on this layer. And then we can use the layers panel to go to highlights. And once again, we're just going to bind these points appropriately to the different parts of the leg. Just like that. Bind those. And we could also move these points just up a little bit like that. So that should help with everything. And I think that's looking better. So now if we come back here to the bone layer on frame 0 and take them manipulate bone tool. We can come in here and you can see now we can bend the leg. And it's actually doing something, at least. Now of course, this isn't looking like it should. But we can correct that in due time here with smart actions. What's notable here is everything is tracking and we have something working. So with that said, I'm going to pause the video here and up next, we can move on to point binding the coat. 9. Connecting the Coat with Point Binding: For this video, we are working off of 07 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. Like the limbs. We want to go into the torso and start point binding specific areas. And in this video it's going to be all about the coat. Let's re-enable the torso so we can see all the contents. Now coming down to where the coat is, I'm actually going to hide the neck and color belt and shirt. And it might also benefit us to hide the head entirely. And coming all the way down to the bottom, we have back hair, which is the pony tail. We're just going to hide that as well. And it might not even hurt to hide the arms. So that way, there's not as many distractions going on and we can focus just on what we need to focus on. Now with the coat, if we drop the group down, we have four different layers. And we want to start with the bottom layer, which is the coat layer. Keep in mind we have this setup so that four bones will be controlling the coat. However, I want some points to line up with the body and to begin using I on the keyboard to select the bind points tool. I can Alt click on the top torso bone, use Command a and then bind the points. So now we can go in and start figuring out how we want the coat to react to this. Let's Alt click on this green bone, which is the coat bone. And I basically want to keep the top part here connected to the torso. And then starting right about here, we can go all the way down like this and lasso those points and make sure that we have that bone selected. So let me do that one more time. We have the coat bone selected. I'm just going to come in and lasso these points right here and then bind the points. Then we can come down to the bottom front coat bone. But before I do that, I'm going to zoom in and you'll see that I have two points on each side. I actually want to add just another point on the bottom of these with the Add Point tool. That way, we can easily bend this when it comes time to do the smart actions. And we can also come in and adjust this so that this point is matching closer to the top of this bone. And this point is matching closer to the bottom of the top bone. So something like that should be fine. And I wanted to do the same on the other side as well. So just come in and add in those points. So that way we have that setup. So now coming back here, we want to hit I to bind the points and then Alt click on that bottom bone. And now we can last. So these bottom points beginning with those two new points that we just made and then going down like so. And then we can bind just like that. So now we want to move over here to the other side and Alt Click on that coat bone. And once again, we can leave these five points up here attached to the torso. But beginning right down here, I can select all of these points and then bind them. Alt click on the pink bone and come in and just come down and select everything and find it just like that. So now we have this setup and it's starting to shape up. Now we need to basically repeat these steps, but come over here to the coat triangles layer and start again. This time we don't have to worry about attaching anything to the torso. It's all about what's going on with the coach bones. So using I on the keyboard we can select the endpoints tool. Alt, click on that front top, coats bone. And then I'm just going to use Command a to select all of the design work and then just bind those points. And then Alt click on the bottom front coat bone and lasso that rectangle and then bind the points. Come over here to the other side. Alt click on that top back coats bone lasts all the points and bind and then come down here and last all those points and bind. Then we have the coat buttons. So coming in here, I can Alt click on the front top coats bone, Command a to select every single point and then bind them. And then Alt click and come down here. And we're just going to worry about these last two buttons down here, along with of course the pocket. So once we have all that selected, we can bind those points. And that should then work for us. And then we have the shading. So coming over here I can Alt click on the front coat bone that's on the top. Select everything in buying the points. Come down here and all to click for this part of the shading. And we're just going to lasso everything like this down here. Find those points. Alt, click on the top back bone and come in here and just lasso everything that's on top. And bind. And Alt click on the pink bone, making sure that we select what we need to select and not those blue points. And then we can bind just like that. So now the coach should be bound and ready to go. If I come back here to the chat layer and just start to move things around, you can see that as I bend, the coat is reacting how it should, even though it's bending this way, the coat is staying straight due to how the bones are reacting. However, if I were to come in here and start to move around with the bones, you can see we have some different things going on, which of course, don't quite work because we need to implement smart actions. But once again, we have the basic framework in place and things are starting to shape up. So we'll pause here and up next, we can bind the shirt. 10. Binding the Shirt: For this video, we are working off of 08 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. We're going to focus on binding the shirt now that the coat is complete. So I'll come down here and hide the coat and this time reveal the shirt. And so we can come in and begin working. And one other thing you'll notice whenever I go to frame 0 and work with the rig, we have these influence clouds surrounding all the bones and that has to do with bone strength. Honestly, I find it kind of annoying. And I don't believe we're going to need it for this course. So I'm just going to click on the bone strength tool or S on the keyboard. Use Command a or Control a. And then at the top where it says bone strength, simply select that number, enter in 0 and hit Enter. That will remove the bone clouds, which will allow us to see things easier. So with that out of the way, we can now jump over to the shirt. Make sure you are still on frame 0. And let's come in and drop down shirt, click on the main shirt layer inside that group. And we can begin the process of binding. We only need to focus on the torso bones for this. So with shirt selected, I'll hit I on the keyboard to bring up point binding. Alt click on the bottom torso bone. Use Command a or Control a to select all of the points. And then we can bind points just like that. Then I can come up in alt click on that top bone. Except this time we're going to lasso around and make sure that we select all of the top points like so, including this one right here. Not all of those. Let's try that one more time. There we are. And then we can bind the points just like that. The issue with this particular setup is that the bones are a little bit offset from where they need to be. We can also adjust these points, but once again, we want to match the red points closer to where the bottom of the top bone is. Let's come over here to the chat bone layer really quick and grab the transform bone tool. And then click and drag and just move this torso bone down a little bit. And that's going to allow us to offset everything that's connected to it. But I just want to move it down a little bit. But I also wanted to come in and make sure that nothing else is being offset by that movement. So let me reveal all the layers really quick by clicking on that layer comp button and choosing show all layers. And you'll see here as I move these bones, it's moving everything that's connected as I said. So I just want to make sure that nothing is to offset from what I did here. And I don't think it is. I just wanted to cover that a little bit more. And I might move the head up a little bit as well as the neck just to kinda repositioned some stuff here. But I think for the most part, we're okay. Just kinda offsetting a little bit. So there we go. Now, let's go back to that shirt. Once again, we can come in and hide the coat. So looking at the shirt, look at the shirt design. And if we look at where the points are compared to where our bones or app, it's still a little bit offset. And so that's not a big deal. I'm just going to come in and move this one up just a little bit, as well as this one. And then move that one up. And this one. And there you go. We can now begin the process of binding. Let's hit I. And everything is looking good because we've already bound these torso bones. So let's now move over here to the shirt design. And we can start with the bottom torso bone. Once again, I'm just going to Alt click on that and then lasso. The bottom part of the design just like that, all the way across. And then I can bind those points. The same goes for the top bone. Just come in and select all of these top points making up that design. And then we can find those points. And then you have your shadow. Just with the top bones still selected. I can come in and select that shaded area with those four points and bind. Alt click on the bottom bone and come in and select. And we can bind. So now with all that set up, We should be good to go with the shirt. If we come in. And again, it's kinda hard to see this because of what it's doing back here. But as we move this, you can see the design is moving along with the bending. So that's actually pretty good. Until we do this, then it's not. But again, smart actions will save the day as they always do. For now. We just got everything bound and that's good for this part of the process. So let's pause here and up next, we can finish up with binding the hair. 11. Binding the Hair: For this video, we are working off of 09 chat vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. We're going to focus in on the head group first. So let's open that up. And you'll recall that we bound the hair group to the head bone. And that's actually what we want for that part. But when it comes to the hair strands, that's a different story. We're going to use point binding for that. Since we have multiple bones making up these particular designs. We can start with hair strand two, since it's at the top. And I'm just going to zoom in here and take a look at what I have going on here. First, hair strand 12 were originally linked to the head and I did that as a place holder just temporarily. I'm now going to take the layer bind tool and just click off on each of these layers so that way the group is no longer bound to the head. So starting with hair strand two, we can drop this down. This is the large hair strand. And we're going to go to that bottom layer and start point binding. I on the keyboard will allow us to select bones. And I'm just going to come in here. Looking at this. I think the bones kinda offset somehow. So if I click on the bone layer and take the transform bones tool and just move this down a little bit. I think I can get it back to where it needs to go. And same with that one. I did a little bit of moving with the head bone and stuff last video. And so I think some of this stuff just got a little bit misplaced, but we're good to go now. So coming back here to hair strand two, I'm going to hit I to select the bind points tool. And then Alt click on that first bone that we see for the hair. Hold in command and hit a to select all the points for that hair. And then we're just going to bind the points. And then Alt click on the next bone and we're just going to keep going. So in last so mode I can just come in. And let me try that again. Sometimes it's a little bit finicky, but we can select those points and bind Alt click and come down here. And again, you're just going to select the points within the area and bind. Come down here and bind. And then down here we can bind these. There you go. Next, let's go to the shading. And this is going to be a little bit different. Let's all to click on that second bone, command a and bind points. Then we can come down here and Alt click. We're going to select those points next. And I can just come in and select everything going down like so. And bind points. Come down to this part. Again, just select all that. Bind points, then come down here and bind those points. Then you have the highlights. Let's Alt click on that first bone and select all the points with Command a and bind, Alt click and lasso, and bind, Alt click and lasso and bind. And I think you're starting to get the idea. So let's just keep going. Getting close here. So hopefully this should work and bind those points. So now with hair strand to set up, we can go over to hair strand one, which is a little bit less complicated, and repeat the steps. Hit I on the keyboard holding Alt, click on that first bone, use Command a and bind your points. Hold an alt click on the second bone. And we can come in here and I'm taking some liberties since this shape is a little bit more complex, but I can just come in like that. Bind points. Alt click. Let's start with this and go all the way down. Oops, we don't want all those. We just want to hear. There we go. Bind points. And then we can start like right here and come in and bind these points. And we should be good to go. And then we go down to the back hair, which is actually inside the body. It's the last group and inside of the body group. And you'll see it's right here. We can drop this down and we can work with this. And again, this is pretty simple. So click on back hair inside of the back hair group, hit I to select the bind points tool, holding Alt and click on that first bone for the ponytail. Use Command a or Control a to select all points and then click Bind points. I'll click on the second bone. And we're just going to come in. Once again, just selecting points here, just like that. And then we combine those. So now we have half and half. And the same thing will be applied to the shading really quick. So just coming in here, I'm going to just select all the points and bind. And then I can Alt click on this one and just kinda come in here like this and grab those points and bind them like so. So now we have something that looks like this. And actually we could bind that one as well. So we can't go like this and this and that, and that will bind those. There we go. And then we have shading to, which is just another shading layer. So let's bind it to the top bone. And then we can come in here and let's draw out a selection field like so in buying those points. And now we should be hopefully set up for the shading, moving along with the hair. And there you go. So now if we come back here to the bone layer on frame 0 and take the manipulate bone tool and play around with this. You can see that we have some functionality here working. And it's actually not moving too bad. We probably won't have to do too much correction with it. Especially since it's public going to be mostly controlled with dynamic bones. We can see here that this is actually looking pretty good. We can have some movement. And then the ponytail, once again, it just kind of bobbing up and down, giving you a little bit more to work with. And there you are. We have now bound our hair to the hair bones. 12. Anchoring with Target Bones: For this video, I'm working off of 10 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. We're now going to begin the process of placing target bones. Target bones allow us to anchor in certain parts of the rig. For instance, if you want your rig to appear, that the feet are planted on the ground and that there's gravity. Anchor bones are a great resource. And the same goes if you want to create a squash and stretch effect, you don't have to do it just on the ankles. You can do it with Arms, any sort of object or body or whatever you wanna do. But we'll keep it simple and focus on the feet for this course. The first thing I want to do is make sure I'm on the bone layer. And I also want to make sure I'm on frame 0. Next, grab the ad bone tool. And we want to make sure that nothing is selected for this. So Alton click outside so that no bone is read, nothing is selected. And then we're just going to come down here and click once to establish a pin bone. Now you could do a traditional bone like this if you wish. However, I feel pin bones work just as well. And they're a little bit neater in terms of how they look on the canvas. And then we have the second target bone. But you also want that to be independent. Just click off with Alt click to make sure nothing is selected. And then click over here to establish the second target. Now how you have your targets setup really depends on how you create your characters. If I didn't have my ankles established here, this would be a little bit different. I would probably bring the targets closer to the heels and have the center of gravity focus there. But again, given how the ankles are set up, it actually makes more sense to alter this so that the target bones are focused at the edges of the leg bones here. And then we can adjust the foot bones to compensate for that. So let's take the transform bone tool. I'm going to grab this target and let's just move it over and put it right there. And you'll notice as you get close to these bones. So I'll do it with this one. It will automatically snap to the edge of a bone. So that is a good example that and actually looking at this, I might come in and move this one down just a little bit more with the transform bone tool and then place it down like that so it's closer to the edge of the pants like this one is. The thing about target bones is you really want everything to connect in order for this to work. And so we want to adjust the foot bones so that they are connected to the target. And if we grab this bone and bring it up, we can snap it to the center of that target. Now this doesn't really work for the feet. But if we rotate it down, you can see that we can get something to kinda work out. Now it might be beneficial for us to move this down even more. So I can move the target may be down closer to here. And then we can bring the leg bone down like that. And then we can take this foot bone as long as we can select it. We have to zoom in just to grab it. And then snap it in just like that. And then rotate it down like so. And we can repeat this process now for the other side. Let's just grab the target and bring it down. Grab the edge of this and just scale it up a little bit. Make sure the target is snapping on. And for the same with the foot, make sure it snaps over and we can bring it down to establish it just like that. So once you have your bones connected, you need to tell Moho what to do with these two new bones. First, let's take the select bone tool and we can click on the right bone that we just established and rename it to front targets. And then hit enter. Now if you were doing multiple targets, let's say you had targets on the feet and the hands on the head. You would probably want to be more explicit with your names. But since I plan to only use two targets for the rig, front target and back target should suffice for what I'm doing. Now, once you've established what the targets are, once you've named them, you want to target them by using the bone that comes before the target, essentially, which is going to be the calves. And so let's click on the front calf. Come over here to bone constraints. And I want to come down to where it says target. Click on that. And here we're going to see all of the bone names. And then we want to go all the way down to front target. And click. Once we do this, you'll see that we establish a target just like this in the middle. To indicate that this target has been assigned. We can click on the back leg calf and assign this then two back target, which again, we'll do the same thing in terms of how it's visually representing this. So now, if we come back here and we can go to frame one. If I were to come in and let's say take the pelvis bone and move it down. You can see that we have something like this going on now. Of course the legs are glitchy, but what's happening here is whenever we move this down, it's basically treating these as focal points are gravity points. So that basically we can bend down the legs bend and we can have that sort of grounded book. Of course, ignoring the glitched legs. Now, you can notice that the feeder rotating as we go up and down. And you could command in manually correct this as you go. So you can see I can kinda do this and it works for the most part. We can get those heels lined up and it's not looking too bad. But we could also, let me just remove these keyframes really quick. Go back to frame 0. Select the select bone tool with B on the keyboard. And this time I'm going to hold shift and click on the front foot so that both feet bones are selected. And if we come over here to the bone constraints, the second option down is independent angle. If you click on this and close. And now if we were to come in and try moving this around, you can see that the feet remain planted on the ground. And because of how we have the ankles set up, we could come in and maybe do some smart actions for this and we might actually end up doing that just to kinda help. You can see though, that it's looking a lot better than it was. We can at least kinda hide the fact of what it's doing and we just kinda have to be aware of the limitations. You know, you can't maybe go like this unless if you decide you want to go in and adjust a smart action to compensate for that along with everything else. But that is looking good. I think it suits what we're doing for this rig. So I'm going to pause here and up next, we can keep working with this character. 13. 402: For this video, I'm working off of 11 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. We now want to look at angle constraints for some of the body parts because I think it'll help us when it comes to correcting certain movements. Here is a good example of this. If we come in and we click in, rotate the hand, you can see that we can basically just rotate it around and around and around. And that might be something that you want. However, in my case, I don't. It can be easy to accidentally rotate it too far when you're trying to animate and it can cause problems. The same goes for the feet. You can come in here and do your rotations. Now, since we do have independent angle establish and we are using anchors or targets, it does act a little bit differently. Instead of moving the feet, like we would traditionally, we can move them with the targets and then rotate them using the foot, as you can see to do so. But at the same time, you could come in here and rotate the foot over and over and over. And it's gonna be kinda wonky. So my point is we need to come in and add in some constraints to help with our movements. It'll help with animation and save on creating errors as we go through the process. So first, let's focus on the hands. We can take these selected bone tool and click on the front hand. And at the top. Under bone constraints, you can see that we have what is called angle constraints and it's the first option on the top. So if we click on this, we have the ability to enter in the range for how far we can rotate this bone. And if I come down here, you're going to see we have a visual representation of this as well with this red line. So if I come in here and let's just kick this back to negative 20 and 20. You can see as I do this, it updates in real time. Amy get a visual representation of what this is going to do when we rotate. So if I close this and we were to test it out, you can see now I can create some rotation, but I go up against a wall, so to speak. I can't go any further. Therefore, I can't easily break the rig or the animation when it comes to working with the hands. As you can see here, the difference, it's pretty clear. So what that means is I need to go back in and do some constraints for the backhand. So let's select the back hand with the sludge bone tool. Also unframed 0 in on the chat bone layer. Come over here to bone constraints. And we're just going to go down and change the constraints from negative 20 to 20 and then close. And now this hand should also have no problem when it comes to animating. So let's come down here and focus on the next obvious choice, which would be the feet. We can set both up at once if we wish. So I could click and hold and shift and click on the other and come in and set your angle constraints just like this. Now because we have independent angled turned on it isn't going to be as big of a thing. But I will put this to negative 30 and 30. So that means if we are moving along here, we could come in and set this so that we can't go too far with the rotation. And even though we have independent angle, it still helps. Now, you might want to disable constraints during certain instances simply because you do have independent angle turned on. And if you have the constraints turned on and the independent angle turned on, it will actually override the independent angle option. So when you do bends and that sort of thing, your feet will once again do that rotation effect. So turning on angle constraints for the feet is best served just for temporary measures, just to animate. And then you can turn it back off. And you can even reign that in a little bit more if you wish, but I think that should be okay. So now we can move over and look at some other things such as the head. If we come in and rotate this, you can see we could rotate it wherever. It can do all sorts of weird things. So let's come over here and click on that head bone, dropped down the bone constraints. Go to angle constraints. And this time let's enter in negative 30 and 30 and see what that does. So now if we go up and down, it's actually much more manageable and it looks more realistic. The problem, of course, the lies with the neck, but we can constrain that as well. So you can come over here and we can add in some constraints for the neck, maybe a little bit less than the head. So negative 20 and 20, we can come back and you can see now we can go that far with it. And then over this far with it, which I think actually is pretty good for what we want to do. Then you have the body, so we could go all the way around and so on and so forth. So once again, you might want to just come in here and add in some constraints to kinda help with all this. Let's just try negative 20 and 20 and see what that does. So we can go back that far forward, that much. Coming back, I might actually just extend that a little bit more, maybe to negative 30 and 30. So we can go all the way back like that and all the way down like that. And I think that's a little bit better. And for the top torso bone, we should also kind of bring that in as well. Negative 30 and 30, maybe the same as the other one. We can kind of see here. And again, it just depends on how far you want to bend. Maybe a little bit more. So I can come back here to the, to the constraints and just bring this up to negative 40 and 40. We have a little bit more motion if we wish to have it, and I think that should be fine. So then if we come down here and just take a look at what we have going on, I think everything else is fine. Again, you could go through and play with all this and we could do various things with it. But I think it's looking pretty good. So we now have constraints in place which will help with some of the movement. I'm going to pause the video here and up next, we can start adding in smart actions, which will help us correct those weird anomalies were getting with the bends. 14. Correcting First Front Arm Bend with Smart Bone Actions: For this video, we are working off of 12 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. We're now going to start implementing smart actions to help correct some of the issues we're having with the rig. As an example, if I grab the manipulate bone tool and I'm on frame 0, and I click on that bone layer and we come in and we start to bend the arm. You're going to see that we have this weird anomaly occur where we have this gap. And that happens a lot. We have it here. We have it here, and we move the legs. You can see that it's just not quite working the way it should. And so what we need to do is go in and make those corrections with smart actions. And we're going to start with the arms. Now the first thing you'll need to do is bring up the Actions panel. And you can do so by using Command K or control K. If you're on Windows. You can also go up to Window and then go to actions from the list. Once you do this, you'll want to take the selected bone tool or B on the keyboard. Make sure you're on frame 0 and make sure you have the bone layer selected. You're going to want to create a smart action for the offending bone. So what is the offending bone? Well, the easiest way to determine this is to use the transform bone tool. So if you go to 1 second or one frame in, I should say, and you take the transform bone tool and we look at the arm and we start to rotate the bones individually, it becomes clear where the offending bone is. So if we click and drag on the top one, you can see actually it's not creating any real issues for us. We might have to do some stuff up here with the shoulder, but that would be minor and we'll see if that is the case. But if we come in and start rotating the bottom part of this, you can see that that's where the issue is. It's this bone right here. And so once you find your offending bone, we're going to select it with the actions panel open. Click on the New Action button, and this will bring up the name of the bone that you have selected. This is going to create what's called a smart action or a smart bone. And this will allow us to make those corrections when we move the bony certain way. So once you have the name the same as the bone, you can click Okay to go inside. Once you're inside of this action, there's going to be some changes. First, you'll notice that there's a big red arrow next to front forearm on the actions panel. This indicates you're inside of that action, as well as the blue timeline. So there's a few visual indicators to let you know that you're not animating on the main line. When you're in this action, you're isolated from everything else and you're just focusing on the corrections that will be needed. So to correct this, we first need to replicate the problem. Let's go to frame 24. I like to give us 1 second of animation when making smart corrections, because sometimes you can go back through that animation and make further corrections to help smooth certain things out. So while on 1 second or 24 frames in, I can grab the transform bone tool and start to rotate this up. And it's important to get this as close as you want it. In terms of how far you feel you're going to raise things up, like your arm. And in this case I can just bring it right about there. I think that will be a good limit. Now, if we page back through, you can see what's going on here. It's just the action that we've seen before in it's broken glory. So now we want to come over here to the layers and find the front arm and start tweaking with that. So dropping the front arm group, I can go into the front arm vector and also unframed 24. I'm just going to come in here and start to untangle these vectors. Because as you can see, that's basically what's happening here. So let's grab that bottom point and just move it up like so. And there's another point right here. I can click and drag and move it over like this. So now once you do that, you're getting something that looks a little bit more natural. You can only move the points around and use the curvature tool while working this way. If we come back here and just page through, you can see that the arm bend has been corrected for the most part. But there are a couple of things I would like to do, such as coming in and just kinda bringing these points in a little bit more, kind of down like that. And depending on how you want this to look. The curvature tool I could come in and make this a more definitive bend. So perhaps something like that. Also, you'll note that while doing this, I accidentally put this all on frame 23. I do that sometimes when I'm moving quick, if that happens to you, just select the frames that you just sat down and click and drag and put it to frame 24. And you should be fine. So now if we come back and look at this, you can see that it's looking like that and it's looking pretty good. Now again, we could go in and let's say at frame 12, continue to add even more enhancements. Like I could come in here and try to just make that look a little bit less flimsy. And then we can come back and you can see we can kind of go like this now, creating a more natural bend. So now we can go to the front arm details and just continue doing this. As you can see, we have the arm right there and it's moving and looking good. What I could do is just command and while on this action, grab those details. Maybe just kinda rotate them over a little bit. It's kind of see what that looks like and that's looking pretty good. It looks a little bit more convincing. And then you have the other design points on the bottom of the arm which seemed to be tracking just fine so we shouldn't have to do anything there. Next going to shading, I can tell we have some issues here, I think. So as we bend the arm, you can see that the shade is sort of falling off the arm at around 12 frames and it never quite gets back there. So let's start at frame 24 and see if we can make some corrections to this. First, I'm going to come in and just grab this point and try to make it a little bit more symmetrical in that regard. But by coming in with the curvature tool, I should be able to tweak this a little bit and just kind of move it into place like that. There we go. So now if we come in and move this, you can see it's looking a little bit better. And then we have the highlights for the front arm. And this is a little bit more screwed up. So you can see here that basically these two points move and track. And as we move up, it kind is bunches everything up and we don't want that. So now we're going to focus just on these two points to untangle this little mess that we created or I created. You guys are just coming along for the ride and being traumatized. Nods. Okay. We'll get this. So we're just going to move this over and just kind of get that situated. And then we're just going to move this one over like that. Let's move it up like that. And then we can come in and fill in the highlights with this shape. And you can even use the curvature tool if needed to get the points that are needed to help create this effect. So now if we come back like this and we page forward, we can kinda see what this looks like. It kinda bows out a little bit too much at 12 frames. So I'm just going to come in and play with that and get it, manipulate it and moved over like so, just like that. So you kinda have this going on now. And again down here, we just kinda have this little issue. You can just kinda bring that stuff out. And there you go. That's looking pretty good. So now we have the front forearm complete. If we double-click and go back out here to the main line and go to the chat bone layer. And we grab the hand now and we bend this. You can see that the smart actions are working and everything seems to be in place and that is looking good. So with that established, I'm going to pause here and up next, we're going to keep working on the arms to make sure that everything is set up and polished. 15. Correcting Second Front Arm Bend with Smart Bone Actions: For this video, I'm working off of 13 chat vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. In the last video, we went in and added a smart action for the front forearm. So the bend now fixed and looking pretty good. However, if we take the arm and bend it back this way, we're going to repeat the error that we're seeing on the other side. And that's because we did not set up a smart action for the bend going this way. But we can easily do this by coming back here to the start at frame 0. And with the Chad bone layer selected, hit B on the keyboard and select that front forearm bone and bring up the Actions panel. Once again, Command K or control K. If you're on Windows and click on the New Action button to create a new action. This time, you're going to have the bone name with a two after it. And that's what you want in this case. This will allow us to create a second action for the bone. And once you're good at, you can click Okay to go inside the action, to get started. Just like before, we're going to go to frame 24 or 1 second in. Take the transform bone tool. So T on the keyboard in this case, while on the bone layer, click and drag and rotate this all the way up to about where you think. You'll go with it. And I think right about there should be fine. We are at frame 24 still. You can see we have those keyframes, but we want to come in and start correcting the front arm as it bends this way. So let's go over to the front arm group, find the front arm vector. And we can come in here and start playing around with untangling the vector points. So I should be able to come in and just kinda wrap things around like that. And just like how we had it bent the other way, I can come in here. And we're just going to bring these points down like so to kinda help with the elbow. And something like that should be fine. And again, if you want a more definitive band, you can always take the curvature tool and come in and play with how everything is looking like that. So now if we page back through this, you can see that there is a little bit of an issue due to how we adjusted the points and the curvature. So at frame 12, I'm just going to come in and bring this point out a little bit. We can even bring this up and bring that up to kinda just help with the shape of the arm. And then the same goes for the curvature right here. I'm just going to bring this in a little bit. And because we have a couple of points close together, we might have to come in and adjust the curvature right here as well. So maybe about like that and something like that. So now you have the arm bending that way and it's shrinking up a little bit too much. So I could just come in and bring those points out to a more natural bend. So it kinda goes like that. And then you can choose how you want to animate it out from there. Right here we have a little bit of a wonky genus occurring. So once again, just come in just the curvature a little bit. And that's looking better. Okay, so now once we have that set, we need to go through the front arm details and do what we did before in terms of correcting. So if we come up here to frame 24, we can see where the issues lie, mostly with the bottom design pieces. And so I'm just going to come in in lasso those two triangles. And we just wanted to come in and place it so that it's covering the arm. So right over there. And we can also rotate it a little bit just to have it compensate for that and we'll be back. So you kinda have something like this going on now. And at around frame 12, I can also come in here and just make a quick correction, something like that. So it kinda goes up like this. And there we go. Now, the top design could have a little bit of movement to it. You can see that the arm is flexing and doing some different things. And so it could at around frame. Let's see here, 16. We could come in here and add some movement to that if we want. But first, let's go to frame 12 and lasso that design in command with the transform points tool and just click once on that selection. Now when we selected on frame 12, we've created keyframes. And we have that little bit of a movement right there on frame 16. So I could just come in then with those points. And let's just rotate a little bit like that and move it forward. See kinda have something like this going on. Again, just a little bit of movement in it might actually be a little bit too much. So let me just back it up. So just kinda goes with the arm a little bit. And we could also do something similar for the end. Again, just a little bit of rotation and movement to bring it back out. So it kinda goes like that. There we are. Next, we can go to the shading. And once again, we are looking for untangling the vector points here. And if we look at this, it's pretty easy to see what's going on here. This bottom point is getting wrapped around and it's just not doing us any favors. So we can come in here and start to untangle this as best as we can. Kinda bring those points up and bring these points over. And then I can come in and start to shake this up so that it makes sense with the original shape. And if I come back through here, I can take a look at all this. Maybe at frame 12, I can come in with the curvature tool and just tighten things up a little bit as well as command and move this up. Just kinda by the way, like so. So you kind of have something going on like that. And you go up like this. So that's looking pretty good. And then we go over here to the highlights. And it's just the same thing, ensuring that the bottom part of the arm here is consistently highlighted. You can see here at the final bend it's a little bit off, but I can come in here and just move it in right there. And maybe just move it in out a little bit right there. Now throughout the whole bend, it might not be quite right. So I'm going to backup to frame 12. Just make those corrections. And you can use the curvature tool if you feel it's necessary. Unframed six, I'm just going to make a couple of more adjustments like that, just to help the keys along frame 18. Same thing. Since I did a bit of a steeper curvature effect there. I can just come in and curve it around like that. There we go. It's looking pretty good. So now we have that portion of the arm taken care of. If I come back here to the main line, go up to the chat bone layer, grab the manipulate bone tool, and we bend the arm like that. You can see it goes like this and it goes like that. So it's looking pretty good. The curvature might be a little bit too intense with this. So maybe if I go back into that action really quick and just look because it gets really tense right there at around frame a teen. So if I go back into that front arm and look at the curvature, I might just scale that back a little bit here. So come over here and let's try to find that Bezier handle. It looks like right here I want to adjust it a little bit. And I can just adjust that a little bit as well. And again, you have this little dip right here due to the curvature. You can go in and adjust that as much as you feel is needed. But I think that looks a little bit more consistent. We might need to go in then and adjust the highlighting. Just because I made that quick change. Scale that back a little bit thick. Everything else is looking OK. And there we go. We can now go back out here to the main line. And we should be good to go with that arm. I'm going to pause the video here and up next, we're going to keep adding smart actions. 16. Correcting Back Arm Bends with Smart Actions: For this video, I'm working off of 14 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. We're going to dive back in now and quickly take care of the back arm, which is very similar to how we took care of the front arm and then move on to the legs. So let's come in here. And since we've done this before, I'm going to go through this rather quick or as quick as I can. So let's click on the back forearm. Come over here to the Actions panel. And we're going to create a new action with the same name and click Okay. Come over here to frame 24, grab the transform bone tool, while of course on the bone layer, come in and rotate the arm up as far as you feel you need to rotate it. Then we're going to drop the bone layer down and locate the back arm near the bottom of your Layers list, you can drop that down. Click on back arm. We're going to zoom in here and just very quickly swap these two vectors around and try to shape the arm up so that it looks a little bit more presentable. And we can bring these points more in line to create a DEP like so. And if you wish, you can also use the curvature tool to help with the bend. So it's looking like that. Now we want to focus on the other details. So if we come over here and take a look at what's going on. And if it's easier, you can also hide the torso. We wanted to just animate this out and the triangles on the bottom part of the arm need work. So with those details selected, I'm just going to move in, rotate them over like so, and bring them in line. And then just page through and make sure that it's looking pretty good. We have some issue here with the design, starting at around frame 12 on the top of the arm. I can just select that and maybe move it in a little bit. So it kinda looks like that. And then we have that flex occurs. So at frame 24, I can take these bottom rectangles and just kinda move it out a little bit and maybe even rotate it a little bit like so. So we kinda have this going on now. And we can do the same for this top design. Just lasso it really quick. And we can just nudge it. So maybe out like that. Rotate it. So it's more in line in this kind of line it up. So you can see now there's a little bit of movement occurring there. Jump over here to the shading. We need to go in and unwrap this mess. So we can start with this point on frame 24. I'm just going to grab it and move it up, grab this one and move it up, grab this one and move it over like that. Move it up, and then over like so. And this part doesn't matter as much, just as long as it's outside of the design. And I can take the curvature tool and just kinda tightened some stuff up like this. So now if we come down and we look at all this, we can see what's going on. And it's looking pretty good. Jump over here to your highlights. And once again, just correct to make sure that it's visible and everything's looking good. So we can back up. And as polygon be some anomaly is there, usually is due to just how we use the curvature tool and all that. And you can use a curvature here as well, but I don't think it's really necessary. I can just kinda come in here and make these adjustments. So it kinda looks like this and perhaps bring it closer to the line work. Just like that. It's looking a little bit better. Unframed 24, I could just stand to drop that a little bit more. There we go. So now with that complete, we can back up by going up to the main line and double-clicking. And we're going to create the second action for the bend for the other way. Because if we test this out really quick, we'll find out that the band is now working this way, which is great. But when it comes to going down this way, it doesn't. Let's come over here to the chat bone layer. Grab the selected bone tool, click on the forearm once again, create your new action and click Okay. Go to frame 20 for this time we're going to rotate this way. Now I'm not sure how much I'm going to be rotating the arm this way. So let's just go right about here. And we can correct for this movement. Go all the way down here to the back arm, find the back arm main layer inside of its group. And we can start the process of untangling. So it's kinda come up like this and I can bring these points in as well. And it looks like that right now. Again, if you desire, you can try to make the bend a little bit more definitive like that. So you have something like this going on. And that's looking good. Let's jump over here to the details and just take a look really quick. And actually that part seems to be working well. But I might come in and just make a couple modifications just to help with the movement of the arm. So you can see a kind of moves along like that. And I think everything else is looking good. So go over here then to shading. Once again, just a quick correction. It seems like the vectors aren't as messed up when we go this way versus the other way, which is nice. It makes for a quicker process for correcting the mass. So we can just come in here and modify this and get it where we need it to be. And that's looking pretty good. Go over here to your highlights and this is the one I guess that didn't quite make it, but that's okay. I'm just going to come in here and try to untangle what happened here. So come in like this. And we just kinda want that to wrap around like so. And using the curvature, I can bring some of that in. So if I take a look at what it's doing here, we basically just need this to be more compressed towards the line work. Again, taking the curvature tool and holding Alt, I can adjust the individual Bezier handles. It just kinda come in here and make the corrections. At around frame 12. I might just want to come in and increase this a little bit so that way it's somewhat visible. There we are. So it kinda have this going on. And there we go. So now you have the back arm going in the opposite direction. So if we double-click on main line and come back up to the Chad bone layer. It goes this way. And it goes this way. Of course, the hand isn't quite right, but that's all going to be worked on. When it comes to creating the switch layers with the hands will have different hand poses. So right here it's fine. But when it's down like this, you might want it to be different. Or when it's up like this, you might want it to be swapped or just show different parts of the hand are different hand poses such as pointing fingers, thumbs up, whatever you wanna do. We'll get there. But for now we've corrected both arms. I'm going to pause the video and up next, we can jump down to the legs. 17. Correcting Legs with Smart Bone Actions: For this video, I'm working off of 15 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. We're now going to jump over to the legs and continue building up these smart actions. And this should actually be simpler compared to the arms, since there are less details to pay attention to. First, let's come over here and examine what we're looking at. If we click on the chat bone layer on frame 0 and select the manipulate bone tool. And I come in and grab the anchor, or I grab any part of this and start to move it. You can see that we are getting that familiar looking glitch with the bend. So as demonstrated before, in order to isolate these things, you have to figure out what is the offending bone. And in this case it's going to be the calf bones that are causing that to happen. Which means we need to create our smart actions on that bone. So let's come over here and click on the Select bone tool. And we're selecting the front calf and come over here to your actions panel, which is Command K or control K. If you're on Windows to bring that up, click on the New Action button. Make sure it's named front calf. And then we can click Okay to go inside. Now we can jump to frame 24, grab the transform bone tool, and start to rotate. So we can rotate up just like this and go as far as we feel we need to go right about, there should be fine. Coming over here now to the layers, I want to locate the front leg, which is right here, drop that down and locate the leg layer. Here. I can take the transform points tool and start to unravel the mess. Let's just come in and we can move it up like so. And we want to create a more natural bend. I can bring these points over just like that. And then I can bring the bottom points like this in, sort of like this. So you can go down as far as you want in terms of how you want that knee to look. And I can probably just bring it up a little bit like that. So you have something that's going on like this. Now at frame 12, I'm going to make some corrections just to help with the way it looks. There we are. So you kinda go like this and then it goes up like that. And it compresses it a little bit, but I'm okay with that. And with that done, we can jump over here to your shading and it's just a matter of untangling the mess once again. So with that shading layer, you can preview this and see what's going on. And basically those bottom points are wrapping around and going in the opposite direction. So we're just going to grab these points. I can move this one up. I can move that one up. And then we can move this one over. And you can see now we have our shape back, just a matter of doing some minor corrections here. And I can come in and make sure everything is lining up this part right here. I might want to just bring out like that. So that way we keep that straight edge for the shading on that part of the pants. So if I come down like this, we can see what's going on with this. And actually I was mistaken with that one part. Let's make sure that it's actually brought back. I forgot that I created a separate rectangle shape for that part of the shading. And so there's really no need to involve this part since that part is tracking appropriately. You'll see right there that rectangle stays with the pants and moves down. And so we should be okay then just as long as you keep the shading outline intact throughout the motion, making sure that it's consistently lined up. Everything should be good and you should hopefully have no issues. Let's move over here to the highlights. And this is just a matter of making sure we line everything up on frame 24, just like this. And then of course, tracking to make sure everything is consistent throughout. At frame 12, the highlight gets pretty big. So let's just come in and scale it down a little bit like that. And that's looking better. At frame a teen, I can maybe just make a quick small adjustment does come up and make sure that again, the highlights are a little bit more definitive. There we are. So now we have the front leg complete. We can jump back up here and double-click on main line on the actions panel. So now if we test this, I'm just going to jump ahead to frame 1. I can grab the transform bone tool. And click and drag. And as I move the leg up, you can see that it's animating fine. And there should be no issue now with what's going on. So what about bending the other way? Well, that isn't so much a concern, at least with this particular rig because we're always going to intend for the legs to bend this way. I can't ever see the legs bending the other way. At most he can do something like this. But really there's no need to even create that second action because we just never get to the point where we're going to invoke that other bend with the arms. That does make sense though. So that means we just need to focus on the back leg. I'm going to jump back here to frame 0, making sure I'm on the chat bone layer. I can hit B on the keyboard to bring up the select bone tool and then click on the back calf so that we can create a new smart action with the actions panel. Make sure that the action name is set to back calf and click OK. Jump over here to frame 24. And we're just going to repeat what we did before by clicking and dragging on the leg and moving it up like so. So now with that set, we can move down to the back leg, group, locate the leg layer, and start to untangle these two points on the bottom. And just kinda bring everything up a little bit. And of course you can define this as much as you want. So you can bring it up just like that. It's looking pretty good. We shouldn't have to worry about too much else. And we'll compare it to the other leg here in a moment. But let's jump over here to shading. And this one's going to require some untangling like usual. So just come in here and untangle that vector. Bring it up so that it's outlining that leg. And we can come down and test this. And it looks like it's working out. And then you have the highlights. Again. You just want to make sure that the outline stays intact throughout the animation. So I can come in here and start to move some of these things around to ensure that's what's going to happen. Let me come up here and hide the front legs so I can make sure I can see everything here that we are just to make sure that the highlight is going all the way and we can come back and this is looking good. So now the back leg is complete. I can double-click on main line to go back out and also reveal the front leg. And let's just reveal everything. And in order to reveal everything, if you ever need to, just come up here to the layer comps button, click on it and you'll have a variety of options, but two of which are show all layers or hide all layers. Let's just click on Show All Layers to bring everything back. So now if I jump to frame one or 0 or whatever, just to test this, I can come in and move this. And you can see now we have something that's looking like this and it's not looking too bad. So we have the ability now to bend the legs without a glitch. You can see that the bends are consistent. They don't look too different and everything is looking good. Now you might have some slight issues. It just depends on how you look at this. If you go down really far and again, it depends on how far you plan, I guess, to go down and move this character. But you could go in and adjust this with a smart action, as you can see right here. And so this might be something you have to correct? Again, it just depends on how far you plan to move the rig and do different things with it. But it's something worth pointing out and maybe I'll do a video here. You can see it's kind of in the way. So we might just do a quick Smart action to take care of that. But for the most part, everything here is looking good. I'm going to pause the video and up next we can move on to correcting the torso. 18. Adjusting for Bottom Torso Bends with Smart Bone Actions: For this video, we are working off of 16 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. The last major part of our character that we will have to go in and correct is the body. And so if I come in here and with the bone layer selected on frame 0 with the manipulate bone tool, I can start to bend the torso and it's obvious that things are just not working the way they should. We have constraints in place which helps. But in the end there's a gap here. We just have different things going on with the shirt. If we were to hide the coat. If I come down here and go into the torso, hide the coat. You can see when I bend, we have all sorts of weird distortion going on, similar to how the legs and arms we're distorting. And so this just requires us to create some smart actions to help with the process. So first, let's start with the bottom torso bone. I will go to frame 0 and hit B on the keyboard. To select the select bone tool, I can click on the torso bone. And we wanted to go up to the Actions panel. If you don't have an open, it's Command K or control K. If you're on Windows. And name this action the same as the bone. And click Okay. Go over here to frame 24 while still on that bone layer. And taking the transform bone tool, I can start by rotating back like this. Now will rotate as far back as we can until the constraint stops us. And here we can take a look at what's going on with this particular movement. It's pretty obvious that right here is the biggest part. We have a gap and that's not good. So let's come over here to the layers and go down to the torso group. And inside of that, we want to go into the shirt and locate that shirt layer. Take the transform points tool. And on frame 24 still we're just going to come in and bring the shirt down like that. Now we can do some things to kinda help with this to make it look more like it's fabric. Coming in here on frame 24, I can also adjust the curvature so that we can shrink this in to make it look like gets sort of stretching a little bit. And then down here, I could maybe just bring this out and then take the curvature tool and adjust just kinda how this is looking. So that way it kinda looks like it's bunching up a little bit. So you can have this going on now. Of course we have that leg, which is sort of an issue as we move like this. So one thing we could do is also create some movements for the leg whenever we bend this way. Let's come over here to the front leg really quick. And I will get back here to the other details for the shirt. But since I'm seeing this little issue, Let's just jump over here to front leg, drop it down. And it's just a simple matter of coming in here, clicking on that 1 and just moving it down like that. And so as the movement moves, you can see we just kinda have that slight correction. So that way it's not as obvious that that line is in the way. Jumping back here now to the shirt, we want to ensure the other layers are working appropriately and the yellow design seems to be fine. The shadow could use a little bit of help. You can see that it works for the most part. However, it might be best just to come in here and grab the bottom points like this and move it down. So that way we are covering that portion just like that. And there we go. The other thing we can do now is bringing the coat just to see what it's doing. And it looks like it's working fine. Again, when you bring the codeine though, you can see that it affects this leg. And so we might have to go back here to the front leg really quick depending on how extreme you were with your changes. And just move this down a little bit more so I can come in and just scoot it down just like that. And then even isolate this and just kinda bring it down like that. So it's connected right at that point. And I think that'll help. So now you can see as it bends, we kinda have this going on. Next with the coat. Let's just come over. And I want to find the coat group and drop it down and then click on the coat itself. And I'm just going to make a couple of small modifications to this with the transform points tool holding in command, which will allow me to select points. I'm going to lasso around these points just like that for the coat. And then come in and just rotate it a little bit like that and then bring it over. So now you might have this weird bunch up effect. So I'm just going to make sure that's not getting in the way. And I can kinda drop it down like that. So you can see now it's sort of looking like this. And it just adds a little bit of extra something to what's going on. I might come in here though with these bottom points and just bring everything up a little bit so that we're bordering that leg once again. So it kinda looks like this. And we can keep going with this. So with the design work on the coat, the top part is fine, but this bottom rectangle, we can come in and just move it in. Kinda see how it looks here. It's looking pretty good. And then focusing here on the buttons and the pocket we have here, we can start pass that third button and just come down, select those points, come in and I'm going to rotate. It, just kind of move things down a little bit like that. So if I take a look, you can see it's kinda looking like that now. Not too much of a change, but it does help. And then coming over here to the shading, I'm just going to look to see what this is doing. And actually I'm not sure if I even really need to correct that right now. Not too bad. So now coming back here to the coat, once again, I'm going to do the same thing on the other side. Just coming in here, I'm going to select the bottom points for that part of the coat. And I might have to zoom in here to really select what I want. There we go. Take the transform points tool, just going to rotate and just move it down a little bit. Again. It should just help with some of the movement. Let's take these two points down here and push them in a little bit. Press that one in as well. Just to kind of tapered off slightly. There we go. So you kinda have this just adding a little bit of something to it. So with that side covered, we can double-click on main line and come back out here. And let's grab that bone layer. Come in and rotate it and you can see that it's looking like this and it's not looking bad. Looking pretty good. However, if we rotate like this, we could do a couple of things to help, especially with how the coat is looking. Since we kinda animate the coat this way, we could probably also animate it this way. So really quick, we're going to create a second bend for the torso by clicking on that bottom torso bone on frame 0 and clicking on the New Action button and going inside, jumping to frame 24. It's going to rotate this down. And again, nothing seems to be really all that majorly wrong with this. First, Let's just come down and hide the coat so we can correct the shirt like we originally did with the other bend. So locating your shirt, we can come in and just do something similar. First, we'll make sure we pull that down. And then we can kinda bunch this side up, maybe a little bit. And then using the curvature tool, we can kind of come in and help this effect a little bit more. Just by making it look like this is bunching up as we go down. Again, it's subtle, but it works. And then the shirt design seems okay. And the shadow also seems okay for the shirt. So we should be okay there. And let's come over here now to the coat. I can reveal that. Go to the original co-design. And if we take a look at how this is bending, what I'll do here is select the points for the front part of the coat just by holding command with the transform tool. And come in here and select all of those points. Try that one more time. Sometimes it can be a little bit finicky depending on how clean your selections are. There we go. Got that. And now we just want to rotate down like so. Just kinda move it down. And actually I might move it up a little bit so that we can expose that part. And of course it's bunching up. We don't want that, but we can easily just come in and correct that by going up like so. So when he bends, we kinda have this effect where the coat is sort of trailing along, being affected by gravity. So you can have the shirt exposed as he's bending. It's not much, but it works in up here. We can correct that as well, bring that up. So it's not as weird looking. There we go. And let's do the same thing on the other side, or at least something similar to it, committed and select those points. And just kinda move everything over. Like so, a little bit like that. And of course we have that weird warp effects, so we're just going to come in and replace that. Now might be a little bit too low. So coming in here, we're just going to grab those bottom points and just move them up a little bit like that. So it kinda looks like this. And I think that's looking better. So let's jump over here to the coat designed for this side. And just kinda taking a look at everything. First, I want to bring these triangles or this rectangle, I should say right down here, back so that it's not moving the way it is right now. So we'll just come in, grab it, rotate it, and move it over. We take a look. It's looking a little bit better. I might just scoot back a little bit. And there we are. And if we look at the other designs, it seems like the bottom, once again, is what we need to focus on since that's what's actually being moved. So if we look at this, we can see it comes down like that. Perhaps we could come in and just modify this, move it in, rotate it. Let's go take a look here. And I actually might come in and squish it up a little bit since that's kinda what's happening with the fabric anyway. Kind of squishing it as he's kinda bending down. So that's looking a little bit better, more convincing. Then you have the coat buttons. Which once again, we just need to modify to kinda go in the direction that we want with this bend. And I'll start after that third button and this lasso, everything like that, come in and rotate and just kinda move it over and see how it looks. It's not too bad. We could move the pocket a little bit more, perhaps just individually coming in, maybe moving it back a little bit. And I accidentally did that in frame 25. Not a big deal. Just select what you did on frame 25 and drag it over to frame 24. I do that sometimes when I'm moving quick. And there we are. That's looking better. Finally, if we look at the shading just to make sure it's consistent and we're not losing anything. We can see here near the bottom. We could come in here and adjust the shading a little bit, at least for this part that come in, bring it up like that. We can see what it's looking like right now. And the shading here at the bottom can also be adjusted. So something like that should be fine. There we are. Now I'm looking at this and you'll notice that the shade for the shirt is a little bit off now once we bring back the coat, it's easier to see this. So if I go into that shadow for the shirt, at this point, I'm just going to come in here and expand that shade out. Just kinda like that. Maybe bring it in a little bit like so. I can go like that. So as it bends, you can see we kinda reveal it like that. There we go. So now we have the bend for the bottom torso bone complete. We can pause here and up next, move over to the top torso bone. 19. Adjusting for Top Torso Bends with Smart Bone Actions: For this video, we are working off of 17 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. We're going to jump over now to the top torso bone to make corrections. As of right now, the bottom torso bone is working and we have some different things going on with how it's all looking in, how the shirt bunches up. And basically we've made the corrections we need. But if we try this with the top torso bone, you can see there's still issues. And so we can commit in couple this with the bottom torso bone, but it still isn't enough to correct it. And so we need to come in and add some top torso bone smart actions. The first thing we need to do on frame 0 is take the selected bone tool on the chat bone layer and click on the top torso bone. This is called torso to. And I already have torso and torso to, and I could have torso to one and torso to 2 and all that. But just to make it a little bit explicit, and so that way you know what it is. I'm just going to type in torso, chest, and then hit Enter. So that way we know what this is. So with that, I'm can create a new action, will name it torso, chest, the same as the bone and click Okay. Once you are inside, we can jump over to 1 second in and begin the process of working on our animation. I'll bring the torso back first because I believe that's what I did last time I started by going back and then the second action was going forward. And once we do this, and we can come down here and hide, the coat, will start with the shirt and then work our way up. I'm also going to hide the front arm and the back arm as there's really no need to have all that and why not? Let's hide everything. Let's hide the neck and the color that way it's just easy to see and you know what, the head as well. So with all that, we can look at the torso. And it's obvious that when it's bending this way, things aren't going as planned. And so let's come over here to the torso group. And under that, locate the shirt group. And under that we'll find the shirt layer. Take the transform points tool, and just start to untangle this. So we can go like that. And like the other band, we can come in and make adjustments if we wish to help with the bunching up of things or whatever you want to do. But since this is controlling more the top, you might not need to do that as much. But we can do a little bit of it if we wish. Now for the shirt design, going to that next layer, this is looking pretty okay. There's just a couple of minor issues with the shape of this. So I click in, start to move this around. We can create something that's more correct. And remember, you can always use the curvature tool to help with certain shapes. So I can come in here and just make the modifications I need. Kind of bring some of this stuff in and down and rotate it out and just get it closer to the round shape that we originally had. So now if we come back here and take a look That's looking a little bit more convincing. And then you have the shadow, which is right here. We take a look, It's actually looking pretty good. We could do a little bit of animation, possibly, maybe write down here. You could just do something to make it look like it's moving along with everything else as you can see. But the shirt should now be okay when it comes to bending this way. So let's come up and bring the coat back as that's going to be the next step. And click on the coat layer itself. So on 1 second in, we can come in and I want to grab the transform points tool, which is what I have selected. And starting right here. I'm going to use Command to select all of the points up to that boundary where we move them last time essentially. And then I'm just going to come in and modify this by rotating it just like that. And once it's rotated, I can deselect everything here and start to remold this a little bit. Second, kind of bring it up like that. And keep in mind we're moving up like this. And so we're going to have the coach kinda go like that. And now I'm going to grab that bottom portion of the coat. And we're going to move that down as well. Let's come in and just bring it down and maybe put it right about there. So we have the code rotating like this. And I can do the same on the other side as well. Just coming in. This time, I'm going to just kinda modify the points individually and take this part and drop it down. And let's rotate it like that. Kinda get it into position like so. And then coming back here, I'm just going to finish this up. I can come in and just kinda modify it like that. So if we look at this again, it's looking like that. I might just bring some of these points in a little bit more. Maybe up a little bit more. I kinda got a little bit crazy with this and need to kinda get back to where I was originally. So I think that's looking pretty good. Okay. So now unframed 24, you're just going to take a look at everything here and start to modify. So starting with those triangles on the top, it's going to come in here and select and rotate and start to move things around. It's not looking bad. And then we have this detail right here. Let me just take a look at this. I'm going to want that to rotate like this. Bring it up a little bit. Make sure I'm on the right frame there. And we seem to accidentally move that. And there we go. That's looking a little bit better. Of course, we need to go to the other side as well. So you can see it's looking like this and for the most part, we're okay, but I'm going to come in right here, select these and do some rotation and moving. So it kinda goes up like that. And I think I accidentally moved this one while moving those others. I happen sometimes. Let's just bring that back. So grab it and just bring it back over. Not too shabby. Okay. Maybe just bring that over little, a little bit. So now we can go to the buttons. And it's just a matter Of again, shaping this up. So we're just going to grab these points and it's going to move everything down and over. Like so. And then we can watch this and see how it all pans out. It's obvious to me now that these triangles are moving down way too much. These ones around the back here. Let me just select those and move them up. And think that's looking a little bit more consistent. You can maybe go down a little bit. But I think that's better, which now gives me a little bit more room to come back here and move this pocket where I need it. It's gonna move it up a little bit like that. And then coat triangles once again coming in. We need to just adjust that rectangle one more time. Just doesn't seem to be as consistent as I want it. And that's looking a little bit better. There we are. And then we can go to the final layer for this, which is layer shading. And as you can see, we just have a couple of little things we need to do. I'll come in here and first modify this back one just by bringing everything down like this, getting the modifications in place. So something like that. And then the shading on the other side obviously needs some help as well so I can come in. It's kinda bring everything back and get it situated in a way that's going to work. Select that maybe. And then I'll just kinda come down here. Using the curvature tool. I can make those corrections and it's looking pretty good. Okay, so now we have the body, torso for that side. If I come back out here to the main line, and if I grab the chat bone layer and I come in and we bend down like or bend back, I should say like this. You can see that we have something going on and everything is working. And if we come over like this, It's not quite yet. Because we need to get that other action in. But we can also combine these now a second, bend this one back, as well as that one. And you can see that it's even going further in terms of how it's correcting with a smart actions because we now have two bones working with similar points, modifying and molding and doing all that. But it's working. And we can also come in and even move the coat to a certain degree if we wish. And so there's a lot we can do here with this rig and it's starting to shape up. I know it's taking a while to get all the pieces in place, but that's kinda how it works when you are doing vectors and they have a lot of details. So we are going to pause here because I don't want this to get too long and not next, we can tackle the other chest bend. 20. Finishing Corrections on Torso Bends: For this video, we are working off of 18 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. We're going to jump back into the chest bone and make a smart action for when we bend forward. So on the bone layer, hit B on the keyboard to bring up the select bone tool and click on the torso, chest bone. And we want to make a new action using the actions panel. This is going to be called torso, chest two. And we can click Okay, once inside, I'm just going to jump over here to 1 second in. And we want to bend the chest forward so we can grab the transform bone tool and click and drag and just bend it forward. Just like that. Now, I'm going to come in and go into the torso group, hide the coat for right now we'll start by modifying the shirt. Come down here to the shirt and click on the shirt layer. Taking the transform points tool, I can come in and start making my modifications first by untangling what's going on right there. So now we have something that's looking like this. And I might even bring this out a little bit since it's kinda compressing in. So he's kinda like burp, little bit of a gut going on there, I guess. So that'll work. And we can also come in and again, play with the fabric if you wish, by maybe shrinking this up a little bit and then bunching that out even more. So it can kinda look like this. It's not looking too bad. So there we are. Let's jump over here to the shirt design. And this is going to require just some minor untangling. You can see as it moves that just some things are going where they shouldn't be going. So we're just going to come in here and bring that up as well as that. And that makes the correction for the most part. And if we take a look at this, you can see it's looking like that and that's looking pretty good. And then you have the shadow. So once again, we just wanna make sure everything is consistent. We can see there's a little bit of a issue with these points. Again, just how everything is attached to bones. So we'll just come in here and bring those up and just make sure it's all looking symmetrical or rather uniform and everything now is good to go. So the shirt is complete. We can jump over here now to the coats, which is the more complicated part, and begin the process of modifying. So over here at the coat, we have the band going down. And just like we did in the previous videos, we're going to modify the coat layer to compensate. So we can just kinda fill this out. I will lasso these bottom points like so. And just come in and bring these over like that. Bring this over like so. And since we're moving down, we can maybe do a little bit of a bunch up. But if I come over here and look, I think this is looking okay, just the way this is kinda animating out. What I might do though is just come in and fill in that part right there. It's going to bring it out a little bit. And I might bring these points up a little bit and maybe spread them out again to kinda have that bunched up look. So it's kinda like burp like that. Also during the animation, make sure that you're not seeing the shirt pop out at anytime between this 1 second because that wouldn't make much sense. Okay, so now we have something like that going on. I can grab the other side command and make the modifications that I feel are necessary. And again, we don't have to do too much. Maybe just command and bring these points up a little bit. So that we can kinda see is part of the shirt like that. So it's kinda coming up like this. And I might make some more modifications. Let's kinda coming in like that. So that's looking pretty good. And just anything else you feel should be adjusted for this. Up here. I'm just going to bring that up a little bit so that the neck part here is actually covered and actually looking at that, I guess it's never covered. So never mind. I'm going to leave that. Okay. We're good. So now with the coat, we can move over here to the triangles and just keep moving. So we kinda have this going on and some things are working, some things aren't. Let's just go in and move things around to make it work. So I can come in and bring that back. And we can make that a little bit less and bring it down more. Again, I'm just kinda eyeballing it here. It's not looking too bad. Maybe just a couple more modifications. And then we have the triangles and such Up here. Might just come in and grab these and bring them back. So it's kinda like that. Perhaps this one, or in this case, just select that and maybe bring that one back over like so. There we are. We have our triangles and such over here that are getting cut off. So I'm just going to lasso on this side and do a transformation. And just bring this back a little bit. Kinda see where I'm at with all this. I think this needs that come up a little bit more. And let's come in here and separate this lasso, this command. And let's just focus on that first, because I'm getting a little bit confused here. So let's just come in and rotate that and bring it up. And maybe while it's going down, we can even squish it in a little bit to kind of simulate that squished look that we're doing over there. It's it's kinda going like that. And it probably should just go up a little bit more. There we are, that's looking better. And then for the other triangles that we kinda pushed out, we're going to bring those back right now. So lets just grab those and bring them over and kinda see what we're doing here. It's not looking too bad. We're actually probably going to have to split these triangles up and do them individually just because of how this is all kind of going right now. Let's come in and modify that. It's not looking too bad. And then we can grab this triangle bringing over, kind of see what we're doing here. And rotate that one like that. Maybe bring it over like so. So you kinda have something like this going on now. Maybe just do a slight modification on frame 12, so we kinda have that. Okay, Getting closer, come over here to the buttons. And like we have been doing, we're just going to select the bottom portion here and modify it to get it to kinda work how we want it. And that's actually not too bad. However, I'm going to grab the pocket separately and just do a little bit of a different rotation with that. Something like that, and just bring it down a little bit. And then you have your shading. So we come into the shading, we can take a look here and see what's going on. We just need to come in here and make sure that the boundaries are set. Nothing is growing too much. It looks like the shading is, for the most part, doing what it needs to do. On frame 12, I might come up and just help this out a little bit. And there we go. I would say that's looking pretty good. Okay, so now if we go back here to the main line and just for the sake of visualization, I'll click on layer comps and show all layers. And if we come back to the chat group, I can play around here and see what we can do. So I can move it down like that. We can move it up like so. You can see it's kinda compressing and doing different things. But also I could move it back like this. And in addition, you can see when I move this, we also have the smart action triggering there to make sure that everything at the waist is doing what it needs to. And you can just see now that it's working better, the smart actions are inline and we can even simulate the fabric a little bit and have some fun with that. And there we go. The torso is now complete, polished up and ready to go. 21. Correcting Leg Pop in on Pelvis: For this video, I'm working off of 19 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. We're going to make one more correction and it has to deal with when we bend the legs. I brought this up before. You can see when I go all the way down like this, I'm not sure if we ever would go down that far. But if we do, you can see we have this issue occurring where we have this pop-in essentially. And there's also another issue I want to point out. With the feet. You can see that they're slightly rotating. That's because I have angle constraints in place. You might remember I put those angle constraints in to help with the movement of this to make sure that everything was honed in properly. But I can actually go in and turn those off. So now if I go in, you can see with the angle constraints turned off and with independent angle on, we no longer have that issue. So with that, we want to go in and correct these legs. And to do that, we need to find the offending bone. So if I were to go and test this out, grab a leg here and Let me go over here to frame one and just rotate this up. You can see as I rotate it this way, eventually you're going to hit that point where we have the pop-in. And so we need to add a smart action for the top leg bone. Let's go back to frame 0. Hit B on the keyboard and select that bone, which is front thigh. And then coming down to the actions, we can bring that up and then create a new action called front thigh and then click Okay. Go to 1 second and grab the transform bone tool and just rotate up like so. And I'll rotate up to about this point. It's looking pretty good. We can now come over here to the front leg and grab that front leg layer. And all I'm gonna do is just compress these points in like so. In fact, you might not even have to compress this other one. Just doing this one should be fine. So now if we rotate it up, you can see at no point does it ever do that weird pop in effect. And it looks okay from this perspective. Now for the shading, we can come in here and take a look. And that's looking okay for the most part. However, when we get to this point, it might be nice to have this shade connect to that shade. To do that, I could come down here to the pelvis, go into the shading for the pelvis. And we're just going to move some of these points here, spec coming in and making a connection like that. So if we page back, we can kinda see how that's evolving Just like that. Then there's the highlights. And once again, we can just take a look and it looks like we just lose the highlight near the top a little bit. Not a big deal. Let's come back up here, of course, to the front leg to make sure we're looking at the right asset here. And then I can just come in and we're just going to apply that lyse little highlight really quick to make sure it's consistent. And there we go. If I go back out here to main line now and come up here to the chat bone layer just to test this out. And we were to bend this down. Just like this. You can see that it compensates and we no longer have that pop in occurring with the leg. Also, we don't have to worry about it on the other side because of the fact that it's hidden. So everything else should actually be okay. Once again, we might want to go in and maybe extend the ankles out just a little bit more. As of right now you can kinda see they're breaking a little bit. I mean, you could maybe argue that this could work. But again, this is a very extreme pose. I would say at any other point, those ankles are looking pretty good and we don't have any issues. But again, you could continue to build up and work with your smart actions. And we could do some smart actions here. I don't know if it will be needed because the hair is going to be moving that much. But as you can see, I can move this stuff around and we don't really have any real major issues with glitching. So I think we should be okay there. And there we go. We now have all the smart actions we shouldn't need for correcting body motions in place. We'll pause here and up next, move on to the next section. 22. Adding Smart Pin Bone for Pupils: For this video, I'm working off of 20 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. We now want to dive in and tackle the face features. That includes being able to animate the eyebrows, create blinks, and even move the pupils, which is what we'll be doing in this video. The first thing we'll need to do is create a bone, which will allow us to control the pupils. Coming over here to the chat bone layer, Let's make sure it's selected and then hit B on the keyboard to bring up the select bone tool. We can click once on the head to select it. Then choose the hit a on the keyboard to bring up the ad bone tool. And then come in and place a bone just after the hair strand and it can be a pin bone. So just click once to add the bone. Now, I'm going to come up here and rename this to pupils and hit Enter. Next. I want to come in and assign the pupils to this bone. So if I come down to the head, you can see I have an AIS group. And if I drop that down, we have access to the pupils, which is the second layer in that list. You'll note that we actually cannot layer bind this due to the fact that we already bound the eye is group to the head. And we did that as a temporary thing, just so we could see the head animate correctly. So what we need to do is click on that iss group and then click on the bind layer tool, and then click off so that nothing is bound. Come back here to the pupils. And we want to simply bind the pupils to that new pin bone. So what this will do if we come back here to the chat bone layer, and if I were to grab this and move it, making sure that we are on frame 1 when we do so, you can see it's going to move all of this stuff. And the reason why it's doing that. If I come over here and go back to frame 0 and look at my bone strength. You can see that this has some influence and we haven't assigned these other parts of the eye too anything yet. So this influences grabbing that stuff and moving it along. And we don't want that. So we're just going to click and drag on this and drag all the way to the left until that influences gone. And now we should be good to go. We can now jump over to frame one and try this again. You can see now as I move the bone, I'm able to move the pupils up and down wherever I want. You can even do other things such as holding command or control and enlarge the bone so you can make the pupil's bigger if you wanted to. In this case, it doesn't really work. You can see the space between the pupils also gets bigger. But it is something you can do you want. But mostly I use it as a control to move the pupils around as it makes the process quicker and easier, as opposed to trying to dig through all the layers, get to the pupils and move it manually that way. One more thing I would like to do is just click on the Select a bone tool and click on that new AI bone that we made. And then just click on Show label. That way we can see this and we know what this will be used for as we continue to build up more controls for the face. 23. Controlling Eyebrows with a Smart Bone: For this video, we are working off of 21 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. We're going to continue working in, dive in here and tackle the eyebrows, will create a dial, which will allow us to control how the eyebrows move. And this can be useful once again for creating quick emotions, as opposed to diving through your layers and trying to animate things out manually. The first thing we'll need to do is create a dial, which will be used as the controller for the eyebrows. Let's select the Add bone tool by hitting a on the keyboard. And we want to attach this dial to the head bone, much like we did with the pupils. So I'll Alt click on the head bone to make sure it's selected. And then coming over here, we'll place it above the pupils. And this is going to be a traditional bone and not a pin bone. I also want to make it perfectly straight. And to do this, I'll hold down shift, click and drag up to create that dial and release. We now have the ability to rename this so I can come in and just name it eyebrows and hit Enter. Next, we want to choose the Select bone tool. Come over to bone constraints and enable angle constraints for this dial. That way we have a definitive minimum and maximum setting we can apply and then we can close the panel. Now, we want to come in and add a smart action for this dial, which will directly control the eyebrows with the actions panel brought up. Command K or control K. To bring it up, you want to come over and click once on the new action name. And we can create an action called eyebrows, which is the same as the bone and click Okay. Once inside, we can begin the process of creating the range of emotion for the eyebrows. Now, there are a couple ways you could go about this. You could bring the dial all the way back starting here and have this as the default position. And then you can choose where you want to go in between with all that. It's completely up to you. However, I choose to do it a little bit differently. Not everyone prefers it this way, but here's what I do. First. We're going to make this a 1 second animation, but I want to come over here to frame 12 and using the transform bone tool. So T on the keyboard, I'm just going to simply click once on the dial to set down some keyframes. Now, I can backtrack to frame one, grab the dial and bring it all the way down to the left. You're going to notice that my eyes are floating and I know why I actually forgot to do something, so we'll fix that here in a moment. Just ignore that if you can hear there. So we have the Dial going down just like that. And then it's going to go up to the middle. And then on frame 24, we wanted to go all the way down just like this. So you have this range of motion for the dial. Now, before I go any further, let me back out here to the main line and just fix those eyes. It's a simple matter of layer binding and I forgot to do that. I remember I turned off the bone influence in the last video, but I actually didn't go through this step of binding all these pieces to the head bone. So if you go inside your eyes, we can grab the bind layer tool and just go through and bind everything except the pupils, of course, because those are bound to that other bone, to the head bone. So there we go. So now if I come back here and go to the bone layer, I can go and double-click on the eyebrows action and go in. And you can see now we don't have that issue. I guess I still have some issues with the shading. I must have forgot to link it up to the bones up there, which is kinda weird that I would have forgot that. But there's going to be a special little video at the end for polishing for a reason. Because sometimes even when you're not recording, you're going to forget things or things are just going to pop up that you realise could be worked on. And so we will do a polishing video to take care of all these little minor issues. But anyway, coming back to the matter at hand with the eyebrows, we want to come in now and established the action for the eyebrows. And to do this, we can go to each eyebrow layer that we have here, starting with front eyebrow. Now I'm currently on frame 12 for a reason because I want this to be my default position. So if I use Command F, I can establish keyframes for this layer on that frame. And I can come down to the back eyebrow and use Command F or Control F Once again to establish keyframes for both channels when it comes to this vector. So now I'm going to come back here to the front eyebrow. And you just have to decide how you want this to be set up from here. When you go all the way to the left, do you wanna go angry or do you want to go surprised? Well, let's just decide on this and choose to go angry. So I'm going to select all the points for the eyebrow on frame one. The transform points tool Rotate and just move it down like this. We're going to do the same thing for the back eyebrow. Still on frame 1. Just select those points, rotate and move it down. So now if we play this out, you can see we have this going on. Then we're going to come in, go all the way to the end on frame 24, and then go in the opposite direction. So rotate it like that and just move it up a little bit more. Go to your front eyebrow, rotate back and move up. And we can go about like that. So you can see the dial goes from here to here and we have the eyebrows moving just like that. So now let's go back here to the main line. And coming over here to the chat bone layer, I'm going to turn that bone strength for that new dial all the way down. So that way we don't have that shadow floating around every time we move it. And again, that will be corrected here. But let's jump to 1 second in. I can take this dial and we can move it down. And we can go up to default, or we can go all the way up just like this. So as you can see, we now have controls for the eyebrows in addition to the pupils. So we could quickly decide, okay, I've framed six, he's going to go down like this and we're going to grab the pupils and is going to go like that really quick. And you can see just by doing those two things, we've already established animation and it makes the process quicker and easier when it comes to working. One last thing I'll do in this video is just command. We have this dial right here for eyebrows. Again, since we are learning where everything is at, it might be best to click on that and choose to show the label. So that way you know the difference between these dials as we continue to build things up. So there you go, you can now animate your eyebrows using a smart dial. We're going to pause here and up next, we'll move on to creating blinks. 24. Creating Blink Smart Bone: For this video, I'm working off of 20 to Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. We now want to go back in and create a dial for the blink. And that way we can control it just like the eyebrows. First, let's hit B on the keyboard with the bone layer selected on frame 0, and click on the bone for the head. You have to decide here where you want to set up this dial for the blinks. It really is up to you. It just depends on how you want to set up your rig. In my case, I'll place it on the other side near eye level. So just coming out like this about right here. I'll click hold, shift and drag up to create my blink dial. Coming up here to the top, I can rename this dial to blink. And using the select bone tool. Let's enable angle constraints. So that way we can have limits for this dial. Now, we want to come over to the Actions panel and create a new action with the action name, blink and click. Okay. And like before, I'm going to establish the default pose in the middle. You can choose to do this differently if you wish, like having the default pose at the beginning, you could also create two different dials for the extremes. It just depends on how you want to do it. I prefer to do it this way. So on frame 12, I'm just going to grab the transform bone tool and click once to establish keys for the bone. Then go to frame 24. Just move at all. I like that. Go back to frame one and go like that. So now you have the dialogue along like this. And that's looking good. Let's go to frame 12 again and go into the eye is group, as we want to establish the default keys for the blink here. We're going to have a few different layers making up this blink. Let's go ahead and just jump in and get started. First is the highlights. So we want to use Command F or Control F if you're on Windows to establish keys for that layer. On frame 12. Next is tuplets to okay. That's supposed to be bottom lids. I guess I just didn't name that one. I apologize. Let me just go in and name that so that way you know what it is. If you see top lids to all working, that's it is, forgive me. What you have to do here is once again, just use Command F or Control F to establish those keys. And then we can go to top lids and do the same thing, just Command F. And there you go. You can also work with the eyeballs if you wish. And I might do something a little bit with this just to add in some variety with the blinks. Saw command in also established keyframes right there. So now let's come back here to the bottom lids to start. Right now we have it set. So on frame 12, we're out the default position. Let's go back to frame one and create the actual closed eye position. And to do this, I'm just going to click and drag and start moving on these points. And that's weird. I'm finding all sorts of little fun things this time. You look here, it looks like I had a double vector thing going on. We don't want that. Let's just get rid of that and Come back here, so okay. I don't I'm not sure why I had to lids drawn there. It must have just been a mistake, but we're going to start at frame 12. And we want to also make sure that frame one is similar to frame 12. So I'm just going to copy and paste those frames from 12 to 1. And now I can take a look at this. And so since this is going to be the closed pose, I want to bring up this lid just a little bit. Because it's going to be the top lid that's mostly going to be moving here. So we go like that. And then we can do one where the eyes are completely wide. And that can be on frame 24. I'll come in on frame 24 and just bring it all the way down. See, kinda go like this and then down. So let's go back now to the top lids. And if we go back to frame one, we can grab the top of this and move it down. And once again, for whatever reason I had two vectors going there. So let me just remove that. And there we go. So now we have the eye closed and it goes open. And we can now open it all the way on frame 24, despite going up like that, we can move it up. There we go. We now need to go in and move those details. So we have some lines here for the eyes. So on frame 1, I'm just going to grab this one and move it down and rotate it. So it's like that. And so it kinda comes up like that. And of course we need to move it up all the way when it goes wide open. And so just rotate it and move it up. It's just kinda see how that looks. It's looking pretty good and just kinda goes off screen like that. Then we have the bottom line right here for the bottom lids. So right here, we can see, we can probably move this up a little bit like that on frame one. And then it opens up, and then it opens up all the way. Of course, then we're just going to rotate this and kind of move it off like that. And it goes like that. There we go. So now we have that I working, except we do need to also look at the highlights for sure. When we're closed, Let's grab the top highlight and move this down. And then move this one up so that we can try to connect it. And then when I opens it's going to go like that. And then when it opens all the way, can kinda just go like this. And let's see what that looks like. And that's looking pretty good. Okay, so now you have the highlights animating with that. I, so now we're gonna go back through and do the same thing except with the back I. So coming in here we can go into frame 12. That's why we have the default. If we back up, we can bring this bottom lid up a little bit on frame one. And then we can bring it all the way down on frame 24. So just like that. And then let's jump over here to top lids. Frame 24. We can bring it up. So it's looking like that. And then on frame one, we can just come in and close it like so. It's kind of bring it down like that. There we are. Then looking at the top lid here, we want to grab that line, rotate it and bring it down on one. And it's going to open up. And then we wanted to go all the way up. Just like that. There we are. And then you have the bottom line. So let's go to the bottom lids. And this is just going to go up a little bit like that, like that. And then it'll go down, MO, rotate it to help with it. So there you go. And then you have, of course, the highlights. So once again, like the highlights on the front, I am just going to come in and just place it down like this. So it's going to come up like that. And then you have that. And then we're going to go up all the way. And once again, I can probably just grab it and drag it like that. There we go. And that's looking pretty good. All right, so now we can go back out to the main line by double-clicking. And then let's just advance a frame here and go back to the bone layer. Take the transform bone tool. And we can start to do this. And you can see it's looking pretty good. Let me adjust the bone strength here, going back to frame 0 and it's going to bring that down. So that way that's taken care of as well as show the labels so we know what that can do for us. So from here, we can control the blinks and also kinda set up the emotion for the character as well. So you can establish how wide you want the eyes and we could adjust the eyebrows. And perhaps he's looking down and plotting something evil. And since this is kind of based on me, It is definitely an evil plan he is planning. So just so you know. All right, we now have the blink in place. I'm going to pause here and up next, we can move on to building up the mouth. 25. Building an Interpolated Mouth: For this video, I'm working off of 23 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. To continue. We wanted to go in and build up a mouth which will allow us to invoke certain phonemes or mouth poses. So that way we can sync up the mouth with a voice when animating. And the good thing about vectors is we can create an interpolated mouth, which basically means Moho will animate in between the keys for us, they won't be just a direct switch. You'll actually see some animation as it goes from pose to pose. And there are some things we need to keep in mind when doing this. So let's first jump over here to our Layers. And I'm just going to close the actions panel for this as I don't need it. And let's locate the mouth. You'll see it's right here. Now, when it comes to working with this, we're going to set up a switch that's going to have multiple mast groups. And these masked groups are going to represent the different mouth poses. And so if I just click once on mouth, I can rename it to AI and hit Enter. Next, I'm going to right-click on AI and choose Group with selection. And then I'll rename this new layer to mouth and hit enter. From here, we'll make each new phoneme or mouth pose its own group within the mouth. The one thing you must keep in mind when interpreting a mouth with vectors is that each group or vector must be identical in terms of points. If you add or takeaway points from any of these poses you're about to copy and create. Then the interpolated effect will break and you'll simply end up with a switch effect. So let's go ahead and duplicate AI and rename this one to e. And then hit enter within the E. First, let me hide AI just so I can kinda see what I'm doing here. And we will be bringing AI Back to use as a reference. But I just want to show you what we're gonna do. Come into E. And we want to take the bottom of the mouth and just raise it up a little bit because we want to create an e sound with the mouth. And it's going to be just slightly more close compared to the a sound. So we have something like that. And I can come in and grab those bottom teeth and just bring them up like so. And that should be all that we really need to do with this. Of course, you could go further and let's say we wanted to animate the chin. You could definitely do that. In fact, you could set up the whole face to be connected to the mouth. So in that case, I could easily just grab the points here for the chin and move it up. And you would have an animatable jaw to go along with the mouth. But again, it just depends on how you want to approach all of this. So if we come back here, you can see the difference. If I bring back AI versus E. So you go from E to a and it's starting to shape up. Next, we want to just keep building this. So let's come over here to the e sound and I'm going to duplicate it and rename it to ETC. And let's just hide the IE layer once again. And I can come in here. And starting with the opening, I'm going to Command and move this up just a little bit. It's not going to be a whole lot. It just a little bit to differentiate it from the E pose, something like that. Then I'm going to come in and grab that bottom teeth layer. And with my points here, just bring it up. And it's not going to quite connect. So I'm going to have to give it a little bit of help by coming in here and just moving my points up. And I'll have to go as far I can maybe go about like that and then go to the top teeth and then have them meet the rest of the way. Let's kinda something like that. Just come in and meet like that. So now we can come back here. We have an ETC or teeth or S or T sound. And we can kinda see where this is starting to lead into. Next, let's do an O or UX sound. I can duplicate the IV hose and I'll name it. Oh, come in here. Let's go to the mouth opening. And we're going to compress the mouth opening. So I'll select all the points with the transform points tool. And I'm just going to scale things back. I can hide e just to make this a little bit easier. And just bring it over like so. I'm also going to come in and just kind of adjust things a little bit. Kinda like that. Can maybe even bring it down a little bit more. There we are. And for the teeth will still be there, but I'm just going to minimize them. Kinda like that. And everything else is looking pretty good. The tongue could have a little bit more presence if you desire. Can just kinda come in and go like that. But you now have an O shape. We can close that. And things are starting to shape up. We could also do u or Q, u, w sound based off of 0, just to give us more variety for those types of sounds. So I can duplicate 0 and name this one, q UW, hit Enter. And then just come in here to Q UW. And it doesn't have to be much of a change, but maybe just come in and we can kinda work something out like this. Kind of put it in a little bit more. And with this one, I can maybe remove the teeth or at least have a very, very minimized. And again, it just to add a little bit more variety, kind of have in that queue shape. There we go. And again, it's pretty similar to the 0, as you can see, but again, it just gives you more variety. Let's go ahead and do a T-H sound. I'll duplicate the AI. Pose for this. I can name it th and hit Enter. I'll just bring it in, come in here. And with the opening, I'm just going to shrink things up a little bit. Maybe about like that. And for the bottom teeth, I can bring those up just a little bit. And for the tongue, I'm just going to come in here and kind of bring it up like this. Because when we do the th sound, we press our tongue against the top teeth typically. In order to create that sound. The thing is you really want to keep everything the same in between all of these layers. You don't want to add anything, you don't want to subtract anything or else it will not interpellate correctly. All right, so now with the th sound, we can collapse that. And let's go ahead and duplicate AI again and make this one f v and hit Enter. Now FV is just when you make an f sound. We need to bring the bottom part of the mouth up to the top teeth. So we'll go to that opening and just grab this and bring it up and do something like that. And you could do a little bit more with this if you wish. But really that's all we need to do. Should be good to go. And I can do one more pose here. Let's come in and just duplicate the ETC pose. And I'll name this one closed in, hit Enter. And closed is what you might expect. The mouth being closed. So I'm just going to come in. I'll bring this up a little bit like that. And I can just come up and we're just going to bring these points up as close as we can to the top. It's going to bring everything up like that. Again, might look a little bit weird at first, but should work for what we're planning to do. And I can also select those points and maybe move it down a little bit. So it looks like that. We could also come in and maybe shrink it in a little bit and move it over like that. So there we go. Now we will have to go through and do some other little minor things such as the lines here. It might be best when you are moving your mouth around to pay attention to these. So for instance, I have shrunk the mouth and so it might be best to come in here now and just bring that stuff in. We can leave that bottom line words at. Unless if you plan to animate the chin, then you can go in and do different things. But like right here with Q UW Pi, best just to come in here and grab these points and just move it over. Like so. It doesn't require much. You just want to keep it in line with the mouth. That's looking pretty good. Also looking fine. That's looking pretty good, and that's also looking fine. And there you go. We now have all of the mouth pose is established. The last thing we need to do is rename all the visibility on all of these poses. Come over here to the mouth and right-click. And we want to convert it to a switch. A switch will only show one of these layers at any given time. So if I come in here, let's say to frame 4, I could right-click on mouth and go to q UW, and then go to E. And you can see now that it's swapping. Now I mentioned the interpolation. You can see right now it's just doing a standard swap, just like that. But if I were to double-click on mouth and on the layer settings at the top you'll find switch. Click on that. And here we have interpellate sublayers. Click on that and hit Okay. So now if we go through here, you can see that we are interpolating, at least for the most part. Let me come back here and try that again. So if we start at frame one, we can enter in the closed pose, go to Frame 6 and it's ETC. And you can see here now as we go through and start adding these in, that it's going to interpolate. So if you go from here to here, it's going to animate. And this is really, really nice because it just allows you to create nice quick fluid motions with your mouth without having to worry too much about what's going on. Now again, if you're not getting this result, you may have accidentally added points are removed points on any of these layers. And if there's any difference between points in that regard between these assets, you're not going to be able to get it to interpellate like this. So that's why it's really important that you build your mouth up like we did in the previous course for the animation work. And once you're ready, you go in and you get the work done because after that, you might have issues if you've done other changes to it. So anyway, we now have the mouth in place. We're going to pause here and up next, keep working on the rig. 26. Triangulating a Mesh and Linking Layers: For this video, we are working off of 24 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. The time has come to implement head-turn controls for the character. These won't be full head turns. We won't get a full profile shot or a mug shot, but we can get pretty close. And we'll be using a combination of the new smart Warp feature introduced in MOHO Pro 12, as well as traditional means through smart actions. The first thing we need to do is determine which layers are going to belong in the smart warp mesh. And we know that the body is not going to have any part of this since it's a head turn. You could manipulate the body, but for us we're just going to ignore it. So coming down to the layers, I'm going to hide the body. And I'm also going to hide inside of the head, the hair strands, because we'll control those through other means. So now, once we have that set, we can use what we have here as the base for the mesh. One last thing before I start drawing out the mesh. I'll select all of these head bones right here and go up to bone. Hide selected bones. Now, we have a cleaner looking image that we can work off here and the bones won't get in the way. It'll be easier to see where our points are at. For creating the mesh. You're going to need a vector for this. So let's come over here and go up to the new layer button and create a vector. We can name this one head mesh and hit Enter where you have the mesh layer will determine which layers can access it and link to it. For instance, I'm going to place this head mesh inside of the Chad bone layer, which means that any layer inside of the head or body groups can access and link to the mesh. However, if I were to put the head mesh inside of the head group, that would be a different story. We would then not have access to it through any of the body layers. So again, it all depends on hierarchy. In this case, had in body would have access to it. So now with the head mesh, we can hit a on the keyboard to bring up the Add Point tool because that's all we need for this. And we're going to start laying down some points. So just click once to add a point. And I wanted to draw points surrounding the head, going all the way around. You don't want to get too crazy with it. We're not going to add too many, but yeah, you want to have enough so that you have enough control. It's kind of a balancing act. So we'll add three right here. We can move down. I'll add one right there. One right there, one on the outside like that. And then come down. We can add some on the bottom. Come up, we'll add one on the outside of this ear. One right there, there, one here. And we'll do one more like that. As you can see, we have dots surrounding the head. So what are these dots gonna do? Well, think of them as control points. Once we triangulate the mesh, these will act as a way for us to manipulate different parts of the vectors just by transforming the points. Now, we need to go in and add more points so we can control the inner workings of the face. We'll start by just coming in and going across these points we made. So I'm going across like this, I can add a point down, come down like this. We're just going to go in and add some points to control the hair. Just like that. Add some infer the side burn. And while we're at it, let's add one more right there, just because it looks like it could use it. And I'll come down here and also add some points inside of the ear. Then we want to come in and start adding points for the face. I'll add three points on the top just like this for the forehead. And then three points inside of the eyebrows. To control those. Coming in. I can keep going. Let's add four points surrounding the eyeball. And then one for the pupil. And we'll do the same on the other side. Just like that. And then coming in, I'm going to add some points just to for the nose. Moving down. We can then finish off here by adding three points for the bottom of the face inside like that. And then perhaps one more right out here to help control the inner ear. Before I triangulate the mesh, I want to go through and make sure all my points are as neat as possible. Sometimes I'm not really sure why. As you can see, you know, zoom in here, I accidentally create two points when I mean to create one. And so I'm just going to come in here and lasso the points. And usually when you remove one, you remove both. That's okay. We can just come in and replace it. I just want to keep a close eye on that. Again, I'm not quite sure why that happens. It might just be due to how quick I'm moving the mouse. It just laying down multiple points. And we don't want that. But that's looking better. I'm just going to go through and make sure I don't have any of those. Because what happens is when you triangulate the mesh, if you have overlapping points, it can then kind of make it harder to work with because the points overlap and you have to move that triangle different way. And It's just better to make sure that we don't have a double points on accident before proceeding here. And I'm not seeing any others, so I hope I am good to go. Okey-dokey. So now, once you have all of your points set and you are satisfied, we want to triangulate the mesh by coming over here and clicking on that vector layer that we are working on. And then going up to draw triangulate 2D mesh. Once you do this, and you can see we now have triangles connecting to all those points that we just drew out. If we go on the timeline and we advance and we try to move this stuff around. You're gonna see we get no results. And so you need to tell Moho what to do with these points. And it's a simple matter of just linking all the vectors to the mesh, or at least the vectors that you need. So we're going to drop the head group down and start with the eyebrows. You can go in and link all of your layers at once. However, I was having some issues with that with MOHO crashing. And to avoid that, I'm just gonna go group by group here. The first thing I want to do is double-click on front eyebrow to go inside there. Come over here two vectors on the top. And here you can see we have smart warp layer. Before I do anything with that, Let's hold on Shift and click on back eyebrow as well. And then come over here, drop-down smart warp layer. And we can choose the head mesh from the list and then apply. We're going to do the same thing for the eyes. Just drop those down. Link all of the i's by coming in and selecting them and clicking on smart warp mesh and choosing head mission applying. Ignore the hair strand layers and move down to hair. Group. All of the hair layers to the head mesh. Ignore the mouth. We can't actually do this with the mouth simply because we are interpolating the mouth. If you weren't interpreting the mouth the gist, we're doing a switch. You could include the mouth if you want, but we want that nice smooth looks. So we're going to do that manually. And then come over here to the face and come in and we're going to select those three layers and apply it, and then we can close. So now if we step back here and we take a look at this, you can see that there is a minor, minor issue. And this all has to do with just how vectors are linked to different points. But you can see when I come in here, we have this highlight and this line just jump on frame 1 because what's actually happening here is now that you've linked all these points, these points that are being attracted to different points on your mesh. And so this top point for the highlight is really digging this point right here. And so it's trying to link over there versus trying to link to this. And that's not a big deal because we can correct for that before we go in and start moving things around and speaking and moving things around as you probably saw. You can go in and you can start moving things around now using this mesh. And again, it's similar to just going in and manipulating points yourself. But this is actually quicker because we have access to all these layers through the mesh. We don't have to worry about trying to accommodate for different things regarding going to each layer and making sure all the points are set and all that. It can all be controlled with the head mesh. And then the layers we can't quite control can be done through traditional means. So there we go. The mesh is now established. Let's pause the video here and up next, create a dial so we can implement some head turns. 27. Creating Left Head Turn with Smart Dial: For this video, we are working off of 25 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. We're now going to dive back in and we want to establish a dial so that way we can create the left to right motion. Will need to bring back the bones we hid from the previous video. So that way we can link this bone. So first, while on the chat bone layer, go up to bone and go all the way down to show all bones. And this should bring all that back. Next, let's hit a on the keyboard while we are on the chat bone layer to select the Add bone tool. And then Alt click on the bone, the head bone that is, to select it. Coming over here, we want to establish a dial, pass the pupils. So holding Shift, click and drag upwards to create the dial and release. Coming up here to the name field, we can name this one, head, left, slash, right and hit Enter. Then we want to select the bone with the select bone tool. Come over here to bone constraints, turn on angle constraints and negative 70 and 70 works just fine and we can close it. Now with that bone established, we can bring up the Actions panel with Command K or control K if you're on Windows. And we're going to create a new action. Name it head, left, right, and click Okay. Once inside, we're going to go in and establish the range for the bone. Let's jump to frame 21st. Come in with the transform bone tool and click to establish the default position. Come down to 24. We can move it over like this. Come back to frame one and we can move it over like this. Now you might be wondering, why is the head floating? Well, that's because we forgot to link the mesh by layer binding it. So let's just go back to main line really quick. You have the head mesh right here. And it's currently being influenced by this new dial which has strength turned on not a big deal. Just click on head mesh, click on bind layer, and click on the head bone to bind it. And you should no longer have that issue. It should be noted that you can have the mesh be stationary and provide different environmental effects such as water or perhaps foreground distortion. And you can even build up multiple meshes to create some really crazy looking stuff. But for our purposes we just want one mesh bound to the head. So now let's go back here to the bone layer, come down here to head left and right and go inside. And we can start working on creating this motion. So we want to first go with the left view and clicking on the head mesh, I first want to jump to frame 12. Use Command F to establish key frames for the mesh. So that way we have that default position locked down. And now we can come back here to frame one and start playing around. So I'm just going to start moving my points around. And as you can see, we can easily manipulate this stuff. Coming in. I want to bring out the eyes just a little bit like this. We're going to squish in this eye because it's going to be in the middle of turning. And maybe bring that ear in a little bit as well. Command and move the nose. And the nose could go are pretty far, but we'll go right about there. And we're just going to move these points over. Now. You can also use the magnet tool for this if you wish. I do use that sometimes, but in some cases I prefer just to lasso or just go point-by-point. It allows me to easily see what's going on and not get too overwhelmed with all the changes happening at once. But again, completely up to you. So as you can see, just by coming in and manipulating these points, were able to start establishing something here that we are at anytime you can page forward to kind of get an idea of what's going on. And so far I would say that's not looking too bad. Just going to keep going here. Kind of made me move that out like that. And the ear of course, will go in as well, as well as the hair a little bit. So I'm going to try to bring the hair in a little bit more like that. So you can have that going on. And we have a little bit of a balancing act here. Now, because of how this meshes set up, you can see that we have a link here for the ear as well as the hair. And so creating the effect that I want exactly is not going to be as possible. But we can of course, go back through and manipulate on a layer by layer level, which is what I'll probably end up doing here in the next video or so, depending on how far we get here. So right now, the ear isn't exactly how I want it, but I'm just going to leave it and see if I can do something else with that using other means. So let's just take a look at what we have here so far. It's not looking bad. I'm going to go down and hide the mouth because we're not working with the mouth, with the mesh. And so that way it's not as confusing. Now also on frame 1, I'm going to come in and try to bring some things out a little bit like that. Just a little bit over. Coming back and looking at this. We can come up here and bring some of this stuff over as well. Again, to mimic what we're doing here. Just kinda keeping an eye on that hair line going down like that. It's mostly in between the eyes and so far that's looking pretty convincing. I would say. Bring that down a little bit like that. I think I put that in the wrong frame. You can see I put that in frame 2. Let's just put that back to frame 1. There we go. It's not looking too bad. I feel like this should lower a little bit right here. Like that. And looking at this again, I might have been wrong. Maybe I shouldn't erase those. Think I might be thinking about that backwards. As raise it up a little bit. It doesn't have to be too much. I just noticed that they're kinda going down pretty noticeably. There we go. That's looking a little bit better. And then from there we can kinda just manipulate the shape of it to get it a little bit more in line. Looking a lot better. I may actually come down and just bring that one down a little bit. There we go. That's a little bit more symmetrical. And then this one needs it come up like that. There we go. That's looking better. As you can see just by going in here and using this mesh, we're able to, again, not get a full side view, but we can get pretty close. I mean, this will be for full head turns. It's mostly just to add some motion to the animation to kinda help with what we're doing. So that's looking pretty good. Again. We could go in and do some different types of layer manipulation with it. And I think I will do that in a separate video. But I'm also going to try to compress some of this a little bit. Again, that'll be more exposed as you go this way. So if we kind of compress it like that, you kinda get that illusion. It's a little bit more work here and I think I'll call it here. Good. So okay. I'm going to pause here. We now have a basis for the left view here. And up next we can tackle the right view and then the up and down and then bring it all together with all the different layers. 28. Creating Right Head Turn with Smart Dial: For this video, I'm working off of 26 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. We're going to dive back into the head, left, right action just by double-clicking on it within the actions panel. We have our left action here. We're now going to move over to the right. So on frame 24, we can click on the head mesh and get started. This time we're just going in the opposite direction. And I want to create more of a mug shot for the character here. So let's see what we can do. Bring the nose over. Bring this over just like that. The ears a little bit tricky because of how it's linked. So we might have to do some individual layer adjustments for that. So I'm just going to bring that back for right now because that needs to come out more. But because of how it's set, we're just going to leave it for the moment and just kinda keep working here. I'm gonna bring things over a little bit more. Select that and like that. And just keep on going like this. Bring those pupils more center. And that's kinda moving down more than I would like. So using command I'm going to last. So all of this that I was just working on and using Command or Control and then the up arrow, just gonna move that stuff up a little bit or down, I should say, Let's go down. I guess I was wrong. Okay. I'm gonna be up just a little bit. There we go, looking a little bit better. I'm going to nudge it down to one. And now we have something that's looking like that. Okey-dokey. So now let's go and keep working with the mesh. We're just going to come in and unframed 24. Make sure we deselect those points. And I'm just going to come in and try to bring all of this out a little bit more. And this would actually go into a little bit. So it's kinda like you have the ear out like this. And again, this will be played with in an individually here soon, but kinda bring it out like that. And it's gonna go in like this and then even more in when it goes to front. So let's kinda go in and try to manipulate that as best as you can. But again, if you cannot get it exactly how you want it, we'll be doing another little polishing section here on individual layer basis. And there we are. And let's move these eyebrows over now. This eyebrows a little bit tough because it's linked. So that one might again have to be controlled on the layer itself. But we can try our best here and just bring things over. There we are. So looking at the head because like this and then like that is bringing those out a little bit more. And actually looking at the face, I might bring these up a little bit to kinda make the chin more pointed. And that's a little bit too extreme. Let's bring it back down. That's a little bit better. So we're getting there. Let's take a look at our hair at the top here because I haven't really been paying much attention to that. Let's come in here and we're gonna move this hairline over to match with what's going on. Along with everything else. Can bring that out a little bit. Let's take a look here. Bring that over and over that over. And say that's looking a little better. I feel like this point could kinda go over more like that. Maybe. There we are. And this could go in more as well. Loops. Once again, I put out in frame 23, make sure it's unfree. 24. There we go. And yeah, this is starting to shape up. It's not the probably the most impressive head turn in the world, but just from the little that we've done, it's actually coming together. So come back like that and like this. And yeah, we just need to do a little bit of layer manipulation here or there and starting to shape up. Okay, Well, with that now established, I'm going to pause the video here and up next, we can jump over to the up and down tilts. 29. Adding Upward Head Tilts: For this video, we are working off of 27 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. We now want to draw a second dial to establish the up and down tilts for the head. First, we want to click on the head bone for the character, and then click on the Add bone tool. And you can choose where you want to set this dial down. I'm just gonna place it above the side-to-side dial, holding Shift, click and drag upwards to create that second dial. We can name it head, Up, slash down, and hit Enter. Select your bone, go to bone constraints and turn on angle constraints. And we should be good to go. One more thing. Let's select both of those bones and just click Show label. So that way it's easier to tell which dial is which. Now, I can click on head up and down. And on the actions panel, click on the New Action button. And we're going to name this one head up, down and click Okay. Going inside, we can click on frame 12 and click once on the bone to establish the default position. Go all the way down on frame 24, and then go all the way back on frame one to establish the range for the dial. And from here, it's all a matter of animating out the mesh first, and then we can go in and do all the other stuff after the fact. Come over here to the mesh, go to frame 12 and use Command F or Control F to establish your keyframes on 12. And now we can go back to the up position and begin. So just like before, it's just a matter of coming in here and moving different things up. I'm just going to lasso all of these points right here and just move it up a little bit like that. So that kinda gives us something to start with. We're gonna compress the eyes just a little bit while going up like that. Bring the nose up like that. And the ears are also going to come up, but they're also going to angle down. So if I come in and last so these can try bringing them up just like that. Again, like that. But then we're going to try to angle it down. So this might require us to use the different layers to make it work, but let's try it ourselves first just to see what we can do. It's coming in here and trying to make it work as best as we can. And this is a pretty drastic headband, but we'll see how it goes. It's going to come in and start bringing these points up from the bottom. It's got to come up like that. So now if we look kinda have this going on, come back here, maybe come in and just try to lower this part. And again, I have a feeling I'm just going to have to go in and work on that layer itself individually in order to make it work Same with the ears. It doesn't require much, but it will require something. So now as we go up, we're also going to move the hair up. So there's something like that. And we can crunch in the top a little bit. So you can have that motion now. See I have an issue with my eyebrow right here. It didn't really catch that before. We find the point belongs to. It might be due to that ear point right down there. Sometimes it's hard to tell. You've got to just play around with it. That might be something I have to go in and correct. Again on a layer basis once we get there. Because yeah, these little, this point right here, it can go up, but it's also kinda linking over there and we'll have to go in and correct that. So, so far though, this is actually not looking too bad. Let's come in here and make a few more changes. Tighten up those wrinkles right there. So those fall along. Maybe just bring this on a little bit more. There we go. And this can go up a little bit. There we are. Same with this part right there probably, again, it's linked to the ER, so maybe not so much, but we'll call it that, but get that ear separate anyway. So there we go. It's looking pretty good. So now we have the up position in place for the head mesh, at least the starting position of it. We'll pause here and up next, animate out the down position. 30. Adding Downward Head Tilts: For this video, we are working off of 2008, Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. Let's dive back into the head up and down action and keep rolling with this. Now we have the up position at least started. We will have to do some correcting. But now we're gonna go down and just basically do the opposite of what we just did. So on frame 24 with the head mesh, we can take the transform points tool. In this case, I'm just going to lasso some of the stuff. Just like that. If we can sometimes trying to lasso all of these points confuses Moho, there we go. And then we can on frame 24, of course, move this stuff down a little bit like that. So it goes up and then down. We're just going to start moving everything down along with it. And you will be seeing more of the hair here just due to gravity. But just to start, I'm going to kind of get it just a little bit established here, something like that. So up and then down command and bring it all in like that. And just bring this stuff down. See if it's too much. It might be too much. Yep, it's a little bit too much. So I'm going to just bring this backup a little bit. Ease off. The gas will help add on that. Come up here and just I kinda lost the shape a little bit too much. So you wanted to compress, but you also wanted to keep the same shape. And then I also want to expose more hair as he's coming down. But it might be easier again to do that on a layer to layer basis. So I'm going to probably just leave that for that portion of it. So coming back to this looks up and the down, I believe is just I feel like it could just be a little bit better. So just coming in, I'm going to shrink that up a little bit. And on frame 1, I'm just going to contrast it by bringing that out. So you go down and down like that. We don't want this to look compressed like it is. So just come in and move all this stuff down. And we want to move the ear up. Since he's looking down. Earliest, up at an angle like that. Select that and then like this, keep molding here. I apologize if I'm silent. It's just sometimes when concentrating, I tend to do that. Again. It just a matter of just feeling things out, manipulating it so that you are happy with it, of course. And so that it looks like it belongs with the motion. So I'm just gonna continue to stretch this stuff out a little bit. It's getting a little bit closer. It's going to blow this up a little bit more. That's looking better than it was. So it kinda goes up like that down. One thing I might also do, since he's going down is move the pupils down. I think that'll also help, like and then down. Okay, So I think that's pretty good for the start of it. So now if we come back out here to the main line and we were to play around with this just as it is right now. And I know it's kind of a mess here. But let's go back here to the bone layer, grab the transform, the bone tool. I'm on frame 1. So we can move it up and down. Bring it back to default. You can move left and right. And you should be able to do a combination of those two. So you can see I'm facing forward, but we're also looking up, going down, going this way. And maybe it's not the best looking thing in the world, but it's actually looking pretty good given that it's going through these extremes and interpolating all the points. And so really the only things we have to worry about now are just correcting some of these weird little issues within the layers and then adjusting the hair strands as well as the ponytail for the head turns. So we're getting close. I'm going to pause here and up next, we're going to jump in and start tweaking some of these layers. 31. Polishing Mesh Actions: For this video, we are working off of 2009 Chad vector reg. Feel free to open up this file. We now want to dive in to the individual layers and make some corrections to the motions as we animate out these smart actions. So bringing up the Actions panel, Let's first go into head, left and right, and just take a look at what we have going on here. So we have the head moving like this and it's looking pretty good. Except for instance, when we get to the front view, I feel like the IRS could use a little tweaking. It just kinda feels like this year should be exposed more in this year should maybe be shaped a little bit differently. And so while within this action, Let's come down here to the face and locate head. And first go to frame 12 on head and establish your keyframes so that way you're not altering the original design. And then jumped to frame 24. And we're just going to make some changes here. Again. Just some minor linework changes to help with the motion here is come in. It can kinda just manipulated how you feel you need to manipulate it to get it or you need to go. So there's that side and we have this part right here. It's a little bit limited due to the line work. But I feel like I could come in here and just adjust it a little bit so that way it looks a little bit better in terms of how it's facing. So we come like that and then it kinda goes up like that. I'm thinking it might be better to bring this in now, more, maybe more up like that, closer to how that one looks actually. And again, you can adjust the line work like that thing That's looking a little bit better. Now, right here. And then here. I might try to adjust that a little bit more. So it's kinda like they're there. And that's still not quite looking, right. Let's just try to bring it down like that. So maybe right here. I should bring the air in a little bit more, even though I'm kinda altering the original position. And then right there, I can kinda bring it out a little bit like that. Segfault, like this. And I could even try to hide this a little bit more on frame 1, again, just to kinda help with that illusion that it's coming out like this. And then we're kind of going up like that a little bit with it. There we are. It's not looking too bad. It might be a little bit too much of a change on frame 24. So I'm just going to try to bring that out a little bit and just kind of grab this stuff and move it along like that. So there we go, That's looking better. And just make sure all the shading and stuff is looking okay and I believe it is, so we're good there. So again, just go through make sure that it's looking good and that there are no issues that you're okay with what's going on. Looking at this I here. I can maybe go in on frame one for the eye first of course, go to frame 12 and establish a key-frames. But then go to one. Maybe just bring this out a little bit. I'm just going to correct that shape. Just a little bit off there. We are. Good like that. And then that. And then for the eyebrow itself, for the back eyebrow, go to frame 12, established keyframes. Go back to one and then just come in and they bring it out like that. And then I'm going to go over like that and then ignore like bat. There we go. I'm going to adjust it a little bit on frame 12 and just bring it in. I know I'm adjusting the main design when doing that, but I'm okay with that. Now looking at the animation here for this, and that's looking better. Let's jump over here now to the head up and down view and see what we can do here. So looking at this, once again, I think it just comes down to the ears. Let's jump over here to the head group under face, locate head, go to frame 12 for head and establish a key frames, and then just back up to frame one. And then you can make your corrections. Again, I don't foresee having to make too many corrections here. I'm just going to try to do a couple of things here with the angles and just try to make it look a little different. Select that. And we can kind of bring that out a little bit like so. Try that one more time. You might have some issues when correcting these things. As you can see, it's acting kinda strange. And that's because of all the different actions now, kinda pulling and pushing on these things. So you might be able to get everything exactly how you want it, but you can try to get it as close as you can. So on frame 24, once again, I'm just gonna come in here and try to just clean this up a little bit, make it look a little bit more presentable. Compress some of this a little bit more. There we are. And then of course the eyebrow is something I wanted to touch on. So going back here to the back eyebrow, we can establish keyframes on 12. Then go back here to frame one. And again, given how this is all set up, this might be kind of tricky, but I'm just gonna use command and the right arrow key to move this over. So it's not quite doing what it's doing. And then grab the bottom point here and just move it down a little bit. And then grab the top point and also just kind of nudge it up like that. And we can see this now in action. It's looking a little bit more presentable. And then we would come down to that point. I'm just going to come in here and make a quick correction like that. And that's looking pretty good. Okay, so now we can look at this one more time, making sure we are okay with all of the changes. Again, I look at certain things and like, I could just make a couple more changes to this or that and you could spend all day on this. I feel like I say that about every aspect of this, but it's actually true. You mean, you could just spent hours adjusting the stuff and getting it exactly how you want it. But I think this is actually going to do the job. So let's come back out here to the main line now and just make sure that everything is running. Hopefully the way we want. Jump over here to frame one. And actually that's one thing I forgot to do on frame one. You might recall, I mentioned that we have the changes to the eyebrow and the ear and I'm fine with that because I made those changes. But this highlight right here isn't right. So really quick, I'm just going to jump back into the head left to right here and take a look at this. And we can see that it's causing an issue right there. And again, this is also due to the mesh. So we can go in and adjust the mesh if we wanted to. But I think just coming down here to the face and looking at that highlight. On frame 12, I can come in and just bring it back like that. And we should hopefully have no other real issues. You can see here on Frame 1, it kinda triggers over that way. So we might need to just take the Command key and nudge it where we need it to go. And you can see now as I do that, it's looking a little bit better. We still have a little bit of an angle on 24. But we can just bring it back a little bit like that. There we are. Head up and down just to make sure. And it's going good on head up and down. Okay, so now we have that fixed. So now if we go to frame one is a little bit of a change, but it's better than it was. At least it's not all over the place. And we can come in here and we can go head up and down. Looking pretty good. We can go left and right while also looking up or down. A little bit of distortion here or there. But I think for the most part it's looking good. You can see that ear is a little bit wonky on that part, but I think actually it's okay. So there we go. We now have the main controls for the mesh established for the head. I'm going to pause here and up next, we're going to go back and implement the other layers needed for this, such as the hair strands and mouth. 32. Animating Mouth and Hair Strands for Head Tilts: For this video, we are working off of 30 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. We now need to go in and implement the motions for the mouth and the hair. First, let's bring up the Actions panel. And then we'll start with the head left and right action. So double-click to go inside. First, we will work on the mouth as that should be the easiest. Let's come down here and click on mouth to reveal it. Go to the mouth switch. And unframed 12. We want to take the transform layer tool and just click once to create a keyframe for that position. You can also come down and when you place your cursor on the outside the selection, you get a scale ability. Click once right there to also adjust the scale. So now as the head tracks this way, we're just going to grab the mouth and move it over a little bit and then shrink it down with the layer scaling. Just go back like that. And we can go over like so. So now as the head moves, you can see by scaling that we create a sense of depth with it. And we're going to do the same for the front view. We can just move this over a little bit and then we don't have to increase it that much, just a little bit, increase the width, and then bring it over and release. So now you have something that's looking like this. And this should not interfere with the interpolating of the mouths because we have that set. So now let's go in and do the same for the up and down motion. Come over here to frame 12. And you're going to just click once for the transform property and then click on the outside to establish the scale property. Go all the way to the beginning. And we're just going to scale this up. So see kinda like that. And you could even go in and compress it up a little bit if you wanted to. So it's kinda like that. And then as it moves down, we kinda have less of a compression going up. And then we can go all the way down like this. And again, we can compress that so that it kinda goes down like so. So you kinda have this effect going on. And it was actually wrong. Instead of stretching it up, we should be stretching it down on frame one. Kinda like that. So then it goes like that, like this and like that. Maybe a little bit more in frame 24, squish it up. There we go. So it's getting a motion like that. And there we are. So now the mouth is in place. We can come back here to the main line and you can see that the mouth interpolates because I have these keys still there, no matter what we're doing. So heads looking like this. The head could be looking like that, or even up like this. And you can see that the mouth is still going to interpellate smoothly no matter how you're moving the head. So now we want to go in and bring back the hair strands and make sure that those are tracking along with everything as well. So once again, we're going to start with the head left and right action and come in here and just take a look at what we have going on here. So the first thing we want to do is come in on the chat bone layer. And I'm just going to click once on frame 12 on this bone to establish a key. And here as well to establish a second key. I do not want to use Command F because I don't want to adjust any other bones, just these two. So that's why I'm clicking on them. Now when the head turns, going to grab that top bone and move it over like this. Now that's not going to be enough, as you can see, because we need to do some perspective scaling with this. But let me just grab this piece and bring it over like so and kinda see what we have going on here. So also on frame one, we could come in and just try to manipulate the bone a little bit if we wanted to. And then also in frame 1, I'm going to grab the tip of this and scale it back. Like so. So you kinda have something like this going on. Now, as you can see, I accidentally forgot to establish keys for that bone transition if that happens for you don't worry. On frame 12, I'm just going to come in and copy all of the bone properties and paste them over here. So that way, we are good to go. And if we come back this way, we can kind of see how this is panning out now, it just looks a little bit better, a little bit more seamless. And I want to come back this way to this side here and do the opposite direction. So we're just going to come over this way, grab these bones, move some stuff that way. It's looking pretty good. Just come in and establish that over there. Finally, we can come down and go to the head up and down and do basically the same thing. So let's start here. I'm going to come in and establish keys for all of these bones, as well as the size parameters and all of that. And then also come in, do the same here. Just clicking on the bones, I can establish these keys. I'm not sure if I'm going to need all of these, but just to prevent any issues. So then we can go to frame 12, making sure that everything is locked down on frame 12, just like we always did. You can also use Command F, but we might have to clean up some bone actions when doing that. So we can now come back here, take this and move it up. Also grab this and move it up. Or going down like that. And then down like so, so down all the way like this. Kinda like that. Suppose up like this, and then down like that. Maybe a little bring that over and put it right there. And there we are. And that's not looking too bad. Okay, so now we can jump back out to main line and let's just test all this so far to make sure that it's working. So going to frame 0, we can come in. We can move things around. The eyebrows are a little bit off, so we're going to have to look at that. It just depends on the angle it's at. But when we look up, we can see at the eyebrows, just don't quite do what they're supposed to. So we can look at that really quick. But everything else, if we go through and play with it seems to be working rather nicely. So really quick, Let's just go back into these actions and look at this eyebrow. I believe it's because I went in here and made these changes that we're having that issue. So let me come in here really quick. I'm going to remove these keys that were laid down for this. Just because I'm kinda curious. And if I go back out here to the main line and we move the head up, we can still see that it's causing that issue. So you can see it's gone like that. So let's go back in here to the main line once again. And looking at the head mesh. This could also be part of the problem. Since we are having issues with that mesh and how this is interacting. What I'm going to do is just double-click on Front eyebrow, holding Shift, and click on back eyebrow, and then come down and remove the smart warp link from this and click Okay. Now, you can see that the eyebrows are not doing what they're supposed to and that's okay except when they are on, of course, frame 12. But we're just going to manually animate them really quick. Not a big deal because they're pretty simple. So on frame 1, I'm just going to make sure that the eyebrows are situated up like that. So kinda come down like this. And then unframed 24, once again, just come down and make sure that they are close to the eyes. So just kinda looking like that, looking good and it comes down. And we don't have to really do anything else. So let's jump back to main line. And I believe that should correct the problem. As you can see, we no longer have that eyebrow going through and doing weird stuff. So come in here, try the eyebrow one more time. We're a little bit off now compared to the eyes. And that's again because of how we move this. 33. Animating Ponytail for Head Tilts: For this video, we are working off of 31 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. Let's dive back in and make sure that the pony tail is moving along with the rest of the character. Because if we go to frame one, you can see that everything is moving except that ponytail. So coming over here to our actions panel, Let's go down and go into the head, left and right action. And then going all the way down here to the bottom, we want to locate back hair within the body group. Go to frame 12. And we can establish key frames. Now, you can establish key frames with the layer and control it like that. Or you can do what we did with the hair strands and use the bone. If you use the bone, you'll have to be on the bone layer. And of course, just make sure you have all of your keyframes laid down on that frame. So that way we have a starting position. Then when the head goes to the left, we can bring it out a little bit more. Even rotate it up a little bit and kinda go down like that. And that's kind of situate it so you can see it kinda goes like this. It maybe it's up a little bit too high so we can just kinda bring it down like that. There we are. We have a little bit of movement occurring and then we'll do the opposite when it goes to the front, you can just come in and we can shrink things in a little bit. So let's commit, committing go like that. So you have this and then you have that. And also maybe here I could stretch it out a little bit as well. Bring it down a little bit like that. So you kinda have this. There we are. And let's go over here to the head, up and down. You're just going to repeat the process. Will start here on frame 1 because I believe we already have keys established for the bones, it looks like. So come back here and we're just going to come in. It's kinda move this and kick it back like that. And we can move it up like this. And then going down, we can bring it in and kind of rotate it up like that. So there you go. Maybe it's a little bit too extreme here so I can scale that back a little bit. Okay, I think that shall work. Let's go back to the main line and we can test it one more time. It's by going up and down and left and right. And you can see that it's working and things are looking good. And again, at this point, you can go through and just make sure that nothing is out of the ordinary. The eyebrows should be corrected now, as well as everything else. So it is looking good. We'll pause the video here and up next, we can move on to correcting any issues with the rig before we jump into animation. 34. Correcting Bone Connection Issues: For this video, we are working off of 32 chat vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. We now want to go through and take this opportunity to make sure that everything is linked to the bones properly. You might recall I had an issue with the hair. I noticed it pretty early on. It's been kind of an issue for the past chapter or so. And you can see it's pretty simple. Basically, the shading and the highlights are not linked properly to the bones. But we want to take this opportunity to go through and just make sure that we have no other issues associated with that. And just make sure that there's nothing else occurring that's glaringly bad in terms of how the layers are working. So I would zoom in and just go through and make sure everything's bending properly. Make sure your highlights are there, you're shading is there. The bends are working. You can see that we have the jacket bending as it needs to. I have some issue here with the smart actions, but I think it's going to be okay because I still can go in and manipulate it a little bit. And it's mostly about knowing the limitations of your rig. And if that is an issue, of course, in cases like this, I could go in and constrain the jacket. So maybe we put this to negative 10 and 10. So that way when it comes time to move the jacket, I don't run into those issues. I can move it a little bit, but I'm not going to move it so much that it's going to really cause huge, huge issues. You can see it's a little bit there, but you can see it's still causing some issues there. So if you really needed to, you could go in and create smart actions for the jacket. And so really quick, if I click on front jacket to, I can come down here and just make a new action. Come over here to frame 24. And just rotate that up a little bit based on the constraint. And then go down here to the coat, go into the body here. There it is. Locate coat. And just come in and just fix it like that. So now you have that little bit of a rotation. And we can come back out here to the main line. Let's go ahead and make a second action for that jacket. Go to frame 24 and I can just move it over. And once again, come in here, grab the coat, and just make that quick little correction so that way we can move it without any real issue. And then go back to the main line. And we have the same issue for this bone as well. So we're just going to click on that, Create an action, go into it. And actually this is looking not that bad. So maybe we don't need to do it for that one. So let's back out and see if it needs it for this one up here. And now we're looking good, so okay. It was just that when we needed to correct everything else is looking okay. So with that, let's also go up here and correct this strand of hair. And again, this is just a simple matter of binding and I forgot to do it. And it happens even when you're not recording. You're just going to run into little issues you might forget. Luckily, it's easy to correct on the fly with MOHO. So here we are, hair strand one. We'll start with the highlights and I want to grab the bind points tool. Alt, click on that yellow bone. And we're just going to come in here and lasso those two highlights and bind Alt click on the green bone, come in, bind those points. And we should be good here with this last one just by binding it to that bottom bone. For the shading, we can come in and let's just Alt click on the yellow bone in Command a to select all the points to bind. We'll keep these back points on that yellow bone. Come over here to the next bone which is the green bone. Alt click on it. And we're just going to come in here and basically select all of these points and bind Alt click, come down. Just keep moving down and binding your points. Alt click and move down and bind your points. So now with all that established, we can go back here and let's just check out the animation. I can run to this frame and give it a go and we can see it's looking pretty good. The only other issue is the shading for the face. As we move this, this should move as well. So let's go back once again to frame one. And we're going to go down to the face and locate shade. We want to bind points for this. Now the problem is we bound the entire head to the bone layer when we originally did this. And so we need to go to the face layer, take the bind layer tool and click off. Come down to highlight. And then we can bind the highlight to the head bone. We can bind the head to the head bone. But for the shade we're going to point bind that. So first we'll click on AI to select the bind points tool, alt, click on the head bone, and then use Command a to select all the shading and then bind points to the head bone. Now I'm going to Alt click on this second green bone for my hair. And then come down and lasso this shade and then bind Alt click on the blue bone, come in, just bind everything like so. And then for that final bone right down there, just come in and bind and we should be good. So now if we come back here to frame one and we play around with this, you can see that the shading moves and that's looking much better. So just go through and make sure everything is working the way you want it to work. I think everything is situated for me in terms of all of those little bone issues. So I'm going to pause the video here and up next, we can move on to adding bone dynamics. 35. Cleaning Up Misplaced Bone Keyframes: For this video, we are working off of 33 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. This video pertains to how I set up the smart actions when creating the head turns. At certain points I was going in and using Command F on the bone layer to lock down certain key frames. And while doing this, this causes problems for other parts of the animation. Specifically, if I want to add in bone dynamics. And this is just a simple process of going in and cleaning up any of the keyframes I might have misplaced. Again, you can take greater care when placing key frames down to prevent this. But cleaning up is actually not too difficult. First, we want to go in and let's go to the head left and right action within the actions panel. Just make sure you're on the bone layer and unframed 0. Double-click to go inside. So here we have this dial going through and doing its thing and we have everything animating out and it's looking pretty good. However, once again, there are some things I did that need to be corrected. So for instance, if I click on this bone right here, you can see within the red channel that we have keyframes locked down for that bone. And we don't need keyframes for that bone. And so basically what's going to happen here is whenever we move this, it's going to be conflicting with certain things simply because this bone has animation to it. And so what we need to do is simply on that bone layer with the slugged bone tool. Hit Command a or Control a if you're on Windows to select all the bones. And then holding Shift and lasso around the bone that we are looking at for its action. So in this case, the head left and right lasso around that to de-select it. So now all of these bones are selected. And really for this action, the only other bones that should be moving or the hair bones. So going in we can now using the same method, holding shift in, lasso around these pieces of hair, just like this. And just keep coming in. And last one around everything just to make sure that all those hair pieces are selected. So now if we look at this, we can see that the hair pieces stay because we animate out the bones with that action. But everything else is selected. And then on that red channel, we can simply come in and select those red keyframes and delete so that way it's cleaned up. And the only bones now animating are the ones that are required. Now let's double-click to go into the head up and down action. And we're going to repeat the same steps, except this time we're going to de-select the head up and down dial. So Command a to select everything. And we're of course still using these select bone tool, holding Shift, lasso around the head up and down bone to de-select. And we're also going to come in and do the same for the hair bones here. So just like that, It's a little bit tricky, just coming in here and last sewing. But it's not actually that bad. So there we go, got that, come down here to the red channels, come in and just remove any of that. And you can repeat this for any of the other actions. So if we go in here, we can just check to make sure that none of these have any keyframes. And as you can see, it looks like we're good. There's no red channels. And just by going through you can check all that. It was mostly those head turns where I went in and did that because we had more complicated things going on. But again, it looks like we're good here. Again, the only red channel should be the dials that we're working with. So you can go through and check all that just to make sure you're good to go. And for me, it looks like I am set in good. So we're going to pause here and up next, we can add in some bone dynamics and IK stretching. 36. Adding in Bone Dynamics and IK Stretching: For this video, we are working off of 34 chat vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. I could have added this part into the previous video. However, I felt it more appropriate to lump it in as we're adding bone dynamics. There are some other key frames we need to clean up within the smart actions. But I wanted to demonstrate here why that is. So traditionally at this point, if you wanted to add in bone dynamics, which allow you to add in physics, for instance, for the hair. So that way when the head moves, the hair can bounce. We can do the same for the coat if we wish. We need to go in and just select the bones we want to apply this to. So if I come in here and we can click and select, let's say these bones. And I could hold down shift and select those bones right here. So the hair bones as well as these hair bones. And let's just do that the start, we can worry about the code here in a moment. You can go over here to bone constraints. And then all the way at the bottom is bone dynamics. So if we turn that on just to see what's going to do with this default setting, we can close and begin. Now, what this should do is when you move your character, the hair should react appropriately. So if I move it back like this and then move it down like this, we should see the hair bouncing around in some capacity. But you're going to notice that nothing is happening. The reason for this is how we set up the smart actions for the head turns. We moved these bones in order to make that work. We also went in and manipulated some of the bones as well. And when we did that, we cut out the ability to add dynamic bones. We can still make it work though. We're just going to have to remove some of the functionality we applied to the hair initially. So it's here where you have to choose do you want physics or do you want more finesse and more control with the hair using bones within the smart actions, you could manipulate the hair in other ways with points and using your layer tools. However, I found it easier just to use the bones. And by going in here and making these changes, I think you'll find it doesn't do a whole lot in terms of breaking what we're doing. So first, I need to go in here to the head, left and right action and double-click. Essentially what has happened here. If we click on any of these hair pieces, you'll see that we have read keyframes and place, meaning that they have animation on the timeline. And when we did that, we are removing the ability for these hair pieces to exhibit those bone physics. However, what we could do is remove keyframes for all the hair except for the top bones for each hair piece. The reason for this is these top bones control the actual movement in placement for the connecting bones. And so we can just remove some of the squash and stretching we did with some of these bones here, but keep the actual movement. So what I recommend you do in a case like this, we can hold on shift and start to select all of the hair bones except for the first bone that starts with that section. So in this case, the top part of the ponytail will remain unselected. And we can come in and lasso around and select these other bones, making sure we don't select the head bone in this case. And we're just going to come up and select all those chunks with the top pieces remaining unselected. Then come down here, find those bottom three red channels, and just remove the keyframes. Now let's repeat those steps for head up and down. Just double-click to go inside of that action. And all the hair pieces that you need should be selected. Just come in and select those red keyframes and delete. And that should do it. So now if we come back out here to the main line, you'll see that the dynamic bones are now working with the exception of the top bone. We can still do the head turns and everything like that. So if I come in here and we bring it up or down, just by grabbing that bone here. If I de-select the hair bones, I can come in. You can see that the hair still moves. We just lose some of the movement I created when going up and down, I did a little compression with the bones here and there. But if you want dynamic bones instead, this is something you can do to correct that. And also with the way the pony tail is working now, with the dynamic bones being as they are. How about we go back here to frame 0? Let's grab the bottom portion of that top bone and just shrink it up so that. It's no longer exposed. Basically it's behind the head. And then we can take this piece and bring it up like that. And just kinda bring it down like that. So now you have something that's looking like this. And it's just looking a little bit more pleasing with how it's animating out. You could also go in and rebind some of those points. And that wouldn't take long at all. You could just really quickly here, jump over here to the body layer, go down to the back hair. Here's your back hair, and then just come in and rebind. So grab the bind point tool. We are on that bottom bone, so we're just going to last so all the way up here and grab all this and bring it down like that. And then bind those points. And then everything else should be fine because everything else is bound to this bone right here. And so now if we were to come in and animate this out again, you can see it's looking a little bit more natural. And there we go. So now with the bone dynamics fixed, we can come in and decide just how drastic you want this to be. I also want to note, you can also turn bone dynamics on or off at any time. As you can see, I'm on frame 27. If I come down here and I turn it off, keys are created because they can be on an awesome, you can just turn them off, which is really nice. But when you're going in and adjusting the stuff, you want to make sure that your unframed 0 when you want to adjust how it all initially works. So while on frame 0, let's come in here and once again, select these dynamic bones for the hair. Just come in and select those. And then we can go over here to the bone constraints. And once again, come down to bone dynamics. And we can just start playing around with the numbers. Basically from how I understand it, spring force is going to make it more springy. Damping will sort of hone in the chaos, so to speak. And then torque force will also add some power. And so let me try it as adding some damping first and see how it works. You can see that it's still pretty crazy, but it doesn't bounce around as long. It sort of homes all that in there, still a little bit of craziness with the hair. I think it's probably a little bit too drastic with how it works. So let's go back to frame 0 once again and go into this. And let's just bring down the spring force and see how that works. So come back here now to frame 0. Maybe it's a little bit better. Come back in, adjust the torque force. You can see now it's starting to adjust a little bit more. It's getting a little bit better. It's pretty extreme, but it's not that extreme. I think we could leave it there because it's actually a pretty quick motion. So I think those numbers are good for the hair bones. And if you don't like that, you can of course go in and keep adjusting it. We can also come down and add some physics to these bones right here for the coat. Let me actually come back and I'm just going to remove all this animation and bring it back to 0, just so I can see what's going on and come in here and click on these bottom coat bones. Just Bye. Using this logic bone tool I can click and then holding Command and then click on the second bone to select it. And then come over here to your bone constraints. And then go down here to bone dynamics and turn that on. And let's just start with this and see how it looks. I always like to start with the default action. And we can just do something like this. And then something like this, and then bring it back to default like that. So if we come in here and test this out, you can see it just has a little bit of movement. And if you want, you can also try adding that to the top bones. Not sure how that would look, but let's just give it a shot, turn it on and just it's actually not that bad, so we could do that, but I might go in and increase the damping at the very least. So let's go in here and up the damping force to two and give that a shot. It's not looking too bad. Maybe come back and try three. And I think that's better. There we are. So now you have physics for the hair and for everything else. And again, you can go in and make sure it's all working, but the head up and down actions should also work with the bone physics. So as it goes down, it will also react in that way. And up and over and all that fun stuff. So there we go. Looking pretty good. The final thing I wanted to do in this video is just add some IK stretching to the legs where we have the target bones. Basically, wherever you have targets, it's easy to apply squash and stretch scaling. So if I come in here and let's just back up to frame 0, I can select these two bones with the select bone tool. Come over here to your bone constraints. And under that you'll find squash and stretch scaling. Just click on that to enable it. And you can adjust these numbers, but I'll come over and increase maximum IK stretching to two and just close it. So now if I come in here and I grab this and start moving it, you can see that we have a stretch effect occurring with what's going on here. And you can also apply it to these top legs as well. It's like a communion. We could just apply it like that. And you can see now that we have this going on. And I like that. It's just a nice springy look. So it really quick. You had a quick movement. He could kind of spring up like this and it would just be kind of a nice quick action for that. And you can also at any time while you're animating going and do this manually. So you can do only and then of course, scale your bones to mimic that squash and stretch effect. By adding in the squash and stretch scaling to any bones really need to targets. You can see that it works really well. So there we go. We now have physics and squash and stretch scaling enabled. We're going to pause here and up next, throw in some switches for our hands and then move over to animating. With this rig. 37. Creating Switches for Hands: For this video, we are working off of 35 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. We now want to tackle the hands. That's the last main component missing from this rig. And I mean, they're okay, but they've mostly been placeholders up until now. We could go in and spend a great deal of time drawing and designing different hand poses. But you know what, we've already done a lot of work. So let's come over here to hands dot Moho, which will also be attached to your lecture. And you can see we already drew up some hands ready to go. And I go through and I draw one hand pose in the course previous to this on how to design vector regs. And so if you want to view that you can. But here, again, it's just some simple design work. And we broke up the hands into front hand and backhand into switched layers. So you can come in here and you can see we have an open hand, we have appointing finger. And of course we just have variation, so relaxed hand and then you have a fist. And then for the backhand we have an open hand, the pointing finger, and then we have a hand in the opposite direction because just in case if we need it and then we have a fist. And so to put these into our rig, we're just going to first click on front hand, go up to Edit, and then go to copy layer. Jump over to the rig. And we want to go into the body. Locate the hands here. So we'll just start with front hand and go up to Edit Paste Layer. And we just paste it in that new switch. And we can keep the existing hand as a reference. We're just going to come in and use that transform layer tool and just scale this down and try to get it into position. So something like that. Let's bring it up and over. And it's looking pretty good. And you can go through and check to make sure all of them work. And it seems like it will let me just come in and remove that existing front hand. So now we have something that looks like that. And maybe we can make it a little bit bigger. Just come in and increase the size. There we are. Okay. That's pretty comparable. And so we have that now. And we just want to go and do the same thing for the backhand. So locate the backhand. We can go in and copy that layer. Go back here to the rig. We'll come down here, locate backhand, and we'll just paste the layer above it, resize it, and get it into position. So about like that. Just come in and replace it like so. And then we can go in and remove that other hand. So there you are. Now you have something that looks like this. And again, we can just go in at anytime and while animating, we can right-click and switch over to another hand, this is not going to be interpolated. These hands were just built differently, each having different points and just the way it's built. So you're not going to have that smooth transition. However, I don't feel we need it for the hands. It's really quick and it should be fine in terms of how we're going to use it. And you can also at anytime just, you know, go up to Window and activate the switch selection panel, which will also allow you to quickly switch these poses on the fly using a visual interface. The last step is to ensure that your hands are linked to the hand bones. Since we remove the original hand bone, we now need to go in and relink thes. So click on front hand, grab the bind layer tool and just click on the front hand to link it. Come down to your backhand and just link it to that backbone. And you can give it a quick test just by coming in here and moving it around. You can see now it's all linked up. We can come out and go like that. And you can see we still have the switches in place and they work along with everything and it's looking good. So there we are. We now have the hand poses in place. I'm going to pause the video here. And up next, we can jump in and create a quick test animation to ensure that this rig is ready to go. 38. Laying Out Canvas and Character Starting Position: For this video, we are working off of 36 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. We're now going to create a quick test animation just to make sure everything is looking good. And that way we can show off the work that we just did. First, we need to set up the document. And you'll see here I already have some animations just from testing things out. To quickly remove this animation, I'll go back to frame 0 and then go up to animation. Clear animation. And then from document. This will clear all the animation from the documents. So I can start over and we can begin. Next. I want to import a background, so that way it's easier for me to animate out what's going on. So let me just zoom out really quick. I can use Command Shift Y or Control Shift Y if you're on Windows to import. And we want to go in and find background dot PNG, which is right here in my list. And you'll find it attached to this lecture. So we can just open that up. We have a background. And you can see that the background doesn't quite fit the frame. It's actually bigger. The reason for this is because this document has been set up as a 720 P document. I'm going to change that right now by going to File and then going down to Project Settings. And here we can go to dimensions. Just bring that down and change it to 10 ADP. And everything else should be okay here, typically, you want to set this up before you begin animation or design work. Now in the case of the vectors, we really don't have to worry. Sends you can scale vectors as much as you want without losing any quality in. So what we're doing here is okay. And once you're good, you can click Okay. And we should now be good to go with this background. Let me just remove it and come over here and use the Command Shift Y method to once again import and come down and bring that background in. And you can see it now fits the frame nicely and we don't have to go in and do any scaling. Now I can bring the background dot PNG image below Chad. So that way we can see what's going on here and everything is looking pretty good. So now with that set, we can kinda begin to feel out how we want all this to work. I accidentally placed a keyframe on frame one. So I'm just gonna go in and remove that really quick. But I'm going to have him start off screen and then move in by jumping. And then he can say a line which will use lip sinking for first, he's a little bit too big. So if I start to scale him down, I can do so. Notice how it's scaling from the center or close to it. I actually don't like that. I prefer to have the scaling occur from the bottom up with characters. And so I can take the set origin tool and just come down on the bottom of the feet and click to create that new origin point. And so now when I resize, you can see it goes down like that. So it's easier to place where you want the character down in the background and then resize accordingly without losing your spot. So we can come in and resize about like that. Let me bring them down just a little bit more and up about like that. So that's looking pretty good. Now from here, you can choose how you want to animate with a combination of layer scaling in transforming. Or you could animate strictly using bones. So for instance, if I wanted to move the character back all the way like this on frame 1, I could do so with my layer tool or you could take the pelvis and move it back like so. Now when you do this, your targets are going to stay behind. So you have to bring those along for the ride, so to speak, and kind of bring it up like that. And so I think I'm going to go with the method of moving all the bones. I just kinda prefer to do it and it creates a nice grounded look. I might do some layer transforming if needed. But here starting on frame 1, I'm okay with what we're doing here. And since he's going to jump, we could have the jump animation occur off frame. But let's actually raise him up a little bit and put him into the position of jumping through the air so I can bring all the legs up like that, the arms up like so. And just depending on which phase of the jump or in, we can go in and kinda get that setup. And so how about we go the opposite way? Well, it's kinda start Lake. He's halfway through the jump or about to come down from the jump. So kinda just going out like that. And right now I'm only concentrating on the body movements. And all I'm doing right now is moving the main body bones. We're not concentrating on the dials at all. In fact, just to make this maybe a little bit more explicit, let's hide those dials since we don't need them at the moment. I'm just going to select them and make sure we don't select that target. But we can go up here to bone and then hide selected bones just like that. So it's a little bit easier right now just to get the main movements down. But anyway, we can keep going here. This moving things along. Something like that. You just couldn't bring it up a little bit like this. There we go. And it's going to rotate these feet. Like so. And something like that should be good. So I'm just going to start with this position and pause the video here. And then up next, we can continue working on this. I'm going to try to split this up into smaller videos so that way it doesn't get too overwhelming. 39. Laying Out First Phase of Jump Animation: For this video, I'm working off of 37 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. Going back to frame one. We now have something like this going on. And I'm not quite sure about the pose. However, I'll have more of an idea once I get this animation laid out. And so that's what I'm going to concentrate on right now is just getting everything laid out in terms of main motions. So jumping to frame 12 and again, I'm not sure if frame 12 will be the frame I use for this ultimately, but we can easily move that once we get this in place. I'm going to grab the pelvis and just move him over like so to get him more in the center of the screen. And then of course we can grab those targets and bring them over. Sort of get everything lined up like this. And we can even have him in a pose like so since he's landing. And again, this is just a basic idea to kinda get this going. And then at frame a team when I can do is go over to frame 0 and copy the keyframes on frame 0, and then paste them. And so you have something that looks like this. And again, not great. But we need something here to kinda get us going. And so if I hit the space bar, I can get an idea of how fast this is moving. It's not too bad. Let's come over here and start to add a little more movement into the middle of all this. So he's coming straight down. Not really sure I like that. Let's go to frame one and grab the pelvis and just move this back a little bit more and move the feet along with it. And then at Frame 6, I'm going to bring it up to create an arc. And I can kinda come up like this, maybe up like that. And you can use the transform bone tool or the manipulate bone tool. It just depends on how you want to animate. I know people who exclusively use Transform bones and others who just do manipulate bones are those who do both. Just keep in mind when you do manipulate bones, you're moving all of it at once. When you use Transform bones, you're isolating the movements and you're able to kinda rotate like that. And so what I have going on here is starting to shape up. I would say, if we play this, it's a little bit more convincing than it was. So it's kinda like that. It might be a little bit too fast at the moment now. And so what I'm going to do is just come over here to frame one and highlight all of those frames. So just click and drag to lasso from frame one to 18. And then holding Alt and just drag from 18 and go to 24. That will allow you to create a uniform transformation of the keyframes. So you keep the spacing and everything uniform even though you're creating more time. So if we come back here and play this out, maybe looking a little bit better. Now the landing, of course needs work because the feet are doing this weird floating thing. And so what I'm gonna do is on frame 16, come in and go to frame 0 and copy and paste the frames. So it's gonna kinda look like this, which is good. But we're going to change it. So now on frame 16, where we just pasted those new keyframes, we can come in and redo that landing. So that's kinda come down like this. Again, this kinda getting all the basics in here. Just like that. So it's like bump. And then like that. And so if we come back here and play this out, it's not looking that bad based on just a little work that we did. So now if we keep just going through here, I might unframed 12. Just add a little bit more movement. Just kinda bringing it up like this, maybe a little bit back like that. Just adding a little bit more of something there. So there we go. And the landing is a little bit too long. He kind of goes up like that. Let's scale the landing back a little bit. Now. Let's just go to frame 20 one. So we have this. But instead of just going to default, I want to add a little bit of a bounce. So let's go back to frame 24 and just use Command F to lock everything down. So you have the keyframes here and then you have them there. Going back to frame 21. I can come down and stretch this up a little bit. Might be a little bit too much. We'll see here in a moment. I'm going to go up like that. And then it's gonna go back down. So he's sort of like this, like blink just adds a little bit of bounce to it. And it allows us to showcase that squash and stretch. And you can always squash and stretch at any time. In fact, coming from here to here, it might not be a bad idea to maybe exhibit that a little bit. It might not be able to catch it. But maybe if we kinda go out like this a little bit, you could then kinda show it off. Maybe going from this to that, it's a little bit hard to catch, so let's just not do that and just leave it how it is. But we can showcase it right there, which is nice. And you don't have to always flaunt it and show off every single little thing that you're doing. But again, since I flew it in, I kind of wanted to at least have a little bit of squash and stretch. So we now have something like that going on now. And it's not looking bad. I think I'm going to pause here and up next, we can implement the next step and then go back and polish up and add in head turns, blinks and all that fun stuff. 40. Lip Syncing Dialogue: For this video, we are working off of 38 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. The time has come to import an audio file so we can try out the lip sinking we created for this character. Let's jump over here. We can see what we're doing so far and everything's looking pretty good. So he jumps in. And perhaps that around frame 36. Let me take a look. Actually, let's go to 42. We can implement the audio file and he can start talking. So to do this, we're just going to use Command Shift Y to import. And this is just a general import. And attached to this lecture you'll find a file called test voice. We're just going to open that up. And it will place it right where we need it on the timeline. And you can see the waveform right here. We're going to give this a test. I'm not sure if my computer audio will record. Had been having some issues with that with this update with this app that I use to record my screen. So I'm going to turn up the audio as well on my end. As much as I can just see, you can hear what we're about to lip-sync. It's time to rig and animate using vectors in MOHO pro. Pretty simple. And so let's go in and implement the lip sinking right now. And the easiest way to do this is to first navigate to the mouth. Coming over here, we can locate the head. Mouth is right here, and then go up to Window switch selection. We might have to click off the mouth and click on it again to reveal it. But here we can see we have our switches and we're able to go in and easily select between the different poses. And so to begin, I want to make sure that we have a smile pose implemented right here. Since, because this interpolates, if we had the clothes pose on frame 0, and then we start with an AI pose on frame 42, you're going to have this mouth going all the way to open from one to 42 and then he's going to start speaking. So you need to make sure that you have a closed pose lockdown. And I can just do that by sliding back and forth to make sure it's in. And then we can just keep going. Right here is an oppose. Locate that th for there. And then right about here I might add an e sound. And then we can go to closed. And let me just zoom in on this. You can see this little bit better while we're doing it. Okay? Now we want to add in another pose. So I'm just going to make sure again, we lock in that smile pose. It's ETC. There we go. Sure, I move this up. There we go. So good. Etc, right there for the D. And back to a. Let's go to th. And so you want an m sound which would be closed. And here you can decide if you want to keep the teeth or if you want to close the mouth, this kind of pens, Let's try closing it so it goes. Now we're gonna go to you here. The funder V sound here. And then we have the S sound. I'm gonna go to closed. And then back to open it. Right about here. Let's add any TH sound for that n sound kinda acts as the same. Clothes for the m sound. An OH. And then we'll end with clothes. Alright, so let's give this a test. Hey, there, it's time to rig and animate using vectors in MOHO pro. Oops, and it looks like my last keyframe was missed there. Not a big deal. I'm just gonna jump back into mouth. Make sure that we have the close pose. And then the 0, 0. And there we go. In MOHO pro, there we go. So now we have that in place. Hey, there, it's time to rig and animate using vectors in MOHO Pro. And that's looking good. So now the lip sinking is in place. Will of course need to go in and animate out the body motions for the dialogue. But right now, what we have here is so far looking good. We'll pause here in Up next, continue building the final phase of this animation. 41. Animating Body to Dialogue: For this video, we are working off of 39 Chad vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. We now want to go in and finish off this animation. We should have some body movement when he's talking. Just to add some more to the scene and to add more character to the character. To begin, let's just give this a test. And so far it's looking good. However, I feel like we could shorten the duration between him landing in starting to talk. It feels like this almost 1 second gap is too long. Maybe at around frame 36 is when he should start talking. So what I could do is come over to the sequencer and clicking on that, I get a different view of the timeline. I can grab that voice file and just click and drag and bring it so that it comes to frame 36. And now if I come back here, you can see it has been drawn closer. But we also need to come down here to the mouth and ensure that the key frames are not offset since we animated the mouth a certain way, we also need to make sure that these keyframes get moved back. And so I'm going to come in here and just scale my timeline down a little bit, grab these keyframes and bring them up to frame 36. So now if we come back and give this another play, we can see what it looks like. And that, I believe has better timing to it. So we'll go with that. Now. Once we go to frame 36, we can use Command F or Control F to establish a new set of key frames. So we'll have just some stillness right here. And then we'll have them go into his things. So as he starts to talk here, we can spring into action. And so I can start despite lowering him a little bit like this. You bring him down like that and just bringing the hands and stuff over like this. So it goes. And then when he says, Hey there, we can maybe do a little bit of an effect like this. Kinda when he landed, just that squash and stretch effect. So kinda go up. Like so we don't want to move the neck, want to move this part right there. Not sure why that's being so stubborn. Just go like that. Sometimes you have to zoom in to get the bone that you want. But as you saying, Hey there, I'm going to raise the arm up and maybe raise that one down. And we can even raise the head back a little bit like that just individually. And then as he says there, I'll lower him. He's going to bend his knees and come down like this. Raise that up. Maybe raise the head up a little bit. We can bring the arm down. And then at 54, we can bring him back into a more neutral position. And if you ever need to get back to that neutral position, just come over here to frame 0 and copy those frames and paste them back over. So now you're back to where you need to be. Although I don't want the arms out like that. I'll kind of bring him down more to the sides. I can see that I have an issue with the backhand now overlapping the back leg. Not a big deal. Let's just come back here to frame 0 really quick. Go down here to that backhand under body. And we want to make sure that the backhand is behind the back leg. So we can just grab the back arm and hand and just bring them below the back leg. So now, coming back here to the animation, I can move forward. You can see now when it goes back to default, we now have a proper view of the hand. Instead of going back to the sides like this, I'm going to bring the torso up a little bit like this. And will also come in and bring this arm up a little bit back, a little bit like this, maybe this up a little bit more. And then unframed 59, I can come down something like that. And then at this point I'll put the hands on the hips. And then on 63, it's gonna kinda bring it back up and get him into a more default position. It doesn't have to be the exact default position, but something close, you can bend his knees a little bit. That's fine. There we are. So maybe when he says it's time to, and then at 78, I can hit Command F to enter in some keyframes. And then when he says rig, Let's do something else. Actually will go down like this to start to kind of add in that opposite reaction to the motion we're about to do. So there's come in and kinda break things down like that a little bit. And then on 85 maybe you just go up a little bit like this. And then I'm going to copy frame 0 back then to 90. So we kind of have more of a default position except again on, bring those arms down a little bit like that. Then from here, we can maybe have just a few seconds here if just him standing. And then we'll do something else here at around 110. So Command F, it's gonna go down like this, just a little bit. Scrap the bones and kinda go up like this. We don't want to put the jacket, but we want to grab the arm. Again. It can get a little bit messy with some of this. Just going to zoom in. And perhaps when he says using I'm going to raise the arm up along with that motion. And then he can come down on around 120 to just kinda lower it like that. Then we can kind of break it up like that. Something like this. And we can also, let's add one more here. So let's just go to 144 Command F. Kinda go down like this. And then this up a little bit. It's going to raise this up. And maybe here we'll just lower him down and lower the arms down. And then more of a default position at around 164. It's kinda bring it up and let's bring it all down like that. And that should be pretty good. Just make sure that the jacket is also looking good. There we go. So I would say we now have all the main motions in place. We can come back here and give this another view just to make sure everything is working. The only thing I don't really like maybe is this one right here. I'm not sure if I like that animation. Maybe I'll just kinda go back like this instead. There we go. I like that better. There we go. We now have all the main body motions in place. From here we just need to go in, do some fine tuning with the dials, polish anything up, and then export it out. 42. Implementing Blinks, Eyebrow Movements and Head Tilts: For this video, we are working off of 40 chat vector RIG. Feel free to open up this file. We now want to go in and reveal those dials that we hid before and start adding in blinks, eyebrow movements, and head turns. Let's come over here, click on the bone layer and then go up to bone, and then choose to reveal all bones. So right down here, click on Show All bones and everything is brought back. So now we can start with the blinks and just kinda go from there. Basically whenever there's a action change, landing on the ground, perhaps turning the head, doing any sort of major movement. We're going to implement blinks, but also add some blanks if we feel it's necessary just for added character because people like to blink. So we're going to come in here and first start with the action blinks as I like to call them. So right here when he lands is when we should add in our first blink. And how fast we want to blink really just depends. So if we come in here, we can zoom in. I'm just going to click once on that blink Bone. And when I do this, you're going to see we have all sorts of keyframes within the timeline due to all the command F, things we've been doing throughout this. In, so just to make this a little bit easier, I'm going to come in here and remove all those red keyframes just like that, which will reset the bone and allow me to move it without having any sort of other functionality in place. So when he comes down and lands on frame 16, I'm going to implement the blink small command and just have the eyes closed like that. And then when he pops back up, we can open them up, maybe even a little bit wider than normal, and then bring them back to default. And again, to get back to default, you can just go to frame 0 and just copy and paste that frame over. So you go just like that. And then you can also decide where you want to add more blinks. So starting at frame 36, I might add another one just like this, like that. And then I can paste frame 0 to bring it back to default. And then maybe on frame 78, I'll add another one. So something like that. We'll do another one here when he raises the arm. So add a keyframe on 110. We can do the blink. And instead of manually doing these blanks, you could also just copy all of these keyframes. So you can see if we come back here, I could just copy the last blank keyframes and just paste it right in. So just paste in the 0 all the time. You can just do it that way too. And then we'll come over here and just paste in these last set of keyframes. And of course, once you add the keyframes, you can tweak them to adjust the duration and such. So I could come in here and maybe just move that over, increasing the duration of the blink. There we go. It's looking pretty good. So now let's come back in and adjust the eyebrows. Let's come over here. And perhaps when he lands, we can implement some eyebrow movements. So I'm going to click on that dial and just like before, come in and clear out the red keyframes for this. So that way we don't have any influence. And then Command and just click once on the eyebrows to establish the main key for that. And then when I land or when he lands are, I guess me since it's based on me, I can lower those eyebrows. And then when I come up squat like this, we can raise them. And then from there you can decide what you wanna do with them. I'm just going to copy frame 0 and bring them back to default, just like that. And then from here, I can come in and copy those keyframes and add an eyebrow movements wherever I feel it's needed. Or just manually do it. Like for instance, right here. Click to add in a keyframe. You can just lower them a little bit and then maybe raise them up a little bit. Bring it back to default. So the mean here, just a little bit. It doesn't have to be a huge, huge change either. Even just little changes can help. And then maybe one more here. So on 144 and I'll just lower. Oops, we don't wanna do the head turns quite yet, but will raise up. And then let's come down a little bit. Just like that. Now you go. So now if we come back, can play this out. Just adds a little bit more to it. Now, we can go in and add the head turns. So as he's jumping in, we can start first with the left and right dial. And once again, I'm going to go into that left and right dial and clear all the red channel keyframes. And we're going to just start right away with a profile view. So as he's coming in, we're going to just have it look like this. And then when he lands, we can add in another key for that bone. And then when it comes up like this, I'm going to rotate over. And then we'll rotate back a little bit. We'll have them facing more forward the knots and C is addressing the audience. And we can also do some other things. So for instance, when he goes down like this, we could add in a slight head turn and then down like this and maybe just kinda back a little bit like that. And then maybe back like this. And then we can bring it back to default. And again, to get back to default, you can just copy frame 0 and paste it right in C, you just kinda have this going on. And then we can add in another keyframe right here. Again, I'll just do another head-turn, like they're right there. And then bring it back to default. And we'll do the same thing here. Just add in a keyframe. This will be just a subtle one like that. And same thing here, doesn't have to be much. And then we can kinda bring it back to default like that. And then we'll do one more here. We go down like this, over like this. And then we'll do frame 0 just to bring it back. There we go. Now, let's go back and focus on the up and down motion. Once again, just click on the up and down dial, remove the red channels and begin. So when it comes up like this, we might want him to be looking up so I can just face it up like that. And then as he comes down, we're going to, of course, haven't gone in the opposite direction, kinda like this. So it's like that. And then when he comes up, of course we will have a look up. And then let's bring him back to default on frame 24 just by copying and pasting frame 0. So you kinda have something like that now. And we can just do what we did with the sideview. Just put in some keyframes here and just add in some subtle below motions like that. Again, just kinda paying attention to what's going on with the head itself. Then we'll add one here. Go down and up, and then back to default. Go down and up. And then back to default. And then one more set. There we go. There. So now if we come back in. Play this out. The eye gaze is maybe a little bit off. It's kinda hard to tell. So I might go back really quick with that eye gaze and click on that pupils pin bone and move the red channels. And just kinda take a look at this. I'm going to try to keep the pupil center. So as he's looking, Let's come here and I'll bring that one back to default. So we'll add in a keyframe on 36. And then just lower this a little bit again just to kinda keep the eye gaze, eye gaze up a little bit like that. And again, just kinda keep adjusting it. Maybe I'll add a key on 82 and then we go up to 85. It's going to bring it over like that. And then in right here. And this is something you don't have to do, but I think it just adds a little bit, being able to control the eye gaze here. There we go. So again, come back and take a look. The last thing I want to do is just swap out those hands. So, so far, looking good right here. When I land, Let's do some phis. So going into the body here, and it's going to right-click on front hand and change it to fist, top, come down to the backhand. And if I type in hand under the Layers panel where it says name contains, making sure that's enabled. We can quickly just isolate this. So I can come in here and then I can choose the fist bottom. And then when it comes back like this, maybe bring it back to relaxed. So come in. And we're just going to take a look here. We can do that one and then we'll do this one right here. We're actually, let's go open hand back. So it's more symmetrical with that one. And that's fine right there. But when he goes like this, we will switch the backhand to this bottom, switch front hand to fizz top. Then right here on front hand, we can change it to, or excuse me, backhand, we can change to a point and then put it back to relaxed, or in this case the open palm. And then we'll also put it into a fist when it gets back down like that. Actually, instead of putting that to a fist, let's keep that open hand and put this to an open hand. So the front we'll go to open hand, will go up like that. And then when they contact the hips, that's when we'll go to the fist. There we go. So that should work. Now, I'm going to zoom out and just give this one more viewing to make sure everything is where I want it. Not bad. I don't see any other anomalies at this point you would want to go through and just make sure that there's nothing else going on, that all of your bones are working the way they should, that there's no breaking, there's no weird things going on in the background with your actions and all of that. And so be sure to go through and take a look at all of that with all the polishing we did. This is looking good. By my view. I can't see anything really wrong with this. It could, of course stand maybe a little bit more tweaking here and there. But again, given how this was made and under the time limit it was made, I'm actually pretty happy with this. So we're going to pause here and up next, we'll export this out and move on to my final thoughts. 43. Exporting Your Animation: With everything now in place, we can export the file out. I'm currently on 41 Chad vector rig. This will also act as the final file. So if you want to reference the final stage of this, this is the file for you. And so I'm just going to export this out to do that, to create a standard export, just go up to File and go down to Export Animation. You can also use Command E, or you can use the Moho exporter. However, I only use the Moho exporter when I'm working with layer comps and multiple animations. If you do use the Moho exporter, You will have similar options as you're seeing here. First, you want to determine how long this animation is. As you can see right down here, my voice file ends at around 16, 8. And so I think since the animation doesn't have anything after that, I'm just going to cap this at 192. That way we can save some time when rendering and we don't have a bunch of dead space at the end. Next, I'm just going to save this as an mp4 format. That way. It's small and file size and you can access it easily. Preset will be h point to 64. And again, if you were exporting this out for a larger production, if you wanted to combine different assets and all that kinda stuff, you'd want to export out at a higher quality. But here, MP4 will work for what we're doing. Down here. You have all these render options. I'm just gonna leave all that as is. I never play with that when rendering out a standard video like this. And then coming down here to your destination, you can choose where you want to export it to. In this case, I can just choose a folder and I'm going to stick it inside of our exercise files for this course. And of course this will be attached to this lecture for you as well. That way you can view it as a final result. And this will also be saved as final render. So that way you can look at it and you know what it is. And once we're good, we can click Okay. And the process will begin. Now depending on how detailed the animation is, this can take a considerable amount of time or not. Again, it just depends on what you have going on and how fast your computer is with exporting everything out. But I will leave this video file for you, once again attached to the lecture, so that way you can view it. I'm going to pause the video here for now though in Up next, we can move on to my final thoughts. 44. Final Thoughts: And there you go. You now have a vector Reagan complete with a test animation. And it's looking pretty good. Of course, there's always changes you could go back and make. You can always enhance these things. You can keep adding features. For instance, if you wanted to add more phonemes for the mouth, perhaps you want different expressions for the mouth. You could create an AI pose that's happy and then one that's sad. And you could invoke those at anytime. And you can just keep building up and up and up until you get the rig that you want. Now you can make things too complicated. And in cases where you want a lot of features for one rig, it might be beneficial to split that up into multiple ribs. And that's a more complicated process and perhaps that's something I can touch on down the road, creating really complex character animations and all that good stuff. But hopefully here you now have a solid understanding of how animation with vectors works inside of MOHO Pro. And if you're curious about how images can be rigged in animated in MOHO Pro, I also have a Udemy course on that as well. The process is a little bit different, a little bit more simplified, but ultimately, you should gain some knowledge from both of these courses. Thank you for watching. I hope you found this helpful and I'll see you next time.