Recipe Illustrations on Your iPad in Procreate + 26 Free Procreate Textures and Stamps | Liz Kohler Brown | Skillshare

Recipe Illustrations on Your iPad in Procreate + 26 Free Procreate Textures and Stamps

Liz Kohler Brown, artist | designer | teacher | author

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13 Lessons (1h 46m)
    • 1. Recipe Illustrations on Your iPad in Procreate + 26 Free Brushes

      2:17
    • 2. Downloads & Inspiration

      3:32
    • 3. Creating Procreate Textures Part 1

      7:49
    • 4. Creating Procreate Textures Part 2

      11:26
    • 5. Illustrations & Text

      11:05
    • 6. Arrangement & Fillers

      8:11
    • 7. Sketching and Using Stamps

      10:46
    • 8. Creating Procreate Stamps

      7:07
    • 9. Tracing and Referencing

      10:50
    • 10. Text & Placement

      9:45
    • 11. Layout & Photo Filters

      13:59
    • 12. Color & Placement

      3:58
    • 13. Adding Filler & Texture

      5:36
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About This Class

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In this class, you'll learn how to create unique and eye catching recipe illustrations on your iPad in Procreate.  I’ll show you three different illustration styles, so you can explore which one works best for your personal style.

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When you take this class, you’ll get all of the Procreate brushes and textures I use to create my recipe illustrations as free downloads.  The set of 27 brushes includes 14 stamps, 8 textures, and 5 drawing tools.

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In the class, we'll cover

  • a simple way to turn a recipe title into a playful illustration with overlapping textures, layers of color and text.  I’ll show you the easy steps to create your own texture brushes from photographs.
  • some quick ways to turn an object into an illustration, and how to make beautiful text even if you don’t feel confident with your hand lettering skills.
  • how to turn a drink recipe into a sleek illustration using stamps, tracing, and hand drawn elements.  I’ll show you some easy ways to work from real ingredients to create your own custom stamps, tracings, and drawings.
  • an easy way to create a detailed illustration from a photograph.  We’ll look at ways to use repeated elements to fill the spaces around a recipe and instructions.

The amazing thing about this process is you can use Procreate to turn any recipe into a beautiful illustration in a few easy steps.  You can use the recipes for your business or blog, or print them out as gifts for friends and family.

All you need to take this class is your iPad and a stylus.  I’ll be using the Apple Pencil, but you could use any stylus, or even your finger.  Let’s get started!

Here is the class downloads and resources page (the password is shown in the beginning of the class)

Transcripts

1. Recipe Illustrations on Your iPad in Procreate + 26 Free Brushes: Hi everyone. I'm Liz Kohler Brown. I'm an artist, designer, and teacher. Today, I want to show you how to create recipe illustrations on your iPad and procreate. I'll show you three different illustration styles. So you can explore which one works best for your personal style. When you take this class, you get all of the brushes and textures I use to create my recipe illustrations as free downloads. The set of 27 brushes includes 14 stamps, eight textures, and five drawing tools. First, we'll look at a simple way to turn a recipe title into a playful illustration with overlapping textures, layers of color and text. I'll show you the easy steps to create your own texture brushes from photographs. Then we'll look at some quick and easy ways to turn an object into an illustration and how to make beautiful text, even if you don't feel confident with your hand lettering skills. Next, we'll turn a drink recipe into a sleek illustration using stamps, tracing, and hand-drawn elements. I'll show you some easy ways to work on real ingredients to create your own custom stamps, tracings, and drawings. Next, I'll show you an easy way to create a detailed illustration from a photograph. We will look at ways to use repeated elements to fill the spaces around a recipe and instructions. The amazing thing about this process is that you can turn any recipe into a beautiful illustration in a few easy steps. You can use the illustrations as printouts that you can sell or give as gifts for friends and family. You could also post the digital images on your blog or your social media accounts. All you need to take this class is your iPad, procreate, and the stylus. I'll be using the Apple Pencil, but you could use any stylus or even your finger. So let's get started. 2. Downloads & Inspiration: The first thing I want to do is show you how to get all the downloads that you will need for this class. You can find a link to get to this page in the About section of the class. The About section does not show up on the app though, so make sure you are viewing Skillshare in a browser when you go to look for this link and you will need a password to get into this page and I will show the password on a screen right now. I am opening this page in Safari, if you have any trouble with another browser, try Safari and this should work as I am showing you here. l see the downloads in the middle there, Procreate Brushes Download. I am going to click and hold that link and then click open in a new tab. Once that new tab opens, you should see the option open and procreate if you do not click more and then you can choose procreate from the list. Once you click add to procreate, it should open whatever document you had open last and you can just click the brushes symbol and you should see the brush set recipe illustrations on the very top. If you go back to the Class Resources page, you will see there is also a couple of things that I will mention in a class, some free image resources and an app that I will use in the class and also a Pinterest Inspiration Board. I am going to open that board. You will see that I have collected a ton of different recipe and food illustrations on this board in a lot of different styles. You will see everything from bold line drawing with just a little bit of color dropped in to something a little more detailed illustrating every single ingredient in the recipe. You can scroll through here and see what works best for your personal style. You may like the hand drawn look with just a little bit of color or you may want to go with something a little more detailed, maybe using a photo filter and we will cover a few different ways to do that in the class. You will also see if you scroll through this page, there are a lot of textures and bold colors used with recipe illustrations. You may want to bring that into your own and do something really bold like this piece. But you can also do more of a light pastel with just some simple text and ingredients in some food container. You will also see that once you create these food illustrations, you can use them for a lot of different purposes. You could turn your food illustration into a seamless repeat and you could use that for print on demand, wallpaper, fabric, mugs or you could do maybe a print for your kitchen. You will see some more detailed pieces here that have the ingredients and the instructions on the image itself. We will cover both options so you can play around with what works best for your style. Let us go ahead and get started on our first piece. 3. Creating Procreate Textures Part 1: For this first project, we're going to create a semi abstract piece combining some texture brushes and some simple fruit shapes to create an interesting composition around some hand lettering. In this piece we're going to focus on the title of the recipe and use the ingredients to highlight the title. So if you were posting this online, for example, you could leave the ingredients and instructions on the comments or the post. This is a great simple piece to start with, because you can play around with illustrating some ingredients and also adding in a little bit of text. So to start my image, I'll click the plus symbol and click "Create custom size." I'm going to work at 10 by 10 inches. I like this size. This seems to work well for most of my users online and in print. But you may want to go with a different size if you have a different final use for this piece. One thing to keep in mind is you can always size down an image, but you can never size up an image. You want to start with a size that's the largest you would ever need and you can always make it smaller later. So I'll click "Create." The first thing that I like to do is start with a dark background. I've already chosen my colors beforehand, and I did that just by looking at some images of lemons and blueberries and taking some of the colors out of those and then toning down the colors a little bit. There are a lot of different ways to choose your colors and you don't have to choose your final colors now, you can always play around with changing them later. Just start with something that looks good to you and then you can play around with it as you go through the process. So I'm going to start with this dark blue background. I'll click that first layer and click "Fill," next I'm going to create a new layer on top of that layer and choose a texture to cover the background. I'd like starting with a texture, so I don't have this really clean, perfect background. I'm going to choose this "Linen Texture Opposite." So you'll see there's a list here of a lot of different textures that you can choose from. I make sure to create this on a new layer because sometimes I like to change my texture, change the color, change the style and I want to have that flexibility later on. I'm going to choose a color that's slightly lighter than my original color and then just cover the Canvas. I'm making sure not to pick up my brush when I do this because then there would be two layers of texture or overlapping texture. So I'm doing this all in one single swoop. If I zoom in here, you can see the texture a little bit better. So let's say you try that and you just don't really like how the color turned out, you can easily adjust this color. I'm really clicking hold on my dark blue background, so I have that color in my palate now. Then I'm going to go to a color that's closer to white. So just maybe a quarter of an inch towards the white area. Then I'll go back to that texture layer. Swipe two fingers to the right to alpha locket. That means I can only affect the areas that I've already painted. If I click on that layer one time and click fill layer, that adjusts the color of my background texture. So I like that color a lot better than the previous texture. If you want to just kind of go back and forth, two fingers to step back, three fingers to step forward. I do this a lot just to go back and forth between colors to decide which one looks best. So as you're choosing your texture, you may want to go with something different than what I have on this list. I want to show you how simple it is to create these textures. So if you go back to your "Gallery" and create a new image. I'll just choose the same size, 10 by 10 inches. When you're creating these brushes, it's important to think about how large you want this brush to be. You can apply the same rule that I said in the beginning. You can always make a brush smaller, but you can never make it larger. So I'm creating this at 10 by 10 inches because that's how big I want this texture to be on a piece and I can always size it down, but I can't size it up. I like to create brushes at this size. Next, I need to import some kind of image so I could take a picture of my desk right here. This would be a nice wood background. You can take a picture of carpet if you want, kind of a grainy gritty background, really, anything can be a texture. The only important thing to keep in mind is it needs to be an even texture. So I'm going to click "Insert a photo" and I have a photo here on my iPad. I got this from the site and splash. I'll put a link to that in the class resources page in case you want to check out some textures on that site. They're all free and free for personal and commercial use. I want this piece to totally fit my Canvas. I'm making sure "Magnetics" is selected. I'm just going to increase the size of this a little bit so the entire Canvas is covered. So this is a perfect image for making a texture brush because it has really even lighting and even lighting is key for creating a texture brush. So if you find an image that has a dark space over here and a light space over here. That's not going to work well for this process. So just make sure you find or create an even photo for this. So the first thing I want to do is turn this into a black and white image. When you create or procreate brush, you want to work in black and white and not have any color in your image. I'll click the "Hue Saturation Brightness Tool" and bring the saturation all the way down. I want to add a little bit more contrast to this so that my brush has more of a high contrast than real wood texture. I'll click the "Adjustments Tool" again. Click "Curves." Then move these sliders on the bottom to create an image that's closer to appear black and white. It doesn't have to be perfectly black and white. But I think if you get close, it makes for a more interesting texture.So I have that image in place. I need to create a seamless repeat out of this block. To do that, I'm going to duplicate this original layer three times so that I have four blocks total. I always want to duplicate the bottom image because that's my original. So now I have four of these in the layers panel. 4. Creating Procreate Textures Part 2: Now I need a guide that's going to help me know where the exact middle of this image is. So click the tool symbol, click Canvas, turn on the Drawing Guide, click "Edit Drawing Guide," and then increase the grid size all the way down here so that I have a perfect cross across this image. You may also want to adjust the thickness of these lines so you can see them more easily; and you can increase the opacity of your grid. You can also change the color of your grid up here. I'm going to pick an orange because I think that's going to be easiest to see on camera. I'll click "Done." Then, if I zoom in here, you can see my grid is perfectly in the center. If you've never created a seamless repeat before, the process is really simple. We're going to take these four blocks and shift them to the four corners. I'll take one block and shift it up here. One block will go up here, one will go here, and one will go here. They're just moving out across the Canvas. Click the move tool on that first block. I'm going to move it almost perfectly, but not all the way. If I zoom in here, you'll see I didn't go all the way to the corner intentionally because I want to be able to do that when I'm zoomed in close. If I move my image to out here, Procreate is going to cut off the edges of the image out here, and then I'll lose part of my image. First, I'm just throwing these images down and letting them be not perfectly in the center. I'll do that with all four of these first. There's the second one in the top left corner, there's a third one in the bottom right corner, and there's the fourth one in the bottom left corner. Now I have all of these images close to perfectly in the center. So now I can zoom in and actually get them in the center. I want to be spot on with this, that's why I'm zooming in so closely. You may need to remove Magnetic to do this. The key here is to go as close as possible, but it's not going to be perfect, and that's why I like to work with textures that are a little bit off or a little bit grainy or gritty. Because, if you don't do something perfectly with a texture like that, no one will ever notice, whereas if you try to do a really refined texture, it's probably better to create a brush like that in Photoshop, where you can get a pixel perfect repeat. You could also use the app Pixelmator. I have a class that shows the whole process for creating a repeat in Pixelmator. If you've taken that class or if you want to try that, that's also a way to get a pixel perfect repeat on your iPad. Now that I have all of those in the corner, I can zoom out, and then you'll see that, now my Wood Grange doesn't really match up perfectly. I need that to match up perfectly in order for my brush to be seamless. What I'm going to do is merge all of these textured layers together. Now I have all four of those on a single layer, and I can start fixing this match-up issue. I'll go back to the tool symbol, Canvas, and turn off the drawing guides so I can really see what I'm doing here. Usually what I do is a combination of drawing and copying and pasting. Let's say for example, this area, where this cuts off. What I can do is click my selection tool. Make sure Freehand is selected down here. Circle that little area that I like, of this repeat, drag down three fingers and click, "Copy and Paste." Now I can move that piece down here, and then that little area of my repeat looks really nice. You can do the copying and pasting, or you can get a brush. I'm just going to grab the Ink brush in the recipe illustration set, and choose a somewhat small size, and just come through and try to create that faux wood grain look with your brush. I usually do a combination of the two of those things, because if you do all drawing, it does tend to look a little fake, whereas if you go back and forth between copying and pasting and drawing, it looks a little more realistic. I'll continue this same process and I'll speed up my video while I do that. One issue you might run into as you do this is if you try to copy and paste, and you're not on your original layer, you're on one of these copied layers, it won't work correctly. Just double check that you always go back to your original layer when you're doing the copy and paste. You may also find an area where you need to paint some white. This area didn't really work well to connect the wood grain there, so I've just changed my color to white, and I'm painting to just make that connect nicely, and then I can connect to this other piece up here. So I just turned that awkward area into a v-shape. With this particular image, the middle seam didn't end up being visible at all. I'm not going to do anything with that middle seem, but if you were doing like linen texture, that probably would be visible, and you'd just have to go through and do the same process on the vertical. I'm happy with how this looks so I'm gonna save this image. Click the tool symbol, Share, and JPEG, Save Image. Then I also want to do a reversed version of this. This is white on black. I want to do black on white as well. I'm going to merge all of these layers together. These are just all my little scraps that I pasted around the center. We're going to merge everything together so I've got that on one single layer. On a layer above that, I'm going to click in the pure white zone, and if you double-click, you get a pure white. If you double-click in the black side and you get a pure black. That's one trick when you need a pure black and white. On a new layer, I'm going to click one time and click "Fill." Now I just have a pure white layer over my repeat block. I'm going to click the N symbol on that layer, and that's going to bring up the options for the blending modes. For the blending mode that will switch your black and whites, you can click "Difference" and then click "Difference" again. Now instead of white and black, we have black and white. You can see if you turn that layer on and off, it's just an inversion of that previous block that you created. I'm going to save that image as well. Same process, Share JPEG, Save Image. Now I have both of those saved. I'm ready to create that as a texture brush. So I'll go to the recipe illustrations set and just choose that top texture. It doesn't matter which texture, but it has to be one of the texture brushes, not one of the stamp brushes. I'll swipe left and click "Duplicate." Click on that one time, and you'll see grain down here in this Source section. If you click "Source," take a look at grain, and you'll see there's some kind of photo there. You want to put your texture there so click, "Insert Photo," find your texture, click on it one time, and then it sets down your texture. At this point, you can give it a name. You can also make some adjustments to the brush if you don't like how it turns out. If you go to the Grain tab here, you can change the scale of your texture. Let's say you want a really tiny wood texture, you can move that down if you want a huge wood texture, move it up. You can play around with some of these as well as the preview so that changes what people see when they look at your brush. Then of course, the last step is to test it out. Let's just drop down a color here and then choose a slightly lighter color with a new branch and paint it on. If that doesn't look right, you can go back to your settings. Let's go to Grain and bump up the scale a little bit, and then we've got a bigger wood grain. Once you learn the process of making these texture brushes, there's a lot you can do with these. You can give them away as free downloads, like I do, or you can sell them. You could just use them in your own artwork, to make your artwork look just a little different than everyone else's. It's definitely worth it to create your own textures because it really gives a 100 percent unique look to your work. Let's go ahead and go back to our recipe drawing that we're working on. 5. Illustrations & Text: Now I'm going to start creating the elements of my recipe. I like to do this all at once and then arrange them later. I think it's a lot easier to create beautiful illustrations if I work just on the illustration and worry about where it's going to go later. You may create ten and only use three. But usually that process of creating a lot of images, we'll get you to the point that you need to be with that piece. Your first three or four may not be what you were hoping for, and then number five is perfect. Take your time with this and really create a lot of different versions just to see what works best for your personal style. I'm going to choose a mustard color to create my lemon peel, and I'm going to do this on a new layer. I'm making sure I'm on a new layer, and I'm going to grab my brush called small pastel super sharp. I have two different pastel brushes here that I'm going to go back and forth in between. One is super sharp and one is just sharp. The sharp has a little bit more texture to it. You can kind of play around with what works best for your style. I'm going to create this lemon really big, and just take a few minutes to just play around with this lemon shape. This obviously doesn't have to be perfect. You can create a lemon that's totally oval or total circle. I'm just going to take a few minutes to play around with this shape. Once you're happy with your shape, you can start coloring it in. I'll get the small pastel sharp and make that brush large. I'm going to color in loosely because I like this texture that's created with this brush. I'm going to let that texture be present and just kind of loosely fill this shape in. At this point you may want to sketch some of your texts. I know I want my text to go inside this lemon. I'm just going to see what it would look like here. I'm happy with that shape, but I'm going to click on it one time. Click the move tool and click flip horizontal. I want my top of my lemon to face this way. Just making those little adjustments here using my sketch text, and then I'll move on to my next lemon slice and just make everything else invisible while I work on that. I like working this way because I find it's a lot easier for me to focus if there's nothing else on the canvas and my way. Whereas if I go ahead and put everything on the canvas at once, it can start getting a little messy and it's hard to figure out what to do next. I like to just take my time, create one element at a time, and then bring them all together in the end. You can see I've just used the two pastel brushes to create this really loose interpretation of a lemon, and so you could go even further with this, add more detail, or you could just leave it really loose like this one. I think I'm going to leave mine really loose like this. I'm going to merge all of those layers together, and then I'm going to duplicate that lemon a few times. I'm always duplicating the bottom layer rather than the top ones because that's the original. If I duplicate the duplicates, they'll start getting blurry. I've got a few of those, make most of them invisible. I'm going to take one of those and just put it on the edge of the canvas, perfectly halfway and click the move tool, and what that does is it cuts it in half. Anytime you move something off the canvas it gets sliced on the edge of the canvas. Now I have a nice little lemon slice that I can also place around the canvas. I'm going to duplicate that one a few times, always duplicating the original, and now I can start playing around with my placement. I'll drop down my original lemon and just kind of play around with putting that in the center, and then I can start thinking about my texts. I want that to be centered on my lemon, and I want it to be recursive on the top and bottom and print in the middle. I'm just kind of playing around with that placement before I put down the final lettering. On a new layer, above that lettering layer, I'll get white as my color, and I'll get the super pastel sharp as my brush, and I like this brush size. I'm going to stick with that, this original texts layer, I'll click the end symbol and reduce the opacity a little bit. I want to be able to see that, but I don't want it to be really strong and in my way. I'm going to take just a moment to play around with writing this text out and as you can see, this is a messy style piece, so this doesn't have to be perfect. Just take your time and play around with your own handwriting and just see what you can come up with here and just let it be messy and flowing. I'm happy with that, but I want to move tarts over the left a little bit. I'll click the selection tool, click free hand, circle that, click the move tool and shift it over a little bit. Now on a new layer, I'm going to start writing the word blueberry. I'm going to bump up the size of my brush just a little bit, because I want this to be really distinct from the word blueberry. I want the lemon to be thin and flowing and then I want blueberry to be thick and print. One way to make this text really playful and flowing, is to use different sizes. For example, it's got a big blue for a big B, and then a small L. Then a big U, that's actually a little bit sideways, and then a small E that's a little bit sideways, the opposite direction. I'm letting this be really messy, and that's the best way to hide if you're not happy with your hand lettering skills, just let it be messy. It doesn't have to be perfect. But when you make it intentionally messy, it looks like you've done it on purpose. Whereas if you try really hard to be perfect and it's not perfect, it just looks like you failed at being perfect. I just embraced the messiness with this style and let this lettering be really playful. I'll click the move tool and just shift that text over a little bit, and I'll also go to my layers panel and make my original sketch invisible. That's not in my way. I can also see that I want to move this text around a little bit, so I'll go back to my cursive layer, put that in place, and then again, I'll use my free hand selection tool to shift that. This is the nice thing about doing everything on separate layers. You can really play around with the placement and move things around as you need to. I like the way the word blueberry looks, but I wish it had just a little bit more visual interest to it. What you can do is add some kind of serifs on the edge of your piece. Here are a few examples of some serifs that you can use. This is just the same word repeated several times with different serifs. You can see how each serif adds a slightly different feel. The first one is just some little curved bumps on the end, the second one is dots, the third is some little blocks you can just add on the end of every letter, the last one is curves, and then you can see the last one what it looks like without the serif. All of those are valid ways to do your lettering, but you can see that each one has a slightly different feel. I think the first two are the most playful. I'm going to go with the dots. I'm going to do the serifs on a different layer because I don't know if I'm going to like them. I always do things that I'm not a 100 percent sure of on a separate layer. Because you can always go back and adjust your layer if it's on a separate layer, and we could also play around with doing different colors with this, so it's nice to just kind of leave your options open. 6. Arrangement & Fillers: I do like to do this process with the text before I start adding any of my images, because the text is the central part of this image. If something's not right with the text then we'll have to change the whole piece. I like to go ahead and lay down my image where the text will be and the text itself, and then start playing around with all my decorations. I'm happy with my text. I'm just going to merge all three texts layers onto a single layer to keep things clean on my canvas. Then I'm going to start bringing back my lemon slices and placing those around the canvas. I'll start with some half slices. I'm making sure that Magnetics is selected here, because I don't want to distort the proportions of my slices. You can use the Rotate tool, you can resize. Let some go off the canvas, let some stay within the canvas. I'll just take a minute to play around with a whole lot of different options for these slices. I've also decided I want to make my center piece a little bit smaller. I'll click on the lemon, and then swipe right on the text, click the Move tool and then I can move both of those at the same time. I'm just going to reduce the size of that a tiny bit and leave a little bit more room for my illustrations. Now I'm ready to start adding some more pieces to fill in this empty space. I'm going to do that with some symbol leaves. I'll use one color to create the outline of the leaves, and then I'll come behind it with another color to add in a little bit of a filler. First I'll just go through and find some places that need some leaves. This is a big empty space that could use a leaf sticking out there. I'm just going to move my leaf layer below everything else, so it doesn't overlap any of my elements. Now that I've created the outlines for all of my leaves, I'm going to create a layer below that leaf layer and get a slightly lighter color. Then just go through, get my brush on a larger size here and fill these in. Again, I'm letting that texture show through. I may even switch to my super pastel, not so sharp to give a little bit more texture there. I'll just take a minute to fill all of these in. You can see I've filled in the majority of the space and I've tried to make the leaves come from all angles. Each slice has a leaf coming out from behind it. There are some coming out from the edges, so it appears that this just flows off the canvas. I'm trying to keep that in mind as I create these leaves. You may find some that you just don't really like. Like I don't like how this one is placed on the canvas. I'm going to merge my leaf layer and my outline layer together so my leaves are on a single layer, I'll get the Selection tool with free hand, select that leaf, and then just play around with moving it to a different spot. I just didn't like how that was cropped, so this is a good time to adjust. If you find a lot of your leaves are pointing in the same direction, you may want to shift some so they point at different angles to create a little bit more movement on the canvas. Next, I'm going to add in my blueberries and I'm going to go to a layer above all these layers and start going through with a lot of different shades of blue. I'm just creating these little simple circles, and then I'll add a little more decoration to them once I create all my blueberries. Now I just want to add a little bit of visual interests to each of these blueberries. I'm going to get my brush on a smaller size, and just come through and add these little marks, so it's clear that this is the top of the blueberry. This lighter color will work on the darker blueberries. But I'll change to a darker color when I do the light blueberries. I'm happy with how this turned out, but I do want to add a little bit more texture to this piece. I'm going to create a new layer above everything, and then go to my texture brushes and get that same texture that I used before. I've got a light color here. It's not a pure white. It's like a lavender. I'm just going to paint over my entire piece. It looks terrible at first, but then you can start playing around with the blending modes, and just blend this texture into everything. The one that I like is soft light. That just blends a little bit of texture into everything on the canvas and I really like this because it just adds one more layer of grittiness or texture to this piece. You can try it with the texture on, and then you can just turn the layer on and off and see if you like it. I do like it, so I'm going to leave my piece just as it is. One last thing I might do on this piece is play around with color. I'm going to get a slightly darker color for the background. I'll go to the background layer and click Fill. You can play around with the background. You can also play around with your other elements. I could merge and all of my lemon elements onto the same layer, and so I've got all my lemons there. I'll click the Adjustments tool, hue, saturation, and brightness. Then I can just play around with some different colors. Maybe I want to go a little more orange or maybe I want to go a little more green, or reduce the saturation. This is a great time to play around with a lot of different color options. Maybe even move your leaves around and see if there's a better placement for your leaves. But I'll go ahead and call this piece finished. 7. Sketching and Using Stamps: For this next project, we're going to illustrate a drink recipe. Will combine some hand-drawn illustrations with some stamps, and I'll show you how to make the stamps too in case you want to use your own shapes rather than the ones that I've provided. This is a great project for drink recipes like smoothie, spritzer, and cocktails. In the stamp set, I included a lot of different drinking vessels, like martini glasses, rocks glasses, and some wine glasses. The first thing I'll do is create my new canvas, create custom size and I'll use ten by 10 inches like I did in the last piece. The first thing I like to do is sketch my layout. I'm going to use the narendra pencil, which comes with procreate, but I put it in this brush set as well so you have easy access. I'm just going to take a minute to sketch out how I want this piece laid out. I know I want my central feature to be a pitcher, and I want to have some kind of decorations in the pitcher. Some ice cubes and then the herbs that go with my drink. I'll throw that in the pitcher as well. Then I'm going to just put my ingredients around the edge. I'm going to do a grapefruit and some seltzer water. I'm going to do some rosemary and then am going to leave a space for the name of my drink. This drink includes a simple syrup. There's some ingredients that it's just difficult to know what container should you show to represent that image. I made a bunch of different jar and cups stamps that you can switch out. You could also make some measuring cups, stamps or whatever you need to represent each ingredient. I also want to add a little border around this, so I just want to add that in to remind myself that I need to leave that extra space for the border. Next I'm going to add my texture layer, and I'll do that below my sketch so I can still see my sketch and I'm going to add this linen texture, a dark peach color. Then if that's too intense for you, you can always reduce the opacity of that layer so that you're just getting a light texture in the background. I'm going to keep that texture on its own layer so I can go back later and adjust that if I find it's a little too intense for the rest of my work. I want to do my border first because I want to be sure that everything fits inside my border. To do that, I'm going to get a assisted drawing layer which allows me to create a symmetrical border all the way around. I'm on a new layer that's above my texture layer. I'll click the tool symbol, Canvas. Turn on the drawing guide, click edit drawing guide, and then go to symmetry. For this one I want to use the quadrant symmetry, that means anything I do over here will be repeated in all three quadrants. I want to make sure assisted drawing is on, I'll put done. I'm just going to use a pure black for this, and I'll use my brush called ink brush. I like that brush because you can create thin to thick really easily, so it creates some nice variation. I'll just take a minute to play around with a border for this piece. I'm happy with that border, you may want to remove your sketch layer for a moment so you can really take a look at that, and I've just done one solid wavy layer and then two little wavy lines that mimic the waves of the outer border. There are a lot of different types of borders you could do. You could also just do straight lines, two straight lines beside each other, a single straight line, dotted lines, so just play around with a few different borders and see what looks best with your composition. The next thing I'm going to do is add my pitcher. That's going to be my central piece of my illustration. I really want the pitcher to be front and center. So go to my brush set and you'll see there's a pitcher already in that set, I'll click at one time and one thing to keep in mind with these brushes when you lay it down, that size is the absolute largest that it can be. I wouldn't be able to make it any larger than that. What I'll do is increase the size over here, then I can rotate it and resize it to be the size I want. Whereas if I make it too small, I can't make it larger because that's going to make it blurry. I'm going to take just a minute to set this in place. I'm going to bring back my sketch because I want to be sure I'm leaving room for everything. I've got my simple syrup over here, that will fit and my grapefruit, my seltzer, rosemary, and the title. As I'm working on these, I just bring back my sketch to make sure that I've left room for everything that I'm trying to add to this canvas. Next, I want to add a little bit of visual interest to this pitcher so it really stands out on the page. I'm going to get a pure white and on the layer below this drawing layer, this pitcher layer, I'm going to drop some color in, so I need that bottom layer to know where to drop the color and I want it to drop within the pitcher. So the pitcher will become my reference layer. I'm referencing that pitcher when I'm dropping my colors in. I'm going to click on my pitcher layer and click reference. Now every layer below that layer is a referencing the pitcher. Now if I go to my new layer which is below my pitcher layer, click and drag a color, it fills it within that pitcher because it's referencing the pitcher. I'm going to drop my color into all those spaces, and I'm happy with how that looks. Now I'll create a new layer on top of that white layer and I want to add a little bit of color. I'm going to get my dark peach color again and I'm going to grab my pink brush to just get a smooth, clean line across the top of this, and this is just going to show my drink in the pitcher. Okay, I'm happy with that. I'm going to create a solid shape all the way around here then I can then fill with color. You can see this new pink layer that I'm working on is in-between my white layer and my pitcher layer. Now I want to drop color, solid color into this pitcher that's pink, but I still have that reference layer selected here. You have to be sure to turn off those reference layers because you don't want every layer to be referencing that just for that one little color drop that we did before. I've turned off the reference setting for the pitcher layer and now I can drop that peach color into that little shape that I just created. I also want to add a little bit of texture to this liquid. It looks like it has some bubbles, so I'm going to swipe two fingers to the right to alpha lock that layer. That means I can only affect this peach area that's on that layer. I'm going to get a slightly lighter peach color, and I'm going to use my dry ink large brush to just add a little bit of texture to this. You can see because I have the alpha lock on, I' m only affecting that peach section that I drew. One thing you may find is that if you create this peach texture on the same layer as your original peach, you can't really see transparency or make any changes to that texture. I'm going to go ahead and step back with two fingers so I can create this texture on a new layer. To do that, I'll just click "Select" create a new layer and then I can paint my texture brush over that peach layer and now it's on a brand new layer, all its own. Now I'll go to that peach texture layer and reduce the opacity a little bit and that gives it just the slightest little bit of texture, that's not too overwhelming. The other thing I like about doing this on a separate layer is once you add all your other elements, you may find you need to make little adjustments to things like that texture or the background. Keeping them on separate layers makes that possible. I tried to always stay organized with my Layers panel. 8. Creating Procreate Stamps: Next I'm going to add in my self-serve bottle. I'll create a new layer, get black as my color, and find a bottle that will work. I want this bottle the look like it's pouring in to the pitcher. I'm going to let it be pretty close and put it right above. But you can see now that I've turned it, this black line doesn't really make sense anymore. I'm just going to grab my eraser and remove that section. You can feel free to do that when you use these stamps. There may be little changes that you need to make to make this work, or you may just want to go ahead and create your own stamps. Let's take a look at that process really quickly. I'm going to go back to my gallery and create a new image that's 10 by 10 inches, and I want to create a mason jar stamp here. I have a mason jar here. I'm just going to take this mason jar and laid on my table and take some pictures with a few different angles, and then I can use that to make a stamp. You can see I like to get a lot of different angles when I do this, sometimes you may want to see the top of the jar, you may want to see it straight on. I just go ahead and take a lot of different pictures all at once, and then you can work from any of those now, or 10 months down the line, you may have a need for a jar in one of your illustrations, and you just have that already in your wheelhouse. That's one thing to keep in mind when you create these stamps and take these photographs. This isn't necessarily just for this piece, you can use these for years to come. It's definitely worth it to take some of your own photographs. If you just don't have the object that you want to photograph and you can't get access to it, you can use online resources, and I have a link on the class downloads page with a lot of different resources for that. Now that I have my images, I can go back to my procreate document and click "Insert a Photo", and then I'll take just a minute to decide which one I want to use. I like this image because it shows the nice round top of this jar and some of the other ones didn't show the top. I'm just going to click the rotate tool and then make this really big on the Canvas. Again, my Canvas is 10 by 10 inches and I want the stamp to be used at that high size. I'm going to create my stamp at 10 by 10 inches and try to use that whole Canvas. Now I'm going to go to that layer and reduce the opacity, so I can see it but it's not really overpowering. I'll create a new layer, and I like to use the monoline brush to create these stamps, but you could use any of the brushes. It just depends on how you want your stamp to look. First, I'll choose a size for the brush, that size looks good. Let's say you want this jar to be really perfectly symmetrical, you can go to Canvas, turn on your Drawing Guide, click Edit Drawing Guide, Symmetry, Vertical. Then just adjust that jar layer so that it's almost perfectly in the center of this pink guide in the middle, or whatever color you made your guide. This doesn't have to be perfect and it's not going to be perfect, but you just want to get close so that you can copy the general feeling of this jar. Now back on my assisted layer, I'm going to start doing my drawing. You can see, having this assisted layer on makes it way easier to create a smooth line. If you hold this new feature in procreate, it makes your circle more perfect, it gets a little bit closer to being even, but you may just want to go with your hand-drawn version. I'm going to take just a minute to go through this whole piece and add in all these little turns and curves in the jar. I have the basic outline of this jar now, in terms of adding in any of the text, I probably wouldn't do that. This is a brand and the brand may not want you using their logo in your work. If you did that and then they asked you to delete it, or remove it, or something worse, then you would have to do that. I would just ignore that part and you could put some other texts in there, like jar or jam or whatever your recipe is. Now remove that and then click the Tool symbol, Share, JPEG, Save Image. Now I'll go back to my brush set and get any of these stamp brushes. I'll just use the salt and pepper brush, I'll swipe left and click Duplicate. Click on that One Time, click Source, and you'll see this time we are inserting your image into shapes source instead of shape grain. I'll click Insert a Photo, choose my jar, and now I have a nice stamp for my jar. This is when you can just play around with your stamp a little bit. You may want to change the preview, how it shows up here. You may want to change the name to jar. You can change a lot of these other settings, but for a stamp brush, it's pretty straightforward and this should work as it is. Let's go ahead and return back to our piece. 9. Tracing and Referencing: Now that you know how to create this, you can change this to any other shape that you want to use. You don't have to use this particular bottle, you could create your own bottle. What I'm going to do next is start playing around with some changes to this jar because I know that it's pouring into the picture, so the water level would be going down a little bit. I'm going to grab my monoline brush and I wanna use a similar size to what's already being used here. That's a good size. I'm going to get this level so I can really carefully show where this liquid is pouring. This doesn't have to be perfect, it can just be close and that's good enough. I'll do the same thing I did before, make this a reference layer, create a layer below it, get white as my color and drag that in. I want to add some little bubbles on top of this and there's a little bubble brush here. We'll get black as my color and reduce the size of that quite a bit. This is a pressure sensitive brush, so each time you tap, it will be a different size depending on how hard you press. That's only true if you have an Apple pencil, obviously. If you don't have an Apple pencil, you can just do all your large dots, reduce the brush size, do all your medium dots, do it again. It's definitely still possible even if you don't have the Apple pencil. I'm also going to do the same thing over here with my simple syrup. Now, I'm going to add my grapefruit and my rosemary. You can do that by hand or you can work from a picture. I'm going to go ahead and take a few pictures that I can work from. You can either trace or you can just use them as a reference. Now I can pull that grapefruit picture into my image by just clicking Insert photo. I'm just going to use this as my reference. If other things are in the way, you can just go ahead and make those invisible for now, so it's really easy to create this new piece. I'm going to get a darker peach color on my first layer that's above this layer. I'm just going to go around and create a solid shape here. I want to do a color drop into here. I have to make sure all my reference layers are off. Then I can drag that color into here. Next, I'll make that layer invisible so I can see the rest of my layers. I'm going to do the same thing with a white layer to show the rind. Next, I'm going to do the interior parts and using that same tracing process that I did before. Now that I've got the basic shape, I can make my grapefruit picture invisible. I may want to make some little adjustments to this. Since they're all on different layers, I can easily adjust the spacing or layout of any of these. Next go on the new layer and get widest my color with the ink brush on a small size. I'm just going to go through and create these little marks to show the little juice pockets in each of these wedges. The last thing I want to do is add a little bit of texture on top of this whole piece. I'm going to select my solid layer here. I'll swipe two fingers right to alpha locket, click at one time and click select. Then I'm going to a layer above all these layers, create a new layer above all of these, get a lighter peach color. Then I can just go through with that same ink brush that I used before, dry ink large and just add a little texture layer to that and then reduce the opacity of that texture layer, so I've got just a slight texture going on on this piece. Then I can click the selection tool to remove that selection and select all of those by clicking the first one and swiping right on all the others and then click the Move tool to add that into place. So now make everything else that I was working on visible again. I don't like that texture layer anymore, so I'm just going to leave that off for now and I may add some other texture in later. I'm talking about the texture on top of this grapefruit. So the next thing I want to add in is my rosemary. I'll click, Insert a photo and add that in. Honestly, this piece of Rosemary doesn't look very good. I couldn't find a nice piece at the store. Sometimes you get a reference photo and it's not perfect and you can just use it as an overall guide. I'm going to set this aside where I'm drawing so I can look at it, but I'm not going to trace it because it just doesn't look how I wanted it to. What I'm going to do is use my technical pen here. I like this pen because it has great variation from thick to thin. I'll just take a minute to draw a nice curved piece of rosemary here. I'm just going to look over at my reference photo, just to get some inspiration for how to angle this. You can see if you look at the photo, they are really random. The leaves are totally varied in length and pretty uniform in thickness, but they do vary a lot in length. I'm going to capture that here in my drawing. I also want to be sure I get some realistic overlapping, so I'm keeping that in mind as I draw each of these leaves. I'm happy with that rosemary sprig. It looks like I've accidentally drawn that on the same layer. That's okay. I'll get my selection tool, circle my rosemary, drag down three fingers, copy and paste. If you accidentally put something on the wrong layer, you can always just select it and put it onto its own layer using that method. I'm going to flip this horizontally, and just make some little adjustments to put it in place. I'm also going to swipe left and duplicate that layer and then I'll use the move tool to play around with ways to fit it into this picture. I think I'm going to actually let it touch the bottom and the side, so it looks like it's really resting in that picture. Next we're going to add in some ice cubes. I went ahead and created an ice cube stamp using that same method I showed you before, but you may also want to create your own ice cubes in a different style, so feel free to use this or create your own. I'm going to size the first one and then duplicate it to get all of the rest, because ice cubes will all be the same size, they wouldn't vary from piece to piece. I'm going to set down that first one and then just duplicate it a few times. I'm always duplicating the bottom layer because that's my original. Then I'll just play around with placing this throughout the bottom here. Each time I use a new one, I'll click rotate a few times and maybe flip horizontal, so they look like they're not stamps, they look like each separate piece. 10. Text & Placement: I'm happy with how those look. I want to go ahead and bring some text into this piece. You can do that with hand lettering or you can use an app. I'm going to grab the app called Over, and this is a free app. It makes it really easy to bring text into your Procreate images. I'll click "Create" to start a new file and click "Transparent" as my background. You don't want to choose a colored background, you want a transparent background so you can see your text really well and it doesn't have any background that you have to clip out. I'll use square as my size. First I'm going to type my title of my drink. Then I'll click the check symbol set that type, click "Color" and change it to black and then click "Size" and bump up the size. I'll just stick that on the top there and click the check symbol. Now I'm going to put all of my ingredients at a smaller scale down here using a different font. Click "Text" again and type my ingredients. The first font I use is my cursive font that I created and the second is my print font. I'm going to put both of these up so you can use these in your projects as free downloads. Also if you want to learn how to create your own fonts on your iPad, I have a whole class on that. If you want to really personalize your work in Procreate or anything on your iPad, making a new font is a really good way to do that and it's super easy. But feel free to just use my fonts for this project if you'd like. I'm stacking simple syrup and seltzer water because I want those to be pretty compact. If I type the word simple serve out, I think it's just going to be a little too long for my composition. I'm stacking those on top of each other so they are nicely aligned when I bring them into Procreate. I'll click the check symbol to set that, choose black as my color and then bump the size down a little bit, so it'll fit on this Canvas. Then I'll click the check symbol, click the share symbol and save to photos. Now I can go back to Procreate and insert a photo and put these in place. The way I like to do that, is just circle the text and put it onto a new layer. For example, I'll get my selection tool, click "Free hand," circle seltzer water, drag down three fingers, cut and paste. Cut it off that layer and paste it onto a new layer. Then I'll go back to my original text layer and do the same thing with the remaining text. Now I can just use the move tool on each of these layers to put these in place. I feel like there's not quite enough space for my title and I don't want to make it any smaller. What I'm going to do is move over the simple syrup and the pitcher. To do that, I need to select the layers that contain those objects. We've got the simple syrup jar, I've clicked on that and then I'm going to swipe right on the simple syrup interior, which is that white part and then swipe right on the word simple syrup. I've got those three layers selected, click the move tool and just scoot those over. Now I'm going to do the same process with my pitcher. That's going to include all of my ice cubes, that piece of rosemary, the pitcher, the solid white, the solid peach and texture layer. It looks like there was an extra ice cube that I'm not using, so I'll just delete that. I'll just take a minute here to play around with the placement of all of these objects until it's a layout that I'm happy with. I'm happy with that. I do want to add a little bit more visual interest to the text, so I'm going to duplicate that text layer and on the lower layer, I'm going to get a peach color, that same color we've been using here. Swipe two fingers right, click one time and click "Fill layer" so now I've got a peach layer and then a black layer over it. I'm going to take that peach layer with the magnetic selection off and just shift a tiny little bit to get that little bit of 3D effect on the text. I also want to add a little bit more to the text. I think it could stand out a little bit more so I'm going to go through with my ink brush on with a white and just add some lines to this text. As I do that, I may find I need to shift my text a little bit, so I'll do that at the same time. That adds just a little bit more of a highlight to the text. One more thing I'm going to do to fill in some of this empty space is just add some bubbles around the Canvas. This is a great filler for drinks, anything you do related to drinks, because we've already got some bubbles throughout the piece so it makes it clear that you're just mimicking that bubble design. As I'm doing this, I realize that maybe my textured background isn't dark enough, so I'll just go to that layer and we had originally bumped down the opacity, well let's bump it up a little bit. Then we can see our bubbles a little bit better. I also want to add some bubbles under this pitcher because I can see that it's just missing a little bit right there. I'm going to get a lighter color and I'm on a new layer that is above my pitcher layers and I'll just add in some light peach bubbles here. I'm going to move this bubble layer below my ice cubes because I want some to peek out from behind my ice cubes rather than covering them up. I'm happy with how this piece turned out. But obviously, you can take a lot of time here to adjust the illustrations and the colors and the textures and the opacity and really take your time here to refine this piece and maybe even make it over again. Usually the second time you make it, it's better than the first. I also want to show you another piece that I did using the same process, all of the same steps that we just used and this isn't a drink recipe, but it has the same feel, the same font, the same tracings with filled in areas. The only difference is some of my filled in areas, I made them semi-transparent by just going to that layer and reducing the opacity a little. I did that on a few different pieces just to add a little bit more texture and then I just used some little cilantro leaves as my fillers. You can really use this process for any recipe. But it works best for recipes that you don't have to list the method. If you want this piece to speak for itself, choose something like a sauce or a salsa, or something that you don't have to explain how to make it. You can just show the ingredients. Let's go ahead and move on to the last piece. 11. Layout & Photo Filters: For this last project, I want to feature the title, ingredients and instructions for a Recipe. I need a little bit more space. I'm going to work with a vertical canvas on this piece and I'm also going to use a slightly more detailed illustration that I'll be creating using a photo filter, and I'll show you how to do that. This style is perfect for hanging in a kitchen as an art brand. As you're working on this, you may want to think about what colors and style would work well in your kitchen or if you're giving it to someone else, what would look good in that person's kitchen. I am going to start this piece at 10 inches wide, 15 inches tall and as usual, 300 dpi. I'll start by adding in the background. I've chosen a dark blue for the background at this piece. I'll click on that layer and click fill layer. Now I'll go on a layer above, choose a slightly lighter color. I'm going to grab my linen texture. Let's go with the linen texture opposite, linen texture 1 and cover that whole piece. Next I want to add in the text because I want all of my illustration elements to respond to the text. I need to start with that and I'm going to use the same process that I used before, using the hot cocoa font that you can get on the class downloads page. I'm doing the title first and setting the color and size for the title as pretty large, and then I'm going to do the ingredients and directions underneath that. This is also the point where you can decide how you're going to type the measurements. I just do a C for cup a big T for a tablespoon, a small t, for a teaspoons. But you may want to write the word out. That's totally up to you here. I want to use this whole Canvas because I want the text to be as large as possible so it doesn't show up as blurry and procreate. Now I can save this image and open it up in my document and then I'll take just a minute to change the color here. I'll Swipe two fingers right and then I'm going to choose a beige color, click one time and click fill layer, and I'll just play around with the placement of this text for a few moments. I like the idea of letting some leaves come in here and here. I want to put the directions in a different place. I want those to go to the opposite corners. So we pull that right down the page. I'm going to get freehand selection, circle this whole piece, click the Move tool and move this down here. I'm also going to drag three fingers down and click, "Cut and Paste". Now I have cut the ingredients onto their own layer. I think I'm going to need that because as I'm creating this piece, I'm definitely going to want to shift these around separately, so I'm going to keep this on its own layer. I also think this would look better if it was aligned to a single line on the right. What I'm going to do is create a line here and I'll just grab my narrow ended pencil on a new layer with any color that's easy to see. Click and hold, and then put two fingers down to make a straight line, and I can take my selection tool with free hand selected, click the Move tool, and just move that piece over. I have to make sure that layer is selected and I want to leave the magnetic setting on when I'm moving this because that's going to stop it from moving up and down the page. So same thing, freehand selection tool, click the Move tool and magnetic is selected, and then I'll just move that over. Now that I've aligned that on the edge, I can just remove that yellow guide layer and at this point, I always just take a step back and think about, am I leaving enough space for my illustration elements? Does the text stand out enough? Just keeping in mind all those little points that will help make this illustration cohesive. I want there to be room for a few pomegranates here and here, so I'm just making sure I leave plenty of space. I don't want this text too close to the edge because I want there to be some room for a little leaf for something that come out of the edge. Those are the things I'm thinking about as I'm placing this text. Next, am going to make my title a little bit more bold. I'm going to create a new layer and get a mono-line as my pen and get a slightly thicker brush, something that's a little bit thicker than the current text and then I'll just go through and thicken this up. It'll also just add a little bit of variation to this piece. Right now it does look like a font, but if you can go through and add a little bit of variation, it can really help it go to more of a handwriting feel. Just thickening that up a little bit really made it stand out a lot more. I'm happy with that. I'm going to go ahead and add in my pomegranate illustration and I'm going to do this using a different app. This is a free app to download and use, but it does cost $2.99 to actually save your image. We'll show you what I mean here. This is what it looks like when you open the app, you click import photo and then I'll click on the image of my pomegranate. Then you can just use these little dots to crop. Then I'll click "Go." You've got all these different filters that you can put this through. This one's really nice. This looks like an illustration. If I zoom in here, you can see it's just a few colors, and you can adjust the colors. You could bring it down to just a few colors to make it a little bit more blocky. There are just so many different ways that this pomegranate can be interpreted. Sometimes I'll put an image in here just for inspiration. I don't even use the final piece. It's just to figure out what would be a really cool way to represent this object, in a way that I haven't thought of. There's also an option called enigma that just does something totally random each time. You never know what you're going to get. This can be a really cool way to just find something different, find a different color palette than you're still using. What I'm going to use for this one is a setting called Ink. I like this because it just makes a single color sketch with really nice details. Also, there's all these options here, detail, threshold, stroke, freckles. As you adjust those, it changes how much detail and movement is in the drawing. I'm happy with how it looks here, but you can definitely play around with all of those options. Once you're happy with it, you can click "share." This is the part of the app that is paid. If you're just using the app regularly without paying, you could just take a screenshot of that. When we high-resolution image though, like it is if you pay $2.99, it's a one time fee, it's not a subscription. I went ahead and bought it. I think it's a good investment for me personally because I use this all the time. If you buy the app, you can say that and I'll just click "PNG, " save to camera roll. I'm sure many people will not want to buy the app, and that's totally fine. I turned my pomegranate into a stamp so you can just use that. but if there was any other fruit that you wanted to do, then you would need to buy the app. If you wanted to save the image. Now that I have my image, I need to remove that white background because I just want the outline as if it's a drawing on my piece. I'm going to click the selection tool, click "Automatic," and click one time on this white area. You can see it selects most of it. You can click and hold to change the threshold. What the threshold does is it decides how much is selected. You can see if I go too far, it just selects everything. Whereas, if I don't go far enough, like if I did it threshold of 4 percent, it doesn't select the whole piece and it leaves all these little jagged marks along the edge. What I like to do is go. You can see when I increase the threshold, that white jaggedness gets better. I like to increase the threshold is much as I can without actually selecting any of the black. Sometimes you have to reset the selection tool. Just turn it ON and turn it OFF or otherwise your threshold won't set correctly. If you have any trouble with this tool, just get out of selection and then go back in and it'll work normally at that point. Now, that I've selected the majority, I just need to go through and get all these little pieces that I missed. You can see if you make a mistake, you can tap two fingers to go back. You just want to go slow and get all these little white pieces. I'll take just a few minutes to do that. I'm setting my threshold at about 60. If you're just not sure what to do with the threshold, just give 60 a try and that should be fine. Now, I've selected every single area. Now, it appears totally black. It's actually brown and black if you zoom in. I'm going to drag down three fingers and click "Cut" and "Paste." I'm cutting it off of one layer and pasting it onto another one. Now, my does have that brown ink drawing on one layer. The first thing I'm going do is change that color from brown to a maroon pomegranate color. I'll swipe two fingers right on that layer. That puts it in the Alpha lock state. Then I'll click on one time and click "Fill layer." Now, if I remove this, you can really see I've got this nice pomegranate color here. If you don't want to get that app, this is the point where you can just grab my pomegranate and stamp. You can just stamp that one time. It's the same image, just a different method to get it. Feel free to use that rather than doing the process that I just did. 12. Color & Placement: The next thing I want to do is add a little bit of color behind this piece to make the pomegranate lines really stand out. I would recommend first just testing a color and see how it looks. I'm going to use the ink brush and paint the color behind this. I think I want to go with something a little bit lighter. I like how that looks. I'll go ahead and go all the way around this piece with this color and again, I'm on a layer that's below this layer and I'm just going all the way around the edge and making a circle so I can do color drop to fill this in. Now that I've done a ring all the way around the pomegranate, I'm just going to click and drag that color to totally fill it in. Now I've got a nice two toned image. I'm going to add another color here and I'm going to add this bright orange color and that's represent my seeds. What I like to do with these interior colors is be really loose with my coloring. I let it go outside the lines a little bit. I'm not trying to make this perfect and I think that adds some really beautiful variation to the piece. Then I'll just color drop that and create a new layer and let's do one more color just to add some highlights into this piece. I'm happy with just that little bit of highlighted area. What I'm going to do is group these four layers into a group so I can make some duplicates of this space at around the Canvas. Click on the first layer and then swipe right on all the others, and then click ''Group''. Now this is it's nice little group, but I haven't merged the layers together because I want to keep those separate just in case I decide to make a change later. I'm just not ready to commit, so I'm grouping rather than merging. Now I'm just going to duplicate that group and again, I'm only duplicating the bottom piece. That's the original. Let's duplicate that five or six times. Now we'll make the original invisible. I'm never going to touch that again. I'm going to save that as my backup in case anything goes wrong and I'll use all these others around the Canvas. I'll take just a few minutes, one at a time to place these and I'll use the Move tool with magnetic selected and with each one, I'm going to flip it, rotate it and move it around a little bit so it doesn't look like I'm just using the same image over and over. It will get a little bit of variation to it. At this point, you may decide to move some of your texts a little bit, if you just need a little bit more space in a particular area. 13. Adding Filler & Texture: I'm happy with this layout. I'm going to go ahead and start creating some leaves to fill in these empty spaces. I'm going to start with a dark-green color. Just like we did in the last piece, I'll go through and try to find the areas that just really need a little bit of help. In this one, I'm not going to do the veins of the leaves. I'm going to really let these leaves just be big solid chunks on the canvas so that they don't take too much away from all the detail that's in the pomegranates. I used my ink brush for that portion. I'm going to use my dry ink brush for the color portion of the leaves. It looks like I've hit my layer limit. This may happen when you work in this way, but at this point I can go ahead and start merging some layers together. For example, this layer group over here, I can merge those together. I'm going to go into my layer groups and do some merging. That way, I don't have to worry about hitting my layer limit again. I'm going to create a layer right below my leaves layer. I've got my dry ink brush with a light green color. I'm going to do each side of the leaf in a different color. At this point, you could adjust some of these. You could add a lot more leaves into the mix, you could adjust colors. I think I'm happy with how this looks, but I am going to add a little bit of a texture layer. To do that, I'm going to get white as my color, and get my texture called linen texture. Let's do linen texture 1. I'm just going to cover this whole piece. Then I'm going to go to the end symbol on that layer and play around with all of the different blend modes. These blend modes just change how light passes through the canvas and through all the colors. You can see as you change those, the look of the piece changes. I like this soft light. I tend to go to that one a lot. You can see if you zoom in it adds this really nice texture to everything. You can reduce the opacity of that so it's not quite as intense. Then you just get a slight texture on everything. I think I am going to leave that texture present because I just really like how it breaks up the total smoothness of some of these areas. I will go ahead and call this piece finished. I hope you enjoyed this class and that you feel inspired to start creating your own recipe illustrations. If you liked this class, you may like some of my other classes where I cover a lot more ways to design and paint on your iPad, like how to create a digital planner, how to paint modern florals, and how to paint realistic watercolors on your iPad and procreate. Check those out on my profile if you want to see more. Also, we share a lot of free downloads on my website. If you'd like to get more downloads like the ones you got for this class, check out my site. I would absolutely love to see your finished food illustrations and maybe even your stamps and resource images that you use if you'd like to share those. You can do that here on Skillshare in the project section, or you could tag me on Instagram or Facebook. You could also join the Facebook group I created for iPad artists, illustrators, letterers, and digital planners. It's a place to get opinions and advice on iPad drawing, painting, and digital planning. You'll get inspired by digital creations from around the world. If you love creating things on your iPad and want to share with other people around the world in conversations, sharing ideas, and seeing each other's work, check out the group. If you have any questions about the process you learned in this class, please reach out to me. You can reply to my discussion here on Skillshare, or you could contact me through my website. Thanks so much for watching, and I'll see you again next time. Bye bye.