Python 3: A Beginners Guide to Python Programming | Tony Staunton | Skillshare

Python 3: A Beginners Guide to Python Programming

Tony Staunton, Reading, writing and teaching.

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128 Lessons (7h 25m)
    • 1. Welcome to Beginners Python 3

      1:56
    • 2. Skillshare 101: Getting the Most From This Course

      3:13
    • 3. Topics covered in this course

      2:20
    • 4. How to install Python

      3:08
    • 5. An Introduction to Python variables

      2:24
    • 6. Python strings introduction

      4:04
    • 7. How to concatenate strings in Python

      5:29
    • 8. Using Python's string title() method

      4:39
    • 9. The Python find() method

      5:10
    • 10. The Python lower() method

      1:44
    • 11. The Python replace method

      3:05
    • 12. The Python strip() method

      3:48
    • 13. How to add new lines and tabs in Python

      1:33
    • 14. Working with integers in Python

      2:42
    • 15. Working with floats in Python

      1:14
    • 16. How to convert numbers to strings

      4:39
    • 17. What are Python comments

      2:03
    • 18. Introduction to Python lists

      5:54
    • 19. How to edit lists in Python

      6:29
    • 20. Adding comments to our lists

      3:31
    • 21. Pythons pop() method

      10:20
    • 22. How to organize a list in Python

      5:09
    • 23. How to find the length of a list in Python

      2:20
    • 24. Looping through a list in Python

      5:57
    • 25. An introduction to numerical lists in Python

      0:52
    • 26. Python's range() function

      1:50
    • 27. Working with lists of numbers in Python

      4:29
    • 28. Slicing a list

      3:33
    • 29. Looping through a slice

      2:02
    • 30. Copying a list in Python

      1:39
    • 31. What is Indentation?

      1:32
    • 32. An introduction to Python's input statement

      3:21
    • 33. Python's if statement

      2:48
    • 34. Conditional tests with Python's if statement

      2:51
    • 35. When values are not equal to each other

      1:58
    • 36. Comparing numbers in Python

      2:02
    • 37. Python's and condition

      3:08
    • 38. Python's or condition

      3:17
    • 39. The Python in keyword

      3:37
    • 40. Not in keyword

      2:43
    • 41. If elif else chain

      5:03
    • 42. Multiple conditions

      3:11
    • 43. If with lists

      7:31
    • 44. Muliptle lists

      3:12
    • 45. An Introduction to Python dictionaries

      2:56
    • 46. An Introduction to Python dictionaries Part 2

      2:14
    • 47. In operator

      6:18
    • 48. Get method

      1:51
    • 49. Editing del dictionary

      2:53
    • 50. Looping through a dictionary

      6:09
    • 51. Other ways to loop dictionary

      2:58
    • 52. Using dict in list

      6:24
    • 53. List in dictionary

      4:57
    • 54. Input prompt 2

      2:06
    • 55. While loops 1

      1:42
    • 56. Quiting a program

      1:53
    • 57. Using a flag

      3:43
    • 58. Break statement

      3:23
    • 59. Continue statement

      2:20
    • 60. Lists in a while loop

      6:14
    • 61. Remove from list

      2:39
    • 62. Dictionary with user inout

      6:34
    • 63. Functions intro

      2:21
    • 64. Passing info to function

      2:22
    • 65. Passing arguments

      0:50
    • 66. Positional arguments

      4:13
    • 67. Keyword arguments

      3:05
    • 68. Keyword arguments

      3:05
    • 69. Default values

      4:19
    • 70. Return value

      4:06
    • 71. Optional argument

      5:31
    • 72. Return a dictionary

      3:41
    • 73. While loop

      6:36
    • 74. Books available

      2:56
    • 75. Passengers function

      7:56
    • 76. Not modyifing a list

      1:54
    • 77. Arbitary arguments

      2:31
    • 78. Arbitary arguments 2

      2:14
    • 79. Passenger seats

      3:22
    • 80. Arbitrary keyword arguments

      4:40
    • 81. Importing full module

      4:53
    • 82. Importing specific functions

      5:24
    • 83. Function alias

      1:53
    • 84. Module aslias

      1:20
    • 85. All functions

      0:58
    • 86. Class introduction

      1:30
    • 87. Book class

      5:20
    • 88. Init method

      3:09
    • 89. Instance of a class

      2:37
    • 90. Accessing attributes

      2:55
    • 91. Calling methods

      5:56
    • 92. Multiple instances

      1:40
    • 93. Ereader class

      7:58
    • 94. Attribute default value

      3:30
    • 95. Modify directly

      2:05
    • 96. Modify through a method

      2:33
    • 97. Imcrement attributes

      3:22
    • 98. Inheritance

      8:12
    • 99. Child methods

      4:30
    • 100. Override methods

      3:02
    • 101. Instances as attributes

      6:10
    • 102. Import a single class

      3:58
    • 103. Multiple classes in a module

      3:31
    • 104. Multiple classes from a module

      3:57
    • 105. Import an entire module

      1:23
    • 106. All classes from module

      0:45
    • 107. Working with files in Python

      1:13
    • 108. Reading entire file

      3:57
    • 109. File paths

      3:28
    • 110. Reading line by line

      2:45
    • 111. Making a list from a file

      2:28
    • 112. Working with a files contents

      2:44
    • 113. Writing to an empty file

      2:31
    • 114. Appending to a file

      3:38
    • 115. An introduction to exceptions and errors

      0:53
    • 116. Zero division error

      0:53
    • 117. Try except block

      1:40
    • 118. Handling exceptions

      5:43
    • 119. What to do when a file is not found

      2:02
    • 120. Analyzing text

      4:48
    • 121. Multiple files

      2:43
    • 122. Failing silently

      1:21
    • 123. Json dump function

      2:52
    • 124. Jason load method

      1:54
    • 125. Storing & reading data in Python

      7:04
    • 126. What is refactoring?

      0:42
    • 127. Testing your code in Python 

      9:08
    • 128. Conclusion & Thank You!

      1:27
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Project Description

============================= Start of June Student Challenge =========================

Hi All,

I have been busy creating my next course which will teach students about Python and data science.

In the meantime, to keep your Python muscles flexing here is June's Student Challenge.

This month, your challenge is to create a file manager program. The program should display a list of options that allow you to:

  1. read a file
  2. write to a file
  3. append to a file
  4. delete a file
  5. list the contents of a directory

Extra bonus points if your program can:

  1. check if a file/directory exists
  2. can move a file
  3. can copy a file
  4. create a new directory
  5. check what operating system a user is running
  6. display date and time

This challenge requires four modules:

  • Shutil
  • OS
  • Time
  • subprocess

This month's challenge is a stretch and builds on the January challenge. With this in mind there will be two winners from submitted challenges.

  • The first winner must complete points 1 - 5. Chosen at random this winner will receive a $50 Amazon gift card.
  • The second winner must complete points 1 - 5 and at least points 1 - 3 of the bonus section. This winner will also be chosen at random and will receive a $100 Amazon gift card.

It's a big one! Here is a screen shot of my file output for some inspiration

6bcf3a87

Also if you would like some help and pointers I will at random post code snippets to my Instagram page.

Each time I post a code snippet I will update the source file on my GitHub account to help you along.

This challenge has been posted in the projects section of all my Python courses so please submit your code there.

I hope that I have explained this months challenge clearly but if you have any questions please feel free to ask.

Good luck!

Tony.

============================= End of June Student Challenge =========================

January Student Challenge

Hi All,

Welcome to this months student challenge and the first of 2019. Last month was our first challenge and as promised I will be running student challenges every month in 2019.

For new students these challenges are designed to help reinforce what you learn in my Python classes. There will be two winners of this months challenge, each receiving a $50 Amazon Gift Card. The challenge will close on January 30th and two winners will be chosen at random on January 31st.

So, what is this months challenge?

By now you know that I am a massive book worm, so your challenge is to create a book storage application. The application should allow users to manage their book collection.

To complete the challenge your application will need to have three main features:

1. It must allow users to add new books to the collection

2. The application must allow users to view all the books in their collection

3. The application must allow users to find a book within their collection by any of its attributes

Here are some pointers to get you started

Books should be dictionaries, and you can define the structure of the dictionary to be anything you like. For example you could choose to have books as dictionaries with the following keys:

{

    'name': 'Elon Musk',

    'author': 'Ashlee vance',

    'genre': 'biography'

}

Or you may choose to have more keys, such as:

{

    'name': 'Elon Musk',

    'author': 'Ashlee vance',

    'genre': 'biography',

    'publisher': 'virgin',

    'published date': '2015'

}

How should books be stored?

This is up to you, to complete the challenge a user should be able to print them to the screen, find and retrieve them. I would suggest that you use a list. If you are comfortable using files then you could go with that option.

How to find moves.

With your structure defined, users should be able to "find all books published in 2015" or "find all movies that are biographies". To do this users should be able to tell your application what property they are looking for, is it name, genre, published date or something else. A user should also be able to tell your application Elon Musk, or biography for the examples above.

With both property and the value, a user should be able to find all books that match both. The challenge does not close until January 30th so you have plenty of time to think about your solution. 

If you need any help, just ask in the community section of the class and I'll be happy to help. 

Best of luck,

Tony.

Student Projects

Fama Uzi
Data Science Courses
Matt Powell
Daphne Hegedus Jan 2019 Monthly Project
January Student Challenge
Tomasz Mituta