Read Music Fast - The Simple Way to Sight-Read Musical Notes | Arthur Bird | Skillshare

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Read Music Fast - The Simple Way to Sight-Read Musical Notes

teacher avatar Arthur Bird, Piano Teacher & Session Player

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

72 Lessons (2h 40m)
    • 1. Learn to Read Music Fast - The Simple Way to Sight-Read Musical Notes

      3:44
    • 2. An Overview of a Piano Score - Part 1

      6:39
    • 3. An Overview Of A Piano Score - Part 2

      4:19
    • 4. An Overview af a Piano Score - Part 3

      5:31
    • 5. The White Keys

      2:26
    • 6. The Guide Keys - C's, F's And B's

      2:37
    • 7. C's, F's And B's - Test

      2:19
    • 8. A's, D's, E's and G's

      0:52
    • 9. The White Keys - Test

      2:47
    • 10. The Black Keys

      4:24
    • 11. The Black Keys - Test

      2:28
    • 12. An Overview Of Note Learning Methods - The Old And The New

      3:09
    • 13. The Plan of Action

      0:40
    • 14. The G In The G Clef And F In The F Clef - The Line Anchors

      6:59
    • 15. Note Reading Reaction Test - Slow - The G in the G Clef & F in the F Clef

      1:01
    • 16. Note Reading Reaction Test - Medium - The G in the G Clef & F in the F Clef

      0:36
    • 17. Note Reading Reaction Test - Fast - The G in the G Clef & F in the F Clef

      0:29
    • 18. How to do the Speed Training Drills

      0:58
    • 19. Speed Training Drill - Slow 80 BPM - The Line Anchors

      1:26
    • 20. Speed Training Drill - Fast 160 BPM - The Line Anchors

      0:50
    • 21. The Middle C Anchors

      3:14
    • 22. Note Reading Reaction Test - Slow - The Middle C's

      1:26
    • 23. Note Reading Reaction Test - Medium - The Middle C's

      0:56
    • 24. Note Reading Reaction Test - Fast - The Middle C's

      0:41
    • 25. Speed Training Drill - Slow 80 BPM - The Middle C's & Line Anchors

      1:26
    • 26. Speed Training Drill - Medium 120 BPM - The Middle C's & Line Anchors G & F

      1:03
    • 27. Speed Training Drill - Fast 160 BPM - The Middle C's & Line Anchors G & F

      0:50
    • 28. The C In The G Clef and C In The F Clef - Space Anchor C's

      2:56
    • 29. Note Reading Reaction Test - Slow - The C In The G Clef and C In The F Clef

      1:51
    • 30. Note Reading Reaction Test - Medium - The C In The G Clef and C In The F Clef

      1:12
    • 31. Note Reading Reaction Test - Fast - The C In The G Clef and C In The F Clef

      0:51
    • 32. Speed Training Drill - Slow 70 BPM - The Space Anchor C's

      3:00
    • 33. Speed Training Drill - Medium 120 BPM - The Space Anchor C's

      1:52
    • 34. Speed Training Drill - Fast 160 BPM - The Space Anchor C's

      1:27
    • 35. The Towering F and the Ground Floor G 1

      2:02
    • 36. Note Reading Reaction Test Slow - Towering F and Ground Floor G

      2:06
    • 37. Note Reading Reaction Test - Medium Towering F and Ground Floor G

      1:32
    • 38. Note Reading Reaction Test - Fast - Towering F and Ground Floor G

      1:02
    • 39. Speed Training Drill - Slow 70 BPM - The Towering F & Ground Floor G

      3:00
    • 40. Speed Training Drill - Medium 120 BPM - The Towering F & Ground Floor G

      1:52
    • 41. Speed Training Drill - Fast 160 BPM - The Towering F & Ground Floor G

      1:27
    • 42. The High C and the Low C

      2:36
    • 43. Note Reading Reaction Test - Slow - The High C & Low C

      2:31
    • 44. Note Reading Reaction Test - Medium - The High C & Low C

      1:49
    • 45. Note Reading Reaction Test - Fast - The High C & Low C

      1:21
    • 46. Speed Training Drill - Slow 70 BPM - The High C & Low C - All Guide Notes

      3:00
    • 47. Speed Training Drill - Medium 120 BPM - The High C & Low C

      1:52
    • 48. Speed Training Drill - Fast 160 BPM - The High C & Low C

      1:27
    • 49. The None-Guide Notes - Skipping About the Piano

      3:21
    • 50. All of the White Keys/Notes

      3:04
    • 51. Note Reading Reaction Test - Slow - All White Keys Notes

      3:11
    • 52. Note Reading Reaction Test - Medium - All White Keys Notes

      2:11
    • 53. Note Reading Reaction Test - Fast - All White Keys Notes

      1:32
    • 54. Speed Training Drill - Slow 70 BPM - Guide Notes & None Guide Notes

      3:00
    • 55. Speed Training Drill - Medium 120 BPM - Guide Notes & None Guide Notes

      1:52
    • 56. Speed Training Drill - Fast 160 BPM - Guide Notes & None Guide Notes

      1:27
    • 57. The Black Keys Recap (Including C Flats and E Sharps)

      2:58
    • 58. Reading Notated Sharps, Flats and Naturals

      5:28
    • 59. Note Reading Reaction Test - Slow - Sharps, Flats & Naturals

      2:47
    • 60. Note Reading Reaction Test - Medium - Sharps, Flats & Naturals

      1:51
    • 61. Note Reading Reaction Test - Fast - Sharps, Flats & Naturals

      1:01
    • 62. Speed Training Drill - Slow 70 BPM - Sharps, Flats & Naturals

      3:00
    • 63. Speed Training Drill - Medium 120 BPM - Sharps, Flats & Naturals

      1:52
    • 64. Speed Training Drill - Fast 160 BPM - Sharps, Flats & Naturals

      1:27
    • 65. Putting it All into Practice - Guide Notes and None-Guide Notes (Including Sharps, Flats and Natural

      0:45
    • 66. Note Reading Reaction Test - Slow - Guide & None Guide Notes

      4:11
    • 67. Note Reading Reaction Test - Medium - Guide & None Guide Notes

      2:41
    • 68. Note Reading Reaction Test - Fast - Guide & None Guide Notes

      1:26
    • 69. Speed Training Drill - Slow 70 BPM - Putting It All Into Practice

      3:00
    • 70. Speed Training Drill - Medium 120 BPM - Putting It All Into Practice

      1:52
    • 71. Speed Training Drill - Fast 160 BPM - Putting It All Into Practice

      1:27
    • 72. Congratulations!

      0:17
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About This Class

Learning to read music is one of the biggest challenges people face when learning the piano, and beginners can often feel overwhelmed when they are first faced with a piano score. Sight-reading notes using the traditional methods is difficult, and people can often spend years struggling to remember the note names. This breeds frustration and holds them back from doing what they really want to do, which is to PLAY beautiful songs on the piano!

But there is a way to easily get over this first stage of learning to read musical notes!

It doesn't have to take years, months or even weeks and can quickly set you on a path of learning piano with fulfillment and fun!

Fast track your piano learning journey using The Guide Note Method. It's easy to understand, effective, and much faster than the traditional methods most music teachers use.

Traditional methods are:

  • Ineffective - You have to memorise certain phrases/mnemonics such as Every Good Boy Deserves Football or All Cows Eat Grass, and remember where to use them on the piano score. Students often get these mixed up, and trying to remember which phrase applies where in the middle of sight-reading a tune is an ineffective approach.

  • Slow - Going through the process of remembering a phrase, working your way towards a note using that phrase, and then finding the correct key on the piano is a slow process. It's not ideal when trying to play many notes at the same time.

  • Only partly useful - They tell you the name of the note, but not WHICH specific key is the correct note to play on the piano.

  • Incomplete - They only show you how to name 18 notes on a piano score, and don't even include "Middle C"!

The Guide Note Method is:

  • Simple - The method used is easy to remember because it focuses on a core of just 10 notes, which give you the ability to speedily play 38+ notes.

  • Effective - It uses a visual approach, working off "guide notes" which is much more effective when sight-reading, as oppose to trying to recall phrases in the middle of playing a tune.

  • Fast - It trains you to react quickly to notes and their positions on the piano, because the note recall process is refined. By the end of the course you'll get to a point where reading the notes is more of a reflex than a memory test.

  • Concise - It focuses on one goal, which is to see a note and play it instantly on the piano. You won't spend 10-20 hours learning vast amounts of musical terminology, but you will learn how to read and play musical notes in a short space of time.

The course has Note Reading Reaction Tests that make the process of learning the notes fun! Challenge yourself to keep up with the instructor and see how much you improve as you progress.

There are also Speed Training Drills at each stage as you progress that challenge you to play along to click tracks at various speeds, further improving your sight-reading speed.

It also comes with a 50+ page workbook filled valuable information and graphics that you can download and print off. It includes supplemental lessons that compliment the video lessons, as well as additional written tests that you can work through to refine your note reading skills even more. Having a physical visual guide alongside the video lessons is an important aspect of a thorough learning process.

This course does not cover how to read different rhythms, key signatures or teach you how to play specific tunes!

What it does do is teach you how to read notes using a fast and effective method, hugely accelerating your piano learning experience so that you can spend your time learning how to play your favourite tunes on the piano!

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Arthur Bird

Piano Teacher & Session Player

Teacher

Hi, I'm Arthur and I've been playing the piano for 20 years. After achieving Grade 8 with the Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music, I started touring as a session player in theatre shows all over the United Kingdom. As well as this I have lots of experience in recording studios, and with bands have played music all over the world, from the UK, Europe, USA and even Australia. I've been teaching piano for 10 years now, and am an approved tutor with the City of York Arts Council.

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Transcripts

1. Learn to Read Music Fast - The Simple Way to Sight-Read Musical Notes: Hi, my name's Arthur, and welcome to my course that will teach you the quickest and most effective way to read music. One of the biggest challenges people face when learning the piano is how to read the notes, which is understandable. It can feel very complicated and can be a huge cause of frustration. Many people spend years and years of struggling with this challenge of remembering the names of the notes and which keys on the piano they are referring to. Traditional teaching methods. Use certain phrases or mnemonics, such as, every good boy deserves football for the names of the notes on these lines here. What's your advent do is take the first letter of each word. So these notes are E, G, B, D, F. Well, the examples used by music teachers, our face for these spaces here, or good boys deserve far apples for these lines here. So the notes on these lines are G, B, D, F, a, and all cows eat grass. So a, C, E, G for these spaces. The problem with this approach is that many people, first of all, struggle to remember them and get them mixed up. Forgetting which phrase is applied to which groups of lines or spaces. They are also slow because in order to remember, for example, the name of this note, you'd have to go through every good boy deserves football in order to figure out that the top line is an F. And that's not ideal when trying to read a single note in the middle of playing a tune. Whether you've got all the other nodes to contend with as well. They also don't tell you which specific keys to play. For example, when you're using good boys deserve for apples for these lines, you can say that this note is an a, but it doesn't tell you which a, it is on the piano. There are several A's on a piano or KeyVault. What if I told you that there is a way to quickly get over this first major hurdle when learning to read music. This course teaches the unique guide note method. It's simple to understand, easy to remember, and most importantly, much faster. Focusing on a car of ten guided notes and working from there, you'd be surprised at how easy learning the notes can actually be. It has one goal in mind. And that is to teach you to see a note on a piece of music and play it instantly. This course does not teach you how to play different rhythms. Go into depth on key signatures or teach you how to play specific tombs. But what it does do very well is used this most effective method to drive the musical notes into our memory in a short space of time. It's concise and methodical. And by the end of the costs will get you to a point where sight reading and note is more of a reflex rather than the slow and painful process of the old teaching methods throughout the course, there are speed training drills that will improve your note reading reaction time, giving you the opportunity to improve on your time within each section. On top of all this, the course comes with a 50 page workbook. You can download and print off. It's a valuable tool in itself. And you can work through the lessons and tests within it to further improve your skills. This course is perfect for complete beginners wanting to fast-track that piano learning journey. But it's also idea for people that can already read music. But perhaps it's a slow process and they want to improve their note reading speed. Well, I ready and excited to get started. And so this sounds like the class for you. I'll see you on the inside. 2. An Overview of a Piano Score - Part 1: In this lesson, I'm going to give you a quick overview of a piece of music. I'm not going to go into great detail on how to read the notes just yet. This is just to give you a general idea of how sheet music works and what it's all about. So here we have an arrangement of Swan Lake by Tchaikovsky. And if you're a complete beginner, it may all look a bit confusing. There are groups of lines with these blobs, salt dots everywhere. And some are filled in. Whilst this have holes in, as well as curving lines, strange-looking symbols, lots of numbers and small adopts, amongst other things. So there's a lot going on. If you look at the fundamentals, the little blobs are called nodes. And each node is referring to a specific key on the piano or Key Vault. For example, the first node here is a D. And not just any day, it's this specific D on the piano. So all of these notes are telling you to play certain keys on the piano. By the way, you don't have to remember everything I'm about to tell you right now. I'm just going to help me to get a sense of what is going on. And I'll start by playing you the piece of music so you can hear what it sounds like. So the first thing you may have noticed is that the notes are read from left to right, just like when reading and writing Western languages. And that's all this is your learning to read a musical language. When he gets to the end of a line, you go to this dotted the next line. You may have also noticed that there are two groups of five lines with the symbols of the stops. The groups of lime to call staves. And these lines and the spaces in between the notes original. And most of the time, you play the notes on the top stave with your right hand and the notes on the bottom with your left hand. So as I said, a note is referring to a specific key on the piano. I want to show you something that will hopefully make it immediately clear how these lines and spaces I've related to the keys on the piano. If we take away everything and just leave these lines, aka the staves and rotate them. Each line is now in line with its associated piano key. Like I said before, each note is telling you which specific keys to press. And so these lines and the spaces in between the method used to recall the notes. And so if there is a note on this line here. You would then play this key, right? And if there is a note on this line here, you would play this key here. So you could play all of the notes on the lines like this. And as you can see, there are also keys in line with the spaces on. So if you play the notes in the space is, it would cover these keys. To play the notes in between. You can simply writing a temporary line just for that key. So he could play through this rotated stave one key at a time from left to right. And the notes would look like this. And you may notice that the notes are either directly on top of a line up directly in between the spaces. You don't get note slightly in between them is either one or the other. So as you can see, these lines are referring to the central keys on the piano. It's kind of like that Guitar Hero game. All those YouTube videos you see where the notes flights of all of the keys when being played. That's really all that's happening with music notation, except instead of the lines be vertical or horizontal across the page. So Austin notes, move height of the page. You go further up to the rights on the piano. And if you listen to the pitch of the keys, pitch meeting the degree of how high or low they sound. You can say that as you move the rights of the piano, the notes sound higher. Um, so I go up in pitch. The further down to the left you go the lower the sound. Um, so, yeah, going down in pitch without makes sense in regards to the notation on the page, because high notes on the piano or high on the skull. And as you move down on the piano, the notes are low on the skull. I haven't mentioned black keys yet, but don't worry, we'll go into that a bit later. So the trickiest path of beginners is being able to remember which key to press when you see the nose and the skull. Ultimately, it will get to a point where you aren't even processing the name of the node. When I see it though, I don't say this is a D and then play the piano, I see a note and I just know which key to press. When you've read, you don't go through the letters individually, you just know the word. Eventually. Reading music, we'll be reading words. I'm going to show you some great methods to help me to remember the notes as well. Let's go through some exercises and tests to help you to improve your response time later in the course. In the next lecture, we're going to go back to the piece of music I showed you at the start. And I'll talk through some other things you might expect to see on a piano score. 3. An Overview Of A Piano Score - Part 2: So here was the piece of music again. Let's strip a lot of it back. I'm just going to leave the note heads for the moment. So just the circular path. We've talked about how the notes are written on an in-between the lines and how they are telling you which specific keys to press. But these nodes are only covering this area of the piano. What do you do if you want to play other notes outside of this range? All you do is write in what's called a ledger line, which is like a temporary line outside of the stave, which is what these are here. And you can write to notes above or below either of the staves to cover any of the piano keys outside of this central area. For example. We'll go into this in more detail later in the course. I briefly like to draw your attention to these curvy symbols over here. This is called the brace, which simply connect the treble and bass clef together they form the grand stave. All ground staff in America. If you go back to the notes so you can see that some of them have holes in while some of them are filled in while split this hub dots to the right of them. These outweighs to show how long to play each note fall. We mentioned note lengths in beats, and they can also divide beats to make sure to note lengths. I just want to reiterate that this cost is going to teach you how to read just the notes. Learning to read note length and rhythms is a huge subject in itself and outside the scope of this cost. Okay, I'll put some of the lines and sticks back-in. These are called stems and these are called beams. These also affect the lengths of the nodes. Can you see these lines that go through the staves? These are called bar lines. And they segment the music into what's that called boss, or also known as meshes in America, under the paths of the world. I think the word Mesha is a good word for it because the bars are a way of measuring our counting how many beats there are in each bar. So each bar or measure is divided up into a certain amount of beats. And the bar line signals the end of the bar and the start of the next. If the music wasn't divided into bias, then you would just end with an endless stream of notes on. So this makes it easy to process when reading on plane. But how do you know how many beats there should be an h bar? Well, this is what the time signature is fall. It indicates how many beats that pipa, as well as the length of value of each beads. With this in mind, the little numbers that you see this.tab h line are simply showing what the bound on base. So counting 12345678 and so on. The also needs to be a way to signal when not to play a note and how long fall, because you don't always have to be constantly playing. This is what this symbol is. It's called a rest, and it's telling you not to play or not particular beat and the right hand. There are also other types of rest and bolts here about just a few examples. The notes that we have the moment show how to play the white keys. But what about all of these back keys? Well, this is what the symbols are for that called shops. I'm flats. They anomaly telling you to play certain back here. You either have them within the piece of the music. Here. All they can appear at the start of the line up like this, which is called a key signature. You may also notice this symbol here. These are called natural signs and they are telling you to revert to the not true all novel key. So as you can see, it starts to look a lot more like a piece of music you might expect to see. In the next video, I'll briefly go over the rest of the max and symbols that were in the completed skull I showed you at the stops. 4. An Overview af a Piano Score - Part 3: So we've made a qubit, most of the parts of a musical skull. I'm going to go over these last few musical features quite quickly so that we can get moving on learning how to read music fast when you get to curved line connecting two notes like these, this is telling you to play the first note and then hold the second one down. So the curved line is tying the two nodes together, which is why they're called ties. I'll show you. So did you notice how I kept this k down here with my pinky here? I want this. Yeah. So that is a tie. Now these ties look very similar to these other curved lines that you will often see on a piece of music. These are different because they are placed under groups of nodes as opposed to the ties and just connect two notes that are side-by-side. These curved lines over groups of notes, uh, called slurs, and they're telling you to play smoothly. They often positioned over what is called a musical phrase. Think about a musical phrase like a sentence. You don't put full stops in the middle of a sentence, and you use comments to help shape the flow of the sentence. This is the same idea. Here. The melody can be grouped into smaller tunes or sentences. Say I've got this first phrase here, south, the first part of the tune, and then it moves on. You see that? And then it carries on. So the next phrase, and another phrase. You can also get these slurs in the bass clef, so the low group of lines. But that just isn't any in this piece of music. There are also many of the smaller marks and symbols that you may find Nixon notes. But as I said, this course is focused purely on learning to read the notes. And so we're not going to go into them now, let's keep things moving. All of these other numbers above and below the notes are simply suggesting which fingers to use for those notes. The only difference is that in piano, we count off thumbs as fingers. So 1234512345. Also, it could be first, second, third, fourth, or fifth fingers. And again, first, second, third, fourth, or fifth finger. Then you've got this mark here. This is telling you what dynamics to use. Dynamics meeting, how loud or quietly to play a piece. Again, there are many of the dynamic max that you may come across. Then we've got the composer written in here as well as who arranged it. And finally, there's Italian where to start. This is a tempo direction which is telling you what spay to pet a piece. You can also get to Italian word to the staff is telling you how the pH should be played there, written in Italian because that's the way it's always been. Can they write it in English? I hear you ask. Well, I don't know the answer to that. I guess it's just a tradition. So that's a quick overview of a piece of music. Just to recap, we've got the right-hand stave and the left-hand stave, which is what the notes are written on the notes or read from left to right. And as you go high up the music, you go higher up to the right and the piano, and vice versa. Lower on the music and lower to the left on the piano. Notes can be hollowed out of filled-in to show how long to play them. Sticks, beams and ducts, specifically dust to the right, also affect note lengths. We've got bars, also known as meshes and bow lines, which segment the music to make it more legible. And the time signature shows how many beats there are per back to your notes next to each other with a curved line between them are tied together. And so the second note is held down. The other curved lines of a group of notes are called slurs and group the notes into musical sentences called phrases. They show to play the notes smoothly. Then we've got the dynamics which show how loud or quiet to play the notes. We've got breasts, we've got sharps and flats. Then we've got the finger numbers, some suggestions for which fingers to use on those certain notes. The composer and arranges. And finally, tempo and speed maps and other playing directions. Again, I'm not expecting you to be able to remember all of that, but hopefully it doesn't look quite as intimidating as it did when he first laid eyes upon it. I've included a PDF of a quick guide to the ground state, which covers much of what we've talked about here. So please feel free to have a look at it. And it may be useful to print it off for future reference, right? It's time to learn the most efficient way to read notes. See you in the next lecture. 5. The White Keys: In these next few lessons, I'm going to teach you the names of the keys on a piano keyboard. If you already know that, please skip these lessons and move on to the next section. When you look at a piano keyboard, you may notice that you have groups of two black keys and three black keys. And they alternate up and down the piano. So what's our first might seem like a lot of keys to try memorize is actually just a recurring pattern of just 12 different keys. In music, we use the first seven letters of the alphabet. If you go to any group of two black keys and play the white key directly to the left, you will find a c. You can then move to the left and count backwards through the alphabet. So seeing me from this point, you can count 0 to the right using the alphabet from a to G, a, B, C. That not just repeat to self a, B, C D E F G a B C D E F G a B, C D E F G. That not just repeats itself up and down the piano. So that's one way to figure out the names of the white keys. You can find any group of two black keys. Then move to the left to find the c, then can count down to the left. And that would be the status of the a to G. And he raised. The problem with this is that you may find yourself counting all the way from a every time we wanted to find out, say the name of this note here. So you'd have to go a, B, C, D, and J. So it's quite a slow process, is more efficient to memorize the different keys, a colon to where they are positioned by giving yourself a few guides. In the next lesson, I'll show you them. 6. The Guide Keys - C's, F's And B's: In the previous lecture, I showed you how you can find an a on the piano by going to any group of two black keys and then moving to the left to find the c and then counting backwards C. So then that would be the start of the Ae to the j. So if you take that first step of locating the groups of two black keys, then go to the left to find the first wipe key, to find the c's. This is going to be our first guide key. With it, you can easily find all of the Cs up and down the piano. So let's say stay safe. So I want you to just take a moment to locate all of the C's on the piano keyboard. Then if you find the groups of three black keys. So for instance here, you can think about the front of the three black keys is I. Then the back of the three black keys is here. So to the first letter F, So that would be an ascii. And then the back, first letter is b, so b is the back, so from f. So you can use that if all of them from the back, from F are just the first thing. So just take a moment to find those fruits and back. So the a, s and B's up and down your piano keyboard. With just those three keys, you can easily shop cook to your neighboring keys. For example, if you go see here, Well, I'll be a D are being all for instance, if you want to quickly find this, well, well that's your f from E here. You've got backs of basal be an a off instance here, well to the left of the sea, so upset and so on. So with those three shortcuts that kind of cover all of the piano. And it's a lot easier than counting from the a every single time. So your first test is to memorize these three guide keys. I'm going to test you on them next. 7. C's, F's And B's - Test: Hopefully you've memorized those three guide keys. Now we're going to do a quick test to see how well you know them. Here's how it works. I'm going to play one of the three guide keys and then give you a few moments to figure it out. And then I'll tell you the answer. If you feel like I'm moving too fast, you can pause it. Or you can also change the playback rate by clicking here and adjusting the video speed. Let's begin. That was an F. That was a, B. A C. That was an F. That was an F. That was a baby. That was a C. Those see. That was a B. That was an S. That was a baby. That was a C. That was an F. That was an F. That was a B. And finally, that was a seat. Hopefully you were able to answer those. If you're struggling, you can always go back and try and memorize them a little bit more in your own time. But when I go into move on to look at the rest of the white keys. 8. A's, D's, E's and G's: Now that you're familiar with the Cs, Fs, and b's, it should be relatively easy to find the other keys because they all close to what you've just learned. So you can use a guide now and quickly shortcut to the neighboring notes. For example, from the P, you can quickly find that a or C. The C, you can quickly find a B, or a D. So those are similar notes that, but then when you get to an F, you can quickly find an a or a G, all of those nodes. Now, the a to G is a nice quick shortcut to the other ones. And eventually, when you've done it enough, you won't need to use these shortcuts. You'll just know them all off by half. But for the moment, spend some time getting used to the rest of the keys. 9. The White Keys - Test: Now we're going to get a chance to test yourself on all of the white keys. So it's going to work in a similar way to the previous wall. So again, I'm going to play a key, give you a few moments to work it out and then I'll give you the answer. Don't forget. If you feel like it's moving too fast, you can change the speed of the video. Let's begin. That's a GI. That's a C, D, a, B, C, G, D. So C, a G, B, D, F, a C. That's a. That's a, G, says a, B, D. And finally, C. 10. The Black Keys: So we've looked at how to name the white keys. Now, let's take a look at the black keys. Like we mentioned previously, you've got groups of two black keys out of three black keys and so on. So what are they called? Well, you name them according to which white key they are next to. For example, this is the same I. Then this black key to the right is called a C sharp. You may remember this symbol from the music I showed you at the start. These are shops and bulls. They kind of like a hotshot. Hashtags have both, although the lines is slanted differently. When you shop in a note, you move it up to the right by a half-step. Also note that a semitone, which is the smallest distance you can move on the piano. For example, half-steps, because you're not skipping any white or black keys out. So that's called a half-step semitones. So with that in mind, if this is a scene to shop in it, you may have a half step to the right. So this is a dy, so this is a D-sharp. And we're going to go to this one here, so that's F. So that is an F sharp. This is achieved. So this is a G-sharp. This is an a. So this is an a sharp. So that's what these black keys are called, but they actually have two different names depending on which direction you are coming from on the piano. Take little clumps the sheet music I showed you at the start. I'd like to draw your attention to these symbols here. These are called flat symbols. As you can see, it looks like the letter B kind of, but it's a slightly different shape, perhaps slightly squashed on the side that you can think of them like opposites to shops. When he flatten a note, you move it to the left by 1.5. So this note here is an a. And if you move it to the left by 1.5 step, it takes you to an E flat. So this is a D, and this is a D flat. This is a B here. So this is a B flat. And so this isn't a flat. This is a gene and this is a G-flat. But you may remember that just before I showed you that this was a C-sharp. But how can it be a C-sharp, but also a D flats? The answer is that it's both. It depends on which direction you are coming from. So this k here is an F. If you move up to the black key, to the right, it's called an F sharp. And at the same time, if you want a CI and you move to the left, is called a G flat. So this here is a G sharp here, but it also an, a flat becoming down from the a. This is a C or a D flat. One way to distinguish between the two is when you flatten something, you squash it down. Earlier in the course that talked about how you move down to the left on the piano. So it can help to remember which is which by thinking of flattening the notes down to the left. So flaps go down to the shops, go to the right. Now try and familiarize yourself with the names of the black keys. And next, again, you can have a chance to test yourself. 11. The Black Keys - Test: Now we go into get to Trump's to test yourself on the name to the black keys. We're going to start off with shops Fest and then flat softer. So to start off with shops, that is an F sharp, that is a C shop. That is a G sharp. That it's a D-sharp. That is it a shot? That is an F shot? That is a C shot. That is a DIY shop. That isn't a shop. That is a day shop. That is F sharp. That is F sharp. And that is a C-sharp. And now go to go through, so fats, Let's begin. That's an a flat. That's a B flat. A flat. That's an a flat. That's a B flat. And a flat that's a B flat. And that's an E flat. 12. An Overview Of Note Learning Methods - The Old And The New: In the first lecture, I showed you very briefly how these two staves represent this area of the piano. The top being these keys, and the bottom being these keys. Traditionally, most piano teachers tell the students to memorize certain sayings, all genomics, to help me to remember the names of these nodes. And these are nominees, something like this. Every good boy deserves football. And then you just take the first letter of each word To tell you the names of the notes on those lines. So it would be E, G, B, D, F. And then the other bombs anomaly, something like face for the spaces. And then the lines down here, something like good boys deserve fall apples. And then for the space is down there. All cows eat grass. The problem with trying to remember them this way is that people often get them mixed up and can't remember which ones go with which. So they'll be like goodbyes disease for apples in the top, stave off. Every good boy deserves apples. All cows eat grass here are plain and simple. That just cotton, remember the saying? So that's one problem. There are also ready slow because if you want to remember, for example, the top blind here, you have to work through. Good boys deserve fall first. And that's not great when you're trying to read notes as fast as he can in the middle of playing a song. Another problem with this method is that they tell you the names of the notes on certain lines or spaces. For example, every good boy deserves football. So this slide is an a, but it doesn't tell you which ie, it is on the piano. There are loads. I'm now going to teach you a much more effective approach. The general idea is that you learn just a handful of nodes evenly spaced throughout the staves very well, and use them as guide notes. So instead of learning fault to your ball notes or ineffective MAN omics, you have to learn just ten notes rarely, well, for example, won't see, you know, this notes. You can easily find this note above. And this note below. By moving up on the piano for this wall and down to the left for this one. All for example, this note here is easy to find the note above or below. Or even finding this note here because it's on the line below, see you as skipping out the space. So you just skim out the key on the piano. I've been teaching privately now for over 12 years. And if you use this approach with my own peoples, and I've seen firsthand how much more effective it is. 13. The Plan of Action: Here's how this next section of less than does go into work. I'll take you step-by-step through each of the different diagnoses. And then you'll get a chance to drive them into your memory using the notation speed training drills. We'll get a chance to play through the different guide notes along to a click track. There will be three different speeds for each training drill, slow, medium, and fast. And we will methodically add more amount guide notes as we go along. Finally, once you've learned all of the guide notes, we'll move on to the rest of the notes and you'll be able to see for yourself how effective this method really is. 14. The G In The G Clef And F In The F Clef - The Line Anchors: First of all, I want you to locate the group of two black keys and the center of your piano keyboard. If you don't have ball in front of you, that's fine. Don't worry. You can just refer to man on the screen. So the two black keys and the center of my pen over here, and then to the left is the C, Okay, so this c is called Middle C. I want you to think of this as your anchor point where you said to yourself on the piano and just on a side note, that's where you should be lining up belly button up with, and that's the correct positioning on the piano when playing. Okay, so we're going to come back to middle sees position on the music a bit later. But as I said, think of this as your anchor point. Place both of your thumbs on middle C. And then pledged the rest of your fingers on the white keys going out without missing any your fifth fingers. Remember 15 offers will fall on the right-hand and in the left-hand. Okay. Hold that thought. Your fifth finger on the G in your right-hand and the fifth in the left-hand. Early on, I mentioned that these here are called class. This is called a treble clef, and this is called a bass clef. If you look closely at this one, you can see that the swell on the lower part of this class looks like a g. This second line runs straight through the center of this G shape. Any notes on this line at G, and this specific G on the piano, 50 from middle C. So it might be easier to think of this as the G-Clef because it helps you to remember this G line running through that G shape in the class. Now if we take a look at this other clef known as the base class, this one requires a little bit more imagination, but if you connect the two dots to the curve symbol, it kind of looks like an f, the second line down from the top rooms in-between the problem, all fork of the f 0, if you take them away in-between the two dots. Any notes on this line, Fs and this specific F on the piano. Five notes down from your middle, c ANCA. So you might find it easier to refer to this bass clef as the F clef because of the F line that runs in between those two dots. So we have the g in your right-hand treble clef are the G-Cloud, and we have the F. And your left hand bass clef of the we can call these to guide notes. Your line anchors. We can locate them by putting both thumbs or middle C offers fingers. And without skipping any white keys out, working until your fingers. Just like I showed you before. So you're right, left, and on the right-hand G-Clef on the left hand. You may also notice that the lines mirror each other from in-between the staves, the second line from the middle and the G-Clef, and the second line down from the middle and the F clap. If you learn these to diagnose that, you'll very easily be able to locate these neighboring notes here. So this is your line. So you can easily find these two from that. And these ones. But and then your left hand F clef. So this is not unlike enough that she could easily find these ones here. And these ones here. But more on that later. Now you might be asking yourself, why is this such a big gap between the state at the top and the bottom? This is just the way the music is formatted and helps to give a clear distinction between the two clefs. But if I bring them together, then let's play single steps down from the line oncogene. Single steps being moving from line to space without skipping all jumping. First of all, you'll notice that we're running out of blind. So what you do is write in a temporary line as a ledger line. So that's brought you down to middle C. Then if you play single steps from the line I'm to F and you left. And you see how that meets in the middle. The distance now makes more sense in relation to the distances of the keys on the piano. But when you're reading a lot more notes, you can imagine how having lots of lines close together, it's not great for the eyes. So the staves are spaced apart. And then with that in mind, because their space to pat, you have to write the C in the G-Clef here, and then the C and the F clef here. So these are the same note, but a written on different positions on the music. Your right-hand middle C is shown here. At the left top, middle C is shown here. But don't worry too much about those. Melissa's just yet I was just explaining the distance between the two states. So just to recap these yell First to guide notes and memorize the Nonaka CI and your right hand. The Linac F in your left hand. And it can locate them on the piano by putting both thumbs or fest fingers on the middle C. And then the fifth thing goes, well, Latin above them. So take him out to find them a few times on your piano. Aki bought a familiarize yourself with where these two notes are on the music. Next, you'll get a chance to test yourself on them. 18. How to do the Speed Training Drills: In this video, I'm just going to show you how to do the speed treading grills, again is pretty straightforward. What happens is the video starts and then he get for clicks, and then it begins. I'll show you the first few bass. So on. So this is just the first beat trading drill using the Fest to guide notes. So hopefully you'll find nice straightforward. The speed trading drills build up ACI progress. And there's also videos for different speeds for each of the SPI training drills so you can try them at slow, medium, and fast tempos to further improve, you'll note reading reaction times. 21. The Middle C Anchors: In the previous lecture, we talked about the middle C on the piano and how you can use that to locate your line and Kochi in your G-Clef by counting up to a fifth finger in your right-hand. As well as the lambda f in your F clef by counting down to your fifth left hand. I also explained that the middle C on the piano is written differently for each class. Those middle C notes I go into be your next guide note to learn. Just to mention, I'm showing you these next sets of notes using what's called a crotchet or quarter note, which has a stem coming off it like a stick. Again, I'm not going over note legs in this course. I'm just mixing it up so you can get used to locating notes that look different than just a circular one we were using before. Don't worry about the stem or which direction it's going. You just need to pay attention to the note head. So just to reiterate, when the C is to be played in the right-hand. It is shown just below the G-Clef here, on its own, lead to line. And run the middle. C is to be played in the left-hand. It is shown just above the F clef on its own letter line here. For the same key on the piano, but just appear differently on the music. Once you know these guided notes, you can easily locate these notes in the G-Clef here. And here. And I just want to point out that position these notes examples to be in line with their respective keys on the piano. And this is to help with understanding how the notes are related to the keys. Remember that normally in music notes are written from left to right. You may notice that when you work further away from Mr. Dave, you write in more of the lecture, I'll temporary lines as and when to suit how many steps you want to show. So this note here, you can see that there are two ledger lines. The middle see ledger line is empty. And then there was another one to show the distance of two notes from the sea. Again, we'll go more into this later. I'm back to the middle C. If you memorize the middle C and the F clef, you'll be able to quickly figure out these neighboring notes here. And these ones here. Don't worry about these notes on the ledger lines at the moment though. Right now, you just need to memorize the middle casinos. So the right-hand middle C note is here on the music. And the left-hand Mendocino is here. And there, the same key on the piano, middle C and a, G and F. Middle C. And the F. 28. The C In The G Clef and C In The F Clef - Space Anchor C's: Next we're going to add in another to guide notes. There can be referred to as the space and cosine. If you work from in-between the two staves, they are three spaces, both from the bottom in the G clef, and three spaces down from the top and the F clef. So if you think about the middle of being the mirror, you've got the third space up from the middle and the third space down from the middle. These c's are spaced evenly, the right-hand being the C, middle C, and the left-hand being the C down for middle school. You can also locate them by placing our first thing is on the line because and then it moving four steps outwards. And so Latin thing on your four fingers. I'll show you what I mean. So locate the line uncus so thumbs or middle C and then there's your line uncus, G and F. Then to find these ones here, you just bring your thumbs are first fingers onto them and then go up by four. So 1234. And you're right in the math. So these are new guide nurses. You've right-hand see in the G-Clef and the left times c. And then f. And a is the first space in the G-Clef, and then the third space down and ask them, these guided notes will help me define these notes here. So bombs just above and the ones below. And then the F clef your space, I've just say here, just above and also below. So you may notice that the guide notes are symmetrical. On the music you have. The middle sees, the right-hand being just below the G-Clef, and the left-hand being just above the F clef. But the same key on the piano. The light on because being the second line up from the middle and the second line down from the middle. And then the space I'm because other third space up from the middle and the first space down from the middle. And just a quick reminder to locate them. You can start with both films and middle C. Then to find the line uncus, found a fifth fingers. And then move on to the line, I'm curious with your thumbs and then place your four fingers down to find the space anchors. 29. Note Reading Reaction Test - Slow - The C In The G Clef and C In The F Clef: Okay. 33. Speed Training Drill - Medium 120 BPM - The Space Anchor C's: Hi. 34. Speed Training Drill - Fast 160 BPM - The Space Anchor C's: Hi. 35. The Towering F and the Ground Floor G 1: The next Dr notes the line at the top of the G-Clef, which is an F on the line at the bottom of the clash, which is a CI. So you can see that it's still symmetrical. The top line, the G-Clef, and the bottom of the F clef. When I teach this my pupils and tell them to a monsoon, the staves as a two-block and refer to the notes, the top line of the tower block as the towering f and the g on the line, the bottom as the ground floor, Zhe see you've got the towering F. The ground flow gi. These guided notes will help me to find these notes here. So the towering x and then the vault. And then the ones and the ground fog G will help me to find these no CIA. Then these notes below here. Until locate the correct F key in your right hand. You can move OK by a false from MySpace on QC. And to find the ground floor Zhe, you can go down to fall from MySpace. I'm Cassie. So specific to see that. Hi. 39. Speed Training Drill - Slow 70 BPM - The Towering F & Ground Floor G: Yeah. 42. The High C and the Low C: The last guide notes you need to learn the high C, a, both the G-Clef and the low C below the F clef. These are on the ledger lines to the G-Clef. And two below the G-Clef. They move outside of the staves and define this high C. You can find the C above the tiring. So the tiering F is here. So the C is here. And then you just need to remember they are on the second ledger line above the G-Clef. And then the left-hand. You can find the C below the ground flat G. So ground floor, she was here. So the C is not shown to lead to lines below the F clef. So again, it's symmetrical, two above and two below. And these guide notes will help you to find these notes above here. And these ones below here. And in the F clef help you to find these notes from C and the C here. And again, you don't need to remember those neighboring notes, just remember the guide notes for the moment. So these sees a, both a fifth from the towering F and the fifth down from the ground floor, g. So again, like I said, the distances are the same. It's symmetrical on each side. So to go through all these guided notes, you've got the middle and the middle C in the FM, the same key on the piano. And that you can locate the line because by moving on. Okay. And then you can locate the space on because by moving out by fall. And then you can locate the towering f by moving out by fall. And the ground floor of g by moving out by fall as well. And then again finally, you can locate these high C and low C by moving out by five. So from a thumb on the towering f 45 and then your thumb on the ground flop GI. 44. Note Reading Reaction Test - Medium - The High C & Low C: Okay. 47. Speed Training Drill - Medium 120 BPM - The High C & Low C: Hi. Hi. 49. The None-Guide Notes - Skipping About the Piano: Hopefully by now, after all of those tests and speed training drills, you've really gotten those 10 guide notes in your head and can read and play them straight away. Now it's time to put them into practice and introduce all of the notes in between. And before I continue, yes, By now we shouldn't be able to name and play the guy notes. But for the rest of the nodes, you don't really need to be able to name them. The aim is to be able to play the correct key as quickly as possible. So for instance, if you see this No TEA, hopefully you'll recognize that it's just space advocacy in the G-Clef. If then there is a note here on the line of both, you would then just need to move up to the right on the piano to find it. You don't necessarily need to name it in order to play it. That's just adding an extra thought process. The names of the rest of the notes will come not to lay in time for the moment. The skill in finding the nom guide notes is making sure that you can tell if it's walling. Move a pull down on the piano. I'll skip away from narrowest guide note. And what do I mean by a wall? Move all by escape. Well, if you move up or down on the piano without missing any white keys out. These are just movements of warm and that might seem kind of obvious on the piano. And one of these movements on the piano is shown on the music by moving from a line to a space, or a space to a line, without skipping all jumping. A stamp on the piano is stepping out one white key, for example. So here I'm skipping up and down the piano because I'm missing out on white key. Each time. A sketch on the music is shown by moving from either a line to a line or a space to space. So you are skipping over a space here. I'll skipping over a line here. If you are clear on these two movements on the piano and the music, then it should be relatively simple to identify the rest of the notes using your guide notes. 50. All of the White Keys/Notes: So you now have the means to bail, to find all of these notes. Next, you'll be able to test yourself and all of these notes. Here are the steps you should be taking. First, ask yourself, is it a guide note? Secondly, if not, which of the ten guided notes is nearest? And then finally work out the notes. Let's go through a few together. For example, if there's a note here, first of all, is to guide note, note it's not. So then you would ask yourself which the nearest? Well, hopefully you'll notice that the closest one is the space on to say. So the notes is on the line below. So you would just go down by one. The piano, which is to the B. You could have also used the line anchor G and then gum escape because it's on the line just above. Okay, Let's do another one. If there's a note here is a guide note. Well, yes, it is. It's on the line in between the two dots of the F clef. So let's do another wall. If there's a note here, Festival is a guide note. No, it's not. But you may notice that the closest one is the towering F, which is here. And then it's on the space just below. So you would just go down by one on the piano to find the a. You could have also used the spacetime can see, and then you could have escaped to the E. Let's do some more with this one here. Well, Festival is a guide note. No, it's not. But which is the narrowest wall, the nearest one is the ground flog G here. And then on the space of both, say just go on the piano. Again. You could use the space and to see again in the F clef. And then you could have skipped down. Let's keep going. So there was a note all the way up that you could ask yourself, is it wanted to guide notes? Yes, it is. It's Yuhai see, all the way up here. Okay. And we'll do one Bob. If you were to see a note here. First of all, is this a guy don't it's not. So then you would find the closest wall. So it sent the G-Clef and the nearest one is the middle C and the G. So then you would just go up by one to find that data. So those are just a few examples of how you can use your guide note. Now it's time for you to test yourself on all of these white keys. 53. Note Reading Reaction Test - Fast - All White Keys Notes: Okay. 54. Speed Training Drill - Slow 70 BPM - Guide Notes & None Guide Notes: Hi. 55. Speed Training Drill - Medium 120 BPM - Guide Notes & None Guide Notes: Hi. 57. The Black Keys Recap (Including C Flats and E Sharps): Now you know how to read all of the notes for the white keys. It should be relatively straightforward when it comes to the black keys. I did briefly go over how to name the black keys and the staff that calls. But here's a quick recap. When you shop in a note, you move it the smallest distance to the right. So the piano, this distance is known as a semitone all half-step. So in this case, from a C to a C or a D. And then this is a DIY shop. But these keys could also be a D-flat, so a day. So it did found all this well, could be an E flat. This is because when you flex it and note is moving it the smallest distance down to the left. So H black key has two different names depending on which direction you are coming from, sharpening up, of flattening down. And if you recall, I suggested that you remember the difference by the look of the symbols. So the flat sign, almost like it's being, it's flattened off squashed on the side. And if you think about it, the shop simple looks a bit spiky like a hashtag symbol. So the flat looks like a squash be, so think of flaps like flattening down the piano and the shop to shop in 08 00 down to the left, to the right. Now sharps and flats don't strictly apply to just the black keys though. I didn't mention this at the start. They can apply it to white keys to, for example, take this C here to shop than a note. You move it up to the right by one semitone, a half-step. So the smallest distance and see which if you flatten the C, remember flattening is going down to the left by one half-step. So a C flat Isn't this, because that would be a B-flat. That would be two semitones or two half-steps. So the flux in a C it takes you to this page. So this key has two different names. It can either be a bit or it can be a C. Another example is here. If you flatten that a attentive to the E flat here. But if you shop in it, and so move it up to the right by 1.5 step or submitter. It doesn't take you to an F sharp because that would be to say, so if you shop in the 0s here, so that isn't a shot. As well as the, so it's got two different names that a shot or just the F F natural. 58. Reading Notated Sharps, Flats and Naturals: When it comes to reading sharps and flats and music, the symbol is placed before the node to defects. So for example, if you have this note here, first of all, you may notice that it's on the F line and the F clef, so the F sharp symbol before it. So you moved up to the right by a half-step. So from F to the n, If there was a shops and boat in front of this note here. It's the space I could see, but it's got a shop simple. So moving up to the right by f half-step. I'll flats, for example, this hit is the B, but it's got the flat symbol before I say move it down to the left by 1.5, then it takes to be flat. Or this one here. It's an a because just above the line I could G, the G-Clef, but you flatten it down to the left by 1.5 step so it isn't a flat. So as long as you can identify the notes, you just then need to shift that key to the right or down to the left on the piano by Walmart half-step according to whether it's a shock. So up to the right are a flat, down to the left. You may also see groups of sharps or flats, the start of lines that look like this. All this for example, these are called key signatures. Key signatures scales on the many different kinds of keys is a big subject and so rate she is outside the scope of this course. But the basic premise is that you automatically apply the shops, all flats shown to the notes that the symbols are placed on throughout the whole tube. For example, here that is just one sharp in the key signature. Fats of all the key signature is always the same in both class. If we look at the F clef, you'll see that the center of the shops and is positioned over the F line between the two dots. So that is an F sharp in the key signature. This means that any Fs will automatically be sharpened in the piece of music, not just the notes that are on this line or this line here. Every f will be sharpened. So for example, if there was a note here on this, you would shop. And if there was a note on this, you would shop in it as well. Because if the F sharp in the key signature, That's a very brief and basic explanation, but others said is a huge subjects onto serves a cost in itself. The other symbol that we briefly looked at at the start of the cost, was there not turtle sign, as you can see, it resembles the shops and boat, boat. A couple of the sticks have been taken off. This means you played the novel natural notes. So you would just play the white keys on the piano in sheet music, sharps or flats effect that note and the rest of the nodes of that bar. So not tools I use to cancel out any sharps or flats, so to speak. For example, if you have followed Gs in a row and that wasn't shot before the first one. You would shop in all of the G. So if that bond and then the byline would cancel it out. So go back to normal books. If you only want the first note to be a G-sharp and the rest as normal Gs, that it would need to be a natural sign before the second g to cancel out the first shop. So it'd be and then Gina. Not. Silicides can also be used to cancel out notes affected by key signatures. For example, here, the key signature is safe to shop and any Fs and Cs in the tune because of a natural symbol, the fall the C, rather than playing the C shop here, you would just, we'll see none on the piano. Let's do a few together. Then you will have a chance to go over some yourself with a tests on speed training drills. So this note here is on the G line of the G-Clef, but it's going to shop. So you go up to the right to find it a G-sharp. This next dot here is a scapegoat from the G, but it's a flat next to it. So you go down to the left by half-step. Bob flaps. This dot here is on the day, just above the middle c in the G-Clef. So you would then flatten it down to the left because the fat symbol. This note here is just to book this baseline to see the shot before it would make it into a D. Shout. This note here is on the line I'm F in the F clef with the shop symbol before it. So you'd go up to the right by a half step to find that this is on the ground fog G here. And then you would fascinate down to the left by a half-step. This one is an F, but with a natural sign before it, so it just be the novel. And finally, this one is a middle C in the F clef, but with the sharp symbol before it. So it would be a C sharp. 60. Note Reading Reaction Test - Medium - Sharps, Flats & Naturals: Hello. 65. Putting it All into Practice - Guide Notes and None-Guide Notes (Including Sharps, Flats and Natural: Now it's time to put it all together. In the previous tests and speed training drills, you could get asked any of the notes in both clefs as well as sharps, flaps and that trolls, hopefully by now, you are used to finding the guide notes and confident in using steps and skips to locate their neighboring nodes. And also comfortable with converting them to sharps and flats when they arise. Next, you're going to get asked a combination of everything that you have learned so far. I'd say good luck, but it's got nothing to do with luck. It's all to do with skill and knowledge of which you should have improved significantly with getting to this point. 70. Speed Training Drill - Medium 120 BPM - Putting It All Into Practice: Hi. 72. Congratulations!: Congratulations, you've completed the course. I just want to say thank you for taking it and for trusting me with your musical education. I do, however the cost is so please feel free to have a look at them. And I do hope that you've enjoyed this one. Thanks again. Goodbye.