Procreate for Beginners | Teela Cunningham | Skillshare
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27 Lessons (2h 37m)
    • 1. Procreate for Beginners

      2:08
    • 2. Getting Started/What You'll Learn

      7:19
    • 3. Class Bonuses + Install Instructions

      8:08
    • 4. Creating a New Document + Understanding Resolution

      6:02
    • 5. Interface Basics: Using + Editing Brushes

      7:42
    • 6. Interface Basics: Quick Shapes

      1:20
    • 7. Interface Basics: Color Builds + Palettes

      4:41
    • 8. Interface Basics: Preferences Overview

      4:33
    • 9. Interface Basics: Guides + Rotational Symmetry

      5:21
    • 10. Interface Basics: Layers + Blend Modes

      5:35
    • 11. Interface Basics: Making, Moving + Editing Selections

      1:57
    • 12. Interface Basics: Using + Editing Typeable Text

      6:44
    • 13. Project FLORAL: Setting Text + Background Color

      4:38
    • 14. Project FLORAL: Adding Details + Organizing Layers

      7:22
    • 15. Project FLORAL: Final Details/Finishing the Project

      7:33
    • 16. Masking in Procreate: Clipping Masks

      5:33
    • 17. Masking in Procreate: Layer Masks

      7:14
    • 18. Project LOOPY: Setting Text + Intertwining Flourishes

      5:10
    • 19. Project LOOPY: Masking + Final Details

      7:25
    • 20. Lettering Tips: Brush Settings to Look for

      8:10
    • 21. Lettering Tips: Preparing Lettering for Font Making

      8:25
    • 22. Project SHADE: Creating + Applying Multiple Colors to Lettering

      4:39
    • 23. Project SHADE: Adding Depth + Texture

      7:13
    • 24. Final Project BEAUTY: Preparing Your Template + Editing Guides

      6:44
    • 25. Final Project BEAUTY: Completing Wreath + Adding Lettering

      8:30
    • 26. Exporting Options + Final Steps: How to Export Your Design

      3:55
    • 27. Exporting Options + Final Steps: Thank You + Next Steps

      2:31
239 students are watching this class

About This Class

Procreate is now one of the most popular apps for creating artwork on an iPad. With its similarities to Photoshop, it’s no surprise that with every new update, the app becomes that much more powerful. If you’re new to procreate or not an avid Photoshop user, those updates can get pretty overwhelming. That’s where this course comes in.

In Procreate for Beginners, we break down all the most important tools, in the most digestible way. We begin with mini tutorials describing tools and techniques for an efficient workflow without the confusion. After a series of mini tutorials, we create a project together using those same tools to increase confidence. The repetition of using those tools on a real project also helps to make future projects a breeze.

We’ll complete 4 main projects together that focus on layer order, color palettes, brush settings, editable text, clipping masks and layer masks, blending effects and depth, lettering for art and lettering for future font making, as well as symmetry, blend modes, export options and next steps for your Procreate art.

Through this class, you’ll also receive some procreate bonuses! Included in the course are two custom Procreate brushes, every color palette for our different projects, a transparent png texture and a metallic silver jeweled texture, free lettering guides and every Procreate project file if you ever need to reference them in the future.

Whether you’re brand new to Procreate or have been an avid user that could use some additional workflow tips, this course was created for you.

Transcripts

1. Procreate for Beginners: Procreate is now one of the most popular apps for creating artwork on an iPad. With its similarities to Photoshop, it's no surprise that with every new update the app becomes that much more powerful. If you're new to Procreate or not an avid Photoshop user, those updates can get pretty overwhelming. That's where this course comes in. In Procreate For Beginners, we break down all the most important tools in the most digestible way. We begin with mini tutorials describing tools and techniques for an efficient workflow without the confusion. After a series of mini tutorials, we create a project together using those same tools to increase confidence. The repetition of using those tools on a real project also helps to make future projects a breeze. My name is [inaudible] and I've been creating Procreate lettering and artwork ever since the very first version of Procreate was released, I've also made my career as a graphic designer, creating artwork for both large and small companies. I spent over a decade of daily use in Photoshop. In this course, I'm sharing the best practices for creating our artwork efficiently, non-destructively, and production ready, no matter the use. We'll complete four main projects together that focus on layer order, color palettes, brush settings, editable text, clipping masks and layer masks, blending effects and depth, lettering for art and lettering for future font making, as well as symmetry, blend modes, export options, and next steps for your Procreate art. When you enroll, you'll also receive some Procreate bonuses. Included in the course are two custom Procreate brushes, every color palette for a different projects, a transparent PNG texture, and a metallic silver jewel texture, free lettering guides, and every Procreate project file if you ever need to reference them in the future. Whether you're brand new to Procreate, or had been an avid user that could use some additional workflow tips, this course was created for you. Hit "Enroll" to start creating the Procreate artwork you've always wanted to today. 2. Getting Started/What You'll Learn: Hello, and welcome to Procreate for Beginners. I'm so glad that you're here. Just to kick things off, I want to give you a basic overview of what your expectations for the class should be, what's included, and what you'll learn. So we'll start off with what you'll learn. I'm going to walk you through from the very beginning, opening Procreate for the very first time, how to create a new document, create custom document or Canvas sizes, as well as resolution for those files. Resolution, your file is made up of tiny little squares that are called pixels, this is a pixel based program. Many times users get frustrated because their edges get really blurry. Those pixels, if you create artwork and then you scale up that artwork later on, you can get really blurry edges so resolution determines how many of those squares are in your Canvas. We're going to walk through all of those settings, my best recommendations, my exact file sizes so you can copy exactly what I'm doing and you never have to worry about those blurry edges in the future. We'll also talk about file stacks. That's a way of grouping your files together or putting them into folders, Procreate calls them files stacks so I'm going to show you exactly how to do that. We also cover a lot of Procreate's interface in many tutorials. So we're covering brushes, quick shapes, colors, preferences, guides, rotational symmetry, which is really fun. All kinds of different layers settings including blend modes, how to make selections and manipulate those selections, inserting typeable texts, how to change that text, and also how to install your own custom fonts in Procreate, as well as inserting images and graphics. I've included two different texture file types for this class in the bonus section, there's a JPEG and a transparent PNG. I'm going to show you how to import them and save them onto your iPad. We'll also be talking about masking in Procreate. There are two types of masking that you can do. There are clipping masks and layer masks. You can actually apply a layer mask to a clipping mask. We can take things a lot further, which is really exciting. I'm going to walk you through exactly how to use each one of these, when to use each one of these and how each one of them is different from the other. We're going to talk about lettering as well. Many Procreate users myself included, use the program for our hand lettering. So I'm going to show you my best tips in my settings for converting any of your standard default brushes into a lettering brush that you can use for any of your artwork. I'm also walking you through how to prepare your lettering for font making. If font making is something you'd like to do in the future, you can use the lettering you create in Procreate to convert to a workable sellable font. You'll need a computer to do that part of it but I'm going to show you how to prepare all of your lettering in Procreate so it's good to go if you want to make a font out of it later. Then finally, we'll talk about exporting the different types of files depending on what you plan on using them for, my recommendations and how to export and where to save those files. The class projects that we're going to be creating together after these tools tutorials, we follow it up with a project tutorial to increase your confidence in the tools and the program as well as your memory of the tool so you know exactly where they are, how they behave, and when to use them. So the first project we create, we're going to start with more simple projects and work up to being more complex towards the end of the class. So the first project is what I'm calling floral. You're going to set your own typeable texts. We're going to apply color to different elements. We're going to use multiple layers, a brush and group those different layers together so we have a super organized file. So if you export it later on, everything will be ridiculously organized and perfect for handing off to someone else or just keeping for yourself if you just want to edit it later, you'll know exactly where everything is located. In project number two, we're going to get a little more complex by integrating both clipping mask and layer mask. We're still sticking with some typeable texts, but we're also integrating textures and utilizing blend modes, which can get really fun. We're actually applying a blend mode to our texture. Even though these are basic concepts, once you start pairing them together, your layout can get more and more complex. It can look complex, but it's not complex to create. In our third project, I'm calling shade. We're using a custom lettering brush that we customize together in the video before it. We're going to use that brush for some custom lettering. We're going to create something called stackable clipping mask, which is really cool and really fun to use. We're also going to be using layer mask once again for these lettering shadows to simulate depth, you can see the lettering looks like it's popping up a little bit so we're going to create that exact outcome together and then finish it all off by putting some texture in our lettering using a clipping mask in a background glow to really add focus to the piece. Our final project of the class, I'm calling it beauty. It's a reef design so we're using multiple guides. We're actually using all of our guides. We're using quadrant, radial, horizontal, and vertical. You'll see exactly what that means once you get into the project. We're using rotational symmetry with those guys, which makes wreath creation super-fast and really fun to create. We're going to create our own template so we've got a perfect circle for our wreath to be centered on and we're utilizing multiple layers once again, layer groups, hand lettering, textures, blend modes, and clipping mask so we're packing everything in at the very end. This class also comes with a bunch of bonuses. I didn't want to leave you hanging. You've got all these assets. You can use them with the class and you can use them on whatever you create outside of the class. It's totally fine by me. You just can't redistribute them as if they're your own, but that goes without saying. The first freebie is two free Procreate brushes, my custom monoweight brushes, my most popular Procreate brush by far. So you're getting that one. It does not have a texture in it. It's really nice for those small details. I use it all the time for my lettering and for all of my floral and leafy doodles. Then I've got a flat marker brush that does have texture. This one works really well for hand lettering. I'm also including those two free textures I mentioned earlier. There's an ink texture that's a transparent PNG and a silver jeweled texture that is a JPEG. We're going to talk about how to use both of them and when to use both of them and also how to save them onto your iPad. I'm including three of my favorite lettering guides that you can use in Procreate. You can use this to practice your lettering in keeping everything uniform and consistent. This is also super handy if you plan on converting your hand lettering into a font later on. Because of that consistency, it'll look similar in style and it will look like a family that's perfect for when you convert it into a font. I'm also including all of the original project Procreate files. If you follow along and you get to a place where you feel a little bit stuck and you're not sure how your layer should be organized, you can go ahead and open up one of the original project files and you can dissect it. You can manipulate different items. So I've included all four of those original project files, the exact files that were created from the videos that you're watching. Those are the files that are right in the bonus section for you. Then finally, I'm giving you all the project color pallets. You can use them to follow along exactly with all the project videos. You can also use any of these palettes for any projects you create in the future too. Finally, we have a class hashtag in it is #PROCREATEIT. So all one word procreate it. I would love if you use this for any artwork that you've created from this class, that you posting on social media, please tag me. My handle is @EVERYTUESDAY so I can send it some love. So that said, let's hop into video number one. 3. Class Bonuses + Install Instructions: In this video, I'm going to walk you through where all of your class bonuses are located and how to install everything that came with this class. You want to go to every-tuesday.com/procreate- bonuses. That's a secret page that I've set up for you that has all the bonuses on it. I'm going to show you the differences between installing your bonuses from Safari if you're using that as your browser versus Chrome if that's your browse. I'm just going to jump over there right now into Safari. When you go to that URL that I gave you, this is what's going to show up and you can filter your bonuses up here just by tapping on them and you can go through them all. I've also included this brush install guide. If you don't want to refer to this video in the future, it's right here for installing your brushes. We're going to talk about installing brushes first, I'm going to show you how to install the mono weight brush in Safari and the flat marker brush in Chrome that we can see the differences between the two. What you want to do is you're just going to tap on the image first and then you're going to hit this download icon. If you hit the magnifying icon, it's just going to make this image bigger for you. I'll show you what that looks like. That's not going to download it, you need to tap on it and then hit this icon right here. I'm going to tap on that and then it's going to download and then all you're going to do is hit open and procreate and it'll bring it right in and in your brushes up here, this icon, you're going to come all the way down to the bottom category where it says imported and it'll show right here and then you can just start using it right away. Then I'm going to hop into Chrome to download the flat marker brush. This is the same exact page in Chrome and you're going to do the same exact thing. Just tap on the image, hit the download icon, it's going to download, but it looks like nothing changed. It's actually right down here. There's a little pop-up that'll show up. You want to hit download when that appears and then after it downloads, it's going to change to open in, tap on the open in and then choose copy to procreate. After you do that, it'll be located in the exact same spot. The imported category down here and you'll see the flat marker brush right here. You can see, you can start using it right away. The most recent downloaded brush will appear first in this list, since this was the last one we downloaded, that's why it's showing up first right there. Now, we're going to go download our other freebies that came with the class. I'm back into Safari right now, so the next thing are these lettering guides. We're going to talk about these later in the class when we discuss lettering for font making in procreate. But what you're going to do is the exact same thing tap on the image, hit the download icon and this will load them up. I'll show you exactly how to use these and procreate in that video in the class. But you're just going to do the exact same thing for all of these bonuses, tap on the image and then tap on the download. I'm going to go back and we're going to download our textures now. I'm going to download this JPEG texture in Safari, and I'm going to download the ink texture in Chrome. Tap on the jewel texture and then choose download and it's downloading, you can see it pops up really big in your window. In order to save it, you're just going to tap and hold and you're just going to continue to hold until the save image prompt shows up. Once that shows up, just hit save image and now it's saved to your camera roll and we're going to go back. I'm back in my bonuses and Safari and I'm going to jump over to Chrome. I'm in Chrome and I'm going to download this ink texture, so tap on it, get the download icon and this is going to show up nice and big and you're going to do the exact same thing, so tap and hold and then choose save image. Now, we're going to go into procreate so I can show you where to find these and how to use them. Back into procreate, we're going to come up here to our wrench. We're going to talk about all these preferences later, but just to let you know where everything's saved too, you're going to hit add, the add icon right here and you're going to choose insert a photo. Tap on, Insert a photo. I've got a bunch of other textures here, but this is in your camera roll. You're just going to navigate to your camera roll. If it doesn't bring you there immediately, it should have brought you there immediately and you're just going to select the texture that you want. I'm going to select these silver Jewelry texture. Just tap on it and it'll bring it right in and then I can manipulate it and move it around. But we're going to talk about that all later, but that's how you bring it in. I'm going to delete that. I'm going to first make my background color black, just so you can see what a transparent PNG looks like compared to our JPEG. I'm going to do the same thing. I'm going to hit the wrench, choose Insert a photo, choose my ink texture this time and you can see it's brought in but it doesn't have a big white box around it, it's all cut out. That's the difference between a transparent PNG and a regular JPEG. A transparent PNG has a transparent background, so you can see all the edges of the artwork. These were created as transparent PNGs. You can't just convert a JPEG to a transparent PNG using procreate. This is brought in as a separate graphics. I wanted to make a black background so you can see that it's all cut out, which you can't really see, it's on white. That's the main difference between the two, but you bring them in the exact same way. Let's move on to our other bonuses. I'm going to delete everything that we've done right here and once again, don't let this feel overwhelming. I just want to show you how to bring in your bonuses. We're going to talk about how to use all of your bonuses later. If this seems too fast or a little overwhelming, don't worry, we're getting into all of it later in the class and a much slower pace. I just want you to be able to know how to download your files at this point. I'm going to hop back into Safari for our other freebies. The next thing is, are these color palettes. I've given you the exact colors that have used for the four projects in this class and you can see them all here. If you want to do all the projects, make sure you download all the color palettes, or you can just pick and choose whatever you'd like to do. This is our first color palette right here it goes with our floral project. What you want to do is just tap on it once again, download and you can see this one ends in swatches. It's a little different than our brushes and you're just going to tap open and procreate and this will open in your color palette. We're going to talk about color in our upcoming video, but right here is where you access your colors. You just tap on the circle over here and then you can hit palettes. If you scroll all the way down, I have a bunch of pallets I've already created here. But these will be loaded in at the very bottom of your palate. You can see this is project floral. These are my color palettes. If I hit set default and I return to my disc right here, you can see they're all loaded in and I can use them right away. I'm going to show you how to load them in Chrome now. I'm in Chrome, I'm just going to do the exact same thing. I'm going to tap on my floral color palette right here, hit download and you can see it shows up at the bottom. This is the main difference between Safari and Chrome. Chrome is going to load everything down here where as Safari brings you to a new screen right away. I'm just going to download and then choose open in and choose copy to procreate. It will show up in the exact same place. You can see now, if I go to my pellets, I've got two of these here. This last one was from Chrome, this first one was from Safari. That's how you install your color swatches that we use throughout this course. Last thing we need to do is load in our free procreate files. I've given you the URL original files that came with this class, the exact files that you saw me create in real time. If you want to refer to them later or dissect the files, those files are available to you. I'm going to go to Safari first, so right here I've got my floral project. I'm just going to tap on it, hit download and open in procreate. Now, this will open up in your gallery. If I tap on gallery right here, you can see it's loaded up as its own project right here. This is the one that we brought in. I'm going to go grab a different one from Chrome. Let's load in the loopy project right here. I'm going to tap on it, hit download. This is going to shop at the bottom, hit download and then hit open in and choose copy to procreate. You can see this one was loaded in right up at the top and in order to access the files, I'll have to do is tap on it. Tap on it and now you can see you've got the original files that I've included in the class right here, exactly as you'll see me create them. That's a quick overview of how to access all of your bonuses using Safari and Chrome. Once again, that URL is every-tuesday.com/procreate- bonuses. 4. Creating a New Document + Understanding Resolution: To start things off, I want to walk you through creating a brand new document. When you enter Procreate for the first time, this will probably be totally blank. This is all artwork that I've created since I've had Procreate. So as you create new artwork, that will show up right here, so you can access it. In order to access existing artwork, all you have to do is tap on the artwork and then you can enter that file. In order to create a brand new, what we call Art Boards, where you're going to create all of your work. You'll hit this plus icon over here, and this is your new canvas. So these are all the different options you have. It comes with some default options for sizing, or you can create your own custom size, which is what I like to do. So you can see these are a lot of my own custom sizes over here. If you'd like to create one, all you have to do is tap Create Custom Size right here. This is where you can either choose pixels, inches, centimeters, or millimeters. If you're creating artwork for the web or social media accounts, you will want to stay in pixels. You can refer to different social media networks for the types of sizes that they prefer your images be brought in at, and then you can just put it in right here. So it makes it really easy. Instagram's default is 1080 pixels by 1080 pixels. I like making my pixel count just a little bit larger, so I keep the same ratio. So it's still a square, but I have a higher resolution. So as I'm working, if I create larger artwork, I can reduce it down and vice versa. I will put in 1500 by 1500 pixels right here. Then your DPI. DPI stands for dots per inch. That's typically a term associated when you print something in ink jet. All those little colored dots, those are your dots, and how many dots are in an inch determines how crisp the quality of the image is. The higher the number the crisper your image will be. The web equivalent is PPI, pixels per inch. The more pixels you have crammed into an inch of space, the crisper and more beautiful, your outcome will be. The standard for web is 72 PPI or DPI, and the default for printing is 300 DPI or PPI. So I like keeping mine at 300 just because I know it's going to be super crisp, and if I ever decide to print my artwork later on, it will be at the standard resolution. I know I can still have a great outcome if I choose to print it later. So I typically always make this one 300. You don't have a lot of options in Procreate for your color mode. You're stuck with sRGB, so I would recommend bringing in into another program on your computer before you print it. So I would convert this to CMYK or just bringing into the standard RGB within Photoshop, if you plan on printing your artwork later. Because of all the different color modes out there, you can't guarantee that whatever you create on screen will appear exactly the same when you print it out. So I recommend always bringing in into some kind of photo editing program. Photoshop is my preference to make any edits you need before printing it. If you print it directly, don't expect to have the exact look that you have in Procreate. Just because we don't have very many color options in Procreate as it stands right now for this version anyway. We're going to keep this as sRGB. Then you can name your custom canvas. So this one would be Instagram for me. We'll just hit "Done". Now whenever you want to create artwork for Instagram, you have that default, you can see it opened up a brand new document when I did that. I can return to my gallery of artwork by just hitting Gallery up here, and I can go right back. Now I've got this here if I want. If I want to delete it, all I have to do a swipe to the left and choose "Delete", and that will get rid of it. So let's create just a standard size. I like keeping with a screen size, but I upped the resolution. So our screen size is 2732 by 2048. I'm just going to create a brand new screen size that exact size, but I'm going to up my resolution to 300. Once again I'll hit "Create Custom Size", and this will be 2732 by, my height is 2048 and I'm keeping it in pixels. If you ever want to alternate, remember you can just tap on any of these to change. Then my DPI is 300 once again. I'm going to label this "Screen size High Res", and then hit "Done". So now we have that document all good to go. One other thing that I want to tell you about in this area where all of your images are, is you can group your different files together. If you're working on a project, you can put all those images together. The projects for this class are these four projects right here. If I wanted to group them all together because I'm going to create other artwork later on and just keep things a little more organized instead of having a bunch of files just floating around by themselves. The way that Procreate groups files together is called Stacks. Another form of this would be putting things into folders on your desktop or your laptop computer. In order to create a stack, all you have to do is take your artwork and drag it on top of another artwork until it turns blue and then just release. Now you can see it's named a Stack. You can rename a stack. You can just tap on it and then change the name. So this would be "Procreate for Beginner Stack", done. If I choose later to separate my artwork. If I wanted outside of the stack because I want to be able to see everything, all I have to do is enter the stack, grab my artwork, and then drag it up here to the arrow. It'll it bring it back out here, and then I can just drop it anywhere. Now this is separate, but this is still part of a stack right here, and it just has one image, which is why it's floating higher than all the other images. In order to remove this and remove the stack altogether, all I have to do is hold it and then drag it to the arrow, and then drop it back in anywhere. Then that will be released from the stack. So that's how you can create stacks. I actually want this file to be in front of that one. That's how you can reorder files as well. That's a basic overview of creating a new document, how to adjust sizing your resolution, as well as grouping different files together using stacks in Procreate. 5. Interface Basics: Using + Editing Brushes: Okay, so we're going to start things off by talking about our brushes, and your brushes could arguably be one of the most powerful tools and all appropriate because it really allows you to experiment with different looks for your different types of artwork. There are lot of brushes available to you, and you can customize existing brushes, or you can create your own brushes or you can install other people's custom brushes. So there are a lot of uses for them. So in this video, I'm going to show you where to find your brushes, all the different categories of brushes, how to edit a brush, and we talked about how to install brushes already in the bonus video of this course. So make sure you revisit the video on class bonuses and you'll know exactly how to install your brushes. All right, so I want to show you a few different settings that you can adjust depending on how you write or your preferences when using brushes. I'm going to make a duplicate of this just so you can see those. I don't want to mess up my current settings. So in order to duplicate a brush, just slide it to the left and choose duplicate, and now you can tap on this brush and this enters all of your settings, your different brush settings. These are the different categories of your settings at the very bottom, and you can rename your brush right here. So just tap on the title and this is where you can just name it whatever you want. If you ever want to see the changes you're making to your brush, you can always draw with it up here to see how those changes affect the look of the brush. This brush will also adjust as you change your different settings. So we'll start over here with stroke first. So I'm just going to give you a basic overview of these. I'm not going to cover everything because it can get super in depth and pretty advanced. So we're just going to stay top level with just the most important things that you should know going into procreate as a beginner. So the first thing that you want to be aware of it in the stroke category is your streamline. Your streamline dictates how smooth your brush writes as you're writing with it. So if I write with it over here, let me make this brush bigger so you can see it. You can see that I can draw pretty easily because my streamline is up. If I toggled the streamline all the way down, it ends up being a little shaky or it doesn't make it quite as smooth. You can see the difference pretty clearly right here. A typical rule of thumb is the faster you write, the lower you want your setting, and the slower you write, the higher you want your setting because it smooths out those edges. If you are slower writer, you'll have shakier lines so that'll just smooth it out for you. I usually keep mine between 60 and 80 percent. But if you are a slow writer, feel free to go all the way up to a 100 if you'd like. I like living around the 70 percent range for myself. Your taper down here is just talking about the ends where your brush begins and ends right here. So if you want to adjust the endpoints of either of those, these are the settings that you'll work with right here. Okay, on to the shape. I don't really mess with these very often. Your shape is based on your source over here. So if you tap on your source, you can see this is the shape source and this is the grain source. So whenever you enter the shape right here, you're adjusting what this looks like. Whatever this looks like right here has a huge effect on how your brush behaves and what it looks like. So I usually leave mine alone because I'll already be using a shape that I really like. But this is where you edit that, is the shape right here. Your grain is your texture. If you want to adjust any kind of texture that you have going on in your brush. This brush has a texture. The motto weight brush that came with this course does not have a texture, so you won't want to touch that at all just because you won't see any effect happening. But if I toggle this, you can see how the look of the brush changes the more I move it, it's more smoothed out when your movement is low, when it's all the way up, you can see the texture is far more detailed and you can see the scale of the texture. I can make it really, really big and rough or I can reduce it down so it's really, really small, so it hardly even appears. So we'll keep that one right in the middle. Then you can zoom in on your texture as well. So you can just play around with toggling these, rotating your texture. If you ever wonder about something, just draw out a stroke up here and then just toggle your little nodes and see how it affects things. So remember, you can always draw in here to see how your brush is being affected by your settings. So on to dynamics, this really has to do with if you're using brushes for painting, you can see we've got glazed and wet mix and normal. I don't typically touch these very often. These are more advanced settings, but if you are working on artwork that has a more painterly quality, you'll want to come in here and adjust any preferences you'd like right here. In your pencil category, this really has a huge effect on your pressure of your brush. So your Apple Pencil pressure right here, when you increase the size, you increase how big it gets when you press really hard down on your stylus. So you can see if I increase this, it increases the size. I'm pretty high up already, but I can reduce it way down and that diminishes that pressure. I'm going to keep this one right up where it was. You can adjust the opacity based on pressure. You're smoothing, the tilt is if you are drawing with your stylus at an angle like this versus like this, upright. So the tip of your stylus, if it's at a tilt, that's what these settings relate to. Then finally in your general tab, these are your limits. So how big you want to go, even if I've got this really, really large, if I want to say," I'm going to max it out, I'm going to make it super, super large." This is where you would do it. With max amount of pressure, this is the largest it will appear at. So you can adjust that right here. You can also adjust what your opacity looks like for your max with your pressure as well, and then you can adjust these if you'd like to customize things further. So that is a basic overview of your brush settings. So I'm just going to come back over here, and we've got our edited brush right here. I'm going to delete that because we don't need that as an example anymore. Now I'm back to my custom flat marker brush. Over here, on the left side of your screen, this top slider dictates how large your brush is. You can see as I move it up and down, it's saying what brush size it is. So it's based on percentage. So it can be really, really tiny and it can be really, really big. Over in the slider right underneath it is your opacity slider. So if I'm pushing the same amount of pressure, you can see it's more transparent. So this is the transparency of your brush or your opacity right here. So I usually keep this all the way to the max because you can adjust the opacity further in your layers palette. So I would recommend adjusting your layers versus your brush unless you are working on a painting. That's what might work better versus design to have your opacity changed over here. This is your color picker. So if I am working with a color and I need to find out what color it is or I want to pull a color from a photograph, I'll hold down this little icon. Then I can hover over and grab whatever color I need from that photo or from that design. Okay, and then down here, this is your undo and your redo button. You can also undo anything with two fingers and redo it with three fingers. So it's just a tab. Then finally, your brushes are broken up by categories which you saw earlier when we imported our custom brushes. So we've got all kinds of default brushes that come with procreate. So you can tail these through and you can customize any of them with the settings that we talked about. So if I liked one of these artistic brushes a lot, but I didn't like the way it behaved for lettering, I could just slide it over, make a duplicate and then adjust my settings, my brush settings to behave better for when I'm lettering. So I would need a high streamline for something like this because I'm writing. So you can really change up your options and you can adjust any brush to fit your needs. There's so many different custom ones that Procreate comes with. So that is a basic overview of your brushes in Procreate. 6. Interface Basics: Quick Shapes: In this video, we're going to talk about quick shapes. Quick shapes are a pretty cool tool when you are creating details around or within your lettering that need to be more geometric. All you have to do is draw out a shape and then hold your stylus on the screen and it will snap into place. So if I want a square, for example, I just draw out a square and I hold my stylus and it gives me the straight edges. If I want to triangle, I just hold it and it'll snap those edges to be perfectly straight. Even a line, if you have more of a wavy line or it's just not perfect, it'll snap right into place and give you a straight line whenever you need it. You just want to make sure you keep your stylus on the surface. I can draw a circle and then draw this out right here. This looks more like an oval than a circle, so, if I release it after I've snapped it into a smoother shape, you can hit edit shape up here, and then I can change this into a circle just by tapping it and now I've got a perfect circle and I can do whatever I want with it. Another thing to know, is you can't do complex curves. So I can make a curve that looks like this and it will give me a nice, beautiful curve that I can use, but if I wanted to do something like this, it's going to snap into edges instead of curves. So just a heads up about that. But, you can do line segments, curve segments, and obviously shapes. It's a really cool tool just to be familiar with as you're working through our procreate. 7. Interface Basics: Color Builds + Palettes: In this video, I'm going to walk you through the basics of using color and creating color palettes in procreate. Color palettes are super-helpful, I use them constantly when I'm creating art work just to keep my colors and my artwork really consistent. So in order to access your colors, it's just this little dot up here, and you can see I've got this giant color wheel right here. You can also view colors in the classic mode, in the value mode, or you can view all of your palettes at once, which we're going to get to in just a minute but I want to walk you through these ones first. So I typically have mine on the desk just because it's a lot easier to grab different colors quickly. If you double tap towards the black right here, it'll give you true black and if you double-tap near the white up here, I'll give you true white. So I use black and white very often when I'm working, so that's a really easy way to access true white and true black right away. If you want to change your color, this color sphere right here, which are different tones of the same color, just adding either white or black to it, so you can drag this and it'll change your color. So you can see up here is super vibrant, note down here is going to be dark and dull. Actually over here will be more dull. So you can come around and change your different colors that way. So that's how this wheel works. If you come down here to classic, you can access it the same way, you just change your color using this slider down here and start at that wheel and then you can adjust how much gray is in it, and then you can just adjust the saturation of your color right here. So down here with your value, this is where you would input your own increments if you have certain colors, if you're working on a brand and the brand gives you the colors of their brand, this is where you would put in the specific colors for that brand. As we walk through the different projects, I'm going to give you the color builds, and this is where you would put them in. So you just want to tap on value and then you can type them in right here. So if you already know your RGB values, you just tap right here, your hexadecimal and colors, and then HSP is up here, but I never really use HSP to be honest, I stick with RGB and hexadecimal whenever I'm working. So if you want to edit any of these, all you have to do is tap into them and then you can change the numbers or the values right here. So now let's get into palettes. So your palettes are right here. I have quite a few that I've built up over time with different projects that I've worked on, so this is where all of your palettes are so you don't have to recreate a palette every time that you need one. So you can just create a brand new palette by hitting the plus sign right here and a new palette will be created and you can just tap on it to rename it, and this is my test palette and hit done. Now you can see it's the default. If I want to use one of my other pre-made or existing palettes, I can just hit default and that will set it to the default, and when you set it to the default and you hit disk, now it'll appear right here. If you want to alternate palettes, just come over here and tap on palette, I'm going to come back to this test palette that I just created and hit default and then come back to my disk. So now I can just create some different colors, and if I like this color or if I put in my own value of a color right here, once it's input, I can just tap on one of the squares down here and it will add it. This is how you create your different palettes. So I can come back to my disk and let's just make a redder version of the same hue, and then we'll do a purple one and you can see this is how you're creating your palettes. If I create a piece of artwork and I'm using the screen, for example, let me make it nice and big. You can see my green isn't my artwork, but I never saved it to my palette and I want to save it to my palette in order to find out with green color, this is, all I have to do is tap on this little square right here, you're going to hold it with your finger and then just tap it with your stylus, and it will select the green and you'll see it right up here and then you can just add it to your palette down here. You can also do this with photos. I really like doing this, I can show you how that works. We're going to get into how to bring in photos later, but just to give you a quick preview, you're going to hit the wrench up here, insert a photo. I've got a bunch of different texture packs for procreate, so I'm just going to grab this pink texture right here and bring this in and let's say I want this pink that's being used in here. I can just hold this little icon over here, hover over the pink until I get the shape that I want and then it's up here in my color dot and I can just add it to my palette by tapping a square. So that's how you can grab different colors from photographs to kind of build your own palettes, I do that a lot. I'm going to delete this texture just by sliding my layer over and choosing delete. So I'm going to delete this to clear it. All right. So that is a basic overview of your colors, and once again, just return to your palette. If you create a palette and you no longer need it, all you have to do is swipe to the left and choose delete, and that will delete your palette. 8. Interface Basics: Preferences Overview: Okay. In this video, we're going to just walk through the different preferences that come with Procreate. Your preferences are located under this wrench icon right here. You can see you've got a bunch of different options right here. If you watched the previous video on color, you already saw me bring in a file and right here's where you'll do it. You'll hit the wrench icon and then where it says "Add", you want to make sure that's selected. This is where you can insert a file, insert a photo, you can take a photo. You can add text which we're going to get into in a later video. You can cut and copy and duplicate your canvas as well. These are your basic, whenever you need to add anything, this is where you will come. For your canvas, if you decide you want a different canvas size or you want to change your canvas at all. You'll tap on canvas and you will access your guides, which we're going to talk about in the next video, you can crop your canvas size. So instead of coming back to your gallery, if you've already created artwork and you want to change your canvas size, you can do it right here without having to recreate your artwork. You can also reflect your canvas. I've never really done this because I've never had a reason to flip my canvas, but you can do that right here. If you ever are curious about the size of your canvas that you created, just tap on this and this will give you all the information you need. So based on the size of this canvas, I'm allowed to create up to 91 layers at this resolution, and this size before I'm basically maxed out of memory for one document. That's what I'll be able to do. This is super helpful so you can see everything exactly how you have it set up. It's pretty cool, you can see whatever pixel dimensions you have right here. You can also see it in inches if that's something that you want to reference. I'm going to tap it back. Now, if you want to share your artwork later on, which is something we're going to talk about later on in the course about exporting your artwork. This is where you'll do it. You'll come to the wrench and hit share, and then you'll choose the different file type that you would like to export. This is where you'll come right here. If you just want to share individual layers, if you're working on a project with another artist, this is where you would do that. I haven't found a need for that yet. For video, you can do a time-lapse recording. It's pretty sped up and you don't have any control over how fast or how slow it goes, but you can get a replay. If you create some really beautiful artwork and you want to look at your process of creating that artwork. This is where you'll come. I'll show you. If I just write out, Procreate for beginners. I made this artwork great here, and now I want to watch myself remaking this artwork. I can come to the wrench, come to video, and then just tap on time-lapse replay and it'll show me making my artwork. You can see it goes pretty fast. I can just hit "Done", and now I'm back. I'm going to delete this. That's where your time-lapse replay is, but you want to make sure this is checked. It won't work if this isn't toggled over. Then you can export that time-lapse if you'd like to share it on your social media channels, you can export the video right here. That's where you'll want to tap. In your preferences right here, you can change the interface. This is a black interface right here. I can change it to white if I want, if I want the right-hand interface. All of my brush options, the transparency is down here, my undo, my color selector, and my size and my brush right here. If I would prefer them on the right side, I can just toggle this over and then flip it so they're right here if I need them. I've never used brush cursor. I'm honestly not even sure why I would even need that. Project Canvas, I don't need that either. You can change the amount of undo. If you create artwork and you want to undo it, it's two taps, two-finger taps to undo. To redo, it's a three-finger tap and that'll bring it back. This option right here is the delay of how fast or how slow your undo happens. Okay. If you have a different stylus than the Apple Pencil, this where you'll connect it, right here. Your pressure curve and your gesture controls is getting into some more complex options. We're going to skip those for now, but if you want to edit or alter any of your gestures or pressures, that's where you'll come. Then finally your help if you want to look at anything that Procreate has to offer in terms of information, this is where you would find it. These are your main, I call them preferences, but they're under your actions tab. Once again, that's found right under your wrench right here. We're going to get to these other selections up here as we move throughout the course. But these are where most of your options are that you'll need to access as you wanted to add, export or just your canvas as you work. Okay. Those are your preferences. 9. Interface Basics: Guides + Rotational Symmetry: In this video, we're going to briefly talk about Guides, we are going to get into Guides much more in the final project in this class. But I want to give you a quick overview just to kick things off. Guides are really helpful with aligning things and they also can be used to introduce symmetry within your layouts as well. I'm going to show you how I like to align my artwork using Guides, as well as the different rotational symmetry options that are available within procreate, that are pretty fun to use. I'm going to change this to more of a Grey color so we can see things pretty well on here. I'm just going to drop in this color as our background, so you'll be able to see the guides on screen. In order to access your Guides, you are going to tap on your "Wrench", you're going to come over to Canvas and you want to toggle over Drawing Guide right here. Toggle that over and you can see that it drops in a guide right away. In order to edit that Guide, you're going to tap on "Edit Drawing Guide". Now, here is where you're going to adjust all the settings for your Guide, if you want it to be brighter, which I want you to be able to see this really well in screen. I'm going to brightness all the way up to white over here. You can also increase the thickness of your Guide, so you can see it really well. You can adjust the transparency or the opacity of your guide by toggling this node right here, and you can adjust the grid size by toggling this one, maybe you need a really tiny grid for more detailed artwork or really large grid for aligning different items. This is what you'll adjust straight here. I like keeping us all the way up to the max when I'm centering my artwork, because now I have a horizontal and a vertical guideline and I can center my artwork up on that. I'm going to come out of here briefly. I can show you how that works, I'm going to hit "Done". I'm going to create a brand new layer and I'm going to write something on top of it, so you can see that alignment. I'm going to grab the Fremont away brush that came with the class, and I'm going to write center, and once I have my lettering, all I have to do is hit this arrow selection icon up here and that will select my artwork. Now you can see it puts nodes all the way around my artwork. It doesn't matter if this is lettering or something you drew, its whatever's on the layer that you've selected. Since this layer is selected right now, and I tap this arrow, that's how I get this bounding box around it. Now I can enlarge it, reduce the size, I can rotate it, I can do whatever I want with it. I'm going to undo that by two tapping. Now you can see, since I've got these nodes, I can align those nodes exactly with where my guidelines are. I've got my horizontal guideline aligned and I can tap with just a finger, If I need a small adjustment, I can tap on the corners as well if you want an angled adjustment right here. You can tap wherever you need to make those minor adjustments. That's how I like to center my artwork. I actually like keeping my artwork just slightly above center. I'll tap this up a little bit. But I like keeping my vertical perfectly centered and this is a really quick way to know exactly where the center point of your artport is. No matter what your document size, drop in this 2D grid max all the way up for the size of your grid and you can have that vertical and horizontal guideline so you can center your artwork. Pretty easy. I'm going to return back to our grid settings. I'm going to tap on the "Gear" icon, hit "Edit Drawing Guide" right here. Now we've got other options. Isometric, is more if you're creating three-dimensional artwork in Procreate. That's a helpful grade if you like creating that style of artwork and you have the exact same settings down here. Once again, there's perspective. You will need a tap to create a vanishing point for this. I'm going to up this all the way up to white again so you can see. If I needed my vanishing point over here, all I have to do is tap on the Canvas and you can see it draws out these guidelines that I can work from for this vanishing point. I can move this around as I need it right here. Then finally our symmetry guidelines, you can see there's, let me make this really bright so you can see it well. Right now I've got the center point that's right down the middle. When I have rotational symmetry turned on, if I toggle this over, it means whatever I draw on this side will be repeated on this side. If I change it to a horizontal, whatever I draw down here will appear up here as well, and vice versa. Quadrant, is broken into four sections, so anything over here will be repeated in the other three sections, in it that works the same with any other section you draw in. Then radial is split into eight different sections, so whatever I draw on one section will be repeated in the other seven, as long as rotational symmetry is turned on, and this is specific to the layer here. If I hit done right now and I go to my layers, you can see this layer 2, says that it's assisted. That means I have the rotational symmetry turned on for this layer and they create a new layer above it. It won't work because it doesn't have assisted on it. But since I'm on this layer that has assisted right now, anything I draw here will be repeated in the other ones. You can see how fun that is and you can do that with any of the other guidelines too, like the quadrant and then the vertical and the horizontal. If I come up to this top layer because it doesn't have assisted. If I draw here, it's not going to repeat, and the other ones. I would have to come back over to my wrench, come to Edit Drawing Guide, and toggle on this rotational symmetry to make sure that it would work. Now if I return back, it's going to repeat. I'm going to delete this layer. That is the basics of guidelines and rotational symmetry in Procreate. If you have your guidelines still turned on and you want them turned off, it's really easy. Hit your wrench up here and turn-off, Drawing Guide and you're all set to go. 10. Interface Basics: Layers + Blend Modes: In this video, we're going to talk about our layers. You saw me working with layers a little bit in the previous video on guides. We're just going to dive into those layers a bit more in this video. As you can see over here, we've got the background color layer right here. I like keeping my background color separate than this one, because if I tap on this one, I can choose whatever color I want and I can apply a background to that. But then it's really difficult for me to manipulate my layers as much. I can't hold this one and drag it anywhere. It's always stuck to the background. Sometimes I like to be able to move things around. That's why I always put my background color on a different layer than the original background color layer. Hopefully, that's not too confusing. You can rename any layer by just tapping on the thumbnail and choosing rename. I can call this background, since that's what it is for me. Then you can create layers from here. Whenever you create a new layer, it will appear above whatever layer you have currently selected. Since my background layer right here is selected if I hit plus, it's going to add a new layer right above it. I'm going to add a little bit of lettering to this one just so you can see how we group things. I'm just going to write a line right here. Let's pretend that I have a bunch of lettering for my project and I want all my lettering to be in the same group because maybe I have a ton of layers that are making up my file. If I come to my layers, I will have one of my layers selected that I want part of a group. If I want to group my other lettering layer, all I have to do is slide to the right. I'm just going to slide it over to the right and you can see it changed a different shade of blue. Both of these are selected. Now, when they're both selected, I can do two things from here. The first thing I can do is adjust both of these at the same time so I can select them by hitting the arrow icon up here, the selection icon. Now they can move together because they're both selected. That can be really helpful. The other thing is is you can group them from here, if I tap 'Group' right here, it puts them into their own group and I can toggle this up, I can rename my group, lettering. Now since they're part of a group, I can move them around without them having to be selected. I just need the group selected in order to be able to move them. That's really handy as well. Another thing that you can do with groups is apply blend mode. I wanted to use a different color for this so you can see how this works. I'm going to grab a pink color so we can see it really well. I'm just going to draw a heart around everything. When you draw a path that's close so it's connected, I can fill it really easily by just dragging my color right into it and it'll fill it right up. You can see this covered whatever was underneath that. Layer order is really important since this heart is on top of everything that's what's going to be seen first. If I want to reorder my layers, that's also really easy. All you have to do is tap and hold. Then you can drag it wherever you'd like it within your layers palette, if I would like it, added to this group, all you have to do is tap, hold and hover over the group until the thumbnail turns to a blue right there and then I can drop it into my group. Now it's part of my lettering group, but I don't want it part of my lettering group, so I'm going to remove it from my lettering group by tapping on it and then dragging it down, and now it's outside of my lettering group. Back to blend modes. Your blend modes are settings to adjust how one layer interacts with the layers underneath it. We're going to apply a different blend mode to this heart because we want it to interact differently with the gray that's underneath it. You can do that by hitting the little n right here. Just tap on that and you can see we get a bunch of options that show up. The first option is your opacity. This is the transparency of everything that's on your layer. We can toggle it down, we can toggle it up and that's our transparency. All of these settings right here, you can see there's different categories of blend modes, the darken category. All of these are going to have the color of your heart interact with whatever color is behind it in a dark way. If I hit multiply, you can see it got a lot darker. All of these are different dark settings for light, it's the exact opposite. It's going to get brighter. For contrast, we're just increasing the contrast with us, but you can see how different this can start to look depending on your blend mode. These can be really fun to play around with the more colors you have beneath something and how they all interact. If you ever want to go back to normal, it's always available right here for you, so you can just tap on that to go right back to normal. This is where the building of your file really takes place in your layer palette. It's important to just be aware of what's underneath your objects if you're applying blend modes, the order of your elements, so the stacking and how things are going to appear is going to rely a lot on the order of your layers. Since I come from a design background, it's really important to always have your elements on different layers. Using lots of layers is a really good thing because it means you can go back and edit whatever you want to. If I have this heart and then I draw other shapes on top of it. Then I change my mind and decide I want to get rid of some of those shapes, I have to redraw the entire thing because whatever you draw on that layer, it connects all those pieces together. This is a destructive workflow because you can't separate those items later on. If you keep all of your elements on separate layers, you can always go back and change things. If you ever need a hand your files off to somebody else, then they can change things as they need to too, it's just a very responsible way of creating a file. Remember to name your layers, just tap on it and choose 'rename'. I can name this heart. If you'd like to export your artwork when you're finished with it. That's something we're going to talk about later on in the course. All of these names and organization will be tied to the file as well. It's really important to organize and label your layers and to keep all of your elements on separate layers. That's a basic overview of how powerful layers can be in Procreate. 11. Interface Basics: Making, Moving + Editing Selections: In this video, we're going to talk about selections in procreate and selections can be extremely helpful if you draw something out and you decide you want to reposition, re-scale or rotate anything after you've already created it. So I just created this artwork really quick just to demonstrate how the selection tool works. So all of this artwork is on one layer right here, you can see it's all right here. If I turn it off and on, everything's on the same layer. So the important thing is whatever you're moving, you need to make sure you're on the layer of the item that you'd like to move or select or rotate or scale. So I've got this layer selected and you want to come up here and choose this tool right here. This is your selection tool and from here I can make any selection I want, if I want to move the word "for" down a little bit because it's really close to "procreate" and I want to get it closer to "beginners". Now, I can trace around it and you can see these are what we call dancing ants around it. This is the selection and once you have it selected, you're going to tap on your selection icon right up here. So tap on that and now you can toggle it and all you have to do is tap for it to be re-positioned. You can move it with your stylus or if you're moving it, just a small amount, you can just tap your screen in the direction that you want it to move and it will move in that direction. If you want to rotate it, you're just going to grab this green node right here and you can rotate it using that, and because it's selected, you can scale it up from here too or scale it down. So that's how to use your selection. If you want to move anything else, if I have a dot that I'd like to move or flourish, you just hit your selection tool again, draw around the item that you'd like to move or select and now you can move it, re-scale it, rotate it, reposition it, whatever you'd like to do and then you can just tap on your selection icon again to de-select. So that is selections in a nutshell. 12. Interface Basics: Using + Editing Typeable Text: In this video, I'm going to walk you through how to add typable texts to your Procreate document, as well as how to install custom fonts that you can then use within Procreate. First, when you want to add text to your document, choose a color that you would like your text to be. I've just got black selected right here, true black. I'm just going to double-tap to get true black right here and then you're going to come over to your wrench and choose Add and choose Add Text. Now you can type in whatever text you'd like. I'm going to type in procreate for beginners. It's all typed out and now if you'd like to edit the style of your text, for example, the space between your letters, the different font, the different space between your lines of texts. Now you're going to hit Edit Style to do that. You get this panel that shows up. You can select the font that you'd like to use from over here and I'm going to choose Futura right here. Now you can see these are the different styles that Futura comes in. It's defaulting to medium. I can choose Medium italic, bold, condensed medium and condensed extra bold. I'm going to stick with bold if I would like it to all be caps. I can just toggle this over in this will converted it to all caps, I can change the alignment of my text. I can do a left align, center align, right align or justified text. I'm going to keep it at centered right now, you can underline. You can outline. You can increase the size right here. Just be aware that you're going to want to increase the size of your box if you do that and you can do that just by grabbing a side node and just stretching it out so I can increase my size like that. Unfortunately, you can't see what's underneath here, so that's a little annoying. The space between your lines is called you're leading and you can adjust that right here so I can increase that space or decrease it. The space between all of your letters uniformly is called your tracking. When you adjust your tracking, that's the space between all of your letters at once. If you'd like to change just a relationship between two letters. Like if I wanted less space between my O and my C right here, I could just tap right here and that'll put my cursor in there and then I can reduce my space by using my kerning right here. Your kerning adjusts the space between individual letters relationships whereas your tracking increases or reduces the amount of space between all of your letters at one time. Once you have a cursor placed in here, you're going to want to remove that because you're limited with what you can edit with the rest of your pallets. In order to do that, you just had your keyboard and then hit Edit Style again and it'll go away. I can adjust my baseline if I want. I have never needed this for anything, but that's what that does and your opacity, the transparency of your text is right here, which you can also adjust on your individual layer as well. You don't need to do it right here. There are a couple of ways that you can import fonts on your iPad with procreate. I can hit Import Font right here and I can choose if I've saved it to a file on my iPad and then I can just select it from here. In order to get your if you're not brought here by default, which you should be, this should automatically bring you to the procreate folder on your iPad. But if it doesn't, you can just hit on my iPad and then procreate. It'll show up right here, select that and then toggle all the way down if you have other images and you'll have a font folder. I can just tap on that and then I can choose any of my fonts and install it from here. Another way that you can install fonts is outside of this, you can e-mail the font file to yourself. I'm going to show you what that looks like. I'm in my G-mail app on the iPad and have e-mailed myself my font, skinny jeans. You can see there's a cap style, a symbol style and a script style. I'm just going to tap on the script style and you can see it shows up as just an open type font. I'm just going to hit this little icon up here and choose Save to Files. Then you'll see on your iPad it will automatically open up and it'll go to procreate and then there's a font folder. You want to make sure the font folder is selected. If you don't see this and it's closed like that, just toggle the procreate folder down and then select fonts and then choose add and it will add it to that folder automatically and it will actually install it into Procreate automatically too. Let's head back into Procreate. Now I should have skinny jeans appearing over here and there it is. I can select it right there and toggle this back if I wanted into my lowercase. I need to reduce my tracking so everything connects the way it should. There we go, and you can see my kernings messed up right there. There we go. From earlier, get rid of the cursor. I'm going to reduce my leading as well. Actually, I'm going to reduce it even more. Right now, Procreate doesn't allow you to utilize any type of open type features if you have stylistic or contextual alternatives that are built-in to your font, which are more advanced font attributes to begin with, but just a heads up if you are familiar with those extras, you won't be able to access them in Procreate yet with the current version. That is an overview of how to use editable text in Procreate. If you're done with your text and you choose to edit it later, if you need to change the wording with anything, all you have to do is come to your layers, tap on the thumbnail image right here and just choose Edit Text and you can come back to your settings right here. You can make any edits that you need. If you change anything dramatically, like if I select my text and then I want to distort it, it's going to rasterize the text and you can see you'll have a little red prompt that says texts was rasterized, which means you can no longer edit it. If I tap on this thumbnail, I no longer get the option to edit my text. I'm going to undo this by two tapping so I can go back to editable text and I can see whenever there's an a right here, that means it's still editable. If you transform your text too much, it's going to rasterize your text so you won't be able to edit it later. Just a heads up about that. One last, know, if you'd like to change the color of your text, you're going to want to come back here and tap on your thumbnail and then choose Edit Text and now you're going to tap on the little circle icon and you can change the color of right here. If you have a cursor, you have to make sure that your cursor isn't blinking on here. Just make sure you go to the keyboard and then back to edit style so then you can change the color. Then when you're happy with it, you can just hit your layer and then you are back and good to go. Once again, tap on your thumbnail, Edit Text, select a different color and then just hit your layers and then you're back to normal. That is how to edit text in procreate as well as installing custom fonts within procreate. 13. Project FLORAL: Setting Text + Background Color: Welcome to the first project of the course. What you see on screen is exactly what we are going to be creating together. You can see we are utilizing our editable text feature. We have a bunch of different elements and they're all in different layers, and those layers are card of groups as well so we can keep everything separate. We've got underlapping and overlapping elements. We're using a lot of what we just talked about in the previous videos. If you didn't watch the previous videos all the way through, I would highly encourage you go back and watch them all the way through since there are a lot of things mentioned that we may or may not be using in all the projects within this class but they're still really helpful to know so you can utilize them in some of your own personal projects moving forward. We're going to go back to the gallery and create a screen size document that's High Res. If you remember from our document and resolution settings video at the beginning of this course, we created our own custom Canvas right here as the Screen size High Res, that's the exact one that we're going to be using, so I'm just going to tap on that to create a brand new one. With your enrollment in this class, remember you got access to all the different color palettes. If you haven't installed your free color palettes yet, make sure you refer back to the video on class bonuses and that shows you how to install all of your color swatches so you can pick up with the exact color palette I'm using for this project right now. We're going to begin by putting in our background color and setting our texts, and then in the next couple of videos we're going to introduce all of the elements that make up our project. For the background, you're going to grab this blue color right here. I'm just going to tap on the blue color and then just drag it to my background and now I've got my background and I can even label this. I like having my background color in a different layer than my background color because it's really easy to relay your things around your background. If you only choose the background color layer, it's a lot more difficult I've found. Just from my experience, it's been a lot easier to put my background color on its own layer right above the background color layer in case you're wondering why I did that. I'm going to rename this one as Background. It's a really important habit to start labeling your layers especially with projects that have a lot of layers. It does take a little bit of extra time but I definitely recommend doing that to keep things straight. Now we're going to add in our text. You want to choose the color of your text before you add it in. I'm going to tap on my little circle and I'm going to choose the lightest pink right here. Select that, come to your wrench, come to add and choose add text. This will automatically add your text to a brand new layer. You don't have to create a new layer and then add text. Adding texts will automatically create a new layer. I'm just going to type in Floral, but feel free to type in whatever you'd like for your text. I'm going to hit, Edit Style. I'm going to change it to all caps by toggling this over. I'm going to change my font to Futura bold.I'm going to up my size to about a 180 or as close as I can get to it, it's 181. I'm going to stretch this out a little bit. I have my alignment, center aligned right here, so it stays centered. Then I'm going to increase my tracking about 10 percent right here. Now we can center it. All you have to do is tap on your selection icon up here. Let's see, that looks pretty centered. If you want it exactly centered, you can integrate some guides like we talked about earlier. In order to do that, just tap on your wrench, tap on Canvas, toggle over your drawing guide, and then hit Edit Drawing Guide, and under the 2D grid column, just increase your grid size all the way up and it'll just give you the two that your vertical and horizontal guidelines. I'm going to make mine super thick so you can see it really well on screen. I'm going to make it white. All right. Then hit done. Now I can choose my selection icon again and you can see I've got my nodes and I can just align those write-up with my guidelines. Remember, you can tap on your screen if you just need to move in small increments and it's getting difficult with your stylus. In design school they always told us to have your art work just a little higher than center because it makes your eye naturally focus on the artwork. If you've got more white space underneath the artwork, it's just slightly above center instead of exactly center, it just adds a little bit of asymmetrical balance to your entire layout. I'm just going to tap this up a little bit because I live by those principles. All right. That looks good. Now I can turn off my guide. Hit your wrench and just toggle back your drawing guide and now they're gone. In the next video, we're going to start integrating our floral elements. 14. Project FLORAL: Adding Details + Organizing Layers: All right. In this video we're going to start introducing the floral elements that surround our text right here. I'm going to create a brand new layer. We're going to start by creating our biggest elements, that's typically how I work, just because, then I can use my smaller elements to fill in any white spaces that I had and complete my whole layout that way. If I save my biggest elements for last, then I have to deal with overlapping and non-overlapping elements and fixing those areas. I found this process works best. I'm going to start with my biggest flowers, so I'm going to tap on this and rename it big flower. I start with my darker pink color right here and I'm going to show you the shape that I'm using. I'm going to use my monoweight, the free monoweight brush that came with this class that's also in your bonus section. I'm going to create a larger size brush. I'm going to up this to about, let's see, 14 percent and then all you want to do is, do a basic shape right here. This is really easy, you don't have to be a realistic flower drawer in order to do the assignment, just to do to learn works out just fine. I'm just going to repeat this same shape throughout my word and then I'll be back. [SILENCE] I've got my first floral elements and you just want to make sure any places where you decide to overlap your text, you just want to make sure that it's not going to inhibit readability. We're going to be dressing up this text quite a bit with all different elements. Just keep in mind whenever you are putting elements right on top of your letters that the readability of the word is not compromised. First and foremost, if you're using texts at all, it's meant to be read. Make sure that it's readable no matter what you do to dress it up. Now that we have all of our pink flowers right here, we're going to add some extra depth and detail by putting some lighter highlights on the inside. I'm going to create a new layer right above it because these details need to sit on top of our pink flowers. I'm going to rename this big flower details, all right. I'm going to grab my lighter pink color right here and I'm going to reduce the size of my brush slightly, so I'm down to 6 percent right here. All I'm going to do is just trace the same shape on the inside of these flowers. I'm going to speed up the video and then I'll be back. [SILENCE] Now that I have all these details in, I just have a one last bit of detail to add in and it ends up behind my dark pink flowers. I need to make sure that I create a new layer behind or below my big flower layers. I'm going to tap on my floral texts layer because whenever you create a new layer, it's added right above the layer that you have selected. If I have this one selected, it's going to add it right where I need it to be right below big flowers. I'm going to label this big flowers, small details. Okay? I'm just going to reduce the size, my brush again just slightly down to 4 percent and then I'm just going to come in behind my flowers and just add in this last bit of detail right here. [SILENCE] As you are navigating around your layout, it's really easy to accidentally draw a line. If you do that, remember its two taps to undo it and if you do anything that you undo and you need to bring back it's three taps and that'll bring it back. I need to undo that. All right, so the last thing we need to do with these big flowers is give them some leaves. First we're going to group all the layers that we just created for these flowers, so we don't mistakenly reorder them or edit all of them. You're just going to select one of the layers that you need and then just toggle to the right the other layers that you want part of the group. I'm just going to pull that to the right, pull that to the right and you can see they change colors when I did that. You can add group and then just tap on the little thumbnail of the new group and choose rename. I'm going to call this big flowers. You can just toggle this up and now they're all condensed into this group. The next thing that we need to do is give our big flowers some leaves. I'm going to create a new layer right above it. I'm going to call this green leaves. I'm going to grab my green color right here and I'm just going to do some pointed ovals, really basic shapes for leaves. Once again, just make sure if you're overlapping anything that you can still read the word after you do that. I'm going leave space for some blue colored leaves as well, so I'm going to space these out pretty good around my large flowers. One more reminder, when you're filling your leaves, you can drop color and do an outline, but it has to be a closed path. If I have my leaf look like that and I try to drop in my color, the color is going to bleed out of this open space. If I have it closed, then it will fill in the whole shape, just a heads up about that. If you drop in your color and it doesn't fill your shape all the way, when you drop it in, you're just going to hold it, don't lift up your stylus. You can see up at the top it says color dropped threshold up here. I've got mine pulled all the way up. Well, most of the way up. If you do that, it'll fill more of the shape. If it's way down here, you might have little gaps of where your outline touches the fill. Just hold your stylus down and drag that blue bar up. I like to keeping mine in the 90s if I can get there now, almost off the screen. All right, let's try it again. Just drop it in and hold and then you can bring it up. I'm going to bring mine. That looks good, 95 is good. That'll fill more of your shape if you do that. If you find yourself just not filling the whole thing, just make sure you hold it and then it'll fill it in. I'm just going to color drop the rest of these leaves. All right, so it's starting to really come together. The next thing we want to do is integrate some blue colored leaves to say a bit more visual interest in our layout. I'm going to create a new layer right on top of my green leaf layer and label this one dark blue leaves. All right. I'm going to grab my dark blue right here and begin putting in some more of these leaves between my green leaves. Vary up to scale-up them too as you're working and that'll make it more interesting as well. [SILENCE] We've got our green and our blue leaves, looks like I missed one. There we go. We've got our green and our dark blue leaves all in there and in the next video we're going to integrate the rest of our floral elements and finish everything off. 15. Project FLORAL: Final Details/Finishing the Project: We're just going to keep working on our floral elements and building everything up, and integrating everything and we'll finish off our project in this video. The next thing we need to do is start creating our daisies, and our daisies are going to be smaller than our big flowers and they're going to vary in size. We're going to have medium and small daisies, but all of them are going to be smaller than these largest flowers. I'm going to create a new layer and name it daisy, and I'm going to select my dark gold color right here and just begin creating daisies throughout your Word in different sizes. Now we need to put centers in all of our daisies, so I'm going to create a new layer right above that one. Rename this one "Daisy Center" and then grab my light gold color right here, and then just put circles in the centers of all of these. Now, I can group those two layers together and just call it "Daisy". Now we're going to create a new layer right above our dark blue leaves and make them light blue leaves, so I'm going to create a new layer and rename this "Light Blue Leaves" and grab my medium light blue color right here and just put some leaves around the daisies. We've got all of our light blue leaves in here now, and now we're just going to add in one more type of flower, which is an abstract flower. We're going to create a new layer above my daisy layer and label this one abstract. You're just going to take the same exact blue color that you used for your light blue leaves and we're going to create a bit of a bigger brush here. I'm going to go up to 10 percent. What you want to do is in some of your white space areas, you just want to put a bunch of dots. That's might be too big. Let's go down to eight percent, and you're just going to put a few dots together in different places. Then we will add more detail to them later. These are just little dot clusters. Now, I'm going to create a new layer above the abstract layer and just call this "Abstract Details" and you're going to select your lightest blue color right here. We're just going to put in a smaller size dots inside of these dots or next to these dots. I'm going to bring my brush size down to four percent here, and just put some dots that are that lighter color right around it, just to add some extra depth. We need to add leaves to these abstract flowers, so I'm going to create a new layer behind my darkest blue dots. I'm going to drag this down right here and label this one "abstract leaves" and we're going to use our light green right here, this green color for the leaves. What I'm going to do is make my brush a bit smaller, I'm going to come down to three percent and just add in some stems and some abstract leaves. Just repeat that same thing all the way around. We've finished off our abstract flowers, so we are going to group all those layers together and just call it abstract, close the group. Now, we're going to add in some finishing details to our background and we want to put these behind our text layer. I'm going to tap on the background layer, create a new layer right above it and label this background details. We're just going to grab our dark color right here and then where we see some white space, I'm just going to add in these raindrop looking elements. It just gives a lot more energy to the piece. Then what you want to do is fill in any remaining white space with your green and dark blue leaves. I'm just going to return to these layers, which is why they're currently ungrouped and just put in some extra leaves in just some of these areas that feel a little bit empty. I'm going to go ahead and do that right now. Then if you want to just group together all of your leaf layers, you can do that now. I'm going to select my green leaves, dark blue leaves, and light leaves, group them together and call them Leaves. Close that up, and now we've got everything all set. That is our first project of the course, Floral. You've got background elements, you've got a ton of details. We've worked with layer ordering, layer groups, and editable text. 16. Masking in Procreate: Clipping Masks: In this video, we're going to talk about clipping masks. Clipping masks are really powerful way to integrate texture graphics or different artwork within other objects. I'm going to show you exactly what that looks like. The most common use for clipping mask, is masking textures into types. We're going to do that first. First, we're going to add in some types. I'm just going to hit my wrench up here, add text, and we'll just put this feature bold, and just leave it at text. I'm going make it all caps and increase the size pretty large so we can see it really well. Let me move this down a little bit. All right, so the in-texture that came with this class, we're going to mask this into a text. I'm going to show you how easy that is. Once again, in order to access the in-texture, you should have already saved it onto your camera roll. If you didn't do that yet, make sure you go back to the video on the class bonuses and you'll know exactly where to get them and how to install them. In order to grab it from where it was installed in, if you've already done that, you're going to hit the "Wrench" and choose, "Insert a photo" and then it will appear in your camera roll. You're just going to tap on that "Texture" and it'll bring it right in. Now, I can increase the scale of it if I like, and It always has to be on top of whatever you're masking it into. Since I want the text to be filled with this texture, this texture needs to be above the text, because the textures is what's going to fill the text. Hopefully, that makes sense. In order to apply it, all you have to do is tap on the layer thumbnail and choose "Clipping mask" and you can see it's automatically masked into my text. If I decide that I want it to be incorporated into some artwork that I draw instead of text, I'm going to show you what that looks like as well. I'm going to turn off my text layer and you can see that this texture is automatically associated with whatever is underneath it. If I turn off my text, my texture automatically gets turned off as well because this is associated with this. If I want to go back to having my texture just on its own, I have to tap on the layer thumbnail and uncheck clipping mask. Tap "Clipping mask" and now it's just it's image. It's not masked into the text anymore. Now, you can see if I turn it off, it's not masked anymore. If I want my texture masked into something else, I'm going to turn off my texture temporarily and my text. I'm going to create a new layer between these two, and I'm just going to draw out a heart using my [inaudible] weight brush and fill the heart since it's a closed path, a closed shape, and just drag my circle in and now I have a filled heart. So because this object is the one that I want to be filled with the texture, the texture has to be above it. I need to make sure that my texture is above my shape. I'm going to turn the visibility back on by tapping this checkbox right here. I want to make sure that it fills the entire heart. I'm going to select my texture and just rotate it a little bit so it fills that whole heart. Now, I can tap on it and choose "Clipping mask" and you can see it's masked right into there. One other thing when it comes to clipping mask, you can actually stack clipping mask on top of one another which is pretty cool. Say I like the texture in here, but I also want to add some doodles in here. If I want to add a layer between my heart and my texture, I'm going to hit the plus sign right here. You can see it automatically adds a clipping mask onto that layer because it's sandwiched between these two. You can see that we're automatically stacking a clipping mask. If I remove this clipping mask, the top one also gets removed. Whenever you have things sandwiched in between, they all take on a clipping mask. I'm going to apply the clipping mask right here, but you can see it didn't automatically apply it to the texture because the texture is above it. If I select this and drag and in between these two, you can see it automatically applies that clipping mask. I'm going to add this layer since it's above my texture layer. I'm just going to draw on some doodles. Let's choose a random purple color and just draw in some doodles. You can see I can draw outside of the heart, and it's only going to appear inside the heart because a clipping mask is applied. It works not only with textures and graphics that you bring in, but also in the artwork that you create within Procreate as well. You want to make sure that the little layer is right there, and if you tap on the thumbnail, that clipping mask is checked. You can also adjust the blind mode of your clipping mask. If I tap on the N right here, we can have this color interact with the layer right underneath it. If you remember back in our latest video, how we talked about blind modes. I can hit "Multiply" and see what that looks like, and toggle through these and see all the different effects that we can get by having a clipping mask and integrating some blind modes with that clipping mask. Once again, you can always go back to the original by just tapping on "Normal" and again, you're passing through the transparency of the layers right here, so I can reduce the transparency too if I'd like the texture to show through a little bit on this layer. That is how easy clipping masks are to integrate within your artwork in Procreate. 17. Masking in Procreate: Layer Masks: In this video, we're going to talk about layer masking. Layer masking is one of those tools that can be really confusing at first, but once you realize how to use it and how powerful it is, you'll want to use it all the time. Layer masking is basically the ultimate form of non-destructive editing. Non-destructive editing meaning, if you erase something, you can't bring it back, you have to recreate it that would be destructive editing. With non-destructive editing, you can hide something and then you can bring it back whenever you want without having to recreate the artwork from scratch, because you haven't permanently deleted anything, you've just hidden it temporarily. The way you use layer masking is you paint in black or white. I'll show you exactly what that looks like. I just have a pink background right here, and I've got a new layer created right above it. On this new layer, I'm just going to grab a blue color and draw out a heart, and I'll fill it in. Okay. With this heart and now we're going to apply a layer mask. In order to do that, you do it just like a clipping mask. You come near layer, you tap on your layer thumbnail. And this time instead of clipping mask, you're going to just choose mask. When you choose mask, you can see we've got a mask that's associated directly with our layer. Unlike a clipping mask, which is just tied to the layer beneath it, this one is attached to it. Even if you move this layer later on, they both move together. You can't reorder like you did with a clipping mask and just have whatever you put between these take on layer mask. This layer mask is always attached to this layer unless you remove the layer mask completely. So on a layer mask you can see it's all way right now. I mentioned that you paint in white or black with the layer mask. Since it's all white, it means everything is revealed right now. The important term to remember is white reveals, black conceals. Since this is all white, you can see everything that's on this layer that it's tied to. If I paint any areas in black on this, it's going to hide whatever is on this layer in that exact same spot. I'll show you what that looks like. I've got my layer mask selected. You can see this is the brighter blue color right now. Make sure it doesn't look like this, make sure it looks like this, so your Layer Mask is selected. Then I'm going to grab true black. So I'm going to tap down here and grab true black, and I've got my minor white brush selected. Now if I want to hide a part of this heart right here, I can just paint in black and you can see I'm starting to hide these areas of this heart. If I want to bring it back, all I have to do is paint in white, so I'm going to double tap right here. You can see what the layer mask looks like. These are the black lines that I drew. If I want to bring this back, if I don't want this line right here, I just return to my Layer Mask and I paint in white instead of black and that will bring it back. This is revealing it. I can make my brush bigger, so I can work a little faster here. But you can see any lines that I want to bring back, I just painted white and that brings back my original layer. Since this is tied to my heart layer, I am now revealing the heart layer. Whereas these lines that I drew in are black, it's hiding those portions of this original layer. Hopefully that makes sense.That is the gist of layer masking. You paint in black to hide portions of the layer that it's tied to, you paint in white to re-reveal them. That way as you're working, you never have to actually use your eraser to delete anything. You can just hide it and bring it back if you change your mind later. I'm going to show you a practical use of this, and then we're going to go even further with the project that we do together using layer mask. I've got a new document ready to go. And you can see I've got text on a layer right here. I've got masking just on a text layer. I have hand lettered the word layer, and then I just have a background right here. Layer is my top-most layer, so you can see it's on top of everything else. I'm going to apply a layer mask to this lettering layer, so we can intertwine it with the text behind it. This is an ideal situation where a layer mask would come in handy. I'm going to tap on this layer and choose Mask. And I'm going to select black because I need to hide portions of it. This is going to be a little bit more advanced because we're going to start making selections, but first I just want to show you how this works. If I want to hide this portion of my L, I want it to go behind the letter M right here, because I got black selected, I can start erasing away this part of my L, so it looks like it's going behind the M, but you can see it's not exactly right here. I've got lines right here and I can switch back to white to re-reveal these areas and kind of bringing in as close as I can to make it look as seamless as possible right here, but there's a quicker way to do that using selections. I'm going to show you how to do that, but that is how to use, your black and your white to start hiding. If I want to hide this part of my letter, I just come back to my black and I can paint it away and hide it just like that. But then I have to re-come in and make it precise. I don't want to do that. I want to make things even easier on myself. I'm going to come over here and I'm going to select my masking. I'm going to tap on this layer thumbnail and just choose, select. Now all of my letters in my masking, in my text right here are selected. Which you can see these horizontal lines right here. That shows you that there's a selection that has taken place and you can see this little selection icon up here is blue because it's selected. I have all of my Letters selected right now. If I return to my Layer Mask and just paint in black, I'm only going to paint the areas that are selected. If I grabbed my brush and I've got black selected right here, if I brush in, now I'm only going to remove areas that overlap the selection, because my letters are selected. That's the only area that I can paint on. It can be really, really helpful for something like this. I'm going to hide this part and now I don't have to come back in and try and make things super precise because I'm only eliminating, where this is overlapping. Where my lettering layer is overlapping, my texts layer. I'm also going to remove this one just to hit home this overlapping and under lapping luck. And I'm going to remove this one too, because if I remove this big part of my Y it's not going to be readable anymore and I want to make sure everything's still very readable. Remove this, have the E, readable. Take that away and remove this part so you can still read the R. So now you can see I've got my overlapping and under lapping really believable right here. In order to deselect, all you have to do is tap on the icon and now everything's deselected. And if I zoom in right here, you can see we've got a very believable look of overlapping and under-lapping. Right here we've utilized selections and layer mask. Layer mask are super helpful and you're going to be able to practice these and see them even more and really get a hang of them in our next project. 18. Project LOOPY: Setting Text + Intertwining Flourishes: Welcome to project number two. In this project we're going to integrate our clipping mass and our layer mass. You can see these flourishes right here. They intertwine with our different letters, so we're going to utilize what we talked about in our layer mass video. Then we've got a clipping mask of our texture. I'm using a glitter texture right here, but you can use the silver jewel texture that came with the class, in the same way. We've got that applied as well as a blend mode. Then we've just integrated some extra details for the background. This is the final outcome of this project. We're going to create a brand new document that screen size and high rise, just like we did with the first project. Come to your gallery, I'm going to hit the plus sign and choose screen size high res down here, and that will open up my brand new document. If you missed the first video on resolution and document size, make sure to revisit that and you can create that preset as well. Once again, make sure you refer back to the class bonuses video and you can see how to install your color palette for this project. Make sure you do that first and then come back here, and you will have your project pallete all loaded up and ready to go. We want to set our background first, so it's this darker color right here, this darker blue color. I'm just going to drag it in, and labeled my layer background. Now we need to put our text in. I'm going to choose the color that I want my text to be. I'm going to tap on my little round circle and choose this lightest color right here. Then come to your wrench and add texts. We're just going to type in whatever text that you'd like for this project. I'm going to keep it with our example. So loopy. I'm going to hit ''Edit Style''. I'm going to make it all caps by toggling this little note over here. I'm going to change the font to Baskerville bold. Baskerville and the bold style right here. I'm going to increase the size to about, let's see. Let's go up to about, 200. Looks good. We'll do that and then will just increase our tracking slightly, so we got a little bit at room between these letters. I'm going to go up to eight percent. I'm going to hit ''Done'' and just put this in the center. Once again, if you want to center everything, you can just turn on your guide. I'm going to hit the wrench, canvas, turn the drawing guide on, edit drawing guide, and I'm just going to change my 2D grid all the way up. I'm going to make it white, so we can see it and make it really thick so we can see it extra well, hit ''Done''. Now it can grab just by hitting my selection icon, I can grab my texts and line up those nodes in. Once again, I usually keep my artwork just a little bit above center. That looks good to me. I'm just going to deselect by hitting the selection icon. Then I can turn off my guides by returning to my gear and just switching off my drawing guide under the canvas category. We've got our texts done, we've got our background all set, and now we can draw our flourishes. I'm going to choose my blue color right here for the flourishes. I'm going to select my free monoweight brush that came with this course. I'm going to use, let's see, about a five percent brush size for this. We're going to create a new layer right above it and label this one flourishes. The way that I'm drawing my flourishes, the original flourish is like a sideways eight. I'm going to start down here and then come around and then come back up like that. Then I like putting some extra detail on the end of these flourishes. I'll just put like a raindrop shape on the end and then have it integrate with the rest of the flourish. I'm going to come over to this one and do the same thing. This is the first flourish and I'm going to move it just slightly and rotated a little bit too. I'm looking at where I'm going to overlap my elements and I a like where this o is hitting and now I like where this o is hitting. That looked like it was a little bit off before. I just want to make sure, I'm showing off where things are overlapping and underlapping. Then for my second flourish, I am going to put it on a new layer, so just create a new layer. I'm going to rename this flourish too. Then for this one, I'm going to come through this one, and follow it around like that. We redraw that. Then I'm just going to add in the details on the ends of these again. Now we are all set to go with our layer masking. In the next video we're going to apply that layer mass so we can have our different flourishes, overlapping and underlapping our texts and then we'll finish everything off with that texture and then our background details. 19. Project LOOPY: Masking + Final Details: Now we're going to put into practice everything we learned from the layer masking video. I'm going to start with the second flourish that we created. If I turn it on and off, it's that smaller one right there. This is just to make things less confusing since they're overlapping each other. That's why I have them on two different layers. We need to apply a layer mask to this one first. I'm going to tap on the layer thumbnail and choose mask. Remember, we're going to paint in black or white. We're going to paint in black the areas that we want to go behind our text layer. In order to make things really easy for us to overlap and underlap and intertwine everything, we want to select the text first. Tap on your texts layer and choose, select and then return to the layer mask and make sure you have true black selected double-tap to get it. Grab whatever brush you would like, I'm going to stick with my monoweight brush right here. I'm going to start by putting this one behind. I can increase my brush size to make this a little easier and quicker. Since that went behind, the next one I want to go in front and then behind and then in front and behind. I like alternating back and forth for mine. That went behind and this will go in front. That is the first one. To de-select just tap on your selection icon up here and you're all set. You can see that flourish that we just did. It goes behind the L. It goes through the second O, through the P and through the Y and then it comes on top of the P at the end. Now we're going to do the other flourish. If it helps to see things better, you can always turn off your other flourish. Now we're going to come to our original flourish. We're going to tap on it. Choose mask. Once again, tap on the thumbnail of your texts to select it. To select, return to your layer mask, make sure that's the layer that's got the brighter blue color. Grab black and whatever brush you'd like. I'm going to be using the monoweight brush again. Now I'm going to decide that I'm going to start by under lapping and overlapping. I want this one to overlap too, because if this one under laps, it's going to be two under laps right next to each other, so I actually want this one to stay that way. Then this one will go behind and that one will go in front and that's the last one. This one was really easy. De-select and now we can turn on our other flourish and we can see what that looks like. Now we just need to add in some final details. A really easy way to enhance texts that's a little on the thicker side is to just draw details inside of it. That's what I'm going to do. I'm going to select my text layer, create a new layer right above it. I'm going to label this text details and I'm going to paint it in with this background color, so it's the darkest orange color and I've got my monoweight brush once again. I'm just going to come in here. I'm going to reduce my brush size down to five percent. You can draw any details you'd like. I'm just going to do follow the contours of the letter to just add some chunkier details right here and fill them in. I've got all of my details in here now and you can leave it just like this if you'd like or if you want to add in a texture now is a great time to do that and utilize a clipping mask. That's what I'm going to do. Right above my texts details layer, I'm going to import a texture. I'm going to grab my silver glitter texture. That's part of my same procreate metallic kit. If you'd like to use the silver jewel texture that came with this class, feel free to do so right now. I'm just going to tap on my wrench, hit add and choose, insert a photo. I'm going to grab that glitter texture right here and just make sure it's covering all the areas that you want it to be massed into. Since I can't see any of those orange areas that I just drew in, I know that I'm good. I can just return to my layers right here. I can label this glitter and just tap on the layer thumbnail and choose clipping mask and that will mask it right into the shapes that we just created. It looks like I had some extra shapes from when I was drawing, so I can just erase those away but make sure you erase them away on the text details because that's where the mask is happening. Then the other thing that you can do is integrate a blend mode right here. You'll want to apply the blend mode to your glitter because that's what's interacting with whatever is right underneath it. I'm going to select my glitter layer, tap on the N. I know that I want high contrast, so I'm going to tap on my contrast. You can see what the other ones look like. These ones are a little too dark for me. Contrast works really well to lighten things up so you can see what overlay looks like, hard light, soft light, vivid light. I really like the hard light one. That's what I'm going to stick with. You can see what that looks like. It's pretty cool, really easy to integrate glitter and also have it take on the same colors that you're using in your project. The last thing we're going to do to just finish everything off is integrate a few more flourished details on our flourishes and then we'll add in some background details. I'm going to create a new layer right on top of my top-most layer and this will be final flourish details. I'm going to grab the same blue I was using before. I think I still have the same size brush, which is at five percent. I'm just going to add in some extra raindrops shapes right here, like what we did in the first project. Now I'm just going to add in some background details. Tap on your background layer, create a new layer right above it label this background details, and then we're going to grab this medium orange right here, and then just draw in some more of those raindrops shapes just to finish everything off. That is our second project all completed. If you'd like to mess with the blend mode for these background details, you can totally do that. I like the look of them just as the color that they are. Remember, you can just tap on the end and adjust it to whatever you'd like. If you want some different looks of integrating that color with the color right underneath it. I'm going to leave mine at normal. We can just group our layers together so it's nice and organized. I'm just going to grab my flourishes and group those together and call these flourishes. Everything else looks good to me. That's our second project, integrating clipping mask, layer mask, blend modes and textures. 20. Lettering Tips: Brush Settings to Look for: In this video, we're going to talk about some brush settings to be aware of if you prefer to use your brushes for hand lettering. You can edit any existing brush that you really love to be more suitable for hand lettering if you choose to create hand lettering versus just traditional art on your iPad. I want to show you what those settings are and just things to be aware of as you're nailing down specifics of what you like best when it comes to lettering with Procreate brushes. I've got my monoweight brush right here selected. We're going to edit it. Then a really nice way to edit your brushes without destroying your original settings is just to make a duplicate brush. I'm just going to slide this to the left and choose "Duplicate". Now I have a duplicate brush and now I can edit this one just by tapping on it and then tapping on the title of it. Instead of calling this monoweight, I'm just going to call this Et Custom Lettering. Now what you want to do is come down here, and these are your different categories for all the different settings that a brush can have. As Procreate has advanced in their different versions, they've added a ton of different settings and it can get really overwhelming with all the specific settings. Many of them are for painting or creating traditional art. So luckily, it's not that difficult to adjust a brush to be suitable for lettering. You can see all the different categories down here. With your Stroke, the most important thing to look at is your StreamLine. A lot of people wonder why their lines are a little shaky when they're drawing on the iPad. You can adjust that and fix it entirely by just adjusting your StreamLine right here. If I have no StreamLine selected, it's really easy to make a line look shaky even if you have a really steady hand with traditional lettering. If I write lettering, you can see it doesn't look very good because it's shaky, even when you try and write really fast so it doesn't get shaky. Actually let me show you this too. If I just draw a straight line, it looks like that. If I adjust my StreamLine all the way to the max and I draw a line, you can see how it just makes it really straight. Even if I draw it really slow, it looks really straight. I like keeping this between 60 and 100 percent, depending on what you like. I tend to write pretty fast, so I need a lower setting for me. If you write on the slower side, you're going to want this to be higher. So it all depends on how fast you typically write. I'm going to keep mine at 65 percent, 64 percent. Now if I write this out again, you can see how much smoother the line quality looks. I didn't change anything, I wrote it the exact same way. But just adjusting your StreamLine makes a huge difference when you're adjusting your brush specifically for lettering. I'm going to delete this stuff right here. Now we're going to move on. We've got our StreamLine adjusted and just remember, you want it lower if you're a faster writer and higher if you're a slower writer. Down here at the Stroke Taper, I don't typically mess with this much, but you can see what it looks like. If I increase this or decrease this, you can see the end of the brush right here. You can always test and preview what your brush is going to look like by just drawing up here, so you can see any changes you're making automatically if you draw up here. The taper is just the very end of your stroke. This one with this brush it doesn't make a huge difference. But if you want it narrower at the end or larger, you can see this moving right here as I adjusted it. So that's what that does. I'm just going to leave this where it was to begin with. That is your taper and you can adjust the different settings too. If you want the end of your stroke to be influenced by the pressure that you have on the end of your stroke, you'll want to adjust your pressure down here. Same thing with Opacity. I really don't mess with my Pressure Taper much. I like the end of my stroke to be uniform. I don't like the end of my stroke to have anything fancy on it. That's just me though. Honestly, you don't need to mess with this at all for lettering. Your grain is if you have any texture in your brush, you will adjust it right here. So if you have a strong texture, it'll be a little more condensed if you adjust your movement right here, and you can adjust the scale of that texture as well. So that's what your grain is all about. But since this is a monoweight brush, I don't have any texture in it. Your Dynamics really come into play if you have that textured brush, if you're using it for painting. You can see we've got Glazed, and Wet Mix, and Normal. You'll only adjust this if you're working with a brush that's got pink qualities to it. That tends to be the best example for adjusting your Dynamics. Pencil is where you really want to come If you're adjusting your brush for lettering. Your Size right here is the important node to adjust if you want your stroke to change based on pressure. If I increase this, you can see right away how big of a difference that makes. If I draw a little bit, you can see if I press really hard on my down strokes, how big that's getting. If I don't want it so intense, I can just bring it down a little bit. So it's not quite as obvious; the pressure change. You can also change the Opacity as you're drawing based on pressure. For lettering I don't like introducing Opacity very often unless it's specific to the look of the lettering piece. I like having my custom brushes not changing Opacity very often. So I'm just going to leave that one at zero. Smoothing, you can see how this changes it right here. If this comes all the way up, it goes back to a monoweight. So just be aware if you increase this one all the way it's going to go to a monoweight. It just makes the sides of your stroke a little smoother. I would keep this probably around 40 percent. Then your Angle tilt. If you're holding your stylus at an angle like this when you're drawing, that's what that has to do with. If you're drawing like this, then the Pencil Tilt won't affect you at all in any of these settings. But if you tend to draw like this, then you can adjust your settings over here. I'm just going to leave these the way they are right here. But you can see we've got other options for that too based on the angle that you're holding your stylus at. Then finally in your General tab, this is where you're going to dictate the Size Limits and your Opacity Limits. I don't typically mess with these ones unless I'm using a hyper accustomed brush. But for lettering, these are the important sections. Your Size Limits, this will determine how extreme your pressure. Because right now if I put a ton of pressure, you can see how big it gets. But if I reduce the Max that it can ever go to, I will reduce the max amount. No matter how much pressure I put on it, this is the Max amount that it'll ever get width wise. So that's where you'll edit this. I'm going to keep this one probably around 60 percent. Then the same thing with Opacity. If you are adjusting your Opacity back in the Pencil settings, for either the Opacity for the Pencil Tilt or the Pressure, this is where you'll want to adjust the transparency of your brush. This is what I like to have if you want a brush that's changing up with your pressure as you're writing. Now we can try it out. Let me increase the size of this so you can see it really well. We can try it out. Then I'll compare it to my original monoweight brush right here. You can really see just by editing a few settings, all the adjustments that have been made to the way that the brush behaves when you're using it for lettering. Now we've got pressure, so the size changes on pressure. We have that Smoothness applied as well as our StreamLine. So it writes really well. Any brushes that you really love that are great for painting, all you have to do is make a duplicate brush and then it adjusts those few settings and it'll work great for lettering as well. So those are my biggest tips when adjusting your brushes for hand lettering in Procreate. 21. Lettering Tips: Preparing Lettering for Font Making: In this video, I'm going to walk you through my biggest tips for creating lettering with the intention of converting it to a workable, soluble font later on. I have an online course called Learn Font Making, and in the course, we create hand lettered fonts. We take lettering that's either created traditionally or on an iPad, and we bring it onto our computer and into font making software, we make it all work together, and then we post it for sale to create a passive income stream. In this video, I want to show you how to create your lettering on an iPad with the intention of bringing it onto the computer later in order to convert it into a workable font. If that's something you're interested in, then this video is for you. I like using lettering guides when I'm creating my lettering on an iPad just to keep everything super uniform, and that way you can kind of look at everything altogether. In this course, I included a set of free lettering guides, and you can find that in the bonus section of the course. I am back to the Procreate bonuses in my browser. I'm in Safari, but this works the exact same way whether you're in Safari, or if you're in Chrome. Once again, the URL for your bonuses is every-tuesday.com/ procreate-bonuses, and you're just going to scroll down until you get to your lettering guide, so tap on your "Lettering Guide Image", and then hit the "Download icon", and you can see there's three different kinds. There are your standard traditional lettering guides, there's the italicized lettering guides, and then there's a dot grid, whichever guides are most helpful for you when you're creating your lettering. I'm going to use these traditional ones. I'm just going to move it up, so I have most of the lettering guides right here, and then create a screenshot. The newest iPad, it's the top button, and then it's the volume up buttons, so just hit them both at the same time to create a screenshot. Then what you're going to do is head into Procreate because this has already saved to your Camera Roll now as a screenshot. I have a high res screen size document which we created earlier on in this course, and I'm just going to hit the "Wrench", and choose "Add", and choose "Insert a photo". Here's that screenshot that I just took, so I'm going to select it, and it's going to pop it right into Procreate for me. I'm just going to deselect it, and now I can use this as my base for all the lettering that I do, and you can see it's already put on its own layer. The most important thing to remember right here is you want to make sure you're creating your lettering on a layer separate from this, because if you put it on this layer, it's all going to be stuck together, and when you bring it onto the computer later, it'll be a nightmare to try and separate these lines from your lettering, so just remember to create a brand new layer right on top. Grab your favorite layering brush. I've got my custom flat marker brush right here that came with the class, and then you can see we've got our ascender height, cap height, x-height, baseline, and descender. All of your letters should live right on your baseline. Your x-height is the height of the lowercase x, and many of you are lowercase letters like this e and this o right here. Your ascender height is for your ascenders like l's, and lowercase h's, and lowercase t's. Your cap height is right here, so all of your caps will go up to that line, and then any of your lowercase letters that extend below the baseline, like a lowercase g or a lowercase j, will go down to this line, that's your descender line. The other important thing to remember is that you want to create all of your lettering for font making in black. You want it black and white because it will create the most amount of contrast. When you move your lettering that you create on the iPad onto the computer, you need to vectorize it in Adobe Illustrator so the font can be used in all common programs where installing a custom font is allowed. In order to vectorize it, you want the highest contrast possible, so you can pick up all the details, especially if you're using a textured brush. Make sure you're using true black. Remember, double tap down here where the black is, and then I'll give you true black. All right. There are two ways that you can create your lettering for font making. You can connect all of your lowercase characters together, and then you can create all of your uppercase separately, and then your numbers and your punctuation. Creating all of your lowercase characters together, make sure you're on that new layer, will look like this. That will be all of my lowercase characters, and then I would put in all of my uppercase, and remember to go up to your cap height. You get the idea. All my uppercase would come right here. That would be your sans-serifs style. If you wanted a more script style, you can definitely draw out script style uppercase characters. Then you would put in your numbers and your punctuation. If you run out of space down here, all you have to do is turn off this layer and create a new layer right above it and continue working. You can have as many layers as you'd like. Just make sure that you're putting it on new layers whenever you run out of space, and you can just keep this template in the background while you work, so all of your characters are uniform and they look more like a family. That way, when you are creating your font, everything looks like it's uniform and it belongs together. Another way to create all of your lettering, I know that sometimes when you're creating all of your lowercase and connecting them all together, it doesn't really feel as natural as if you're just writing out a word the way you normally would, that feels comfortable to you. What I also like doing is coming up with a word for every letter of the alphabet. I'll start with a capital A, and the first word that comes to mind would be apple, so then I would write out apple. Even though I've got two piece here now, I've got two piece to choose from for my final font, so I've got more options that way, and then I can create B, and the first word that comes to mind is balloon, and then C. Now, this way, you are taking care of all of your uppercase characters together and you're writing out real words, so it feels a little more natural the way your lowercase connects. Just go through the entire alphabet, and then just make sure that you've fulfilled the need for every lowercase character like X's, and Z's, and V's are less common with many words, so just make sure you integrate a few of those with whatever words that you come up with, and then remember your punctuation and your numbers. Once you have all of your lettering all set on as many layers as you'd like, now it's time to export it, to send it to your computer so you can use it later on and factorize it for font making. What you want to do is turn off your template layer. Just turn that off, and check it so that the visibility is off, and now you just have your black and your white. We're going to get into exporting later on in the course. But for font making, this is what you're going to want to do. You want to come up to your Wrench, to Share. I've had the best luck with experience either a JPEG or a PNG file. I typically choose JPEG right here, but feel free to choose PNG. You really don't need a TIF, a PDF, or a PSD file because it's just creating a larger file size than you need. We're just taking this into Illustrator, and factorizing it, and then we're done with it. We just need a really high-quality image, and since we're using a screen size document at 300 DPI, we already have that high res side, so we don't need any of these larger files. A JPEG or a PNG will be perfectly sufficient. If you choose JPEG, for example, it's going to export it, and then if you are on a Mac, you can just AirDrop it onto your Mac. If you're on a PC or if you're on a Mac and you don't have airdropping capabilities, just e-mail it to yourself. That's also what I do. Either AirDrop it or you can e-mail it to yourself, and I'll just attach in an e-mail, open up the e-mail on your computer, download it, and then you can bring it straight into Illustrator and get working from there. If you have more than one layer that you need to export, totally fine. You just turn off the layer you currently have turned on, turn on the next layer, and repeat the process. Go to the "Wrench", "Share", "JPEG". It ports, e-mail it to yourself, or AirDrop it to your MAC, and then you're all set. That is how to prepare your lettering for font making if font making is something you're interested in. A link to my courses right below this video if you want to learn more about font making. There's also a free mini course available there if you want to get some extra information about what's involved with converting your hand lettering into workable soluble fonts. 22. Project SHADE: Creating + Applying Multiple Colors to Lettering: Okay. We are on to the third project in this class. What you see in front of you is exactly what we're going to create together. We're actually going to be using that brush that we customized in one of the previous videos on editing your brushes for lettering. If you've followed along with that, you've already got the brush and we are all good to go. I've got my color palette all loaded up down here and you already know how to do that if you've been following along. I'm going to create a brand new document that's once again screen size high rise. We're going to start out by just putting in our lettering right now. Our lettering is going to be the same color as our background for the effect that we're creating. I'm going to create the lettering first. We're going to put in all those different shades of color into the lettering and then we will add in the background color. I've got my layer right here, I'm going to rename this one shade, because this one is all lettering this time we're not adding any type-able text. I'm going to grab that custom lettering brush that we created together and just write out your word. I like putting a little flourish underneath it. That's large, let me make it just a little bit smaller by selecting and pinching it. All right. Now we're going to start integrating all of those different shades of color and this is really fun. We're utilizing stack-able clipping mask for that. We're going to create a new layer right above this one and we're going to apply clipping mask to it right away. Tap on it and choose clipping mask. I'm going to start with the lightest shades first. I'm going to start with my yellow right here. I'm going to rename this one the light- yellow and we're going to grab our soft airbrush. Over here, go to your air brushes and grab your soft brush and you want it to be fairly large. I've got 20 percent right here. All you're going to do is paint in random areas in your word. You don't want to fill too much because we're going to put in a bunch of different colors here. But I like just randomly placing different areas. All right, that looks pretty good. Now we're going to create a new layer right above it. We're going to apply clipping mask. Once again, we are masking all of these little splotches of color right into our lettering layer. This one, we're going to do peach. I'm going to rename this one peach and I'm going to select that color and reduce my brush size just a little bit. I'm down to 12 percent for this one. Once again, just in random areas, start painting it in. Okay? Now we're moving on to the next layer and this one is going to be bright- pink, so apply clipping mask, rename bright- pink. Select that color. I like the size of this brush, so I'm going to keep it the 12 percent. Actually, I'm going to make it just a little smaller. I'm going to come down to eight percent for this one. What you're trying to do right here is eliminate all of the darker purple from it. Now any areas that are dark purple, those are the areas that I'm going to paint with my final color. Create our final layer right above it, apply a clipping mask again. This color is going to be regular pink. I'm going to tap, rename pink and then grab that color and brush it in. I'm going to reduce the size of my brush to seven percent and just paint in those remaining areas. All right, I think I've got them all. I put a little on this E. Okay, so now we are all set, we can drop in our background color now. I'm going to create a brand new layer. I'm going to hold it and drag it all the way to the bottom underneath my lettering layer. Grab your background color and just drop that in and we're going to rename this one background. Everything's looking really good right now. Then the last step will be to integrate some shadow areas where our letters are going to overlap different strokes and then we'll put in a texture at the very end. That's what we're going to do in the next video and finish everything off. 23. Project SHADE: Adding Depth + Texture: In this video we're going to add in the shaded areas of our text so we have that cool perception of depth where our strokes are overlapping. Then we're going to add in texture to our lettering, and then just add a background glow to finish everything off. We're going to use our background color for our shadow because it's the darkest color in our color palette. We're going to be using our soft brush for this, and we're going to be making it about five percent. Then we want this to be on top of all of our layers right here, so create a new layer above. It's also going to be masked inside of our lettering. Tap on your layer thumbnail and choose clipping mask. Now, we're just going to paint in the areas where the shadow needs to go. I know that this stroke is overlapping this stroke. Wherever you have an overlapping stroke, the shadow will be underneath it. I'm going to give myself a little spot of color right here, and then we'll remove the parts that we don't need afterwards. This stroke overlaps this part of the stroke, so I'm going to add a little bit of color right here as well, and then we come up and come down, and then this part overlaps here. We have an overlap right here, right here, right here, and right here, and there we go. We've got all of our shaded areas and now we need to remove the parts that we don't need. We're going to utilize a layer mask for this. We've got a clipping mask and we're also applying a layer mask. I'm going to tap on my layer and choose Mask. You can have a layer mask attached to a clipping mask. This is definitely getting a bit more complex now, but totally doable. We've got black selected, our true black right here. I'm going to return to the monoweight brush, and we're just going to brush out the stroke that's overlapping the other one. The cool thing about this is because we're using a mask, if you mess up at all, you can see, if I went too far right here, all I have to do is switch back to white, and this will reveal the shadow again. This is where layer mask gets really powerful. All right. I want to reveal more of my shadow. If this is too hard of a brush, meaning the edge is is too hard, all you have to do is switch to a softer brush if you'd like it to be a little more seamless. I'm going to reduce the size a little bit. I'm switching to a softer brush and that makes that transition really nice. There are areas where you want a hard transition, there's always areas where you want a soft transition. I'm going to switch back to my monoweight brush, go back to my black because I'm hiding the shadow now, before, I was revealing the shadow, and just come along this edge. I want all of these shadow to go away, so I'm going to make my brush a little bigger. If you zoom out, you can see how nice that's looking. Now we're going to just continue on with the other areas of our letters in the same exact way. Now, we have all of our shadows all set. If you'd like them to be even darker, you can change the blend mode to 'multiply'. Tap on the N, under the darkening category, and multiply. You can see they all got a little bit darker and they're interacting with the colors underneath them a bit more. I like doing that and then reducing my opacity down to about 70 percent, just so it feels a little more natural. Now, all we have to do is drop in our texture. You just want to make sure your texture is on the topmost layer, if you want to integrate it with all of the colors right here. I'm just going to create a brand new layer on top, apply clipping mask, label this one as texture, and I'm going to go grab that free silver jewel texture that came with the class. I'm just going to hit the wrench, add, insert a photo, and here's that texture. Tap on the texture. You can scale it down and just make sure that it's filling all the areas that you'd like it to. Since we already have the clipping mask applied, you can see it locked it into our lettering right away. I'm just going to deselect, and now we can apply our blend mode so it interacts with the colors that are underneath it. We're just going to come to our texture layer, tap on the end, and you can toggle through. I know that I want this to be a brighter interaction, so I'm going to come to my contrasts and choose overlay. You can also toggle through the other different blend modes to see what you'd like, but I'm going to stick with overlay for this. If the intensity is too much for you, remember, you can always reduce the opacity or the transparency of that texture as well, but I'm going to keep mine all the way up to 100. The last thing we need to do is just add in some back-lighting to put the focus entirely on our lettering in this piece. A really easy way to do that is just come to your layers, tap on your background layer, create a new layer right above it. We're going to label this one "Glow", and then we're going to select our brightest color. We're going to tap on the yellow color right here and then grab your soft airbrush. You're going to come into airbrushing and tap on "Soft airbrush" right here. We're going to make this really tiny, down to like two percent. I've found that making a small glow and then expanding it makes a much smoother glow than just making it super-large and tapping it once and having a giant glow behind it. I like the effect of stretching a small glow. I've got my brush size to two percent. I'm just going to tap once on the screen and then grab my selection tool, that arrow tool up there, and then just keep pinching to make it nice and large and stretch it out to the shape that you'd like it to be. That looks pretty good right there. I'm just going to rotate this back. Now, I'm going to change the blend mode of this one to overlay as well, so contrast, overlay. You can see the difference, it looks really subtle right here. Let me zoom out. If I turn that layer on and off, you can see the effect that it has. It's very subtle, but it's still beautiful and it definitely focuses your attention right on the lettering since it's right behind it. That is our project shade. We use a custom lettering brush, our own hand lettering. We utilized clipping mask stacking, and we integrated a texture along with multiple blend modes. 24. Final Project BEAUTY: Preparing Your Template + Editing Guides: Welcome to the final project. In this course, we're going to create a wreath together, a decorative wreath and we're going to be utilizing a lot of our symmetry guides. You'll be able to see how powerful your guides in your symmetry settings really are to create this wreath. You can use as much of the symmetry or as little of the symmetry as you'd like, I'm going to show you a bunch of different scenarios. We're just going to get started. I've got my mono weight brush already selected, and I've already loaded in our beauty color palette right here. If you are unsure of how to load the color palette, just refer to some of the past projects and you'll be able to see exactly how to bring those in. The first thing we're going to do is bring in our background color, which is this dark green color. I'm just going to drag this onto my art board and label this background. Once again, I'm using a screen size, high res document size. Now we've got our background in and we need a template to base our whole wreath off. I'm going to create a new layer right above this. I'm going to grab one of my lightest colors. It doesn't matter what color it is, just make sure it's light. Then with my airbrush, I'm going to come to Air Brushes right here and choose a hard brush right here. This is the default brush, so everyone should have this. You're going to make this pretty large. Then you're just going to tap on your screen once. One tap and now I've got this perfect circle here without having to draw it. I can select it and move it into place centered. Let's make it perfectly centered by turning on our guides. Tap on your "Wrench", "Canvas", turn on your Drawing Guide, Edit Drawing Guide. Come to 2D up the grid size all the way, up the thickness all the way. I'm going to change this color so we can see it better. Hit "Done". Now I'm going to grab my circle and align it perfectly. I'm not going to go above center here. I want this to be perfectly positioned. Take an extra second if you need it, just make sure all of your dots are hitting your guidelines right here. Then the next thing you want to do is just reduce the opacity of your circle. This is going to be our template for our wreath. Actually, I'm going to bring the size down just a little bit so I can put some decorative elements all the way around. I don't want to worry about having decorative elements come too close to the edge right there. That's why I scaled it down a little bit. Then I can just bring this down here. That looks good. Now we want to reduce the opacity of our circles since we're using it as a template. Make it light enough so you can still see it, but not too dark where you're not going to be able to see what you're working on as you work on top of it. Now I'm going to label this Template and create a new layer right above it, and this is where we're going to start bringing in our different elements. I'm going to bring in some leaves first, some fairly large leaves. I'm going to grab my light green color right here. Label this large leaves. I've got my mono weights brush right here selected. I'm going to change my guide settings so we're going to start introducing that symmetry. Return to your wrench, return to your Edit Drawing Guide under Canvas. Now we want to come over here it is symmetry. This is where we choose what symmetry we want. The default one has a vertical guideline right here, which means whatever you draw on one side will be repeated on the other side. If I want a horizontal, I just tap "Horizontal" down here and now whatever I drop here will be repeated down here and vice versa. Quadrant will repeat four times. Anything I drawn on one quadrant will be repeated in the other three. Then radial splits this into eight different sections. Whatever I do in one section will be repeated in the other seven. I want to start with a middle ground, so I'm going to start with quadrant and then I just want to change my color on my guide so we can see it better. I'm going to increase the thickness of it. That looks good. You want to make sure rotational symmetry is turned on. Just toggle this over, makes sure these are your settings down here and then you're all set to go. Hit "Done." This is only going to apply to this layer, the settings that I just put on, you can see it's got assisted written underneath the layer now. When I draw in one quadrant, it's going to be repeated in the other three. I'm using a five percent brush size. I'm going to create a leaf right here and you can see it repeats in the other ones. I'm going to drop color in. If you're on Instagram, you may have seen some videos where people use the symmetry feature to create Mandalas from the center point. That's a really fun use for this symmetry setting as well. But we're going to just keep it to reuse for this one. I'm going to draw in some extra leaves right here. I want to put enough leaves, so it still looks like a circle around here. If I have too few it might look a little boxy. Then just fill these in with color and you can see how fast you can create a wreath just by using the symmetry setting. These are my big background elements that are going to be supporting my smaller elements that are going to sit on top of them. If at anytime you want to preview what you've got going on, just return to your layers and turn the visibility of your template layer on and off. At the end we're going to turn this off all the way. But as you're working, you can see how things are looking by turning it on and off. Now we're ready for another layer. I'm going to create a new layer. Once again, remember now anything I draw on this one is going to stay here because those settings that we had were only on this one layer. Whenever you create a new layer, just remember you have to reput in any symmetry settings that you may want for that layer. For this one we're going to create small branches. I'm going to rename this one Branches. I'm going to grab my darker green color right here. I'm going to reduce the size of my brush down to three percent. Let's grab our most extreme form of symmetry for this one. Tap on your "Wrench", hit "Edit Drawing Guide" under Canvas, and we're going to come over here and choose "Radial." Everything else is fine the way we have it. Rotational symmetry is already turned on, so we're good to go. I'm going to hit "Done"and I'm just going to come in here and draw a branch like this. Draw another branch. You can see those branches repeated all the way around. I can preview it by returning to my layers palette and turning on and off our template layer. That's looking really good. I'm going to create a new layer right above it. We're going to label this one abstract flowers. In the next video we're going to pick up right here to continue on creating our flowers. We will put in our lettering and we'll finish everything off. 25. Final Project BEAUTY: Completing Wreath + Adding Lettering: In the last video, we left off with starting our flowers for a wreath. We're going to pick up right there, we're going to create abstract flowers very similar to how we created them in our very first project of the course for the floral project. We're going to come down here and we are going to select our dark purple color first. We're going to just drop in some dot clusters in different areas. We're going to change up the symmetry a little bit on this one. I want you to be able to see all the different types of symmetry that we have. I'm going to tap on my wrench, tap on edit drawing guide, and this time, we're going to do a horizontal one. Everything else looks good. I'm going to hit done. Now, I can come in here and it's nice to change up your symmetry every now and then. That way, everything doesn't look too repetitive with how it repeats around your wreath. I like changing it up quite a bit. I'm going to repeat the exact same shape of our abstract flowers like we did in the first project of this course. If you remember, we just did little dot clusters wherever we needed them. If I zoom out, you can see it's repeated all over here. I'm just going to come around here and just put a bunch of little clusters in. We've got all of our dot clusters, so I'm going to create a new layer right on top and we're going to drop in a brighter color of the purple just to add a little extra depth. Same exact process as before. I'm going to do a new layer called abstract flower details. I'm going to grab my light purple right here, come up here and hit the wrench, hit edit drawing guide because remember, we have to put in our symmetry settings for every new layer that we do. Just make sure horizontal is still selected or rotational symmetries turned on, and hit done, and then just come in here and do little dots. I'm going to bring in my brush size down to three percent for this one. We've got our depth applied to our little clusters and now we can give them leaves. I'm going to create a brand new layer on top of this one, call it abstract leaves. I'm going to grab my light green color once again, and just turn on that horizontal symmetry, and hit done. Then, just come in and create any kind of leaves that you would like. I've still got my three percent brush selected right here. Now, I've got my abstract flowers in there and now I want to bring in some daisies. I'm going to group all my abstract flower layers together, just toggle them over, hit group. Label this Abstract Flowers, toggle out my group, create a new layer right on top of it. I'm going to call this Daisy, and change this one to my darker orange color. This time, I want to do vertical symmetry just so you can see all the symmetry at once. Come to my wrench, edit drawing guide, change this to vertical symmetry, and hit done. Now, whatever I do on this side will be repeated over on this side. I'm just going to do a bunch of daisies that vary in scale. Now, we just need to drop the centers in our daisies. I'm just going to create a new layer and label this Daisy Centers. Apply the same symmetry to it. Hit done. We're going to change this color to our lightest yellow color right here, and just drop the dot inside each one of these daisies. Then, just finish everything off. I usually fill in any gaps or areas that need a little extra something with just some randomly spaced leaves. I'm going to grab a brand new color. I'm going to grab this final color over here, and I'll create a new layer on top of it. I'm going to group my daisy layers together. We'll group those and just label this one Daisies. Close that group. We're going to name this one, Leaves. I'm going to remove all of the symmetry after this just so you can see this project go from the most extreme form of symmetry all the way down to no symmetry at all. I'm going to turn off my drawing guide. Now, I don't have any symmetry at all. You can see there's no assistant underneath this layer. I'm just drawing it straight off without any guides or anything. We can even turn our template off now since we've got our circle pretty well established. Now, I'm just going to come in here in any place where I feel like the layout just needs a little something extra. I'm just going to draw in some leaves. We've got our final small leaves, just filling in any last minute gaps that we may want something in. I would always recommend doing at least one layer that has no symmetry on it. It just enhances the entire piece by not making it feel it too repetitive all the way through to have some of these random pieces, really ties everything together. I know it takes a little extra time to go all the way around the circle, but I would definitely recommend having at least one of your layers do that. One final thing that I'd like to do is just insert a little bit of texture into here. I'm going to go down to my large leaves right here and just drop one of my watercolor textures in there. You could also use the silver jeweled if you'd like, or any other textures that you may have on hand. I really like the look of watercolor in leaves, so I'm going to do that so you can see what it looks like. I'm going to come over to my wrench and insert a photo, and I'm going to grab my green water color texture right here. That's part of my procreate watercolor kit. It's just going to drop right in. You want to make sure it's covering all those big leaves so when we apply the clipping mask, it'll fill all of those leaves. I'm going to come over to this layer, tap on it and choose clipping mask, and now, it's masked in there. If I'd like to apply blend mode because it's a little too saturated for my layout, all I have to do is hit the end and change this. I'm going to change it down and multiply. Now, you can see It's got this really nice, subtle texture in here. I can even reduce the opacity if I feel like the texture is just a little too intense. You can see we've got a lot of flexibility with that. I'm going to bring it down to 65 percent. I like the way that looks. Lastly, what we're going to do is just finish everything off with whatever you want to write inside of your wreath. I'm going to write "beauty". I'm going to come to my top-most layer, create a new layer on top of it. I'm going to grab my light green color, I'm going to label this lettering, and I'm going to grab my free flat marker brush that came with this course and just write out "beauty". I'm going to be using a 35 percent size brush. Obviously, I wouldn't had a pretty extreme angle, so I'm going to fix that. See, rotate it just a little bit more. That looks good. If you'd like to add in a background glow like we did in the last project, you can feel free to do that. Just make sure you add it in right above your background color layer. That way, it doesn't interfere with any of your other layers. That's how to you create a wreath with all kinds of different symmetry. We've integrated a texture and a clipping mask, multiple layers, groups, and even some hand lettering. 26. Exporting Options + Final Steps: How to Export Your Design: In this video, we're going to talk about exporting your artwork. So if you'd like to bring it on your computer, if you'd like to print it, if you'd like to post it to social media, we're going to talk about what to do with your artwork now that it's all created and procreate. We're going to use this first project a Floral project as an example for this. So when you're ready and everything's done, make sure all of your layers are nice and organized especially if you plan on bringing this into Photoshop. This will work wonders for you if everything's organized right here and labeled. So I always make sure that my layers are labeled an organized before I export anything, and when you're ready, just hit the Wrench icon, up here, Navigate, to share and you can see all the different file formats that you can share. If you'd like to share your artwork with another procreate user, like in this class you got all the procreate files for free. When I finished creating these I exported them as Procreate files, and then I gave them to you in the bonus section of the class, so that's how I made those Procreate files. So if you'd like to share your procreate artwork with someone else, save it as a Procreate file. I like bringing mine into Photoshop for any last enhancements or editing that I may need to do, and when you export as a PSD, it keeps all of your layers, everything labeled. It's really, really handy, even your blend modes are pulled over. So your PSD is basically your most editable form that you can bring on to the computer. I love exploiting as a PSD. You can also change your color mode if you need to and make any additional edits that are necessary for you to print really well, as well. If you don't have Photoshop and you'd like to print your artwork, I recommend exporting as a PDF, opening it on a computer and then printing from the computer versus printing straight from your iPad. I know a lot of people have had issues matching color when they print directly from the iPad, so I would highly recommend in the best case scenario, if you'd like to print anything export as a PSD, bring it onto a computer, edit anything that you need to and then print it from there. If you don't have Photoshop, you can print from any other of these file types, just do a test run and see how that works out. All right, so we've got PDF, JPEG, PNG, and TIFF. PDF is good if you'd like to print it off, it will be a larger size. JPEG is going to typically be your smallest file size, but if you created the original file at a large size, at a high resolution, it will still reproduce really well if you just need to print it or post it to social media, JPEG is a really great option. You just want to make sure that you've created your document at a really nice size before you export as a JPEG. A PNG is similar to a JPEG, it retains your image quality a little bit better if you need to resize later. So PNG is also a great option. TIFF is very similar to a PNG. It will be a slightly larger file, but still a great file type for printing or editing later on. Okay. Then finally, if you want to share just a few of your layers with another artist that may be working on a similar project as you, you can export your individual layers down here by choosing PDF, PNG files, or Animated GIF. So if you'd like an Animated GIF, like a stop motion look, that can be really helpful to export all of your layers individually and then you can get that look that you're going for. With PNG files, you're just going to be exporting your layers as individual PNG image files. Then a PDF is going to be more of a document type file. All right, so once you choose whatever file format that you'd like, you're just going to tap on that file format, it's going to export it and then you can choose what you want to do with it. If you're on a Mac, it's really helpful to export, you can export pretty large file sizes through AirDrop, but if you don't have a Mac, if you're on a PC or if your AirDrop is just not enabled on your Mac, I recommend emailing it to yourself than opening it on your computer, just download it from that e-mail. If your file size is too large, you're going to want to save it to your files and then you can save it to your Google Drive from there. So that is a basic overview of exporting your files so you can use them after procreate. 27. Exporting Options + Final Steps: Thank You + Next Steps: That concludes our class. Thank you so much for being a part of Procreate for Beginners. I hope that that you've learned something new and that you're excited to dive into all that Procreate has to offer. I wanted to offer some next steps now that you have this foundation built up on procreate, what do you do next? I've got a few tips. First of all, experiment. Think of things that you'd like to make and then give yourself the freedom to experiment using the tools you're now familiar with. Since you have an understanding of what those tools are meant to be used for, you can get even more creative when you see something that you really love, try to recreate the using the tools that you already know and have used. The more you practice, the faster and better you'll get. You'll understand the tools and how they behave that much more just with time that you spend with them. If you're looking for a challenge, a really fun exercise would be to go back to our projects and just look at the final outcome, and attempt to recreate it without watching any of the video tutorials on how to make it. Just look at that final outcome and make your decisions based on what the final outcome looks like. Please share what you've made with others in the class by using the #PROCREATEIT. That's all one word on Instagram and I'd love to see it, so please tag me. My handle is @everytuesday. If you'd like to take your skills even further, I offer a class called 3D lettering in procreate. Now that you have the foundations, this is the perfect opportunity to push your skills that much further and add on additional skills in the 3D Realms. 3D lettering in Procreate uses the exact same tools from this course but we use them in more advanced ways. There's an emphasis on selections, multiple detailed layering and also color variation and shading to get those letters really popping off of the screen. You'll be able to easily apply the 3D techniques that you learned in that class to any lettering, any text or any flat graphic as well. That skill share classes available at every-tuesday.com/ skillshare-3D-procreate. You can also get to it by just going to my profile here on skill share and clicking on the class from there. In this course, you saw how we prepared our lettering for font making. If you'd like to convert your procreate lettering into a professional sellable font, I have a bunch of free resources over on my website for that. You can find that at every-tuesday.com. Just search for our font making and you'll find a bunch of results of free tutorials and lessons on converting your lettering into a font. Once again, thanks so much for being a part of this class. Don't forget to use our class hashtag and I cannot wait to see what you make.