QuickStarter Beginner Guitar Course | Studio33Guitar | Skillshare

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QuickStarter Beginner Guitar Course

teacher avatar Studio33Guitar, Learn Guitar the Right Way!

Watch this class and thousands more

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

19 Lessons (1h 6m)
    • 1. QuickStarter Intro

      1:29
    • 2. Part 1: Parts of the Guitar

      2:48
    • 3. Part 2: Tune the Guitar

      1:05
    • 4. Part 3: Holding the Guitar

      1:47
    • 5. Part 4: Choosing and Holding a Guitar Pick

      2:36
    • 6. Part 5: Strumming the Guitar

      2:26
    • 7. Part 6: The Left Hand

      3:56
    • 8. Part 7: Your First Chords

      4:35
    • 9. Part 8: Strumming Your First Chords

      4:51
    • 10. Part 9: Changing Chords Smoothly

      1:14
    • 11. Part 10: Adding Upstrokes to Your Strumming

      4:56
    • 12. Part 11: The Most Popular Strumming Pattern

      3:22
    • 13. Part 12: More Strumming Patterns

      2:24
    • 14. Part 13: Adding 16th Notes

      3:06
    • 15. Part 14: More Beginner Chords

      3:50
    • 16. Part 15: More Strumming Patterns and a New Chord

      4:10
    • 17. Part 16: Putting the Chords Together

      3:11
    • 18. Part 17: Three More chords

      8:05
    • 19. Part 18: Strumming in 6/8

      5:46
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About This Class

The QuickStarter Beginner Guitar Course is designed to be the fastest and easiest way to learn how to pplay guitar.

Studio33Guitar is well known for its KickStarter courses which combine learning guitar and learning music theory. However over the years many people have expressed that they would like to learn guitar without learning all the theory which tends to slow down the progress. This course was designed specifically for those people.

If you are wanting to learn guitar quickly so that you can strum along to your favorite songs or enjoy playing guitar around the campfire, the QuickStarter course is the one for you! 

Meet Your Teacher

Teacher Profile Image

Studio33Guitar

Learn Guitar the Right Way!

Teacher

Hi, I’m Troy, the founder and Lead Instructor for Studio33Guitar. I love music and especially guitar, but what I love even more is teaching others to play and watching them succeed in their music journey.

I have played guitar for over 30 years and I have been teaching guitar for almost as long. From private lessons to video lessons, I have had the pleasure of teaching thousands of people of various age and skill levels from all over the world.

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Transcripts

1. QuickStarter Intro: I Welcome to the quick starter series. If you're familiar with studio 33 guitar lessons, you've probably heard of the Kickstarter series, which has been very popular over the last several years. The Kickstarter series is very in-depth and goes into a lot of detail about music. I've had people say that they enjoy the lesson, but they're not interested in learning so much theory. They really wanted to jump in and start playing. And while I think knowledge of music theory is really important, I understand that there's some people that just want to be able to play guitar at home. They just want to be able to sit around the campfire and play. They're not interested in joining a band or writing music. They just want to be able to play some of their favorite songs. And that's exactly what this course is designed for. It's to skip over the unnecessary theory and just jump right in to how to play guitar. Now there will be some theory in this course and there will be some important information about technique and how to actually play. But I've tried to really narrow that down and focus on just the essential things that you really need to know. I hope you enjoy this course. Grab your guitar and let's get started. 2. Part 1: Parts of the Guitar: The first thing obviously you need as a guitar, you don't need anything special. They're all basically the same as you get a little bit better. You might want to invest in a better quality guitar. But for now, you can learn the basic mechanics and theory behind how to play on any instrument. Let's do a quick overview of the parts of the guitar and what their names so that when I'm talking about them, you'll understand what I'm referring to. This main part of the guitar Here is the guitar body. This is the guitar neck. Up here is the headstock, and that's where we tune the guitar. Now on the body of the guitar, we have this section back here, which is called the bridge, and that's where the strings attach. And then this whole that's here is cleverly named the sound hole. And that's where the sound of the guitar comes out. On the neck of the guitar, we have these metal strips going up and down, and those are called frets. Now when we talk about the frets on a guitar, and I tell you to put your finger on the first fret or second fret. I'm not talking about putting your finger directly on the metal bar. I'm talking about the space in-between these spreads. So this would be fret number 12345, etcetera. The different strings that we have on the guitar are each tuned to a specific note. So when you play a string without putting your finger on any of the frets. For example, like that, this thickest string produces an E note. Each string will produce a different note. So the next string down is called the a string because it produces an a note. The next one is a, D, The next one, g, and then B. And then there's a few different ways that you can remember what the names of each of these strings are. But typically I will teach people to memorize a little saying to help you. And the letter of each word would correspond to the name of each string. So one of the sayings you can use is eddie eight, dynamite. Goodbye Eddie. Another one you can use is eat all day, get big easily. There's a few other sayings out there or you can make up your own to help you learn these names. 3. Part 2: Tune the Guitar: It's important to know the names of the strings and the notes that they produce because you need to be able to tune your guitar to those notes. If your guitar is not in tune, it won't matter how good of a job you're doing a playing, it's not going to sound good. If you don't know how to tune the guitar, take the guitar to a local music store and have them tune it for you. And while you're at the guitar store, you're going to want to purchase a guitar tuner. There was a lot of different types. Some of them look something like this that you hold in front of you and it has a microphone that picks up the sound. Or there's this style which clips onto the end of the guitar. There's lots of different styles of tuners available. You can even download a tuner app on your phone. But regardless of what method you choose to tune, it is very important to have your guitar in tune. 4. Part 3: Holding the Guitar: Now we'll talk a little bit about posture. When you have the guitar, you just wanna sit it on your leg, where this little curve is here is designed to fit right on your leg. Now if you're a right-handed player, it would look just like this. If you're left-handed obviously would go the other way and you'll be on your left leg. You may have seen people play guitar with a guitar sitting on the other side like this. And that's more for playing a classical style guitar, which is not what we're doing. So this is the way that you want to sit with the guitar. Now you want to bring your arm around and just rest this back part of your elbow against the top part of the guitar here. And then just let your arm come down naturally. You also wanna make sure that you're sitting up straight. You don't want to be slouched over. Try and sit up straight and also have the guitar sitting straight up and down. A lot of times beginners wants to bring the guitar back like this so they can see where their fingers are going a little bit easier, but you want to resist that temptation. You wanna make sure of that guitar stays upright like this, so that you're not forming any bad habits that you'll have to correct leader. But once you get that into a position where it's straight up and down and your elbow is just rested on the guitar. You should be able to sit like this, and it should sit balanced. So you shouldn't be trying to hold the guitar up with this hand. This hand should only be concentrating on playing these notes. 5. Part 4: Choosing and Holding a Guitar Pick: The other thing you're going to want to pick up while you're at the music store is some guitar picks. Now there are countless different types of guitar picks made out of different materials and different thicknesses. A lot of the difference between guitar picks is just simply personal preference. But if you're a beginner, it's best to go with a thinner pick. The typically for acoustic guitar, you're going to want to have a thinner pick than if you were playing electric guitar anyway. But for a beginner, you don't want to have something that's a little bit, It's going to have more flex to it. And it's going to be a little bit easier to play in, a little bit more forgiving with your strum. And if you go with something a little bit thicker, it's going to be more difficult to play. So this one that I have here is a 0.73 millimeter pick. And that's a goods medium type of pick that is great for beginners and it's what I use most of the time now for acoustic guitar as well. So I would suggest picking up a couple of these, 0.73 and also a little bit lighter. So maybe a 0.60, somewhere in that range, it'll be a little bit thinner and you might find that a little bit easier to handle. So the next thing we need to cover is how do we hold this pick? I find a good analogy to think of when you're trying to figure out how to hold a pic is to imagine that you're taking a key and opening up a lock. So you're unlocking the front door of your house with a key and the way that your wrist turns and the way that your fingers come together is basically how you want to hold a guitar pick. It's almost like making an okay sign, but our finger and thumb are going to overlap a little bit more. So imagine that you've got that key and you're turning it. Now, just take that pick and put it in between your finger and thumb. The main thing is you want this pointy end of the pick to becoming out from the side of your thumb. You don't want to be holding the pick like this, where the pick is coming out the end of the thumb. And you want that to be turned so that it's facing and pointing out from the side of the thumb. And you don't want to grip the guitar pick too tightly. You want to have just enough pressure on there to keep from dropping it, but you don't want to be squeezing it too hard. 6. Part 5: Strumming the Guitar: So there's a couple of important aspects to think about when you're strumming the strings. One of the main things is we're gonna keep our arm fairly straight and we're going to be making the motion from our elbow here. So it's going to be like that. So we don't want it to be all wrists. There is going to be some risks in there. And as you get a little bit more experience playing, you'll probably incorporate a little bit more risk movement. But for now, we just want to use the arm going up and down like this. And you really want to think about the guitar pick gliding over the strings. And you might want to imagine that the guitar pick is a paintbrush and that you're just putting some paint on the wall. So you're just gliding that pick over the strings. So you don't want to stab at the strings really hard. You just want to be able to glide through. So let's try that without worrying about our left-hand and what it's doing on the neck. Just keep the strings open. It's not going to sound great, but just to get you used to strumming the pic across the strings. Now for now, let's not worry about doing upstroke, let's just worry about going down. So that would be something like this. And you can also try it with your hand just lightly resting on the strings. You not pushing down at all. You're just holding them so they're not really making a sound. Now it's really common for beginners when they're strumming to kinda strum away from the guitar and this sort of emotion. And you don't wanna do that because that's going to cause you to miss some of these high strings. So what you wanna do when that peak comes down over the strings to actually have the pick come into contact with the guitar rate here. So this part of the guitar is called a pick guard, and most guitars have them, and that's exactly what it is for. You're not going to damage your guitar at all. The pig can come down and actually hit that pick guard and not cause any problems. Now I recommend doing that for now again, after a while you're not going to consciously think about that. But right now you really want to focus on having that pick come across the strings and literally landing on the guitar body. 7. Part 6: The Left Hand: Now is look at the left-hand, as I mentioned earlier, when I'm talking about the fret. So the guitar, I'm talking about the space in-between these frets. So when we talk about the first fret, when talking about the space in between. Now when you play a note with your finger, you want that finger to be as close to that fret as you can, so you don't want it to be on top of the fret, but you want it to be pretty close. So you're not going to have to push as hard when your finger is close to the fret as you would if it was back here. So that's a really important part. It's gonna make your notes sound a lot cleaner. I'll demonstrate the difference in sound. If I play this note back here, I get that buzzing sound. And what that is, is the string actually buzzing against that fret, and that's how you get that buzzing sound. So if I move my finger forward, you can see how that note becomes a lot more clear as I've gotten really close to that fret, because now the string is coming into contact with that threatened. It's not buzzing and vibrating against it. So with all of our fingering that we do, we wanna make sure that that finger is as close to the fret as we can. So when we play a full chord, we're going to want to try and get those fingers as close to the fret as we can. Now, it won't always be possible because you'll have some fingers that'll be crowding out the other fingers. But that's the general rule that you want to think about when you're reading a note is you want that finger to be as close to the fret as you can get. Another really important part here is how we are gripping the neck. We don't want to grip it like we're holding a baseball bat with our thumb wrapped around like this. And then later on as you're playing, sometimes the thumb may come over and you may actually be able to use it to fret certain notes. Some people are able to do that. It's never really worked out very well for me because my fingers aren't that long. But if you've got larger hands especially then that could actually become something that's an advantage to use to be able to reach around with the thumb. But for the most part, you want to keep your thumb down back behind the neck and situated just roughly above the middle of the neck. Now there are certain chords that we're going to play that your thumb will naturally have to come up over top of the neck or at least kind of peek out from the top like this. And there's other styles of playing to that. As you get more experience if you're playing electric guitar and so on, and you're doing a string bending in that type of thing, where you'll bring your thumb up over top to get a little bit more strength. But for now, we're going to try and keep that thumb down close to the middle of the neck. And we also really want to try and play with the fingertips and not have our fingers light to flat because they'll come into contact with the other strings and prevent them from bringing out. So you wanna make sure that your fingers are playing with the fingertips on the string and that you've got a good curl around to your fingers. So in order to get that, you may need to make some adjustments with your wrist. You might need to push it out a little bit more or you may need to change your elbow. And that shouldn't be something that's super uncomfortable. It shouldn't cause you to contort your body a certain way. You shouldn't have to throw your elbow way out or turn your wrist way in. Your arm should fit fairly naturally on the guitar neck. If you put your arm down on your lap and you just raise your hand, it should be in roughly the right position, but you may need to make some minor adjustments in order to make sure that you're getting your fingertips on the strings. 8. Part 7: Your First Chords: Now let's look at how to play your first chord. So a chord in music is just simply a group of notes played together. Certain notes will sound better than other notes. So let's take a look at how to play your first court. This first chord that we're going to play is going to be a very simplified version of an E chord. So we're gonna take our index finger and we're gonna put it on the first fret of the G string. So that string is going to be the third one up from the bottom. And again, we wanna make sure that our fingers close to that fret and that we're playing with their finger tips. So we're going to play just these highest three strings. So if your finger is linked to flat, you're gonna get that sound. So again, just make sure you just move your risks may be forward a little bit. So you get all three of those notes coming out. And like I said, that's a simplified version of an E chord. Later on we'll get to a fully quarter, which will look something like that. But for now, you just want to get used to holding down the strings with your fingers. And now we're going to try a simplified version of an acorn. And all we're going to do for that is just move that index finger on the same string and move it up one fret and we're going to play those same three strings. And that is a simplified version of an a chord. So those two cores actually sound really nice, going back and forth between the two. And that's what I would recommend you do next. You play this E and then try the a. Now I'm strumming those up here with my hand just so you can see it on the camera, but really we should be back here. So that would look like this. Once you get a little bit more comfortable with that, then you can try strumming a little bit quicker. Now we're going to add another string and a couple more fingers. Let's take a look. We're going to build on that idea that we just had. So that index finger is gonna go in that same spot that we just had it. And now we're going to add our middle finger to the next string up And then one fret higher. So we're moving from fret one to fret to index finger's, their middle fingers there. And now we're going to be playing these four highest strings. Now again, that's an E chord. It is just again a simplified version of it. And now we're gonna make this into another a chord. Earlier what we did is moved this finger up one fret. Now we're gonna do the same idea, but instead of moving that index finger up, we're going to use our ring finger to play that note. So it's the same notes that we were just doing with our index finger. But now we're going to use our ring finger. And we're going to leave that middle finger on that New Note that we just introduced. So that's going to look like this. Here's that E chord. And then we're just going to leave these two guys right where they are. And we're just going to add this ring finger. And we'll get that back to the first one. Ring finger del. Technically, once we put that ring finger down, the index finger's not really doing anything anymore as far as the note is concerned, but it's a good anchor position for us so that we can just leave that where it is and not have to lift it off and put our fingers back down. 9. Part 8: Strumming Your First Chords: So now we're going to practice switching from one chord to another. And what we're gonna do is play each chord four times. Now, the reason that we're using the number four is typically that's how we would count music. So the beat of the music is when you listen to a song and you kind of tap your foot or nod your head, that's the beat of the music. And typically those beats are happening in groups of four. So we would count 1234123 four. And that would keep going. So for this exercise, what we're gonna do is play each of these chords in a group of four. And then you can decide what the beat is or what the tempo is, and start slowly. And then eventually you can get a little bit quicker. But that's going to look something like this. 1234. And then put our ring finger down, 1234 and take that ring finger off 1234, put the ring finger down on 234. The really important thing that you want to work on here is making that change from one chord to the other without stopping in between. So in the beginning it's very natural for you to play 1234 and then stop. Move your finger and then start again 1234. But what you want to get to is be able to make that change without changing the beat. So that continues. The 1234123412 act just keeps on going because if you're playing an actual song, that's how it needs to sound. You're not going to be able to have time to play four times and then take a break, switch your fingers, and then carry on. So what you really wanna do is try and get this arm with that strum. Keep going in that same tempo. So like we were talking about before, the tapping your foot in time, you want your arm to be doing that. That's going to take a little bit of time. But eventually what you want is sound like this. 123412341234. Now we're going to take those chords one step further so that you'll be able to strum all six strings. If we go back to this ii chord shape that we had. Now we're gonna make a couple of changes. We're going to move our middle finger up one string, and then we're gonna put our ring finger directly below it. So then we end up with this shape. So that's our middle finger on the second fret, our ring finger on the second fret of the next string down, and then our index finger back where it was before. So our ring finger now is where our middle finger was. And now we can play all six strings. And that's gonna give us a full E major chord. And now what we're gonna do to play that a chord is we're going to again leave that index finger rightward as we're not going to lift it off the neck. Well, we're going to move our middle finger and ring finger, both of them down to the next strings. And that's what we call an a2 chord. So for that chord, we're not going to play this low E string that we have. For the ii chord, we are going to play all six strings. For the a chord, we're only going to play these five strings. And the reason for that is because this is an E chord. And this is the E string. When we go to the a chord, we're playing the lowest note is the a string. So now we want to practice switching back and forth between those two chords. So we would count it the same way in groups of four. And that would sound like this. 1234123412341234. 10. Part 9: Changing Chords Smoothly: There's a couple of really important things to think about when you're switching from one chord to the other. One is you want to make sure that you don't lift your fingers off too far on the neck because that's just going to take you more time to come back down. So you want to make that movement as small as possible, so stay as low and as close to the strings as you can when you make that change. Also when we're moving from that E chord, a chord and back, we want to try and move these two fingers together at the same time. We don't want to move one finger and then the other one down. We want to try and move them together. Imagine that those two fingers are taped together and they have to move in that same shape. So another good thing to practice is Don't even worry about your strumming hand for now. Just practice switching your fingers back and forth and just work on getting those fingers to work together and move together and move in the smallest amount of distance that you possibly can. 11. Part 10: Adding Upstrokes to Your Strumming: Now we're going to look at how to add up strokes to your strum to make your changes a little bit smoother to make the chord sound a little bit smoother and a little more musical and a little less rough and rigid. Now the most important part about upstroke is knowing how to play them. And the main thing that you want to be concerned about when playing an upstroke is that you're only going to be catching the top two, maybe three strings. You're not going to be strumming all the way through all six strings, like you would on a downstream. You're only going to be getting the top, highest sounding strings. And you're also going to be giving it a little bit more of a risk motion instead of a full our movement, you are going to be just using the pic to kind of grab those two higher strings and kinda give it a little bit of a flick out. So that's going to look and sound like this. So now that you know how to do an upstroke, you need to learn when to do them. Now there's no specific rules about this, but there are some guidelines that will help you to fit those upstroke n. So earlier we were talking about how we count in music. We count in groups of 41234. And when we do that, we're counting what's called quarter notes because we're dividing this bar of music into 44 quarters. Now we're going to divide it further into eighths. And so if we were to count eighth notes, it would be 1234. And the important part here is that upstroke generally will fit best on the ads. So we're going to start really simply and we're going to play it upstroke on the and after four. So that's going to sound like this. 1234123. And once you're comfortable being able to do that on that E chord, now we're gonna try switching to that a chord and back to the E. And we're gonna put those up strokes on the and after four each time. That'll look like this. 12341234. To the other great thing about upstroke is that it really helps to smooth out our chord changes. Because we're only playing those top couple of strings, we can start moving our fingers off that first chord to the next chord while those high strings are ringing out. So it covers up a little bit as you make that change, I'll demonstrate that slowly for you now, 1234. And you can see that my hand is coming up, my fingers are coming off that chord as I'm playing that upstroke. And then they get into position on that next chord, just in time for me to hit another downstroke. I'm going to try and exaggerate the movement of my hand. So you can see exactly when that's happening on the upstroke. But like I said earlier, you wanna make sure when you're changing chords, you try and do as little movement as possible. But for the sake of demonstrating it, I'm going to try and exaggerate this movement, 1234234. So again, because we're only playing those high strings and they're the same notes for both of those chords. They can be ringing out while you're making the change with your fingers. And so that really helps to smooth out your chord changes. So now we're going to add in another upstroke on the And after two. And it'll sound like this. 12424223. 12. Part 11: The Most Popular Strumming Pattern: Now we're going to make a few more changes to really get a nice strumming pattern. And this strumming pattern is probably the most popular strumming pattern that guitar players use. And it's very useful for many different songs. You can usually make it fit for most songs. So the next thing we're gonna do is we're going to remove the downstream come on beat number three. But we're gonna keep that upstroke after two and after four. So that's going to look like this. 12341234. And so even though we're skipping beat number three, our arm is still moving, so we're still coming down on three, but we're just not letting the pick Hit the strings. So it's important to keep that motion still going. Now we want to try that with the two courts, 123412342341234. So we're almost there. The next thing we're gonna do is add in one more upstroke before for, so we're still leaving out beat number three. But we're going to add in one more upstroke on the end right before four. And that might sound confusing, but that's going to sound like this. 12341234. And once we get that up to speed, it would sound like this. So that is an extremely useful and very popular strumming pattern. So to combine the two courts together with that strumming pattern, that would sound like this. Now counting that out and skipping the three, it becomes quite confusing to do so another way that you can think about the strumming pattern is simply down, down, up, up, down, up, down, down, up, up, down, up. And you'll hear it referred to that way if you're watching other videos, are talking to other guitar players, they will talk about that strumming pattern in that way. Once you practice it enough, it'll just become natural. You won't have to think about the counting or down, up, down, up. You'll just be able to play it and you'll be able to feel it and it'll sound great. 13. Part 12: More Strumming Patterns: The first one's going to be fairly simple. All we're gonna do is add an upstroke on the And after three and after four. And that's going to sound like this. 12341234. And now again, that's one that you should practice with, just one chord. And then once you're familiar with that, then try adding in that second court. So for the two chords together, it would sound like this. 12341234234234. For this next one, we're going to be leaving LB number three, but we are going to be playing all the other eighth notes. So that's going to sound like this. 12341234. So remember you wanna keep that are moving even though we're not playing on beat Number three, we're still moving on number three. So we're still doing a downward motion. We're just not coming into contact with the strings on bead number three. So adding in that second chord, that one would sound like this. You don't always have to change chords after four beats. Sometimes a chord will last for two bars or three bars or four bars. The important thing to know is that that sequence that we're playing equals one bar. So if you're staying on the cord for two bars, then you would play that same sequence two times before you would switch. We showed an example of what that looks like. Okay. 14. Part 13: Adding 16th Notes: For this next one, we're going to be introducing 16th notes. Now previously we've talked about quarter notes, 1234, eighth notes 1234. And, and now we're going to look at 16th notes. 16th notes are counted like this, one, E and 2340. And that might sound a little bit funny, but that's an easy way for us to hear how we're dividing each of those beats up into smaller segments. Now as far as how that sounds with our strumming hand, it's going to be something like this, 11. And so it's still just a combination of playing downs and ups, but now we're just adding in more of them in that same space to create this next really popular strumming pattern, we're going to add those 16th notes in after beat three and beat four. So that would sound like this, 1234. And now a little bit more up to speed would be like this. When we play with 16th notes and our strum powder, we don't have to play all four of those 16th notes every time. So now we're going to look at another strumming pattern that uses 16th notes, but we skip a couple of them. So I was explaining how we count one, y0 and, and that would be all four of those 16th notes. A very common way to play 16th notes is to skip that e. So instead of one E and we would have one. And so what we're gonna do for this strumming pattern is played 1234. And so that's going to sound like this. 1234123 for n. And a little bit quicker would be like this. Spend some time with those strumming patterns, become really familiar with how to play them. And then in the next lesson, we're going to look at some more chords that you can use those strumming patterns with. 15. Part 14: More Beginner Chords: Now we're going to look at a few more chords and then apply those strumming patterns to those courts. The first chord we're going to look at is a G major chord, and that's gonna look like this. Now there's a number of different ways to play a G major chord. The way that I'm going to show you here is how I recommend it. And I'll explain why as we go along. We'll start with our middle finger on the third fret of the low E string. And then our index finger will go on the second fret of the next string. Then we'll leave the next two strings open. That our ring finger goes on the third fret, the B string, and our pinky finger directly below it on the high E string. So we end up with this. Like we've talked about with the other chords. Make sure that you get a good curl around to your fingers so that you're playing with your fingertips. So you don't block out those open strings or interfere with any of the other notes too, as you strum through that chord, if you end up getting that kind of a sound, then make some adjustments with your wrist and your arm until you're getting your fingers playing with just the fingertips. So in this case, this index finger was lying too flat and it was making this open string clunky. So I was getting this that sound once I bring my hand around so that my fingers are playing with the fingertips. Then the fingers get out of the way of those other strings and the chord sounds a lot smoother. You may have learned a G chord before and you may have seen the fingering just a little bit different. Sometimes these two notes appear not both played. Sometimes you would play the rest of the chord the same way, but you would have just your ring finger down on this highest note. And that's correct. That is also a way to play a G major chord. You could also play that with the pinky finger and have your ring finger up. Those are also G chords, but I usually recommend playing the cord this way with both of these fingers down. And the reason for that is there's other chords that we're going to learn that have those fingers in that same spot. And so it makes it really nice and easy for making chord changes. If you have those fingers in the same position for different chords, makes it changes a lot smoother. So now let's move on to the second court. Now this one is going to be what's called a C add nine. And the nice thing about this chord is it looks identical to this G chord, except we're going to move our index and middle finger both down one string, everything else stays the same. So that sounds like this. For that core, we don't want to play this low E string. So typically what I will do is use my middle finger just to nudge up against that low E string to keep it from ringing. So if my pick hits that string, it's not going to ring out. So you can actually strum all six strings. For now, it's important to know that a C89 chord is a version of C major chord. So if you're looking at a chord chart online, you're trying to learn a song and it says C major. You can substitute a C89 chord for that C Major and it will sound great. The exception to that would be if the song you're learning uses specific notes from the C Major chord. So if it was some sort of a finger picking type of thing that needed to have some of those notes from a regular C-Major chord, then the C89 may not work. But for most cases, when you're strumming, the C89 chord will fit perfectly. 16. Part 15: More Strumming Patterns and a New Chord: The first thing we wanna do is practice the core change from that G chord to that c ct. And like I said, that's a nice easy change because the court looks identical. These two fingers are going to stay in the same position and we're just going to move these two fingers down one string. So let's practice changing from the G chord to the C chord using that strumming pattern that we learned that went like this, down, down, up, up, down, up. So let's play that strumming pattern with these chords will play two bars of g and then two bars of c. So that sequence, we're going to play two times for each chord. So that's going to sound like this. Now let's have a look at the third chord we're going to learn today. This is the D Major chord, and that's going to look like this. For the D Major chord, we don't want to play these two lowest strings, so the E string and the string, we just want to skip over those and we're going to start on the D string and move down. So for the fingering on this chord, you'll notice that the ring finger is in that same spot that it was for the two other chords. And again, that's why I recommend playing the G chord this way. And that C89 this way, because that enables you to keep that ring finger there for all three of these chords. Next, what we wanna do is move our index finger To the second fret on the next string up. And then our middle finger is going to go on the second fret of the high E string. So together, it looks like this. Again, make sure that you're playing with your fingertips, especially this ring finger, because it has a tendency to lay a little bit flat and it may cause that high E string to not come out properly. So make sure that you've got a good curl around to those fingers. You're playing with your fingertips, like we've talked about before, when you're changing from one chord to another, you want to try and make as little movement as possible to don't lift your fingers too far off the string is try and lead them low so that you're not having to move very far. And it's good to practice changing chords from one to another without even strumming. Just sit there with a guitar and start moving your fingers from one chord to another and work on getting those shapes quickly and easily. What might help you is to keep that pinky finger down and just work on moving back and forth with just these two fingers first. And once you have those moving quickly and smoothly, then you can work on lifting the pinky finger off. Now let's practice going from G to D with that same strumming pattern we're just using. If that was a little bit quick, you can slow that down and take it at your own pace. The other thing you can do is simplify that strumming pattern for now, the more important thing is to be able to make those chord changes really smoothly and quickly. So if you want, you could go back and just do strictly downstream comes just 1234 and then switch to the next chord, or go eight times counter for twice, and then switch to the next chord. Make it really simple. Don't try and take on too much at once, simplify things, get comfortable with that, and then move on to something a little bit more complicated. 17. Part 16: Putting the Chords Together: Now it's time for us to put all three of those courts together. We're going to play a chord progression of G to D to C. And this is going to be just like it's done in Knocking on Heaven's Door. Let's take a look at that. The strumming pattern we're using for this is the same one that we learned when we're playing 123 for NDA. So in other words, that's down, down, down, up, down, down, down, up. For this core progression, we're going to play that strumming pattern one time through for the G chord, and then one time through for the D chord, and then two times through for the C chord. So technically what we're doing here is we're playing half a bar of G, half a bar of d, And then a full bar of c. So I'll count that out for you. So you can see how that looks. 123123412, the 3401234. And as I mentioned with those three chords and the strumming patterns that we've learned, you can play a lot of different songs. You can mix up the order of the chords, whether you play from G to D or G to C, or start on D and then go to C, whatever combination you want to use to come up with different cells. Here's some examples of what you can do with those three chords. You might recognize some famous songs. Okay? Okay. 18. Part 17: Three More chords: In the last lesson, we were looking at a G major chord and a C add nine chord. And I was talking about how these two fingers stay in that same position for both of those chords, which makes it really nice and easy to change from one chord to another. This next chord that we're going to learn is an E minor seven chord, and it also uses those same two notes. So we're going to start with those two fingers where they were. Pinky finger on the third fret of the high string, the ring fingers right above it on the B string. And then our index finger is gonna go on the second fret of the a string. And our middle finger is going to go right below it on the second fret of the D string. And that gives us an E minor seven. Now just so you know, if you play without your pinky and ring finger on and played just these two notes. That is irregular, E minor chord. So that's a bonus chord that you're learning right now. But we're going to work on keeping those two fingers down because we're going to keep those fingers for these other chords so it makes the chord changes easier for you. But let's work on changing from that E minor seven chord to that G major chord. That would look like this. Now you can see, like I've mentioned before, it's a very small movement to go from one chord to another. And we want to try make that movement as smallest possible so that we can make the chord change quick and smooth. So from that E minor court, all we're gonna do is lift off our middle finger and place it on this genome. Now as we do that, we want to slide our fingers forward a little bit in order to get that note. But other than that, we don't want to lift off this finger because you're just gonna have to put it back down in the same spot. We don't want to lift these fingers because they don't need to move. So that makes the core change pretty quick and easy. All you're gonna do is liftoff that middle finger, move it up to that genome. So I would recommend just work on practicing that change even without strumming. Just work on getting that change to be quick and smooth. Once you're able to do that, then add in some strumming. Right now we'll keep it really basic with just doing downstrokes. Now just there I was playing for Ostrom's for each chord. But earlier I was just playing drums on each court. And that's what we're going to need for the song that we're going to learn later on. So work on that next to strummed on each court. The next chord we're going to learn is called a D sus four chord. Now we're not going to get into the theory behind why it's called that. But if you are interested in learning more about music theory than check out our website studio 33 guitar.com. We have more lessons and courses on there that dig deep into music theory. This D sus four quarters is going to look and sound like this. So this is just like the decor that we've already learned, which look like that. That was in the last lesson. Now all we're gonna do is put our pinky finger down in that same spot where we've had it for that G chord, the C at nine and now this E minor seven chord. So those same two notes. And then we're going to lift off that middle finger because we don't need it down anymore. So then we end up with this. So now we're gonna work on going from E minor to G to this new D chord. Let's try to strummed on E minor, 2t drums on g, and then force drums on this nu D chord. Now we're ready to move on to the third core to this one is going to be called an A7 SAS for it probably sounds a little bit harder than it actually is. Let's take a look. The A7 sus four chord looks like this. So this one looks a lot like that E minor seven chord that we did. But we're just moving the index and middle finger both down to the next set of strength or E minor look like this. This A7 sus four, looks like that. Now let's add in that a cord to these other ones. So we're going to start with the E minor seven to G to D, two that a chord. And we're gonna be playing two beats on each court. And then we're going to make it a little bit more interesting sounding by changing our strumming pattern. Now let's make the strumming pattern a little bit more interesting. And you'll probably start to recognize what song this is. Where you're able to guess which song we're learning. The bonus here is we're actually learning to songs because they have the exact same core progression. The first one is Wonderwall by Oasis. The other one is boulevard of broken dreams by Green Day. So you may have been able to hear both of those songs in there. If you didn't, then go back and listen again and try and sing both of those songs. Along with the core changes. The core changes are identical in both songs. And if you try and play along with the original recordings, you'll find that these chords don't quite sound right? And that's because the originals are in a different key, then what we're playing in right now. But if you have a guitar Cato, you can put that on the neck and then be able to play along with the originals. For Wonderwall, you would put the cable on the second fret. For boulevard of broken dreams. You put the cable on the first fret. But you can play these exact same chord shapes that we were just doing, but with the kapo, that'll help you to play along with the original, Also the strumming patterns on those two songs, maybe a little bit different than what we're playing right now. But this will still fit. It'll just be more of a simplified version. Let's take a look at that Strom now. So this Strom is going to be the same as one that we learned in a previous lesson. We are going to be playing 1234 NDA, down, down, down, up, down, down, down, up. So I would recommend just getting that strum pattern down with just one chord for now and then start adding in the other ones. Once you're comfortable with that strung, then start adding in the other courts. So far with the chords that you've learned in the strumming patterns that we've learned, you can now play literally hundreds or thousands of songs. 19. Part 18: Strumming in 6/8: If you've been trying to learn some different songs and you're wondering why your standard strumming pattern is not working and it's not fitting with the song. It could be because the song is in 68 time. The majority of popular songs are in 44 time, but there are a lot of popular songs that are in 68. Some examples of popular songs in 68 timing would be, We Are The Champions by Queen, iris, by Google dolls, hallelujah by Jeff Buckley. Nothing else matters. By Metallica, Norwegian wood by the Beatles, kiss from arose by seal and House of the Rising Sun by the animals. If you've watched some of my other videos about strumming, you've seen how I count music. One, 234. That would be for a song that is in 44 time. For a song that's in 68 time, we would count in groups of six. The really important particle getting the 68 time feel is there is an emphasis on beat one and beat four. So we don't count it straight. We would count it with a bit of a swing. So it would be 123456123456. And that's a really important part to get a handle on how to strum a 68 time. If you just merely count to six, it's still not going to quite feel right. You've gotta have that little bit of a swing in there. I'm going to show you a few different popular ways to strum 68. Let's zoom in a little bit and have a look. The first thing you wanna do is just get a really good feel for that 68 time. Again, we want to put those emphasis on 14. So without playing any cords and just holding the strings with our hand, let's try strumming that 68 field. It would sound like this, 123456123456. Now let's try playing that with a G chord. One bar of 68 time would be that full count of six beats. If we were to play a G chord for one bar and an E minor chord for one bar that would sell like this. 123456123456123456. That's the basic idea of a 6-8 strum, but now let's add in strokes to make it sound a little bit more interesting. If you've seen some of my previous lessons, then you know that when we count strumming patterns, sometimes we will add in eighth notes by counting ands after each number. So 123 end, and typically those ends are where we add in up strokes. So for this first strumming pattern, we're going to add the upstroke on the and after five and after six. Let's take a look at that slowly. 123456123456. And a little bit quicker would be like this. With that GND chord, it would sound like this. Now we're going to add in a couple of more upstroke. So we're gonna put them after two and after three. So again, slowly, that would sound like this. 123456123456. A little bit quicker would sound like this. This next one is probably the most popular strumming pattern for 68. We're going to skip beats two and beat five. So slowly, that's going to sell like this. 123456123456. And a little bit quicker, that would be like this, 123456123456. And if you find counting that a little bit tricky, you can also think about this strung in terms of ups and downs. So this one would be down, up, down, up, down, up, down, up. Now once you get the feel for 68, you won't need to count it and you won't need to be thinking about that down, up, down. You'll just be able to feel it a little bit quicker. And with that G chord and the minor chord, that would sound like this. Okay?