Removing Background Noise from Audio | Andre Angelo | Skillshare

Removing Background Noise from Audio

Andre Angelo

Removing Background Noise from Audio

Andre Angelo

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10 Lessons (40m)
    • 1. Introduction

      1:52
    • 2. Downloads

      0:59
    • 3. Why?

      1:09
    • 4. Software

      1:09
    • 5. Audacity

      13:29
    • 6. Adobe Audition

      9:45
    • 7. RX Elements 6

      7:11
    • 8. VST

      3:00
    • 9. Workflow Tip

      0:41
    • 10. Closing Thoughts

      1:03
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About This Class

Hello!

Not all of us can afford a soundproof professional studio whenever we want to record something - we record in our homes. Whether it's voice over, podcasts, instruments, or whatever else you may record, there will be background noise.

Common sources of background noise:

  • Traffic
  • Air Conditioner
  • Appliances
  • Computer Fans

These can be treated if you have the know-how.

To follow along with this course, you need no prior experience and all the software used is free or offers extended free trials for you to experiment.

Software:

  • Audacity
  • Adobe Audition
  • RX Elements 6
  • more coming soon!

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Andre Angelo

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hello, my name is Andre Angelo and thank you for checking out my course on removing background noise from audio. Now, when most people think of removing background noise, they think it's some technical skill or something that requires a lot of manual labor. But once you learn how to do it, it actually only takes a few seconds on whatever project you're working on. Before we get started, I'd like to show you a clip with some background noise. Once upon a time, mother duck sat gently on her eggs, waiting for them to hatch. She had three small eggs in her nest. She left them just for a moment to take a drink from the river. But first, she counted them; one, two, three. Now here's that same exact clip, but with the background noise removed. Once upon a time, mother duck sat gently on her eggs, waiting for them to hatch. She had three small eggs in her nest. She left them just for a moment to take a drink from the river. But first, she counted them; one, two, three. You see as subtle as it is, it adds that little extra bit of polish and refinement to whatever project you're working on. If you really care about the quality of the project you're working on, this is something you would, you know, lunge after. So in this course, you don't need to purchase any software. Everything I use as either free or has extremely generous free trials for you to use and experiment with. You also don't need to have any audio production knowledge. All this stuff is pretty beginner friendly. Again, thank you for joining me in my course. I really appreciate it and I hope you learned something. 2. Downloads: With the course, I've included six tracks that you can download that have background noise in them, so you can practice. I strongly encourage you to take these files and try to remove the background noise to the best of your ability. Don't just watch the course because, once you start, you'll instantly figure out that removing background noise is more experimentation than anything, seeing what works and what doesn't. Four of the tracks that are included are a bit unrealistic in terms of the background noise involved in them. You wouldn't really find a track that you have to work with that had background noise as bad as four of them, two of them that have a prefix subtle are more realistic or if you're recording in a home studio and you have a little computer fan noise in the background or a car goes by or something like that, it's a bit more realistic. Just know for the four that aren't more subtle, you probably can't get them perfectly the way you want, but it's still a really good practice. 3. Why?: Why do we want to remove background noise? It's just one of those things that it's a good tool to have in your back pocket. You hope you don't have to use it, but if you do encounter a track that has some background noise, it's a lifesaver. It's just one of those things that's convenient to know. But what people don't often think about is, well, if you have one track, so this is me talking right now, if there's a little background noise in a single track, it's not that big of a deal. People can deal with that. But what happens is, if you're doing a eight-person podcast where each person has their own microphone or you're a musician doing 20 tracks of recording, a tiny little bit of background noise will build up over those multiple tracks. You won't realize it when you've finish the product that it sounds muddy and you're not sure why. Well, if you know how to remove background noise or you're aware that background noise does this, then you can go through and clean up your entire mix. A lot of times people don't really pay attention to that, that it builds up. But for musicians, that's a really important thing. 4. Software: In this course, we use three pieces of software. The first one is Audacity, which is a free digital audio workstation. I'm sure many of you have heard of it. If you needed any software for free that handles audio, you probably know about Audacity, most people do. Just Google it, download it, it's free. The second one is Adobe Audition, which is a part of the Creative Cloud Adobe Suite. If you have a subscription, then you can just download it and start using it. If you don't have a subscription, then they offer a seven day free trial for you to experiment with. The last one we use is RX Elements 6, which is a audio restoration suite by iZotope that is extremely popular and extremely powerful. It cost $99 or a little bit more, I think it's a 135 or something, but they offer a 30 day free trial. So that's more than enough time to learn the software inside and out and we'll only be using a very, very small portion of the software, just one little feature. So it shouldn't be that much of a learning curve. 5. Audacity: I'm sitting here in Audacity and I'm going to remove the background noise of three different files that are found in the student downloads. Let me pull one of those in. You can just drag them in. It might give you a message, just click "Okay." I already turned mine off. I'm not sure. I think it asked you whether or not you want to copy the file into your workspace or just reference the original file and just do the referenced the original file. But anyway. When you have a track with background noise in Audacity, you're going to want to highlight a portion of a segment that's strictly background noise as in there's no voice-over. Let's listen to this whole thing.[NOISE] Once upon a time, mother duck sat gently on her eggs, waiting for them to hatch. She had three small eggs in her nest. She left them just for a moment to take a drink from the river. But first, she counted them 1, 2, 3. As you can hear, there's a lot of background noise. This is pretty unrealistic. If you've got a voiceover with background noise, it probably wouldn't have this much. But I think these clips help a bit for learning how to remove background noise. Again, you're going to start by highlighting a section that is strictly background noise. Don't start highlighting in the voiceover or things will get messed up. Now I left a little segment at the beginning and the end so you can highlight either one of those. But a rule of thumb is highlight as much as you can. Don't just do a little highlight like this because there might be something weird in this little segment you highlighted and if there's something weird, it's going to assume that the entire background noise has that weird thing in it. If you highlight a good portion, it basically takes the average of the whole thing. You're less likely to get some weird anomalies when you're doing this. You're going to want to start by highlighting a big section and hit "Spacebar" to preview. [NOISE] Sounds pretty even. Then you go to Effect, noise reduction, and you're going to see these two steps here. The first step is to just click get noise profile and then nothing happens here. But audacity takes what you highlighted and learns what the noise is. Now what you're going to want to do is highlight the entire file and you can do that by either clicking somewhere in the file and hitting Control A or just clicking right here at the beginning of the track, anywhere in this blank area and it will select the whole thing. Now let's go back to noise reduction, and we can start messing with these little levers here. I think default it's 6,3 and 12. I think this is the default when you first open it. First, let's just preview with the default settings. Once upon a time, mother duck sat gently on her eggs waiting for. As you can hear, there is way less background noise. It's 12 decibels quieter. This slider is basically how much you're going to reduce. This is nothing. If it's 0, there is effectively no background noise reduction happening and if it's at 48, that's as high as it goes. The sensitivity is how sensitive it is to the background noise, like what the background noise is. The higher this one goes, if you put this way up here. It's going to assume more things are background noise. If you have this at 24, it might start eating into or definitely well start eating into the VoiceOver. Let's just keep this as 6 for now and we'll start messing with this later. But, and then frequency smoothing is essentially if you're doing background noise reduction and you start hearing these weird artifacts like little flaky sounds like in the recording, that's typically because it's not being smooth enough. But when you're first starting it, I would start at 0 and only up this if you need it and I'll show you why in a second. Let's leave this at 0, and let's leave this at 12, and let's leave this at 6, and let's do it again. Once upon a time, mother duck sat gently on her eggs waiting for that. I don't hear any artifacts. I wouldn't smooth this at all. I'll leave this as 0 for this particular recording. But lets up the reduction because it still sounds good. I think we can get away with more noise reduction because the rule of thumb is always remove as little as you have to. Because once you start removing too much, it starts eating away at the voiceover and it sounds growths which is not what you want. Always prioritize the quality of the VoiceOver. Actually, put this at 20 and let's see where we are there. Once upon a time, mother duck sat gently on her eggs, waiting for them. At 20, there's almost no background noise at the beginning, but the actual voiceover starts getting a little wobbly. I'm going to down this to 16 and let's lower the sensitivity a little bit. Once upon a time, mother duck sat gently on her eggs waiting for that. There is a bit of wobbliness and that's from the artifacts. I'm going to up this to 1, which should smooth it out a little bit. But what will happen here? I'll show you an example. Let me put this at five and let's just listen to it. Once upon a time, mother duck sat gently on her eggs waiting for that. Now, if I put this back to 0, you'll notice that when I put it up to 5, the voiceover got a lot thinner. Because the majority of the background noise is lower frequencies. The more you have it's smooth on this frequency smoothing, the more it'll seep into other frequencies and start taking away those assuming it's noise which will be the lower frequencies of the voice most often. You're going to want to keep this as low as possible. Now if I go to residue, this will show me what it's taking away. You're going to hear what the finished product is going to sound like. But residue is what it's actually taking away soloed. Lets us know that. [inaudible] [NOISE] That's just what it's removing. Now you don't hear much vocalization in there, which is what you want. If I put the sensitivity really high in the bands really high, you'll start hearing the voiceover in there. [NOISE] It's sounding more like a voice. Use residue to really dial in what you're trying to do. I forgot, I had this at six. I forget,[LAUGHTER] but let's listen to this again. [NOISE] Yes. We don't hear any of the voiceover in this. Which is exactly what you want. The residue is really useful to make sure you're not removing any of the voice or whatever you are trying to remove background noise from. Let's click "Okay." I have the residue checked. I just gave me background noise. Let's highlight this again and it still saves the noise profiles. Then make sure you put reduce, click "Okay," and this is done. Now let's do it. Once upon a time, mother duck sat gently on her eggs. Waiting for them to hatch. She had three small eggs in her nest. Now let's listen to how it sounded before. Once upon a time, mother duck sat gently on her eggs, waiting for them to hatch. She had three small eggs in her nest. That helped a lot and if you don't know how to use audacity and you're just using it for this, this is all you need to know and to get the file out of here, File, export, wav or MP3 or whatever you're trying wherever you are putting it and then save it wherever you need to save it. Let's do a couple more and then we'll be added here. Let's do the Little Red Riding Hood one and we can have is a lot faster now. [NOISE] Oh yes, this one's rain [NOISE] Once upon a time, there was a little girl who lived in a village near the forest. Whenever she went out, the little girl wore Red Riding cloak. Let's do what we did before. Get a huge portion of this sound [NOISE] Pretty consistent effect, noise reduction, get the profile, select the whole file, effect, noise reduction. Let's leave it at here and we can see what it sounds like. Once upon a time there was a little girl who lived in a village near the. Now there is some artifacts because the nature of this background noise, it's rain hitting a roof. There is some mid-frequencies in there. It will start eating away at the voiceover. I think in this case, we need a bit more smoothing. Let's try that and see if some of those leakiness goes away. Once upon a time there was a little girl who lived in a village near the. That definitely helps. Let me lower the sensitivity a little bit and up the reduction. Once upon a time, there was a little girl who lived in a village near the. That sounds fine. Let's listen to the residue to make sure we're not getting too much of the voiceover in there. [NOISE] There is a pretty significant amount of low frequencies in there. Let's try and reduce the sensitivity of it [NOISE]. [NOISE] It's definitely helping. Let me try lowering the smoothing because I lowered the sensitivity as well. [NOISE] Now this should sound a lot better because this was a lot thinner, meaning the voiceover is going to be a lot heavier. Once upon a time there was a little girl who lived in a village near the. I think that sounds a lot better. Now let's listen to that comparison and again, you have to remember this is an unrealistic amount of background noise. You're not going to be able to get it perfectly. In the next one, we can get it a lot closer to what you'd want. But let's listen to this. Once upon a time there was a little girl who lived in a village near the forest. Whenever she went out. Lets us do it before. [NOISE] Once upon a time there was a little girl who lived in a village near the forest. Whenever she went out, the little girl wore red. That sounds that sounds a lot better and again, you're not going to get this perfect when the background noise is this heavy. Let me show you an example where you can get it very close. Let's do this. The second one and I call be subtle because a backer noise is a lot more [inaudible]. Let's listen to this. The first little pig builds his house out of straw, because it was the easiest thing to do. The second little pig built his house out of sticks. I think this is a computer fan that I added back here. We're going to just take this and a lot of times if you can't see the background noise and it bugs you, you can view it by going to the right here, the spectrogram, and it shows you the frequencies right here. You can very clearly see that this is noise, but we'll leave it on what we had before. It's just a different way to view the same thing. Let's select all this. Let's listen to it. Pretty even, boom, boom. Get the noise profile, Select All, effect. Here we go. Now we wanted to remove as much. Let's just start by taking this to maybe 10 and the sensitivity to. Let's leave it at six would it's at default, and let's put the smoothing at nothing. The first little pig builds his house out of straw, because it was the easiest thing to do. The voiceover still sounds really good. I'm going to reduce this to 14. The first little pig built his house out of straw, because it was the easiest thing to get. I don't hear any of the voiceover. I don't hear any of the background noise at all. Let's listen to residue. [inaudible]. This is perfect. You hear it removing backer noise at the beginning and then it's not touching the voiceover at all. I can leave it right here, and then let me click "Okay". It's going to remove it, but let me switch to the spectrogram. What I'm talking about. I'm going to do Control Z to add the noise back in. Hold on. It's going controls [inaudible]. The noise is still there. I'm going to leave it right here and then remove the noise so I can go back and forth, select all, remove the noise. You can see now that what it's actually removing some of the Controls Z to put it back and you can see all this noise up here, all this and then Control Y to redo and you can see that it's removing a pretty significant amount without really touching any of the voiceover and you can even see it removing it throughout the voiceover. If you look right here, [LAUGHTER] there we go, and then make sure you don't undo your voiceover or undo your noise reduction. Let's put back the waveform and that lets us do it again. The first little pig builds his house out of straw, because it was the easiest thing to do and that sounds really good. This is a very realistic example of the noise remover you'll do where it's a little PC fan or something in the background and then again you go File, Export, save it as a wave if you want to move it somewhere else or whatever you're doing with it. But that's pretty much all you need to know to reduce background noise in audacity. 6. Adobe Audition: Now I'm sitting in Adobe Audition CC 2018, and we're going to try and do the same thing we did in audacity. I'm going to bring in that same file we did the first time. I'm going to use the same theory, and it's a very similar process. Let's listen to it again. Once upon a time, mother duck sat gently on her egg. Oh, I forgot, you guys probably won't see this. If you drag a file in here, it'll most likely open like this. You can see the spectrogram by clicking this little bar here and scrolling up. For me when I work in Adobe Audition, I like to sit this setup almost always because a waveform, it'll show you how loud things are. But in a spectrogram you can see where the frequencies lie. We know just visually that a lot of the frequencies of this background noise are lower because the brighter and more yellow, in this the more loud there. Let's listen to this again. Once upon a time, mother duck sat gently on her eggs, waiting for them to hatch. She had three small eggs in her nest. She left them just for a moment to take a drink from the river. But first, she counted them 1, 2, 3. The process again is very similar. In Adobe Audition, you're going to want to highlight a big portion as we did in audacity. Then you're going to go to effects, noise reduction and restoration, and then you're going to capture a noise print, Shift P. If you use Adobe Audition, I definitely would learn these shortcuts. Highlight, Shift P, and it'll tell you the current audio ball by, just telling you that you captured the noise print and you can click, don't show this again. We have it. It run this little area. Now, we go back to noise reduction in restoration, and now we do the noise reduction process, which is Ctrl, Shift P. I'm going to do Ctrl, Shift P. Now this is the window for Adobe Audition. We're just going to be messing with two buttons here. A two controls here; noise reduction and reduced by. I think when you first start this up, I think it's 1516. Noise reduction controls how much of the noise is removed or what percentage of the noise more like is removed. If you've had this at a 100 percent, it will use the entire noise profile. Then reduced by is how much that noise profile you set is reduced by. If we click output noise only, we can see what it's actually doing. We can see it's removing a good amount of the voice-over. Let's reduce the noise reduction. Essentially from audacity, this is like sensitivity. Let's lower the reduction to 10. I don't know if I said it, the output noise only just shows you what's being removed. If I uncheck that box, we can hear what it sounds like after the noise is reduced. Once upon a time, mother duck sat gently on her eggs. So it sounds really good. I think that sounds pretty good. There is still a significant amount of background noise. Let me up the reduction by again, and let's keep listening. Once upon a time, mother ducks. From the output noise only it sounded as if it was taking a lot away from the voice-over, but it doesn't sound like that once I'm previewing the whole thing. I'm going to up this back to 50 and see if the voice-over still sounds good. Once upon a time, mother duck sounds, it sounds really good. Actually, I'm going to open up this to 70 because you want to you want to keep pecking away at it until you start to hear the voice over deteriorating. Then that's what you know, and it's too much. So as you can hear, just when I up it to 70 percent, this portion is a lot quieter. Once upon a time, mother duck sat gently on her eggs, waiting for them to hatch. She had three small eggs, in her nest. She left them just for a moment to take a drink from the river. But first, she counted them 1,2, 3. Now, there's this pumping effect that happens with the Adobe Audition noise reduction that doesn't happen in audacity. In some instances, I think the audacity one is better. In some instances, I think the Adobe Audition one is better. I think that sounds pretty good here. Let's apply it, and you can see this is much quieter. There's a lot less color here. Let's listen to this. Once upon a time, mother duck sat gently on her eggs, waiting for them to hatch. She had three small eggs in her nest. She left them just for a moment to take a drink from the river. Let's undo that and let's hear what it sounded like before. Once upon a time, mother duck sat gently on her eggs, waiting for them to hatch. She had three small eggs in her nest. She left them just for a moment to take a drink from the river. In the noise reduced version, if you do Ctrl, Shift Z, it does a redo. Once upon a time, mother duck, it does sound a lot better. There is still a significant amount of noise within the voice-over. It seems like there's a lot still in there, but that's just how the Adobe Audition noise reduction works. Let's try it with a different file. Once we get to the third file, it'll be more of a realistic situation. Let's drag in a second one, and let's do this one really quick. Again, boom, capture the noise print. You don't select the whole thing, but make sure to deselect, Ctrl, Shift P to bring up this. Let's hear what it sounds like. This button right here turns the whole process off if it doesn't have that green light in there. Let's listen to the file to begin with. This was that rain one. Once upon a time, there was a little girl who lived in a village near the forest. Let's turn it back on. Once upon a time, there was a little girl who lived in a village near the forest. Whenever she went out, the little girl wore red, riding cloak. Everyone in the village called her little, red riding hood. You can hear that pumping effect happening again where this portion here, there's a lot of reduction. Then as soon as the voice-over starts, you can hear the rain a lot in the background. Once upon a time, there was a little girl, in audacity, you don't really get that. Let's try with a more realistic example. Again, I'm showing all these in different software so you can see how they all handled noise reduction. Again, this is the more subtle one, the more realistic one. Once upon a time, there were three little pigs, and the time came for them to leave home and seek their fortunes. Let's capture this one, Ctrl, Shift P, and then Ctrl, Shift P. Let's put this down because it's a little quieter, let’s put this under 10, and let’s lower this back to 50, which is around the default settings. Once upon a time, there were three little pigs, and the time came for them to leave home and seek their fortunes. Before they left, their mother told them whatever you do. The voice over still sounds good, let's up the noise reduction. Once upon a time, there were three little pigs, and the time came for them to leave home and seek their fortune. The voice-over still sounds good. I'm going to keep popping it. Once upon a time, there were three little pigs, and the time came for them to leave home and seek their fortunes. Before they left, their mother told them whatever you do, do with the best that you. Let's see what it sounds like with a 100. Once upon a time, there were three little pigs, that still sounds good, and the time came for them to leave home and seek their fortunes. I'm going to apply this, and we can see much of the sound goes away. Now, this one sounds really, really good. Let's just assume it as first part. Once upon a time there were three little pigs. I don't hear a lot of the noise in the background of the Voice-over. Now, I'm going to Ctrl Z to bring back the noise and we can compare it. Once upon a time, there were three little pigs. Now here's the noise reduced. Once upon a time, there were three little pigs. Now this one's perfect. This one's really good. This is a very realistic situation. This one, and I think it seems like when there's more subtle background noise, audition handles it pretty well. But when it gets a little too crazy, audition seems to freak out a little bit and not be able to take it away from within the voice-over. I encourage you, if you use Adobe Audition to take all these files, try your best to reduce the background noise as best you can without distorting the voice-over and see what you come up with. 7. RX Elements 6: Now I'm sitting in RX elements six by isotope. I think this is one of the better noise reduction plugins or programs I've ever used. Let's start by bringing in those same files we've been using. So here to here. So now it automatically starts up with the spectrogram and the waveform superimposed. In a very similar fashion, we will highlight the noisy area. Let's listen to the file first. Once upon a time, mother duck sat gently on her eggs, waiting for them to hatch. She had three small eggs in her nest. If you've been following along, you're used to this one. I'm going to highlight this and open the voice de-noise, which is right here. Now this is their background noise reduction software. All you have to do here is once you've highlighted the area, click learn, and it'll instantly learn what that noise sounds like. Let's just listen to it with its default setting. You can't just play it. It won't show you the noise reduction. You have to click preview down here. Once upon a time, mother duck sat gently on her eggs, waiting for them to hatch. She had three small eggs in her nest. As you can hear it's perfectly removing the background noise within the voiceover as well. In Adobe Audition, there was a lot of background still within the voiceover. Since we have a very clear voice over, so I'm going to up this to, let's go 18 decibels and let's see if the voiceover still sounds good. Once upon a time, mother duck sat gently on her eggs, waiting for them to hatch. She had three small eggs in her nest. She left them just for a moment to take a drink from the river,. What's nice about isotope software, the RX elements, is that you can compare them here as well. Instead of doing that control Z, Control Shift Z thing to listen to what's been changed. You can click compare. Right here it'll have the original audio and then the modified audio. Visually you can see that it's removing a lot of the background noise, but then it's also easy to compare them. You just click the one you want to hear. Click preview. Once upon a time, mother duck sat gently on her eggs. Then let's check this one. Once upon a time, mother duck sat gently on her eggs. I think that sounds really good. I think that sounds extremely, extremely good. I don't hear any of that pumping effect happening. I'm going to go and and then once you're done, it doesn't just happen. You have to click process down here. Once you have the settings you want, if you are getting a little bit of that artifacting that was happening in the other software, that's where you'd mess with this. This is essentially the sensitivity or the percentage noise reduction in Adobe Audition. That's here, but it sounds fine. I'm going to leave it, I'm going to process it. Then boom, we're done with this one. Now there's a little tabbing system here that I like, so you don't actually have to close it. You can just drag another one in. But I'm going to close this and bring in, I'm going to save it for now. Bring in the second one. Let's do the same thing where we highlight this voice denoise over here, learn and then let's hear what it sounds like. Once upon a time there was a little girl who lived in a village near the forest. We didn't originally hear this, my bad. Once upon a time, there was a little girl who lived in a village near the forest. Whenever she went out, the little girl wore red. The rains really heavy in this one the rains extremely heavy. In almost every other instance, not just Adobe Audition and Audacity, a few other things I've tried. A lot of them don't remove the rain that well when the voice over actually starts but isotopes does it very, very well. Lets's do it again. Now this is with 18 decibels reduction here. Once upon a time there was a little girl who lived in a village near the forest. Whenever she went out, the little girl wore red riding club. I mean, compare him here. Now there is some harsh hits happening but you have to remember that this whole section, once you've reduced it, you'd take this part out anyways. Let's just do the original. Once upon a time there was a little girl who lived in a village. Okay then the reduced version,. Once upon a time there was a little girl who lived in a village near the forest. Now I think the voice over here, it's still sounds extremely pure, even though I've reduced it by so much, which is why I like isotopes so much. It seems like you can get away with a lot of reduction without actually damaging the voice over. Let's bring in that third one, which is again, the more realistic sample of the computer noise. Once upon a time there were three little pigs, and the time came for them to leave home and seek their fortunes. Okay, so let's do the same thing. Highlight, voice de-noise, learn, and we've got that computer noise right here. Let's put these back at their defaults. You just double-click it. Okay. Lets preview. Once upon a time there were three little pigs and the time came for them to leave home. Once upon a time there were three little. You can hear there's a lot of reduction. We can get away with a lot more. Let's bring this up to 18 like it was before and since it's handling it so well, we don't really have to mess with the threshold because we aren't getting that artifact situation. Once upon a time,. That's the original, you have to hit preview. Once upon a time there were three little pigs and the time came for them to leave home and seek their fortune. Okay, so that sounds really good. Let's just try 20 because this is such a subtle background noise, you can get away with more reduction so let's compare these two. We have the original here and you can see the denoised one. There is heavy reduction in so let's compare them. Once upon a time there were three little pig. Once upon a time there were three little pigs. We got away with a lot of reduction there without damaging the voice-over at all. I feel that in Audacity and audition, you don't get a reduced that much without forcing the noise reduction into the voiceover and causing those artifacts so let me process that. Now you have your reduced audio here. Then if you want to export it from this application and bring it into something else or whatever you're doing with it, file and then export. Then you can send it in whatever format you want and send it wherever you want. That is our x elements voice de-noise. 8. VST: I'm back in Adobe Audition cc to show you how VSTs work. If you have the trial or you purchased our acts elements 6 from isotope, then you actually can use it in other applications that accept VSTs, which is most audio programs. If you have RX elements installed, even if at the trial, you can open up any audio software and use their VST. In Adobe Audition, and in this case I go to Effects, Audio Plug-in Manager. If you haven't installed in the default location, all you have to do is click "Plug-ins" right here. If you don't, you have to click "Add" and point it to where you installed. But if you click "Scan", it'll show up mine is right here. I have a few other things installed. Mine is right here. Click "Okay" and then let's bring back in those files we were working with. We can just drag it in like before but instead of using Adobe Auditions noise reduction software, maybe we like RX elements a lot better, and I personally do. Now that we've found the plug-in, we can go here in the effects rack and we don't see the effects rack, you go to window and you can see the effects rack right here. Effects rack, VST3, Restoration and it'll show up right here. A lot of little selections you get to make there. It's the same thing as before, except this time when you hit "Learn", it doesn't find it instantly you actually have to play it this time,so just highlight the part portion with noise click "Play". Now it has it right here and now we can do it just as before. Just play it and you can hear it's already reduced. Once upon a time, mother duck sat gently on her eggs waiting for them to. This one, it's actually nice because you can do it in real time. She had three small eggs, in her nest. She left them just for a moment to take a drink from the river. But first, she counted them 1, 2, 3. Once upon a time, mother duck sat gently on her eggs, waiting for them to hatch. She had three small eggs. Now we have this done the same way we did it in the isotope program, but they give it to you so you can use it whenever program you want. You can even use these in a lot of video editing applications. If you don't want to take your audio, bring it into Adobe Audition, or bring it into Audacity. You can actually bring this VST into Premiere Pro or de Vinci resolve or whatever you're using. Almost all video editing applications can do that the same way and you'll have the same little tree like that. I just wanted to show that even if you don't like the noise reduction in Adobe Audition, you don't have to use it. There's more than RX elements. There's a bunch of people that create noise reduction plugins and in this course I might test out some more of those if someone wants me to. That is pretty much it for this section. 9. Workflow Tip: I just wanted to give a little workflow tip if you're going to apply more things to the track other than noise reduction. So if you're going to apply a limiter, or compressor, or whatever you're going to add to it, it's almost always a better idea to include or to add the noise reduction first. The only other time you wouldn't include noise reduction first in your signal chain is if you're doing some kind of corrective EQ, like high pass filter or something like that. You want to get the noise reduction out of the way first so you're not compressing or limiting noise and then having to remove it later. So that's just a little tip. Always, always do the noise reduction first. 10. Closing Thoughts: Here we are at the end of the course. I really appreciate you guys making it all the way through. If anyone out there has any software plugin that they use for background noise removal that I didn't include in the course, send me a message, send it my way so I can include it into the course. There is a few other pieces of software that I wanted to include, so if you use something different, I can get it and then add it into the course. I also run this newsletter, it's all audio production based, but it could be something like quick tip that wouldn't really make it into a course. Or maybe there's 50 percent off on a software that I've been using or maybe a really good sound design article, whatever it is, I do it all at andreangelo.com. You can find a little newsletter button there and it's just to further immerse you in that audio production world, but that's pretty much it. Thank you for checking out my course. I have other courses on audio production and sound design. Be sure to check those out. Again, I'm Andrea Angelo, and thank you.