Procreate 5X for Beginners | Teela Cunningham | Skillshare

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Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Watch this class and thousands more

Get unlimited access to every class
Taught by industry leaders & working professionals
Topics include illustration, design, photography, and more

Lessons in This Class

39 Lessons (3h 34m)
    • 1. Procreate 5X for Beginners

      1:24
    • 2. Welcome: Getting Started/What You'll Learn

      6:40
    • 3. Welcome: Split Screen, Screen Protectors + Pencil Grips

      3:23
    • 4. Welcome: Downloading and Installing Class Freebies

      7:09
    • 5. Welcome: New Canvas + Resolution + Color Profiles

      8:39
    • 6. Interface: Brush Basics

      3:06
    • 7. Interface: Quick Shapes

      1:55
    • 8. Interface: Color Builds + Palettes

      4:02
    • 9. Interface: Recoloring Options

      7:27
    • 10. Interface: Guides + Symmetry

      6:05
    • 11. Interface: Layers + Blend Modes

      6:15
    • 12. Interface: Making, Moving + Editing Selections

      4:33
    • 13. Interface: Using + Editing Typeable Text

      5:27
    • 14. Interface: Installing Custom Fonts

      4:02
    • 15. Interface: Magic Wand, Selection Tool + Cursor

      8:52
    • 16. Interface: Preferences Overview

      5:43
    • 17. Proj 1: Setting Text + Background Color

      3:47
    • 18. Proj 1: Adding Details + Organizing Layers

      11:01
    • 19. Proj 1: More Elements + More Organizing

      3:42
    • 20. Proj 1: Final Details

      4:31
    • 21. Masking: Clipping Masks

      7:47
    • 22. Masking: Layer Masks

      6:15
    • 23. Proj 2: Setting Background + Text

      3:44
    • 24. Proj 2: Adding Flourishes + Teardrops

      3:11
    • 25. Proj 2: Layer Masking/Intertwining Flourishes

      5:23
    • 26. Proj 2: Text Highlights Using a Clipping Mask

      2:27
    • 27. Custom Brushes: Basic Brush Settings

      8:13
    • 28. Custom Brushes: Beyond the Basics

      9:16
    • 29. Proj 3: Creating 3D Lettering

      9:30
    • 30. Proj 3: Applying Depth with Texture

      5:07
    • 31. Proj 3: Background + Final Details

      2:55
    • 32. Animation Basics: Animation Assist Palette Options

      7:01
    • 33. Animation Basics: Simple Beating Heart

      6:57
    • 34. Animation Basics: Exporting Animations

      2:36
    • 35. Proj 4: Project Overview

      2:44
    • 36. Proj 4: Creating the Artwork

      6:29
    • 37. Proj 4: Animating 'Drawn In' Lettering

      12:16
    • 38. Proj 4: Exporting the Animation

      2:01
    • 39. Thank You + Next Steps

      2:50
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About This Class

New to Procreate? Begin building a solid foundation with non-destructive editing methods, an efficient workflow and prep your files for production-ready outcomes.

In this beginner-friendly course, we follow simple tools tutorials and follow them up with full project tutorials using those tools. You’ll build workflow memory and confidence with your new skills as you use them in real scenarios after seeing how they behave. Utilize the free assets from the class to take your projects even further, both in the class and in the future. At the end of the course, you’ll have a firm knowledge of the program and its tools, along with plenty of ideas for your own unique pieces.

Meet Your Teacher

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Teela Cunningham

Hand Lettering + Graphic Design

Top Teacher

Hey! I'm Teela and I help designers + hand letterers build their skillsets to open new creative + financial opportunities. Freebies + tutorials here! > https://every-tuesday.com

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Transcripts

1. Procreate 5X for Beginners: Procreate is now one of the most popular apps for creating artwork on an iPad and with each new update, it becomes more and more powerful. If you're new to Procreate, those updates can get pretty overwhelming. That's where this course comes in. In Procreate 5X for Beginners, we break down all the most important tools in the most digestible way. We begin with mini-tutorials describing tools and techniques for an efficient workflow without the confusion. After a series of mini-tutorials, we create a project together using those same tools to increase confidence. The reinforcement of using those tools on a real project also helps to make future projects a breeze. We'll complete four main projects together that focus on layer order, color palettes, brush settings, editable text, clipping masks, and layer masks, exporting your work, and even animation. When you enroll, you'll also receive some Procreate bonuses. Included in the course are four custom Procreate brushes, every color palette for a different projects, a transparent PNG texture, and every Procreate project file, if you ever need to reference them in the future. Whether you're brand new to Procreate or had been an avid user that could use some additional workflow tips, this course was created for you. Hit "Enroll" to learn Procreate, and make some pretty cool art at the same time. 2. Welcome: Getting Started/What You'll Learn: Welcome to Procreate 5X for beginners, I'm so excited you're here and honored that you've decided to learn Procreate for me, it's truly one of my favorite programs. I've been using it since the very first version came out, and I now create weekly tutorials for it. I promise you, you are in the right place and we're going to have a lot of fun together. Before we get started, I want to share what you'll learn. You will have an idea of expectations for this course. First we're going to go through creating new Canvases. We're going to talk about resolution and color profiles. We're going to talk about interface basics. You'll have a handle on all the common tools that you will use whenever you're creating new artwork in Procreate. Will discuss masking in Procreate at length, there are two types of masks, clipping masks and layer masks. They're both extremely important because both of them, even though they're pretty different, can make your workflow much quicker and allow you to do different things that you wouldn't be able to otherwise. We're going to talk about brush customizations. If you've heard about Procreate at all or if you're familiar with Procreate, you know Procreate's brush engine has gotten some huge improvements over the last couple of versions. We're going to talk about altering existing brushes and then where to find certain brush settings depending on what you would like to do with your specific brush. We're also going to dive into animation basics, which I'm really excited about this on. Because past versions of Procreate made it really difficult or a little confusing to get animation working properly. But now with 5X, they have the animation assist palette, which makes things so much easier than they ever were before. I'm going to walk you through exactly how to use that palette. We're going to create a simple animation and then we're going to create a more complex animation in our fourth project. Then finally, we'll talk about exporting. The file formats that I recommend for exporting your regular artwork and then your animations as well. Let's talk about our class projects. Now this class came with four projects. The first project is just a very basic floral initial. There's a lot of elements here, but the main focus is going to be on layer order. Layer order is an essential foundational skill to have because it allows you to know where to place different items in your artwork as you're working, everything can be much more organized. It'll be much easier to find different things. We'll talk about layer groups. We're also going to be using some typeable texts, will apply color and we're going to be using our brushes. In project 2 will be using typeable text again, we're going to be integrating both layer masks and clipping masks, will be using multiple brushes for this one. We're also going to return to layer organization because it's such an important skill to have. Project number 3, we're going to create a 3D lettering effect, which is really fun. It's going to look like your lettering is actually popping off of the screen. I'm going to show you my method for doing that. We're going to be using the motion blur, we're going be using clipping mask, layer masks, transparency settings, and we'll throw in a background texture too. Then in the fourth project, this is our most complex project. I threw this one in here, is a challenge project, but all the tools and methods used in this project we will have gone over before you get to it. We'll create some animated drawn in lettering, will talk about layer organization again, we'll use the animation assist palette. We're going to be using a layer mask in a huge way in this project. Then we'll also export that video. The class bonuses that came with your enrollment, you got four free brushes. It's all part of a brush set. Once you install that, they'll all be together. Those brushes are my monoweight brush, which if you've ever caught any of my past tutorials, you know that I use the monoweight brush pretty often. I've included my signature brush, which is a very smooth lettering brush. It's got pressure settings so your thickness will change depending on the pressure you put on your stylist. I've included my dotted brush, which is great for adding some finishing touch details to your artwork. Then my smooth pencil brush, which is also a lettering brush. It's got some built-in texture and it also has that pressure variation. I've included all the color palettes for each project so you can follow along exactly. I've included a free ink texture, it's a transparent PNG. Then finally, all the procreate project files, the exact projects that you see me creating onscreen, I've included those raw procreate files. One question I'm asked pretty often is how you can use the artwork that you make by following along the projects in this class. I want to go over that really quick. First, if you recreate any of the projects and you want to post them to social media, that's totally fine with me. Feel free to do that. A mention and or a tag is always greatly appreciated. You cannot recreate these and then sell those recreations online, because it's based on my own original artwork and concepts. But you can use any of the skills, brushes and color pallets from this class for any future artwork that you want to create and plan to sell. If you'd like to use the ink texture that was provided for free and work that you want to sell because it's part of a larger set, you'll have to pick up the extended license for it. I've left a link on screen to that. One other thing that I want to mention really quick is that you may notice a slight color shift from what you see on screen when you're watching the class to what you see on your screen, on your iPad screen. There's a few reasons for that color variation. First of all, I'm recording a screen and just the general nature of recording a screen can sometimes alter color. The brightness of my screen is also going to affect the appearance of those colors, whether or not they're a little washed out or a little darker. The editing and video exporting process in the compression of the video can sometimes alter color a little bit. Then the screen your viewing it on, your screen specific settings, the brightness, whether it's a retina or non retina screen. It's impossible to match color exactly because of all of these different variables. But I promise we do our best. All the free color palettes that were provided are the exact ones that I'm using in every project, whether or not the color is exactly the same or a little different on screen, but please feel free to adjust them however you'd like. Just a quick mention of what I use to record on. I am on a third gen iPad Pro. It's a 2018 iPad. It is 12.9 inches and 256 gigs. I'm very happy with it. If you're in the market for a new iPad, I would definitely recommend this one based on my experiences with it. I loved the larger size, it feels like I'm drawing on a real sheet of paper. The storage size has been perfectly fine for me. I have tons of Procreate files on here. I use it on a daily basis and I haven't had any issues with storage. Then I'm also using a second gen, Apple pencil. The class hashtag for this. If you decide to recreate the projects and post them on social media, I would love it if you use class #PROCREATIT, you can look at past student projects and cheer other students on by visiting that hashtag in Instagram. If you do try this out and post on Instagram, please tag me my handles every Tuesday. With all that said, let's dive into Procreate 5X for beginners. 3. Welcome: Split Screen, Screen Protectors + Pencil Grips: I have just a few things, a few tips to keep in mind as you're watching the course and as you work in Procreate in the future, that could really improve your experience and make everything more enjoyable. The very first thing is, while you're watching the class, there's a way to watch the class and have a split screen. So you can watch it on one side of your screen and be working in Procreate on the other side at the exact same time. I recommend using Chrome to view this class on. It's just far more reliable than Safari is. I already had the class opened up in my Chrome browser on my iPad. You just slowly bring up your options down here at the bottom. Just pull up with your finger and I've already got Chrome right down here. In order to give myself a split screen, all I have to do is take it and drag it over here. If I drag it all the way, I can get more space, because if I just drop it right here, it's going to be pretty narrow, and that's fine if you want more room to work in Procreate. This one is more of a palette that you can move around on your screen. All you want to do is touch the little line up at the top, hold, and then you can drag it wherever you want it to go on here. If you want it to be larger on your screen, you're just going to drag it all the way to the right and hold. That will give you a true split screen, so then your video player will be much larger over here than it is in the small palette that you can drag around. Then you'll just have more limited space to work in Procreate, but that will allow you to watch the class and work in Procreate the same time if you don't have an additional screen that you can be watching the class on. That's my first tip. The second tip is I use a screen protector, and I was definitely a skeptic before I used a screen protector. I'm like, why would I do that? It's going to wear down my tip. It's going to change my experience drawing, I'm perfectly fine drawing on glass. Then I started using the paper-like screen protector. This is what that looks like. I was skeptical about that to not thinking that it could possibly feel like paper, but it definitely does. It's totally transformed how I work in Procreate because it makes me feel like I'm actually drawing on paper, not having your stylus glide across the glass. I didn't realize it'd make such a difference to me. But if you are in the market for a screen protector, I truly can't recommend paper-like enough. My other recommendation is a pencil grip. I didn't realize that my fingers, like the sides of my fingers would start hurting the way I hold the pencil when I'm drawing, it really rubs right here for me the way I hold the pencil. I didn't realize how much until I had some relief from such a simple thing. It's just a little silicone grip and it just slides onto your Apple pencil, and it can work with a first generation or 2nd generation Apple pencil. I love this. I didn't think it would be part of my workflow once I started using it, but I use it every single day, every single time I use Procreate. It makes things a lot more comfortable. I do have to slide it off on the 2nd gen Apple pencil in order to charge my Apple Pencil. But it seems like such a small price to pay to have that comfort that I didn't have before. You can see it slides on and off pretty easily, but it does stay on pretty well when it is on. So there is a little bit of tension there. I haven't experienced any issues with it getting too loose because it's got to come on and off whenever you're charging the pencil. That's my other recommendation as far as products go. I hope that helps to give you just a few things to keep in mind as you're working in Procreate to make things a lot easier. 4. Welcome: Downloading and Installing Class Freebies: In this video, I'm going to show you exactly where you can find all of the class freebies, how to download them, and then also how to download them into Procreate. You'll be ready to go for all the projects within this course. The first thing you want to do is make sure you're using Google Chrome as your browser. Safari has changed a lot in recent years, and every single time they change, it alters the method that you need to use in order to download and install things, and it can get really complex and confusing. Chrome has been really consistent through all these years. That is the only browser I now recommend to use to download and install assets into Procreate. It's so much easier than the other ones. You can find Google Chrome as a browser in the App Store. I highly encourage you to use Google Chrome to use for this part with the downloading and installing of your class freebies. What you want to do is with Google Chrome open, visit this URL: every-tuesday.com/5x-bonuses. That's going to bring you to a secret page in my website that houses all the freebies that came with this class. Since they're just for you because you have a Skillshare membership. Once you get in there, this is what it's going to look like. There's going to be an area to input a password. Input the password SKILLSHARE, it's all caps. Just put it in in the little dotted area, hit "Submit", and then you'll be in. Once you do that, this is what you'll see. You'll see a page full of bonuses. Now I'm going to walk you through how to download them and then how to get them into Procreate. We're going to start with the brushes first and we'll move through each kind of bonus because we've got brushes, we've got an image, we've got color swatches, and then we have raw Procreate files. We're going to start with the brushes first, plus they're the most fun. Tap on the brushes preview when this shows up. You want to be looking at this on an iPad. You're on an iPad, you're in Google Chrome, you're on the website, and this is what you're looking at on your iPad. When you're here, tap on the image of the brushes. When you do that, it's going to get gray and you'll see two little icons. There's the magnifying glass and then the download icon. The magnifying glass is just if you want to see what the image looks like at a larger size. Tap on the download icon and when you do that, it's going to download it. But it may not be very noticeable. You have to look at the very bottom of your screen. Down there you'll see where it says Download and you want to tap on "Download". Once it downloads it's going to change to Open in. Once it shows Open in, you're going to tap that. That's going to bring up this palette and it's basically asking you, where do you want to put this file now that it's been downloaded on your iPad? I recommend it having Procreate already open on your iPad. It'll be more likely to show up as one of the first suggested places to put the file. If you don't see Procreate as one of the first ones, just drag those icons to the left and it should show up there, especially if Procreate is already open on your iPad. Find Procreate, tap on Procreate and once you do that, when you go into Procreate, you're going to hit the little brush icon in the upper right corner. Then it'll open up your brush library and on the left side of your brush library, those are all the categories of your brushes. You're just going to look for one that's called ET Starter Pack. It should be up towards the top of all of your brush categories. When you tap on that, then you'll see all the brushes and they're all together so you get them all at once so we don't have to download them individually. Then you have them in there ready to go and you can just start using them right away. Now that we know how to do brushes, we're going to return back to the bonuses page on the website and we're going to download this ink texture. When you tap on the ink texture, it's going to gray out again and you're going to tap on that download icon. Once you do that, it's going to bring you to a page that only has the texture nice and big on it. It's downloading the image itself. In order to get this to your camera roll, which is where it needs to go because that's how we're going to use it in Procreate later on, we're going to bring it into Procreate from our camera roll. We need to save this image to our camera roll. In order to do that, you're just going to put your finger on the screen, just tap and hold and wait. This little menu will pop up after a few seconds and you just want to hit "Save Image". When you hit "Save Image", it will automatically save it to your camera roll and that's all you need to do. It's exactly where it needs to go. Then there'll be right on your camera rolls so when we get to the clipping mass part of the course, then you'll see exactly how to use it and bring it in and you'll be in great shape. Obviously this brought us to a brand new page because it has the image on it. In order to get back to the library of Procreate freebies, just hit the back arrow in your browser and you'll be good to go. Now that we have the brushes and the image, Now let's move on to the color swatches. Once again, you're going to tap on a color swatch and then tap on the download icon. This is going to work very, very similar to what we did with the brushes. Once you hit the Download icon, it's going to show up at the bottom of your screen. You're going to tap "Download", then you're going to tap "Open In". Then you'll see the menu and hit "Procreate", and then it will install it directly into Procreate. Once you're in Procreate, you want to hit the little color dot up in the top right corner. Then that will open up your different color palette options. If you don't see the screen right away at the bottom of all of the options, you'll see like five different categories. There's this classic harmony value and pallets. You want to tap on pallets and that'll bring up all of your color palettes and then just scroll all the way to the very bottom and that color swatch that you've just downloaded will appear at the very bottom. You'll see that color palette there. If you want to start using it right away, you just want to hit to set default. When you set it as the default, then you want to go into the disk view. That's the view that you will see me using throughout all the projects. Then just tap on "Disk", the little disk category at the very bottom, and you'll be all set to go. That's how you navigate between them, but we'll talk about that much more in the videos coming up. But I just want to give you a quick heads-up now that that's how to install them, how to find them, and then how to set it as a default so you can start using them right away. Now that we have the color palettes, the brushes in the texture, now let's download and install the raw Procreate files. I included these just so you can see how my files are built. If you're running into trouble at any point in time, these are the exact files that came from the videos that were taught in the course. You can dissect those files, you can pull them apart, you can see how I layered things, how I labeled things, and it can really help if you're ever getting stuck at any point in time. In order to download these Procreate files, you want to do the exact same thing that we did for the brushes and the color swatches. Tap the little download icon, it'll appear at the bottom of your screen. You'll hit "Download", you'll hit "Open In", and then you'll tap on Procreate and tell it to install it into Procreate. When you're in Procreate within the gallery view, it's going to show up at the very top of all of your canvases and all of your artwork. It'll just drop in right there and you can download them all and have them right there or just download them as you need them. Now hopefully you have all of your freebies and they're all installed and you're ready to go. 5. Welcome: New Canvas + Resolution + Color Profiles: When you first open up Procreate, you will get something that looks similar to this. This one's obviously filled with my own artwork, but Procreate pops in a bunch of default artwork right here. You'll have a gallery view. If you ever want to know what version of procreate you're on, all you have to do is hit Procreate up here and it will tell you all the information that you need to know. Over here you can either select different pieces of artwork. If you were to select, you can select multiple pieces, and then you could group them together. Groups, which you can see up here, they're called stacks in Procreate. If you want to group something together, you'll just want to hit Stack and that will stack them together, and then you can label your stack. With this blue bar up here, you just want to x out of it, if you want to do something different. If I wanted to label the stack or label any artwork that I have right here, all you have to do is tap on the name of it and then you can relabel it whatever you would like. To create a brand new Canvas in Procreate, you'll hit the plus sign, and over here, these are all the new Canvas formats. Many of these are my own custom formats, but you will start out with a bunch of just standard sizes that you can choose from and just create a Canvas from those. I'm going to show you how to create your own custom Canvas if you'd prefer a custom size for whatever piece you're working on. In order to do that, you want to hit this black icon right underneath the plus sign, and this will bring up all the options to create a brand new Canvas. I'm going to give you a basic overview of resolution and color profiles, but you can dig in much deeper, Procreate offers some additional reading on their own website and their forums, or you can just Google it and research it as well. But I'll just give you a basic rundown of information just so you have those facts in mind. For dimension it automatically defaults to pixels, but you can change the increments right over here, you just tap on them. For the purposes of this class, because we're working on a screen, the standard format for a screen would be pixels, so we're going to work in pixels. My recommended size, if you caught any of my tutorials in the past, I always recommend working at 1500 pixels by 1500 pixels at 300 DPI. I'm going to quickly explain why I chose that format. So 1500 by 1500, that's a perfect square. Many people like posting their artwork on Instagram and Instagram recommends a square format. Also 1500 pixels is the equivalent of five inches. If you're in the US, five inches is a pretty medium size when it comes to printing something. You can either go larger or smaller, but five inches is still a very decent size if you plan to print your artwork later on. DPI is your resolution. Three hundred DPI is the standard print resolution. If you ever want to print anything you create in Procreate, if you created it at 300 DPI, it's already ready to go for print. That's why I always, always recommend working in 300 DPI. Even if you only have plans to post it online, you never know, you may change your mind in the future, and I would hate for you to have it created at 72 DPI, which is the web standard resolution, only to need it at 300 later on. You cannot just input 300 and have everything miraculously change, whatever you start with with your DPI that's as high as you can go. You can't add to it later on, you'd have to remake your entire artwork. I always recommend packing in as much information as possible in the beginning, and then you can always remove information later on, but you can't add to it. That is my reasoning for that. As well as in Procreate depending on the size of your document and the resolution, so the DPI, the width and the height, all those three combined limits you with how many layers you're able to use in Procreate. With my recommendation of 1500 pixels by 1500 pixels, that gives us 234 layers that we can work with, which is a very good amount for working in Procreate. If you need to work in a larger size later on, just keep in mind that it's going to reduce the amount of layers that are available to you. This is a really good middle ground for most applications, so that's why that is my recommendation for size and DPI. To give you a quick overview of resolution, DPI refers to dots per inch. It can also show up as PPI, which is pixels per inch. Dots per inch, if you are on a home inkjet printer, you know how, when you're printing something out, you get all these little dots of ink and all of them together make up your image. Dots per inch. That's how many dots of that ink exist in a square inch. If you have 300 in there, that's a lot of dots, which is a lot of information which results in a CRISPR clear image. If you only have 72 dots in there, which is the standard web resolution, obviously that's less information, so your picture isn't as clear or optimized. But it does take up less space, so it's a smaller file size. That's my recommendation and a quick overview about resolution. Next, let's quickly talk about color profiles. If you're on a newer iPad, it's going to default to Display P3. Display P3 is the most advanced color profile today, which basically means you have access to way more colors than you do in any of the other color profiles that exists, it's just a much wider gamut. You can achieve more saturated colors in a larger variety of colors. Because of the screen on the iPad, that's why it can take advantage of all of those colors. If you're on an older iPad, you're not going to be able to see Display P3 as an option. But that's the reason why, is because of the screen. If you are on an older iPad, just select whatever the default sRGB color profile is and you'll be perfectly fine. That's just a quick overview. I also want to mention that I always work in RGB. Onscreen is RGB, and print is generally CMYK. If you are familiar with the old way of printing in the past, they've always recommended delivering a file as CMYK, but now printers have become so advanced. They can achieve printing a wider color gamut than they were once able to, or then what CMYK is able to provide. So many online printers and even traditional print shops are now recommending that you deliver your file in RGB. You can always remove color information going from RGB to CMYK, but CMYK has fewer color options, or colors available in their gamut. If you start with CMYK, you can't automatically add to it by just switching from CMYK to RGB. If you go from RGB down to CMYK, you'll notice a color shift, your colors will become more dull just because CMYK can't achieve as many colors as RGB can. I always recommend working in RGB. You can always remove color information later on, but with CMYK you can't add to it if you start there. I hope that makes sense. It can get pretty complicated, so I just encourage you to read up on it if you want to learn anymore, but I just want to give you a quick summary of how that works. For time-lapse settings over here, we're going to talk about exporting your time-lapse of your artwork later on. But I just want to show you that you can change the settings of those. If you plan on sharing the time-lapse of your artwork, it's just an instant replay of everything you've done on your Canvas. If you want to share that to social media or put it on YouTube, you can adjust the quality of that. Just keep in mind that adjusting the quality from this default will substantially impact the size of your file. Your file will be gigantic. Just keep that in mind. If you need a super high-quality time-lapse, you may not want to always keep that adjusted setting for all of your Canvas's moving forward because your files will just get really really big. I leave mine at the default because I don't really use time-lapse settings, and 10 ADP is still high res, so it's still going to be good quality. I just leave all of this at the default. Then for Canvas properties, I always start out with a white background color for my Canvas. This is also the default. If you want to change your default background color, you can do so here. I'm not really sure why you would ever need to do that, but you can do that if you want. I always keep my background on, I don't need it to be hidden. But if you want to toggle that option, you can also do that. Once you have all of your information, this is basically where I always stay because my color profile is always going to default to Display P3, so if I need to adjust anything, I can do it right here. If you want a custom name for this Canvas, like I just named this one my Instagram Canvas so it's really easy for me to find, so then you can just hit "Create" and it will create that brand new Canvas. If you ever want to go back to the previous screen, you just hit Gallery. If you want to create that same type of Canvas later on, if you hit the plus, now down at the very bottom, you'll see it labeled right down here. It'll say Instagram, the P3 is for the Display P3, and then this is the size right at the end. You'll always have it in your default list now. That's really helpful too. Now that we have our Canvas all figured out and understood, now we can get into our interface. 6. Interface: Brush Basics: We're going to start off this module by talking about brushes first. I am going to dig into all of the different settings in brushes later on. In this course, as you get more familiar with everything, it would just be way too much information bombard you with right now, but I promise we are going to get to all the brush settings, but I wanted to start by just explaining the basics of how the brushes work in Procreate. Your brushes are always found up here at the very top, on the right-hand side. All of these are for creation and then these ones are for editing, special effects, exporting and saving, so all of your creation will typically happen with the upper right side of your screen. If you've already loaded up the starter pack of brushes that came with this class, you'll already see the monoweight brush, the signature brush, the dotted brush and the smooth pencil. These are the categories for all of your brushes over here. There's a lot of Procreate default ones, and if you download or purchase any future brush sets, they'll always appear right here in your brush library, so you just navigate to them. This can get pretty lengthy if you are an avid collector of Procreate brushes, but for this pack right here, the monoweight brush is not pressure sensitive, but my signature brush is and the smooth pencil brush is, so I want to show you how those ones work. I'm going to just select the signature brush. This is your color palette over here, I've just got black selected. For example purposes we're going to talk about these pallets later on, but if you want black to be selected just double-tap where the black is, and it will snap to true black. Back to the brushes, I have my signature brush selected. Over here, this determines your size, so how large your brush will get or how small. Then this is the opacity, so the amount of transparency that your brush will have. I'm just going to choose a middle-size right here, and if I don't put any pressure on this at all and I just draw a line, you can see nothing is changing, but because this is a pressure sensitive brush, if I do little pressure on my upstroke and lots of pressure on my downstroke, you can see how that size changes. That's what happens when you have a pressure sensitive brush. Certain brushes will have that pressure sensitivity built-in, and other brushes can purposely leave that out, which is the case with the monoweight brush, and we're going to get to that later on as well. Those are the main things. Not all brushes have built-in opacity, like this brush doesn't have a built-in opacity to it, so even if I reduce the opacity, the opacity does not change, but other brushes have that built in, especially Procreate default brushes. Just keep that in mind, if you want to change your capacity you can do that there. You can also change the opacity on your different layers, which we'll discuss as well. I generally always leave this up at max because you can always change your opacity later on. It's just a much smarter way to work. If you've drawn some artwork and you want to undo it, it's just a two-finger tap and that will undo the artwork. If you want to bring it back, if you've changed your mind, it's just a three-finger tap and that will bring it back. Those are really simple shortcuts that you will use a lot while you're working in Procreate. Those are the true basics of working with your brush, but we're going to dig into that deeper later on. 7. Interface: Quick Shapes: As you begin working in Procreate, you may want to take advantage of Procreate's geometry features by snapping to familiar shapes that can just make things a lot easier or quicker as you're working. If you want to draw a circle, for example, you can just rough in a circle and then hold it and it will automatically snap to a circle. You can see we've got an oval right here or an ellipse. If you want it to be a perfect circle, all you have to do is hit "Edit Shape" up here and hit "Circle". Then you'll get these nodes. If you want to change anything slightly, you can just grab a node and pull it as well, or you can go right back to it being a circle. Then if you just tap anywhere that'll commit the change. If we don't want our circle, we can go back to the very beginning by just two-tapping on our screen. You can also do this with rectangular shapes. I can draw a rectangle and just hold it and it'll snap. I can Edit Shape and do a Square or Rectangle Quadrilateral. We've got a bunch of options right here too. I can just slide this over and hit "Clear" in my Layers palette to remove that. If you'd like to do something a little bit more complex, say you have a star that you want to do. You can just rough in a star and if you hold, it'll snap and then you can hit "Edit Shape" and it'll give you points so then you can make these more exact or perfect for how you want them to be. That's another nice feature of Quick Shapes. You can also do this with lines. If I clear this out and I want to just have a really nice curve, but it's a little wonky right there. If I just hold, it'll snap to a nice curve. If I want a zigzag line, but I want it to be more perfect than it is just hold and it'll snap. You can add Edit Shape and then you can adjust those points to get them exactly how you want. This can be really nice when you want more precise pieces within your artwork. That's a quick overview of Quick Shapes. 8. Interface: Color Builds + Palettes: In this video, we're going to talk all about color in Procreate. So if you hit your little color dot up here, you can see it should default to the disk view. Right here, this is going to change the value of your color, so how much black or white it has in it. You've got your different tones, and then this adjusts your hue. Whatever color that you have, if you put this around the circle and then you adjust how much black or white is in your color is over here. So I usually work with the disk view for adjusting or changing. The classic mode I never use, but you can totally use this too. It's the same thing, just a little bit different. You have your brightness down here, you have your saturation right here, and then you can change your color right here. Under harmony, you can change if you want to work with complimentary colors, this can grab them right away. You can change the brightness right here of those colors. Right now we've got complimentary which are opposites. If you want to change this, just hop on here. You change analogous which are colors that are close together. So whenever you are building a palette, this can be really helpful. I don't generally use this one very often, but it's there if you ever want to take advantage of it. For value, if you need to input specific color builds for colors that you're using, like if you're working on someone's specific brand where they have very specific colors that you must use, this is where you can adjust all of these. So we have hue saturation and brightness. You have R, G, B right here. You can also type in the hexadecimal number for the specific color as well. I generally give colors away in this format, it's just a lot easier to input. That is under value. Over here if you hit palettes, these are all of your color palettes. I have quite a few that I've accumulated over the years. So this is where they will all live if you import any brand new color palettes. So from the class, if you downloaded the color palettes for the different projects and you imported them into Procreate, they'll show up in your palettes at the very bottom of all of your palettes. Right down here is where they're going to show up. When you hit the plus, you can either create a brand new palette from scratch, which is like this untitled one, there's nothing here at all. You could do new from camera, if you want to take a picture with your iPad and then have it create its own color palette off of the colors that are in the photo that you just took. You can do New from file. If you brought a file onto your iPad and you want to grab it from there, you can just hit New from file or new from photos. If you hit New from photos, it will bring up your camera one, you can select a specific photo and then Procreate will run its magic and then give you a color palette that is built off of an existing photo. That can save quite a bit of time. So if we want a brand new color palette, we can just hit that and you can see we've got it all untitled. Then the default, you can just choose if I wanted a different one. If you hit default and then you come down to your disk view, it will pop it right here so you can just access your colors right away. If you have a brand new one that doesn't have anything in it, hit default, hit disc, and nothing will show up down here and you can start building your own color palette. So if I want to build a color palette and I find a color that I like, all I have to do is tap on one of those squares and it will add the color to it, then I can change to whatever I want and we can just build a really quick color palette like this. Then whenever you want to paint with a color, you just tap on it, have your brush selected, and then you've got your color and you can switch between colors that easily. If you're working in a huge piece of artwork and you want to grab color a different way, if you hold this little icon in the middle of your brush settings over here, just hold down on that little button and then you can see you'll get a magnifying glass. You can hover over the color that you want to change to and then when you release, it'll pop it up here and then you can start drawing with it right away. That's another quick way to select color, especially if you're working with a lot of colors and you just want to work faster without having to keep returning to your color palette. So that's another really easy way to work with color in Procreate. 9. Interface: Recoloring Options: In this video, I'm going to walk you through how to change color of different elements within your artwork in Procreate. Over the different versions of Procreate, they have adjusted this multiple times, unfortunately. I hope the way it is right now will stay a little bit longer. I want to show you how it's currently working with the current version. This is, I believe, 5.1.4 that I'm working on right now, the version of Procreate. As of this date, this recording, these are the different ways to recolor artwork in Procreate. I'm just going to draw a few hearts. If you want to fill the color of your shape, as long as it's closed, right here, see how they're touching right there. I can then just grab my ColorDrop and drag it in and that will fill in the color. If you have a shape and it's not closed, these are called paths, this outline. If I don't have a closed path right here, the color will bleed out of that gap and into your background and then everything's going to fill up. If that happens to you, it means that your path isn't closed. If we close this up and then we fill it in, it will fill it in. I'm just going to have three of these right here. The different ways that you can recolor artwork. Say, I want to change all of these to this purple color. I can just select the purple and I can re-drop in my purple, but then I have to do it for every single one of these. If you have a bunch of different elements on the same layer, it can take awhile to do that. I want to show you some other options to do that. The first option is you can select all of the artwork. Just tap on your layer thumbnail and hit "Select." Then you can grab the color you want to change it to. Say, I want to change it to this red color, select the color you want to change it to, come back to your layers, tap on the layer thumbnail again and hit "Fill Layer," and that will fill all of those objects in. That method is really easy. But the caveat with that method is that we have these hard edges right here, so it makes it continuous. When we fill the color, we changed all the color, it changed it all the way to the very edge. But if you're ever using a soft brush, this is considered a hard edge. I'll show you what a soft edge looks like. If you come to your brushes and you come to Airbrushing and you choose the Soft Blend brush. This is a default brush so everybody has it. If I paint this really soft shape and then I try and do the exact same thing by coming to my Layers, to Layer thumbnail, hit select, and then I come to the ColorDrop that I want to change it to like the purple for example, and then come back to my Layer and then tap on the Layer thumbnail and choose Fill Layer. You can see the outer edges is still remaining that red and I want the color to fill the entire object. Really nice workaround for this. Let me undo that by double tapping, so we're back to red. Let me deselect up here. A really good work around for this is if you tap on the layer thumbnail and choose "Select" and then you create a brand new layer right above it, and then have the color that you want to change it to, so the purple, we have to have that selected. Come back to your Layers, on this brand new Layer, you hit the layer thumbnail and choose "Fill Layer," and then you turn off the visibility of the original layer. You just uncheck it to turn off the visibility. You can see now the color goes straight to the edge and I don't have any of that red showing up. That's a really good alternative. I do want to mention just to get this out in the open, some people like using the selection tool and the Color Fill. I'll tell you exactly why I don't like doing this, but I will share that this is also another option. If you hit the "Selection" up here and you choose "Color Fill" down here. Now, if I have my color change to green, for example, and I come to my layer, if I hit "Select" on it, it's going to automatically change it. But you can see, it's leaving that halo along the soft edge. Obviously, we don't want that to happen. The reason why I do not recommend this is we use these different options quite often. We make a lot of selections as we're working in Procreate and if the Color Fill is always turned on by default, you're always going to be changing the color, even if you don't want to, and it can just get really frustrating and really annoying and especially because we have all these other options for changing color. Why make your life more complicated if you don't have to? That's why I recommend not using this option in the selection palette down here. I just want to throw that out there in case anyone's wondering why I don't do that if you are familiar with that option in Procreate. I'm going to deselect now. The very last option for recoloring elements, and it's my favorite option too. It takes a little bit of effort to set up, but once it's set up, it makes life so easy as you're working. Procreate hid it. It used to be really obvious before. I'm not sure why it's so hidden now. But people use it all the time. People were really upset [inaudible] when they removed it and I think that's why they were pressured to put it back in. This is how to do it. You first want to come up to your Gallery and we're going to go over all of these settings later on but just try and follow along with me just for this part because it's worth that, I promise. Come over to Preferences, and under Preferences, you want to hit "Gesture controls." You'll get this whole big menu that comes up. You want to make sure QuickMenu is selected over here, and then I choose the "Four-finger tap" for this option. You can choose any of these, but I didn't want to overwrite any of the other default ones that I got used to already, and this one seemed like the easiest ones. You can choose any of these, but my preference is the Four-finger tap. If you want to do that too, just make sure that one's toggled on and then hit "Done." Once you hit "Done," if you use that for Four-finger tap, so you're going to tap your screen with all four fingers at once. The QuickMenu allows you to do things much quicker, so you don't have to go through multiple steps as you usually would to accomplish an objective. These are some just default ones that were already there, and this bottom one wasn't set yet. This is the one that I set to recolor and that's what we want to do. You can choose to change any of these that you would like, so when you tap and you hold, there's all these different actions that you can choose from and you want to toggle until you find recolor. Choose "Recolor,' so this is Recolor, and now if I select "Recolor," I can move this little hairline right here and I can move it to any object. Once I move it there, now I can preview what it's going to look like if I change it to any other color that I want. So I love this option because it gives me so much flexibility to preview what it's going to look like before I change it and it has the added benefit of extending all the way to the edge of soft edge elements. This really soft circle right here, you can see it's totally filling it in without me getting a halo of the previous color. We can preview all different colors here without affecting anything. Once you're happy with it, you can just tap on any of your tools and that will maintain the color. If you change your mind, you just Four-finger tap again, hit "Recolor." Make sure you drag these little cross hairs to where the element is and then you can come up to your color palette and change it. You can also just deselect by hitting the Magic Wand up here and that will deselect it. Those are all the different ways to recolor elements in Procreate. That last one is definitely worth the effort of inputting into that QuickMenu, and then you will always be able to change it and preview different colors without knowing if you want to change your mind later on. 10. Interface: Guides + Symmetry: In this video, we're going to talk about guides and symmetry in Procreate. Guides can be extremely helpful. For me, I use them all the time when I'm hand lettering. That way I don't ride uphill like I have a natural tendency to do, keeps on my lettering really straight and uniform. You can also use it whenever you are drawing different elements and you want things to be more aligned or symmetrical. It can really come in handy. I first want to show you how to apply just basic guides and then we will talk about symmetry, which can get really fun. Your guides and your symmetry are found if you hit the wrench icon up here and then you come over to Canvas. Right here, you want to toggle on drawing guide. When you do that, it's going to give you a default grid. If you want to edit that, you just hit Edit Drawing Guide and you will get this menu. You can change the color of your grade up here, you can just drag color along it and change how that appears. I'm going to make this nice and dark so you can see it well. If you want it to be thicker or thinner, you'll just adjust it down here. If you want the transparency of it to be more transparent or less transparent, this opacity slider down here will do that. The grid size is right here if you want it all the way to max, this can show you right where the middle of your canvas is or you can make it really tiny if you're working super smaller and you want go trippy or something. I usually leave it around the default, which is 50 pixels. That's it. Once you have that in there, you can just hit Done and then you can start writing and keep everything in line. I use this all the time for that. Then whenever you want to turn it off, if you don't need it anymore, you're finished with it. You just come over to your wrench and toggle it off and then you can get right back to doing whatever you are doing. That's the basics of using just your regular 2D grids. Now we're going to get more complicated. We'll go back to our wrench, hit Edit Drawing Guide. Now these are additional options right here for symmetry, perspective, and isometric. If I hit Isometric, this is the guide for isometric drawings that you can use. The perspective, you'll establish a vanishing point, so just tap on there and then you can see you've got all these other guidelines coming off of it. If that's too light, remember, you can always change the color of it by sliding it along this color slider up at the top, and you can move this around after you establish your vanishing point. If you are painting perspectives, this can be extremely helpful. Now for symmetry, which is my favorite, if you tap on the symmetry settings, you have the one line down the middle, which is the default. This line down the middle means that whatever you paint on one side will repeat on the other side. It's symmetrical on both sides. If you hit Options, you can make it even more symmetrical. If you want it to repeat whatever you do on the top to repeat at the bottom, you'll want a horizontal symmetry guideline. You can do quadrant. Whatever you paint in one square will repeat in the other three. Then radial, this one is split into eight. Whatever I do in one section right here will be repeated all the way around. We're going to have a little bit of fun with this now. Make sure radial is selected and assisted drawing is turned on but do not turn on rotational symmetry. I want to show you what the difference is between having rotational symmetry on and having it off. We have it off right now. We're just going to hit Done and then hit Done again. Now if we just draw a basic petal shapes, we're just going to start from this line right here and go to the next line. If you watched how that happened, this line began right there in these two lines met right in the middle. I'll do it again. See how they're meeting right here in the middle. This quadrant started here and met and all of the other ones did. They're starting right here and then meeting in the middle. Same thing over here, starting here, and then meeting in the middle. That is with rotational symmetry turned off. If I come back to my wrench and I hit Edit Drawing Guide, come to Options and turn rotational symmetry on. Now if I hit Done and I do the exact same thing, I'm going to start from right here. You can see the difference. They all started along that edge. I'll do it one more time. See how they all started at the same place and they finished at the same place. They're not meeting together in the middle. That is the main difference with rotational symmetry. If you're drawing and then you decide you want to add an element only to the section and you don't want it repeated anywhere else. If you want to temporarily turn off your symmetry settings without having to go to the wrench, go to Edit Drawing Guide, go to edit your options over here if you want to avoid all of that and just quickly turn it off and turn it on. You just want to come to your layer and see how it says Assisted right here, that means your symmetry settings are turned on. If you want to turn them off, you're just going to tap on the layer thumbnail and uncheck drawing assist right here. If I uncheck that now it's turned off, you can see assisted is no longer appearing right here. Now I can draw whatever I want in this one section and it's not repeated anywhere else. If I want to go back to using my rotational symmetry, all I have to do is come back to the Layer, tap on the layer thumbnail and choose Drawing Assist, and now I'm back to drawing again. If I have multiple elements that I want on different layers, all I have to do is create a brand new layer and I want to use the exact same settings that I was just using. If you tap on the layer thumbnail and choose Drawing Assist, now those settings will appear on this layer as well. If you just create a brand new layer and you don't add the assisted to it, it's only going to appear in that one section. As soon as you turn on drawing assist, it's going to take on whatever settings you previously were using. You can see we're back to repeating, and this is becoming a mess. If you want to select multiple layers at a time, we're going to get to this later, but I need to delete this. Just drag them over to the right so they're selected then you can hit Delete, Delete, and now we're back to the beginning. That is a basic overview of guides and symmetry in Procreate. 11. Interface: Layers + Blend Modes: We're going to just pick right up where we left off in the last video, we need to turn off these guidelines because in this video we're going to talk about layers and blend modes. In order to turn off our guides right here, come up to your wrench and just toggle off Drawing Guide and now we're back to a blank, plain canvas. Your layers are right here, and we talked about this very briefly in the last video. I recommend, this has always been a recommendation of mine, if you've ever cut any of my other tutorials, you know, I am an extremely huge proponent of using layers. Layers allow you the ability to adjust and alter things later on if you ever change your mind without affecting all of the other work that you've done. If you only ever work on one layer, everything's going to be flattened, so it's all going to be stuck together. If you want to change this one element, you are going to affect everything else. It's just not a smart way to work. I always recommend different elements on different layers. If I have a shape right here, I can draw my triangle. If I decide to draw a circle, I'm going to add it on a new layer, so I can grab a different color and put this here. You'll see right away that the top layer, whatever is on the top layer is going to be on top of whatever is on the layer beneath it. In the same way that this looks like this. So circle's on top of the triangle, over here, circle's on top of the triangle. So your layer order really matters. If I drag this, so if you tap and hold and drag, now I'm putting my circle underneath the triangle, same thing happens over here. Layers can be extremely powerful when you put different elements on them. If you're creating some artwork and you want different elements behind other elements, instead of having to redraw pieces, all you'll have to do is drag them in your layer palette and you can achieve what you're going for really, really quickly without having to alter anything you've already done. That is the basics of layers. If you want to relabel your layers, all you want to do is tap on layer thumbnail, hit "Rename" and with Procreate 5X, if you are also on the latest iOS version, this is version 14, they now allow you to write in whatever you want on your layers. We can either type it with our keyboard, so you can type in circle right here and then just tap anywhere and then it'll be selected, or if I tap on here and choose "Rename", I can now scribble this. This is scribbling it out, so I am deleting it and then I can just write it out in my own handwriting, triangle, and then you just wait and it will rename it for you. It'll change it over to text and then just tap anywhere and then it will commit that change. That makes it really easy too. Now, let's group our layers together. Maybe these are all my shape, and then I've got other things that I'm going to do later on. If I want to group these together just to keep things organized once you have a bunch of layers that can be really hard to find things sometimes, so if you want to group things, you just slide it over and that will select multiple layers at a time. You can see they're both blue and now I can hit "Group" and now add some to a group. If you hit this little caret right here, you can toggle it up and it just makes your layers much cleaner. In the same way that we just named our individual layers, you can rename your group. So just hit the layer thumbnail, hit "Rename", we can scribble it out and just label this one shapes. If you ever want to add to it, you just toggle it down, select a layer inside of it. Whenever you hit plus for adding a layer, it will add a layer right on top of whatever layer you currently have selected. So since I have the circle layer selected and I hit plus the new layer is going to be added right above that. If I decide I don't want this layer as part of this shapes group, all I have to do is tap and hold and then I can drag it right out of it. If I want to add it to the group later on with this toggle down, so I can toggle this down and then just drag it and put it right in where I want it. It's really easy to manipulate your layers this way. I'm going to drag this out of my shapes group and then I can toggle up my shapes group. The next thing we're going to talk about is blend modes. Let me create another shape just so we can see how this works. On this layer, I'm going to draw a heart. You can see what happens here. These are really ugly colors, I should have chosen some different ones. For blend modes, your blend modes are located if you hit the little N, that's your normal blend mode. It appears exactly as you would expect it to appear. This flat color, whatever that color is, that is how it's going to naturally appear. Like I mentioned before, this is where you can change your opacity, so that's why I don't recommend using your opacity settings over here because you can always adjust it to whatever you want over here. This is going to affect the transparency of that layer, so you can just drag it. I'm going to leave my opacity set to Max. Then these are all of our different blend modes. Your blend modes determine how your colors and the layer that you have selected, how that interacts with any colors that are beneath it. Different blend modes will make colors blend in a darker way, some will blend in a lighter way, and some will do an in-between, there's all kinds of different ones. The best way to see how it works is just to toggle through them. In order to toggle through them, you're just going to drag. Different things are highlighted. You can see as I'm going, this is just affecting how this heart is interacting. The color of the heart is interacting with the colors that are directly underneath it, so you can see. If you just want to change up your artwork, this is a really quick way to preview different effects that you can have immediately, and it's just based on color. We can put this back to Normal here. We'll practice this one more time with our other shapes. If I come to the circle, you're going to hit the N. Remember you can change the opacity by dragging the opacity slider and then you can just toggle through. These blend modes are affecting how that color appears by itself and by the colors that are directly underneath it. You can see how I'm changing the circle because it's underneath the heart, it has no effect on the heart whatsoever, it's only itself and what's underneath it. We'll use blend modes quite a bit through the rest of this class, but I wanted to give you a quick overview on how they work and where to find them. When you're done, you can just tap on the N again and toggle it up and then you're all set. 12. Interface: Making, Moving + Editing Selections: In this video, we're going to talk about making, moving, and editing selections. This is something you'll do all the time in Procreate. I would definitely recommend following along with this video and you'll have it down in no time. I just left this exactly how we had it from the previous video so you can see how I delete things. I'm just going to come over to my layers and you can just drag it over to the left and hit "Delete". I can do the same thing here, delete, and then I'm all back to brand new. For this one, I'm going to grab softer pink and we're going to draw a flower. Really basic flower, five petals, just like this, and we can fill them in. So just drag the color and make sure your shapes have closed paths otherwise it will bleed out into the background. Say that this petal right here, I wanted it just a little more angled. It feels a little off right here and I want to reposition it, but it's part of an entire layer. I can't just grab it by itself because if I select it by hitting my "Cursor" icon, I select everything. If I move it, everything moves. I just want this one petal to be adjusted. In order to do that, we're going to make a selection. This is your selection tool right here. You're just going to tap on that and down here, freehand is selected and what you want to do is just draw out a selection. You can see we've got these dancing answers dashed line. Now that this is selected, I can now move it. If I hit my "Cursor" icon, now, just this element has been selected so I can move it around. Whenever you're moving something you want your stylist to touch outside of it on the screen, it just makes it way easier. This green node at the top of your bounding box allows you to rotate. If you stretch it out, you can have more precision over your rotation. If it's really tight, it can just go wherever. That makes it a little easier. If you want to do that, then we can reposition it right in there. This yellow node right here, I never use it, but if you want to use it, you can. This changes what your bounding box looks like. If it gets moved, you can re-adjust it, but I only ever use the green one right here. This helps me to rotate my element and then you can just drag it and move it like this over here. That's how to make a custom selection and then how to move it. When you're all done, all you have to do is hit the "Cursor" icon and now you're back to normal. If I hit "Cursor" again, now I have my entire shape that I can select. If I want this to be centered on my Canvas, let me deselect it, and we're going to zoom out. So you just pinch to zoom and if I want this to be centered directly in the middle of my Canvas, you can see how I have these cross-hairs showing up and that tells me exactly where the middle is. It makes it really easy to center your artwork. In order to do that, you either have to have freeform down here or uniform selected. So with either of those ones selected under Snapping, just happen, make sure snapping is turned on, and then you'll get those cross-hairs so you'll know exactly where they go. Whenever you're selecting something, you're going to get options down here and uniform just means that your proportions are always going to be maintained whenever you're doing anything with a selection, as long as this category is selected. I can do all of these different things. You can rotate if you want to do it in perfect increments, you can flip it. If you are under freeform, you can do these things too. But you can also stretch things which is not super advisable but under uniform, you can see, it's going to proportionally scale instead of uniform. We're just stretching. Those are the main differences between freeform and uniform. Distort means you can grab a corner and distort it this way. You can get some crazy perspective effects if you do that. That's distort. Then warp, if you hit "Warp" down here, you're going to get a mesh grid basically. You can distort different parts of your elements so that you're warping them, but their individual distortions. That's how warp works. I usually use that for custom shadows. Those are the main things that you'll want to be aware of as a basic overview for your selection or adjustment options. I usually keep mine either at freeform or uniform, especially if I'm scaling, I usually always use uniform. It's just not a good practice to distort your elements by stretching them. 13. Interface: Using + Editing Typeable Text: In this video, we're going to talk about using and editing typable texts in procreate. I want to preface this video by saying procreate changed this feature quite a bit when they updated to 5X and in my opinion, it's just not user-friendly at all. If you get frustrated when you are adding and using editable text, I promise it's not you. I really hope that they change this and improve it and make it more user-friendly because it's truly just not intuitive at all. All that said, I do want to show you how it currently stands, how you use this. As of this recording with 5.1.4, this is how it's currently done. You want to first make sure you have the color dot change to whatever color you want your text to be. Then you're going to hit the wrench right here. Make sure you're in the ad category and then hit, "add text." When you do that, you will have text pop up. You can either type in whatever you'd like right here and then when you're done, you'll want to hit the cursor up here, and then this will select it, and then to deselect it, you'll just hit it again. Then you'll have your text. You can also move it around when you have the cursor selected so I can put it anywhere here. But say, I want to change the font or the size of it. In order to do that, you need to first deselect it by hitting the cursor and you can see in our layers palette, we now have a layer and that A shows that it's typable text whenever that A is in your thumbnail image, that means you have text that is editable. With that layer selected, all you have to do is tap on "Your text" and then you'll be able to edit it again. You'll get that blue bounding box around it. In order to bring up your list of options, in order to edit it, you want to hit the "Aa" down here, I can just tap on that. Now I can change it to any font that I would like and I can also change the size. If you want the bounding box to be bigger, you just tap and drag the little point on the side. You can do that. You can change the alignment of your text over here. You can change whether it's underlined or outlined, whether it's all caps or just regular case. If you want to change the kerning. Kerning is the space relationship between two letters. Tracking is the space relationship between all the letters. If I adjust my tracking, I'm changing the space between all of my letters at once. Let me pull this out so you can see it all together a little bit better. You can see they're all stretching out. Kerning will give you the same thing, but kerning is not meant to work that way. Kerning is defined specifically as the space relationship between two letters. Tracking is everything as a whole. Just keep that in mind. I'll show you how to edit that in just a second. Leading Is your space between lines. If I have multiple lines of text, that will adjust how much spaces between those lines of text, either a positive or negative. Let me zoom out just a little bit here. I'll just show you, you can make your baseline super tall, super low, or right where it needs to be. I never mess with that one. There's not really a need to. Opacity is your transparency obviously. You can go more or less transparent and that's basically it. If you change your mind about what your text is reading and you want to change it, just hit your keyboard right here and then you can tap in here and change it to whatever you would like. I can hit my keyboard down here. I have my mini keyboard right now. If I want to have my cursor right here, I can type in extra words if I want. I can also write it out myself now that the latest iOS, lets you just write, and then it'll convert it to texts. If you want to do that first, we need to deselect this. I'm just going to hit the cursor and then hit the cursor again and then obviously to reselect it, I just have to tap on it. You're just going to draw a line through and it will select everything. Then from here, you can cut it, and then I can just write out Hello again and it will convert it into text. Then if I draw a line through it again to select it, I can change my font up here. I can actually write in my own font so if I wanted to change this to futura, for example, I can type in futura and it'll change the font style. I can also change it from medium to bold. That's cool that you can do that. If you want to go back to the main menu where you get all these options at the bottom, you just want to tap on us instead of touching it with your stylist because it'll confuse it and it will think that you're trying to write in the name of it. Just tap with your finger and it'll bring up this menu down here so you can switch back to that. I did mention that I was going to show you how to do the kerning, I'm going to show you that right now. I'm going to hit "Done" and then all you want to do is just tap into your tax and you can see now it's selected because I've got that blue bounding box and I need to put my cursor in here, so I need to tap again where I want my cursor to go. I want to go between the E and the L. Now that I have that, then you're going to bring up this Aa with all of your options, and now if I adjust the kerning is just going to adjust that space relationship between those two letters. That's how you do that. Those are the basics with using an editing typable texts. Sometimes it can get really frustrating because it'll think that you're trying to write it out versus typing it out. I would say just choose one or the other, whichever one you're more comfortable with and it'll make things a lot easier. If you switch back and forth, it can just get really frustrating. 14. Interface: Installing Custom Fonts: In this video, I'm going to show you how I download and install custom fonts into Procreate. What I've done, I already had these fonts downloaded and installed on my desktop and laptop computer, and all I did was email myself the font file. So you can see I've got two different fonts here. One is part of a zip file, so I'm going to show you how to unzip that. Then one is just the regular font file, which is an OTF file. Both of these are my custom fonts, so I wanted them to not only be able to be used on my desktop and laptop, but into Procreate as well. I'm going to first show you how to install the font file if you have just the font file. Every font file will either be a TTF or an OTF. You can see right here, this is.OTF. That's how you know. If it says.zip, that means it is compressed inside of a folder, so we need to extract that before we can install it. All I did was send myself an email and attach this to it, and here's that email. In order to install just the OTF file, all you're going to do is tap on it and you can see you'll get the screen that pops up, and in order to install it into Procreate, you're just going to hit this "Export" icon up here. When you do that, all you have to do is choose Procreate. It will import it in and now it's installed in Procreate. It's that easy. Then to make sure that it is in Procreate, all you have to do is hit the "Wrench", hit "Add Text", and then hit the "AA" over here. If I scroll, I'll be able to find Miss Magnolia here. There it is. So I can switch it right there. Now that we know how to install just a regular font file, I'm going to show you how to extract a zip file. In order to return back to my email, all I have to do is hit "Done" here. I'm back to my email and now I want to get the font file out of the zip folder. You can do this exact same thing for anything that you've purchased online or that you've sent to yourself that is part of a zip. These instructions will still apply. You just won't be installing them directly in a Procreate, you'll either be saving them to your files or your photo role. We're just going to tap on this zip folder and you can see that it's a zip. I'm going to hit the "Export" option again. I have this app that I use to unzip. There are several different unzipping apps that you can use. I'll leave a link to this one right underneath this video so you can download and install it if you want to use the same one. All I'm going to do is tap on that and it will bring me to this app, and then I can find the file right here. It'll list it along with my other files that I've unzipped. All I have to do is tap on it and hit "Ignore all". Now it becomes a folder, so I can tap on that folder, and then I'll tap on that folder again. Now I can see the contents of it. So I have an RTF in here. This file came with vectors, so that's another folder that I can have access to if I want, but I just want the font file, so I'm going to tap on this folder. Now you can see I've got all of my OTF files right here. This font came with a cap version, a script version, and symbols version. Maybe I just want the cap version right now, and you can see there's a little question mark. Even when I tap on it, nothing happens. But what you want to do if this also shows up for you, it's pretty common with my experience so far. All you want to do is hit the little "Info" icon right here, and then you want to choose Open in when this pops up. So if I hit "Open in", now I'll get the option, Open in Procreate. So all I have to do is tap on that and it will import it in. That one was called Skinny Jeans, so I can just toggle down here, and you can see it right here. That's my Skinny Jeans cap version. If I want to install the script version, I can just go back to this app, come back here, do the same thing, hit the little eye, open in, choose Procreate. Now you can see I still have skinny jeans in the all caps right here, but under style now I have a caps version and a script version. I can choose the script version of it since they're titled the same thing. That's where you can find the different styles. That's really how simple it is. You just need to find an unzipping app, unzip it. You may have to toggle through a few folders, but you will find it. Then as soon as you say, Open in Procreate, it actually installs it, as well as opens it in there at the same time. 15. Interface: Magic Wand, Selection Tool + Cursor: We are getting through the rest of our interface basics. Now, we've already talked about our colors, our layers, and our brushes. We will get to the smudge tool and the eraser tool later on within the projects, but I want to use this video to talk about these tools over here because you will use these pretty often as you're working. These tools allow you to apply different selections and effects to your artwork, so I'm just going to give you a basic overview of how they all work, and then in the next video, we'll discuss all the preferences, so everything that's located under the wrench. For this one, we're going to be focusing on the magic wand, the selection, and the cursor tools. First of all, the cursor, you should already be familiar with it with the few videos that we've gone through already. If I have some artwork and I want to select it, move it, rotate it, scale it, that's where your cursor is. We're going to just hit our cursor. How it appears when you are rescaling it will be determined down here by these settings. I typically always have mine on uniform because it's really important to scale things uniformly unless you're purposely trying to distort the artwork, so I keep mine at uniform. Then under Snapping, I always have Snapping turned on, so when I'm moving it around, I can get those crosshairs to tell me where the center of my canvas is. That can be very helpful as you are putting a composition together to keep everything feeling balanced. Moving on, our selection right here, you will remember that this came up once we went into our layers, we tapped on the layer thumbnail, and chose "Select," and you can see, we've got these diagonal lines in here, and these diagonal lines always tell you that whatever's on that layer is being selected. Once it's selected, you have different options that you can apply to them that are very different than the options that you get when you hit the cursor. Down here, you can see we can adjust our selection in different ways. You can go through these and experiment with them. I honestly don't use these very often. If I were to say one that I probably use the most, it would be the copy and paste. With it selected, you can just hit "Copy Paste" and then you can de-select, and over here, in your layers, now we have a copy of it. So if I select it, you can see I've got two of these now, and they're both on different layers, and the layer will be labeled from selection, so you know that it's a copy that was based on a previous selection. I can undo that by double tapping. We've covered our cursor and our selection. The last one is our magic wand. Our magic wand, there are quite a few options in here. The top ones are affecting the color appearance of it. So you can play around with that. Whenever you choose one of these, I always choose the layer to determine how it's going to appear. If I hit "Layer," you can see I've got all my options down here, and then you can change your color, your saturation, your brightness, similar to what we did when we were recoloring our objects. There are different ways to do things. It's all about figuring out what you're comfortable with, what your preferences are. I generally stick with recolor over using my hue saturation and brightness unless I have a final artwork completed and I noticed something that just needs to be bumped up with either saturation or brightness. Okay. Under our magic wand, so those are mostly color adjustments up here. These ones are your blur adjustments. So Gaussian blur, I use pretty often. It comes in handy, especially with shadows. If you hit "Gaussian Blur" and hit "Layer," this one works differently in that the amount of blur that you're applying to your object is going to be determined by how much you slide the slider up at the top. In order to get the blur going, you're just going to tap on the screen with your stylus and then drag it to the right, and you'll see we've got this blue bar going and it's so blurry. You can't even see it anymore. But if I bring it down, you can see it's starting to appear. That's the level of blurriness. Now I'm going off the screen and that's totally fine. I can lift up and then put my styles back down and bring it down the rest of the way. You can see that level of blurriness changing on my screen as I move it. Let me do it up here. It'd be easier to see. There you go. That is your blur slider. I can just bring it all the way back to be done. We can also do the motion blur. Motion blur, we're going to use for our 3D lettering project later in the class. But just to give you a quick overview, Motion Blur, choose "Layer." Then for this one, you're going to tap on the screen where you want the direction of the motion blur to go. So if I tap here and pull down, you can see that's my angle, that's my motion blur. If I pull it way out, you can see it's getting much longer and blurrier. If I want just a small, short blur, I'm only going to be dragging a very small amount. That is motion blur. I'm going to undo that. Then I don't really ever use perspective blur, but it works very similarly. You can do positional or directional. I can choose this and then I can drag it. This is the position. I establish a position and then the blur is based off of the position of this thing right here. I can move it around. You can see how it's changing. If I bring it straight down, you can see these ones are angled. They're coming straight here. If I do directional, same thing. See this little arrow right here, so I can move it, how that's going to go, and I can make it more intense or less intense based on the position of this on the canvas. So that's another fun little blur tool. Heading back to our magic wand, these are just extra. In my mind, I always call these gimmicks, but they can be really fun to use. Noise and sharpen are more of traditional type of adjustments. Bloom, glitch, and chromatic aberration are all new to 5X. They're really fun to play with, but I'm not sure when I would ever use it an actual artwork. I'm going to show you what glitch looks like just so you can get an idea. It can get really funky if you're doing a particular art style. They threw those in there and they're fun to play with, but that's what those are. Then down here, liquify is also a really fun tool to use and I'll show you how to use the clone tool. These ones, I would say you are more likely to use these ones in art work than you are for most of these, maybe not noise and sharpen, but the rest of them, probably not. For liquify, it's the most fun if you have multiple colors on the same layer. I'm going to add a few more colors to this, just to make it more interesting. Okay. If I come over here to my magic wand and I choose "Liquify" down here, these are all the types of options you can apply as your liquify. So we can push stuff around and then you can see we have the amount of power that this liquify has some momentum, is it's really going to push it around and your distortion. We're going to see big effects happening with the way that this is, and you can have different pressure and sizes too. Let me increase the size a little bit so you can see it really well. Pushing, you can see it's just pushing all of this around, and you can just push and push and push, and have a lot of fun with it. It gives you these really cool marbley effects. If you do twirl right, this one, you're going to want to tap and hold, and it will spin the colors. So you have to hold this one to make that one work. Same thing with twirl left. Just the opposite, obviously. Same thing with pinch, and same thing with expand. You're just going to hold, and then it will do its magic. For crystals, this one's going to affect the appearance along the edge. You can see those edges getting all crazy crystallized edge. This one is another one. This one's more geometric. Reconstruct is putting it back to the way it was. If I come over this, it's returning it to normal. Maybe I want to go back to normal, but not all the way back to normal. So that one's fun if you don't want to do a zillion taps to undo. Then finally, if you just want to reset and begin all over again, you can just set reset. So those are the really fun liquify tools. Then for clone, if you're working on a big piece of artwork and there's a piece of artwork over here, like if you drew, I don't know, a ladybug and you wanted another ladybug over here, let's make a fake ladybug. I'm just going to put a dot here. If we go and hit our "Magic Wand" and hit "Clone," this little circle right here, we want to put this over the thing that we want to copy. Let's pretend this is our ladybug, and we're just going to set this right on top of it because that's the thing we want to copy. Then you start drawing where you want it copied. If we want this little dot to be copied right here, I just start painting right here, and you can see how it's following my strokes. Then if I want to paint another one over here, I can do it right there. You can see we can make a bunch of little clones. That's how the clone stamp works in Procreate. 16. Interface: Preferences Overview: Picking up where we just left off, we're going to head into our wrench right here and we've got a bunch of different categories up here at the top. You can see we're going to start with the add category and then we'll work our way across. Our add category is exactly what it is. It's inserting different things into your Canvas. You can insert a file if you've got a file on your iPad that you want to bring in, maybe it's an image that's just in one of the folders in your iPad. That's inserting a file. You can insert a photo. If you hit that, it's going to bring up your camera roll and then you can choose any photo you want and it will bring it right into your Canvas. You can take a photo with your iPad and it will plop it right in your Canvas. We've already talked about adding text and you can also cut, copy, and paste into Procreate. We did it with the selection. You can also do it like this so I can hit ''Cut'', it cuts everything and then I can hit ''Paste''. Pretty simple. Since we've already cut it, Procreate already has knowledge of that copy so I can hit ''Paste'' and I'll paste another one in. Now I've got two of them over here. You can see. That's the cut, copy, and paste. If we head into the Canvas options, we can crop and resize our Canvas. The one thing you want to keep in mind with this one is that if you're cropping down and you crop off any artwork. Let me show you. If I crop into this artwork like this, this artwork that's up at the top is permanently removed when you crop. If you want to crop everything to be a smaller Canvas, you just want to make sure any artwork that you want to retain as part of that artwork, you want to make sure it stays on your Canvas because as soon as you crop it, let me hit ''Done''. As soon as you crop it, if I move this down, you can see it's cut off, it's gone forever. Unless you undo right away, now we're back to normal. But that's how that works with cropping. You can change your Canvas size. If you already start working and then you realize you need your Canvas larger or smaller, you can do that without having to recreate everything later. That is your crop and resize. Animation assist. We are going to get to in our animation basics module. That's coming up later. We've already talked about editing our drawing guide. If you want reference turned on, you'll get a mini image of your Canvas so you can see different things as you work. Down here, these are exactly what you'd expect, flip Canvas horizontally or vertically. I realized that this is one of those videos that's just we're going through all the tools so it can be pretty boring, but this stuff is really important. I'm very grateful for you following along. Canvas information is pretty important because as you're working, if you forgot the size of your canvas or the DPI you're working in before you do too much other work. If you need to change anything, this is a really good place to check those things. Under layers, if you have a pretty large piece of artwork with a ton of layers, you can do a quick check at how many layers you have left available to you. I do this pretty often with my larger files and this has been really helpful to know. You can also check your color profile, your video properties, and the statistics are pretty fun to see what you've done so far. You can see how many strokes you've made on your canvas, how long you've spent in your Canvas, and how big your file is getting. All really, really helpful information. I'm going to hit ''Done''. Over here, under share, this is how you're going to export your artwork. We're going to talk about this later in the class, but you can see all the different file formats you can share as. Sharing layers is more specific to animation. That's the only time I've ever used share layers. But if you want to share individual layers, you have these different file types that you can export them as. For our video, this is our video playback. If you're time lapse recording is turned on, it's memorizing all of your emotions and all of the artwork that you've done on your Canvas to this point and you can replay it later. This is something that a lot of people like posting on social media because it's really fun to see how your artwork came together. You can see it by just hitting ''Replay'' and you can see all the different things that we've done so far. That can be really fun to get into and you can export it by hitting this right here. Then finally, under preferences, this is just if you want to change how things appear, how you're using the program. If you want to stick with a lighter interface, you can flip it like this. If you prefer to have all these tools that are currently on the left, if you want them on the right, you just flip this on and there'll be over here from now on. If you want to brush cursor. Right now when you paint, you can see there's no cursor showing up, but if I flip this on, you'll see a circle now, whenever I'm painting, you zoom in here so you can see, see that circle that's showing up right around my stylus tips. That's the brush cursor. Then projecting your Canvas, that's if you have your iPad hooked up to another monitor and you want to work off that. That's how you would project your Canvas. Third party stylus is if you're not using an Apple pencil, that's where you'll connect it here. You can adjust how your pressure is interpreted within Procreate by editing your pressure curve, I leave all of this at the default and it works wonderfully. You really don't need to get into that unless you are very particular about the appearance of your pressure. Then finally, gesture controls. We talked about that briefly when we were adjusting for recoloring our different elements. You can change a bunch of other things too if you want different shortcuts within the program. There's all kinds of these options over here that you can adjust specific to your wants or needs as you're working in the program. I leave everything at the default except for this forefinger tap, which I've added recolor too. That's basically it. These ones are speak for themselves. Then finally, obviously if you ever need anything further, you can go and get help. That's it for our preferences overview. I'm very excited to say we are ready to head into project number 1. 17. Proj 1: Setting Text + Background Color: We are ready to start project number 1, a floral initial entirely in Procreate. What you see on screen is exactly what we're going to be creating together. If you haven't installed this color palette for this project yet, just refer to the video titled Downloading and Installing Class Freebies in the first module of the course and you'll be all set to go. This is what we are going to be making. This project was created with the sole intent of getting really familiar with layers. Every single piece of artwork you ever make in Procreate should have multiple layers in it, because it helps you to be more organized, it's a smarter way to work, and if you need to edit anything later on, it will be very easy to change anything without affecting everything else. If you put everything on one layer, if you change one thing, it's going to affect other things. So it's just a very smart way to work, so if you follow this project from start to finish, you will be an expert on layers, grouping them, and organizing them. With that said, I'm going to create a brand new canvas that's 1500 pixels by 1500 pixels at 300 DPI. I'm using the display P3 color profile, but if you're on an older iPad and don't see that option, just remember, just select whatever the default SRGB option is and you'll be good to go. Just a reminder on how to do that, we're going to go into the gallery, we're going to hit the plus sign, and then remember we already defined it down here in an earlier video, so I'm just going to tap on that and we are all set. We're going to apply the background color first, which is this pinkish-peachish color right here. Background color layers are a little bit different than regular layers. You can only change the color of this layer. In order to do that, all you want to do is tap on it and it will automatically bring up your color palette, so you're just going to tap on the pink and then you're all set. If you ever want to change it to something else, you can just toggle through the colors right here. So that one is just for color. If I return to my layers, now you can see my layer 1 is automatically selected because I'm ready to create artwork and I'm not changing the color anymore for the background. The next thing we're going to do is drop in our initial, whatever initial you would like. You can choose any letter you want. I'm going to use the letter E, and I'm going to make it this mustard color, the darkest one down here, so make sure that's selected first before you input any text. We're going to come over to the wrench, we're going to hit "Add", and hit "Add text". Remember, we've got a bunch of different options on how to edit this text, so I am going to hit the keyboard. I'm just going to put in an E right here and then I'm going to hit the cursor icon, and it's selected, and I can move it so it's a little more centered now. Then I'm going to deselect it. Now I'm going to tap on it so it's selected again and now I can edit its appearance. All these are necessary steps. I'm going to hit the "Aa" right here. I can always pinch and zoom out of my canvas so I can see everything a little bit better as I'm editing it here. I'm going to set this as Futura bold, so just tap on "Futura" on your font. That's a default font, so everyone should have that and then choose bold. I'm going to increase the size up to, I think I'm going to go to 200 here. Let's see. For the size, if you ever want it exact, all you have to do is tap on the increments and you can type it in right here. Meant to mention that before. Now I have exactly 200. Everything else is fine here. I'm going to hit "Done", and now I'm going to select my E and I can toggle it up until I see those cross-hairs to let me know that I'm right in the center of my canvas. There we go. Now I can deselect and we've got our E all set to go. Now you can see we've got it right here as well, as editable text. In the next video, we're going to start layering in all those elements. 18. Proj 1: Adding Details + Organizing Layers: In this video, we're going to start drawing our new elements in. This part is really fun because everything starts really coming to life and we're going to talk a lot about layer orders. The very first element we're going to draw, we're going to put on this Layer 1 right here. It's totally fine that this Layer 1 is underneath our E layer because this one doesn't really matter. It's not going to overlap our E or underlap it, so it can just be on its own layer right around our E. This is going to be our mustard yellow colors, so we're still going to keep this one selected, and these are just going to be almost u-shaped flowers. Let me bring this down to see. Four percent, and I'm using my monoweight brush for all of this. This entire project is the monoweight brush. These flowers are going to be u-shaped flowers. I like putting my largest flowers or elements in first because then I fill everything out with smaller supporting elements after that. It just makes everything feel more balanced, and I'm guiding your eye where I want it to go at the very beginning. Now they have these outlines, remember we can just color drop these in. One thing I wanted to mention about the color drop is, when you are bringing it in, you can see this blue bar up here. This is my threshold and this is showing how full it is to the edge of my outline as it's filling up. If it's really low, sometimes you can get like a hairline along where the outline is and where the fill is. I usually keep mine pretty far up like almost to 90 percent. Just so I have this nice clean fill that goes straight to the edge of my outline when I'm dropping it in. If you have any edges that are appearing and you don't want them to appear, try that first. Remember when you pull it into the shape, hold your stylus on the screen and then drag and that will affect that. I'm going to put a few right there. I'm going to put some on the edge over here and I'm changing up the size just to add a little extra visual interests, then a final one right over here. I've got those flowers in there and we can label this layer. I'm just going to call this mustard. Remember we can scribble this out and just write it in. Now I'm going to create a new layer right above it, and this one's just going to be called medium yellow. We're going to grab our medium yellow right here and because it's on top of the mustard layer, anything I paint on this layer is going to be on top of that layer. I'm just duplicating the shape, but I'm making it a little bit smaller in here. Once you have all of those elements drawn in, now we're going to add in some lines and some dots at the end just to add a little bit more detail to these flowers and make them look more like flowers. I'm going to create a brand new layer and label this one Blue Lines. We're going to grab our darkest blue color right here. We're going to change the size of our brush to two percent over here. What I want is for these blue lines to come up, and then we're going to put some dots on the tops of them. But obviously, I don't want them to be on top of this yellow. I want these to be sandwiched between the two of them because it'll be way more interesting that way. Right now, I've got my Blue Lines on top of both of these layers, and I just want my Blue Lines to be behind my medium yellow layer. All I have to do is tap and drag. Once I do that, you can see now where it's positioned over here, shows where it's positioned over here. Now I can come around and fill in the rest of these lines for all my other flowers, and can see whenever I draw them, they're always going to appear behind that medium yellow color. Now that I have all my lines, now we're going to add in some bright yellow circles to the very tops of them. I'm going to create a brand new layer label this one, Yellow Circles. Whenever you create a brand new layer, it's always going to appear above whatever layer is currently selected. Since we were previously painting on our Blue Lines layer and then we created a brand new layer, it automatically put our Yellow Circles layer right above it. It is automatically beneath the medium yellow layer. This one doesn't really matter because nothing is going to overlap it or underlap it. But just so you're aware whenever you're creating a new layer, it's going to take the position right above whatever layer you are already on. I'm going to make sure my yellow Circles layer is selected. I'm going to grab my bright Yellow right here. I'm going to go up to eight percent for this, and I'm just going to stamp once on top of each one of these. The important thing with this layer was that it was above the blue lines there because we don't want the blue lines to be on top of these circles. We want it to be really obvious that these circles were on top of the blue lines. Once you have all of your dots on there, now we're ready to add some extra detail to the rest of it. This part is really important. These next few steps for finishing off these flowers. We're going to come up to our medium yellow layer because the next element we're painting, we want it to be above all of these elements. I'm going to create a brand new layer now, and you can see this one's automatically above everything else, and this is going to be called Transition. We're going to return to our dark blue color. We're going to reduce the size down to three percent. On top of every one of these, we're just going to draw a transition element. It's going to connect our flower petal with the stem that we're going to draw in after this. This is just a little bit spiky, and then you can fill it and you can either color drop or just paint it in. Since these are a little smaller, it might be faster to just paint it in. Once you have all of your transition areas done, now we're going to come back to our Layers pallet. We're going to a brand new layer and label this one Stem. We need to talk about where this Stem layer should be in relation to everything else that we've done so far. I need the Stem to appear behind the E, and I also need it to appear behind everything else. Because if I draw a stem right now, you can see that it's on top of everything else, and I want it to be behind everything else. But I still want it to be behind this E, so that part's right. I'm automatically behind the E because it's beneath the E in the layers, but I want this to be behind everything else, so I need to drag it beneath everything else except for my background color. Background color is always going to be your last layer no matter what. Now that I have my stem right there, now I'm good to go with everything else. I want to redraw this because it's not perfectly centered. I can either grab my Eraser Tool or I can just tap on the layer thumbnail and choose "Clear" and that will clear whatever is on my layer without deleting the layer. Since we haven't used the eraser tool yet, we'll do that right now. I'm going to grab my Eraser, so you can choose any brush that you want to work as an Eraser Tool. I think by default it's an Airbrush one, which I've used that before too. The monoweight brush also works really well as an eraser. I've got that selected, but you can choose any brush that you want as an eraser brush, and it's just going to erase it away. You're just going to use it just like a brush, only you're removing instead of creating. Coming back to my brush, I'm still at a, I believe four percent. Let's go to four percent for our brush size, for our stem. Make sure you're on your Stem layer, and then we're just going to draw in these stems coming down. Once you have your stems in there now we're going to add in some floating leaves. These floating leaves, I want to break up the E a little bit because this is just going to be this hard line all the way around, and this way it will interact with the background elements. It's going to be a part of the entire layout instead of just sitting on top of everything. It's really important to me that I have elements that sit on top of the E as well as behind the E. But the E should always be readable no matter what. No matter how many elements I add around it, it should always be able to be discerned as an E.. For this one we're going to come all the way up to our E layer, because this next element is going to sit on top of it and on top of everything else, so it needs to be above it. I'm going to create a brand new layer, label this one Leaves. I'm going to keep the same dark blue color selected, but I'm going to reduce my brush size down to three percent. These ones we're just going to fill in wherever the negative space is. I'm going to make sure that I'm overlapping my E as much as I can because I want it interacting with that background. Once you have a few leaves thrown in here, just color drop. You can see already how pretty that's starting to look. I'm noticing that most of my leaves are a little bit smaller than this one. This one just feels too big to me, so I can erase it away and just redraw it. That's a little better size-wise now. You can see we've got elements that are on top and behind and everything is very intentional what we've done so far. We're just going to keep adding to this. We're going to keep practicing with our different elements in the layer order and organization. Right now we can group all of the yellow flowers together. We can't group the leaves because they're part of our E and we want to keep our E separate so we always know where it's located in relation to all the elements that we are going to be painting in. But as far as all of these elements, they're all belonging to the same little cluster of similar elements. These are all our yellow flowers, so I can group these together and this will help me to just stay very organized in my Layers palette. If I ever need to find a certain layer, it's going to be really easy for me to find it, as we keep adding more and more layers to our project. In order to group, you just want to select one of the layers and then toggle over to the right all the other layers, and it will turn a shade blue. You can see what that looks like, and then just hit "Group". Then we can toggle up our group by hitting this little carat. Then we can rename our group. This one is just going to be called Yellow Flowers. In the next video, we're just going to pick up right where we left off and add even more elements around our initial. 19. Proj 1: More Elements + More Organizing: Picking up right where we left off, we're going to start adding in some white flower buds next in these flower buds. I want the ability to have them overlap the E as we put them around the E. Some will be outside of the E and then a few of them will touch the E just to make that interaction between the E and the background elements even stronger. I'm going to create a brand new layer above the E, so I need to select the E first, tap to create a brand new layer, and this one is going to be called white flower buds. Once you have that, we're going to come into our color palette, we're going to grab our lightest white color right here. Our monoweight brush is still selected and we're going to create these with a larger size brush, so I'm coming up to 8 percent, and these ones are just going to be around in little clusters, just like we did with our yellow flowers. You can see I can overlap the E in some places and then in other places, I can just keep them above the E. Once you have all of your flower buds drawn in, now we can create stems to connect them, so these stems need to be behind the E because we're going to do the exact same thing that we did for our yellow flowers, so we know that we need these ones to be beneath the E. I can tap on the yellow flowers group, create a brand new layer, and this one will be white flower stems. We're going to return to our dark blue color, and our size, we're going to bring back down to, let's go with three percent this time, and we're just going to bring these ones down. You can see how they're behind the flower buds, and behind the E. For these ones that are touching, you can either put a little mark right here to signify that the stem comes up to it or that they're just hidden behind it. I'm just going to leave that one as is. Once you have all of your stems drawn in, now we're going to draw in some leaves on these stems. I'm going to keep the leaves on the exact same layer because I want the leaves on these ones to stay behind the E. Once you have all of your leaves on your stems drawn in, now we're going to create some background, just supporting elements, really basic foliage, but we're going to leave these ones as outlines instead of filled in, just to add a little bit of extra variety and visual interest. I'm going to create a brand new layer, and we know that this one's going to be a background element, so it has to be behind everything. I can drag this layer all the way down behind my yellow flowers layer. Now whatever I draw in here will be behind every single element that I've drawn so far. I'm going to tap on the layer thumbnail, hit rename, and we'll call this one foliage. Once you have your layer named, we're going to come to our light blue colors, so just tap on that. I'm going to continue using my brush at a three percent size, and what we're going to do is just come around and wherever we've got a lot of white space, we're just going to break it up with these foliage elements. These foliage elements are going to have curved leaves, and they're going to be symmetrical on both sides. We've got all of our background foliage drawn in, and in the next video, we're going to add in our final details and finish everything. 20. Proj 1: Final Details: In this video, we're going to finish up project number 1 with some final detail. You'll notice that we still have a few places of whitespace around our E, like this big gap right here, and there's a few other areas where I think it could use just a little bit of something. To increase our contrast between the size, the scale of our elements, I'm going to add in some really small elements that will tie everything together. These ones will just be little floating daisies and we're just going to pop them wherever it feels like we could use just a little something extra to fill everything out. These ones are going to be background elements so they can exist beneath the E. I want to make sure that they stay behind everything that I've done so far, except for the foliage. If they overlap the foliage here and there, I think that's totally fine. They are floral elements, so I want them to be dominant over any foliage elements. I'm going to create a brand new layer right above our foliage. Now that's the only element that it will sit on top of if it overlaps anything. We're just going to call this one Daisies. For the daisies, we're going to make these ones our medium yellow colors. Just select the one right in the middle. I still have my monoweight brush selected. I'm going to keep my size at three percent for these, and I'm going to vary up the size that I'm going to make these. I'll make some of them little and some of them a little bit larger. These ones are just simple five-petaled daisies. For flowers, they could really be any kind of five-petaled flower. I've got all my daisies drawn and I'm noticing that this one is just a little too large compared to everything else that I've drawn so far. I can just grab my eraser tool, and erase it away. Then just redraw in another one. That feels better. Now we just need to add in the centers of these. I'm going to create a brand new layer right above it label this one Centers. We're going to grab our dark blue color once again for this one, and we're just going to put a dot in each of these. There is our floral initial and you could totally call this done right now. I felt that my E just needed a little bit of something extra just to tie it a little bit more with the background elements. I'm going to add in an inline. An inline can be either a line or a decorative element that's within your letter that follows the same shape as your letter. We're going to create some foliage that works as an inline right here, and it's going to be on top of the E. I'm going to come up to the E, create a brand new layer. This one we're just going to label Inline. Before I forget these daisies and these centers, we can group these together because these ones will always belong together. It doesn't really make sense for the daisies to exist without their centers, so we can just group them. Select the centers, slide daisies over to the right, hit Group, toggle it up and just label this one Daisies. Let's return back up to our inline layer. We're going to change the color to our lightest color, the white. Let's see what size this looks like. I think I'm going to make the size just a little bit smaller. I'm going to come down to two percent for this. What I like to do is first draw my line and then I'm going to add all the leaves on top of it. My line, I want it to be more organic than geometric. I'm just going to free-hand this. My line is going to be a little bit curvier, I'm going to loop it up at the top. Loop it down here and then finish it off down here. Then I can add my center stroke right to it. On all of these I'm just going to add some decorative leaves. They're going to be pointy and a little curvy. That completes project number 1. We've got our inline in there and all set to go. Since we made our Canvas 300 dpi is the resolution, it's already ready to go for print if you'd like to print it out or post it to social media, if you'd like to export this out of here as any type of file format, all you want to do is hit the gear icon up in the corner, hit "Share", and then you can choose your format. When I post to Instagram, I export as a JPEG, so I'll just tap on JPEG and then it exports it, and then you can choose where you're going to send it. I usually air to my Mac, but I can also email it to myself as well really easily. 21. Masking: Clipping Masks: In this video, we're going to talk all about clipping mask. Clipping mask are really important to get familiar with because you will use them all the time in Procreate. They are huge time savers, and are very smart way to work. I want to show you a couple of examples of how you can use clipping mask. I sold my color palette up from project 1, so we're just going to use this really quick as an example. If I grow my light blue color right here, and I still have my monoweight brush selected. Let me increase the size over here to four percent. If I draw a leaf shape, let me draw a couple of leaves so we can repeat this process, and I fill it in with color, so all of these leaves are on the same layer right now, and say we want to add just some detail to the leaves themselves. If I create a brand new layer, and let's say I want this darker blue color to be an accent color, and I want to show that half the leaf is shaded, and half the leaf is just the regular shade, or it's in sunlight, and I want just this part to be in the shade. But that looks weird because it extends beyond the shape, and I just want it locked into the shape. We can do that with clipping mask, so if I tap on this layer thumbnail for the shaded part, and I choose "Clipping Mask". A clipping mask will lock whatever artwork you draw on a clipping mask layer into whatever layers directly beneath it. Because our leaf layer was directly beneath our shadow layer, that lock the shadow right into the leaf shape. Let's do it again. Since this already has the clipping mask applied, you can see that it's noted with this little arrow pointing downward. Whenever you see that, that means there's a clipping mask applied to that layer. We can do it again right up here as long as you're on the layer, and even if I draw it, and it extends beyond my leaf, you can't see it because it's locked in there, and I can just drop it in. If I ever changed my mind, and I don't want this to be a clipping mask layer, all I have to do is tap on the layer thumbnail, and uncheck "Clipping mask" by tapping on it. You can see that's the shape now, and I can draw another shape over here if I want to see what I'm doing before I lock it in to make sure I have that closed path. Drop in the color. Now let's reapply that "Clipping mask" tap on the layer thumbnail and choose "Clipping Mask". Now we've got these shaded leaves, and that adds a lot of extra detail to something that's otherwise very simple. If we want to add even more detail to our leaves, and we want to lock that into the leaf shape as well, but we want it to be on a separate layer. Let me create a brand new layer right above this, and I'm going to grab my white color. I just want to add in some detail in here. I want to put a line up, and maybe some lines through my leaf to show that it's a leaf. But this is on a brand new layer. The layer directly beneath it is a clipping mask, it's not my leaf layer. Something that's really cool is in Procreate you can stack clipping masks. What I mean by that is because this layer is a clipping mask, it's tied directly to the leaf layer beneath it, so if I apply clipping mask to this one, it'll skip over this one and go directly here because this one already has a clipping mask on it, so you can put as many layers. This allows you to work in a really smart way because you can keep all of your elements on separate layers, but still apply clipping mask to an element that's pretty far beneath it. If I tap on the layer thumbnail, and choose clipping mask, you can see, it skips over locking it into the shadow layer, and goes directly to the leaf layer because this layer has a clipping mask. If this layer didn't have a clipping mask applied to it then this would be locked into the shadow layer instead of the leaf layer. Hopefully, that makes sense. Now you can see if I zoom up close, you can't see the line extending anymore. Anything I draw on this because I've got the clipping mask now applied to this layer, if I draw directly on this, you're not going to see it when it extends beyond the leaf layer because it's locking into the leaf layer. You can always preview what the original strokes looked like by just tapping on your "Layer" thumbnail and unchecking "Clipping Mask". I want to tell you about one other thing. Let me reapply the clipping mask to this. Because these are stackable clipping mask, if I remove the clipping mask for this one, it's going to affect this layer because this layer needed this one to have a clipping mask in order for it to be tied directly to the leaf layer. If I remove the clipping mask on this one, I want you to see what that looks like. You can see that now both of the clipping masks get removed because this one was relying on this one, so as soon as I removed this one, this one also automatically got removed. Just be aware of that if you adjust anything that has clipping mask, if you're using stackable clipping mask, if you remove one thing it's going to affect a bunch of other things. Before you do anything, just take a look at what you already have, and see if that's really what you want to do, or if you want to change something else. Let me reapply the clipping mask, and now I have to reapply them individually. I can't reapply one, and have everything else go back because now Procreate doesn't know what I want to do specifically, so I have to tell it individually. I hope that all makes sense, and it's pretty clear. If you practice this a few times, you'll get the hang of it, and it'll be crystal clear. I want to show you one other way that you can use clipping mask. I'm going to add some texts. Let's add text in this bright yellow, so we can see it next to these leaves. I'm going to come over to the wrench, hit "Add", and choose "Add Texts" and I'm just going to change this. I can draw my line through it to select it, I can hit "Cut," and I'll just type in the word hello. Once we have our texts, let me also make this bold. Let me just type in bold right here. I'll leave it as the default style, and that's pretty good. Let me select it, and make it a little bit bigger. I'm also going to show you how you can use photographs with a clipping mask, and you can do this with texts, you can do it with drawn in elements. You can always use graphics as a clipping mask, so that's also a really cool. We're going to go and grab the free texture that came with the class. We want to make sure right here we've got our Hello layer. Because this one's selected, our texture is going to be brought in, and a brand new layer right above it. I'm going to hit the "Wrench", I'm going to hit "Insert a Photo", and go grab it from my camera. Here's that texture that came with the class. You can see it's brought right in, and I can move it right above where my text is. Let me reduce the size of this little bit, and I can rotate it as well, so it covers more of my text. Now I can apply clipping mask to this image. If I tap on the layer thumbnail, remember it's going to get locked into whatever's right beneath it, and you can lock it into editable text, which is also a really nice feature. Tap on the layer thumbnail, and choose "Clipping Mask", and you can see now we've got that texture locked right into the text. You could also lock it into an element. We could have locked into these leaves if we wanted to continue our stackable clipping mask right here. The other really cool thing is when something has a clipping mask applied to it, you can still move and manipulate it. With this selected, I can reselect it, and reposition it in my words, so I can get a preview of what it looks like. As I'm moving it around, maybe I want to rotate it more. I can see what that looks like in the color that the lettering is beneath it is showing through wherever the image doesn't exist because this is a transparent PNG image. This is one of my in textures. I'll leave a link below this video to the rest of the site if you're interested in using other ink textures in your artwork. There we go. That's a basic overview of what clipping mask do. Just keep in mind that it's going to lock into whatever is on the layer directly beneath it, and you can stack them, just be aware of what's underneath it as you're stacking it if you decide to make any changes later on. 22. Masking: Layer Masks: In this video, we're going to talk about layer masking. Layer masking can seem a little complex but once you practice with it a little bit, you'll realize how easy it really is and how smart it is to incorporate it into your workflow. Layer masking you'll generally use whenever you would typically think to use the eraser tool. Using a layer mask is just a smarter way to work because instead of permanently erasing or removing anything, it's just temporarily hiding it. I'll show you exactly what that looks like. It's a little easier to show you rather than just trying to explain at all. What I'm going to do is set a background color just to help us visualize everything a little bit better. I'm going to set my background color to this peach color from our Project 1 palette. I'm going to select black, so double-tap where the black is and we're just going to draw in some lettering as an example. I've got my signature brush selected and my size is at 26 percent. I'm just going to write out the word masking. I have my word masking. Let me make this a little straighter. Say I want to play around with some inline details which we just talked about in project number 1 with just my regular writing. I want the background color to poke through it. I want to be able to see the pink behind it, but I'm not sure if I want the background color to remain pink or not. I don't want to paint in any elements that are pink right here because that might change later depending on what background color I have. That is where you would maybe sometimes go to the eraser tool, the erase portions of your lettering away so you can preview what that looks like. If I use the eraser tool and I selected my dotted brush right here and I just erase away portions of my M, and then I decide that I changed my mind, I want it to go back to the way it was. Now I have to come in here with my brush and very meticulously try and get right to this edge without messing up my original lettering. That makes it really hard, and then I have to go through and fill in every single one of these dots and that can be extremely time consuming. A nice alternative is layer masking. Let me undo this, and we're going to apply a layer mask to the lettering layer. Let me just label this one lettering to begin with, and we're going to apply that layer mask. All you want to do is tap on the layer thumbnail and choose mask. When you do that, it's automatically going to put this mask layer right above it and it's tied together. These ones are attached to each other, so wherever one goes the other one's going to follow. Basically what's happening is, is this preview of the white right here just shows you what's being revealed on this layer. The two things to remember whenever you're working with layer masking is that white reveals and black conceals. Since this is all white, it means everything that it's attached to with this layer, everything in the layer beneath it is being revealed or seen. Anytime I paint in black on this layer, it's going to hide portions of this layer that it's tied to of this. Because this is white right now, it means everything is being seen. Let's grab black, double-tap where the black layer, make sure you're on the layer mask layer, it's going to be the brighter blue color. I'm going to once again use the dotted brush only on painting in black this time on the layer mask layer. If I come in here and paint this in, it has the exact same effect. I can still see the pink behind it. Even if I go off of my letters, and I change my mind, all I have to do is paint in white. You can see right here I've got these little dots that are painted in black. That means that portion of this artwork is being hidden, which is why I can see the background color poking through it. As soon as I paint over these black areas and white again, they're going to be re-revealed. I'm revealing what's on this lettering layer. The more you do this, the more it all click and it'll all make sense. But you can see we've got this A right here. Let's do the exact same thing that we're trying to do before by painting these back in. All I have to do because I'm on a layer mask instead of the original layer, I just adjust the mask and I'm not permanently affecting the lettering layer in any way. If I come to my layer mask and I change back to white, double-tap where the white is to get true white. Now let me select a denser brush. I'm going to grab my monoweight brush. I can be as careless as I want to be with this brush because I'm just painting over the black areas on the layer mask. I'm not actually painting on my original lettering layer at all. Now you see because this area is now white instead of the black dots that were once there, everything is re-revealed on this layer. I'm just hiding things when I paint in black. These dots are being hidden on the original piece of lettering which is why the background is showing through. If I want to play around and test out different inline styles, maybe I want to add just a regular line in here. Let me reduce the size of this, go back to black and make sure I'm on my layer mask layer. Now maybe I want to play around with different doodles in here because I'm not sure what type of inline I want this to have. This gives me the perfect opportunity to play around and see what I like before committing. Because if I was permanently deleting these areas, then it would be so much more difficult, especially when you have areas that extend beyond the original lettering. It's so hard to paint this back in and get it exact if you aren't using layer masking. If this is removed permanently with the eraser, the only way to bring it back is to paint it back in and try in lightness up exactly. But because I'm on a layer mask and I'm not permanently affecting my lettering layer, I can just be on my layer mask, switch back over to white and then paint this back in, and you can see it's perfect. I don't have to worry about it at all. I can change my mind with whatever I want after that. That's a quick overview on layer masking. We're going to get into this a lot more with another technique that I think you're really going to like in project number 2. 23. Proj 2: Setting Background + Text: Welcome to project number 2. We're going to get a little more advanced with every project as we go through the course. So this one is building on what we've already done and adding in some new elements. We're still drawing some flat elements, but now we're integrating clipping mass and layer mass and once again, we're setting our own text. This is the final outcome of project 2. This is exactly what we're going to be creating together. If you haven't downloaded your color palette yet, just make sure to refer to the video titled downloading and installing class freebies in the first module of this course. Once you have your color palette in place, we're going to create a brand new document that's 1500 pixels by 1500 pixels at 300 DPI using the display P3 color profile. Same exact settings that we did for Project 1. So just repeat the exact same thing and create that new canvas. In this video, we're going to set our background color and set our text, and then we'll add everything in and apply all those extra effects in the next couple of videos. For the background color, just come to your layers, tap on background color. We're going to choose this darkest one, it's the first one at the top and now we're going to set our text. So we need to come back to our layers, make sure layer 1 is selected and we're going to tap on our color dot. For our text, we're going to make it this medium blue color. So just tap on that and now let's add our text. We're going to hit the wrench, make sure the add category is selected and choose add text. We're going to type out the word hello, and we're going to make this all caps. So we're going to enter our text settings, which we can do by just hitting the double a over here. That's another way to get to it. That is if you needed any other ways. So for this one, our font is going to be Baskerville, but because we've got a blinking cursor right here, whatever we set it to will not take effect until the text is highlighted. In order to highlight the text, when you have a blinking cursor, you just want to double tap in the middle of the text and it will highlight it. Now we can change the font to whatever we would like. So let's toggle this up and we're going to find Baskerville and we're going to change it to semi bold. We're going to make it all caps. So toggle this little knob over here and we're going to increase the tracking just a little bit. Let's come up to like 15 percent. Remember you can tap on it if you want an exact number and our size, we're going to bring this one up to 70. We can stretch this out if we can't see it very well, come out and bring this out and let's see how that fits in the middle. Let's make it a little bit smaller. That's feeling a little tight. I'm going to come down to 65 and that looks better. Okay, so I'm just going to hit my cursor up here and then we can drag it into place. So I have uniform selected. So when I drag it, I'll get those crosshairs because I've got snapping. Under snapping, I've got snapping turned on and there we go. So I've got my word all ready to go. I think my tracking is a little more than I want it to be, so I'm just going to double tap on it, hit my double a and reduce my tracking down to 10. I think that'll be better. Done and I can select it and just make sure that it's centered again. Now because we have a straight line with an H and a curve on the O, it can give the impression that there's more space over here than there is over here because I've got my serifs that come and extend a little bit further. Even though I know this is directly in the center visually, it doesn't feel like it is. I'm actually going to tap mine over just a little bit. So visually it will feel centered more than literally and there we go. All right, so in the next video we're going to start drawing in all of our decorative elements. 24. Proj 2: Adding Flourishes + Teardrops: Now, we're going to draw in all of our decorative elements, and then we can begin applying our layer mask and our clipping mask. The first thing we're going to do is drawn some flourishes, and our flourishes will end up being intertwined within our letters. When we're drawing our flourishes, we want to make sure we're overlapping quite a few letters, that way we can have that overlap/underlap effect, and that will make it seem all intertwined. What we're going to do is grab our yellow color for these elements. I'm going to be using my monoweight brush, and the size of this is going to be 5 percent, and we want to make sure that we are on a brand new layer. We don't need this layer 1 anymore, so we can just delete this, and we're going to create a brand new layer right above our HELLO layer. Just hit the plus, and we'll get that layer right above it. Because we want this to be overlapping and underlapping, we can achieve underlapping utilizing our layer mask, so everything else we want to draw on top. I'm going to label this one Flourishes, and once again, we've got our yellow colors selected, we've got our monoweight brush, and the size is 5 percent. You can draw any type of flourishes that you would like. I'm going to have one that comes around, it's going to loop through the E, and the H, and then it's going to come back around, and it's going to loop through the O, and come out. I'm going to start on one end and work my way all the way to the other end. Once I have that in there, now I'm going to just add a few extra ones, that way I just have more to play around with when I'm overlapping and underlapping elements. I'm going to come around the L and swirl into the E, and I'll do the same thing over here with this L. These are my flourishes. I'm going to create a brand new layer, and these ones are going to be teardrops, so I'm going to tap on the layer thumbnail, rename this one Teardrops. These tear shapes are just going to add just another element, and tie all of my colors together. I'm going to draw a big yellow one right around here. I'll draw another one right about here, and two big ones down here that are mirroring each other. I'm going to add in some gray ones too, so I'm just going to grab this, it's a gray tannish color. Once you have your teardrops in there, we're just going to add in one extra little embellishment, and we're going to use our dotted brush for this, so navigate to your dotted brush, select that. We're going to change the color to this bright blue, and we're going to create a brand new layer, and just call this one Dotted, and the size of this brush is 6 percent. We're just going to add some extra areas of detail by just following the same curve as our flourishes, just here and there. Once you have your elements all set, in the next video, we're going to apply layer masking to our flourishes. 25. Proj 2: Layer Masking/Intertwining Flourishes: In this video, we're going to apply layer masking to our flourishes to give the impression that they are overlapping and underlapping the lettering. So they're intertwining directly with the lettering. This is a really cool and fun effect that you can use for lettering all the time. I love using this effect. What you want to do is first come to your flourishes layer. The goal here is we want to hide portions of our flourishes. Like this one, we would normally want to erase it. That way it would look like this is behind and then this one's on top of it. But if we change our mind and we want this one to appear on top and this one behind, that's why we don't want to permanently delete it. We just want to hide it. That way we can make those decisions as we see fit, and we can change our mind later and nothing is permanently removed. So we're going to apply layer masking by tapping on the layer thumbnail and choosing "Mask". You'll remember before, now we have this mask directly tied to that layer. Because it's all white, it means everything is being seen right now. Once we start painting in black in some areas, that's when it's going to look like it's being removed. Let's select black right now by double-tapping in the black area. We're also going to grab our monoweight brush for this. We could just come over here and say we're removing this part and we're removing this part, and you can see on the layer mask, we've got those black areas, so it's hiding those portions of the layer that's right underneath it, and we can just go around, and all the way through our letters, and have our intertwining look like this. But if you want more precision, if you want these lines to be right up against your texts like I do, I'm going to show you a really easy way to do that. I'm going to double-tap to undo both of those. What we want to do is make a selection. We're going to select our text. That way we tell Procreate, select everything but the text. So when I am painting in, I'm keeping within just that selection. It'd be a lot easier if I just show you what that looks like. Come to your layers, come to your text layer, tap on the layer thumbnail and choose "Select". When you do that, you'll see these diagonal lines going across the background. So they're running across all the elements except for the text because we've selected the text. Once you have that, we're going to come back to our layer mask. Make sure layer mask is the brighter blue color and that you still have black selected as your color. Now when we paint across this, it's only going to happen in the text itself. You can see, I'm painting up here and that's not getting removed. That allows me to go straight to the edge. So I've created a selection of the text inside. I only want to be able to paint within this selection. So that's what's allowing me to do this. Now, I can come through and say this one's going to be hidden as well, and I can do this for all of my flourishes now for this layer. This one was behind, so this one's going to be in front, this one's going to be behind, this one's going to be in front, this one's going to be behind, and I can paint. I don't have to worry about being messy because it's going to stop me because I still have that selection active. You can see those diagonal lines, so that's going behind and this one's going to go above. Now, I can do these extra flourishes, maybe because this one is overlapping, I want this one to underlap, which means this one will overlap. Since this one's underlapping, I'll leave that one overlapping, and this one will underlap. I just don't like having two that are doing the same thing right next to each other. There we go. I just noticed this one goes under, this one goes over. This one could go under, but it's right next to this one. So I don't really like that. I'm going to leave that one the way it is. I like the way that looks. Once you're happy with painting away or masking away all of those areas. In order to deselect, all you have to do is hit your little "Deselect" icon right there, and now we're back to normal. We don't have any more diagonal lines, and we have all of that intertwining going on. You can see right on our layer mask, we've got these little black specks. Those are the areas that we temporarily hid away. If we change our mind and we say, "Oh, you know what, I actually would prefer that this would overlap and these two underlap." All I have to do is reselect my text. So tap on the layer thumbnail, choose "Select", come back to your "Layer mask", and because this area is painted black right now, all you have to do is paint it white. So come to your color dot, double-tap where the white is, and now I can paint in here white and this is revealing it. White reveals, black conceals, so I'm re-revealing it. I don't have to line anything up. I don't have to draw this from scratch again and perfectly line it up. It's already there. It was just temporarily hidden. Now, I can switch to black, double-tap where the black is and I can hide these areas now. I can do whatever I want. I can change my mind and go back and fix things. Now I can deselect, and now I'm right back where I want to be. So that's how easy it is to remove things and then bring them back by using layer masking. Nothing is permanently gone because we didn't use the eraser tool. So it's very, very powerful. I would highly encourage you to practice with the layer masking, and the more that you do it, the more you'll see what an advantage it is to use that in your own artwork. 26. Proj 2: Text Highlights Using a Clipping Mask: We're going to finish up project number 2 in this video by just applying a clipping mask with some really simple highlights to our texts. As we discussed in the clipping mask video, you can apply any type of clipping mask that you would like directly to text. Remember, clipping mask is creating artwork that you're going to lock into existing artwork. Whereas layer masking, we are removing portions of artworks. They're very very different even though they both have the name masking involved. What we're going to do is come to our texts layer, we're going to create a brand new layer right above it, and this is just going to be locked into our text right here, which is exactly what we want. I can either draw it and then apply the clipping mask or apply the clipping mask right now and we can just draw with it on. I'm going to apply the clipping mask right now that way it can help us to see how everything is coming together. So I'm just going to tap on the layer thumbnail and choose clipping mask. I'm going to choose my brightest blue color, and I've got my monoweight brush selected. I'm just going to add some really simple highlights on to it. Onto the top, I'm just going to draw a line across, same thing over here, on the crossbar and on the serifs below. Basically, anything that's horizontal is getting some little highlights. If we want to see what that looks like without the clipping mask applied, all we have to do is tap on the layer thumbnail and turn off the clipping mask by tapping on it. You can see that those are the original pieces of artwork, and now let's mask it in a clipping mask, and now we've got it nice and tidy and locked into that lettering. I'm just going to come through and do the exact same thing on all of my letters, just on the horizontal strokes. That's how easy it is to just apply simple details to lettering. We're just adding a little bit of highlight to it and it's already popping off of the page a little bit. It's a really simple technique that can have dramatic effects on your artwork. That is clipping mask, layer mask, decorative, flourishing and details, and editable text. That wraps up project number 2. 27. Custom Brushes: Basic Brush Settings: In this video, we're going to talk about the basics of brush setting. We're going to go over some really simple settings that if you want to change just minute things about how your brush is behaving, you'll know exactly where to find it; you'll know exactly what to do. In the next video, we will take this one step further. We'll talk about some more advanced settings, but if you're just looking to make really minor changes, that's what we're going to be talking about here. We're going to use our monoweight brush as the example. Once you're in the starter pack, all I want you to do is slide this brush to the left and hit "Duplicate", and this will make a copy of that exact brush. That way, we don't mess with any of the original settings of that brush. For example, if you have a brush that you really love, but you want to make just a few alterations to make it more your own for your style of lettering or drawing, this is a really good way to alter it without losing the original. You can see it's put a one right after it. You can also rename this if you'd like. If you tap on the brush, you will enter the brush settings. All the categories for the brush settings are on the left side of your screen, and there's a preview area over here that you can actually draw and doodle and preview. You can change the appearance of the brush by hitting "Drawing Pad." You can either clear your drawing pad, you can draw with a different color if you'd like to preview it in a different color, and you can change the size of your brush here, too, if you'd like to preview at a smaller size. We're going to change this back to white for us, and I'm going to hit "Clear drawing pad". If you are a hand letter, StreamLine is going to be one of the most important settings that you alter based on how you like to hand letter. StreamLine dictates how smooth your stroke appears as you draw it. If you tend to write on the slower side, you may get frustrated with how your lines are appearing that could look a little too shaky for you. If you have your StreamLine turned all the way up, it will make your line that much smoother. If I turn this all the way down here, it forces me to write pretty fast. If I write this really fast, I can have it looking somewhat decent, but if I'm a slower writer and I want to write it nice and slow, you can see how shaky the lines can get. If I have StreamLine turned all the way up, you can see how much smoother the strokes become if you have a shakier line. Let me clear this, and I'll write it out now so you can see how the line is just following my pencil and it's keeping it really really straight. If you are a faster writer, you won't want this turned all the way to max because if I write this out, you can see it's trying to keep up with me, but because it's stretching that line to keep it super smooth, it can't keep up with me if I'm writing really fast. So it all depends on how fast of a writer you are. It could look better if it's turned down, if you're a faster writer or it could look worse if it's turned down and you are a slower writer. Just keep that in mind. I'm going to turn this. I usually have mine up around 65. Jitter is exactly what it says; it's just going to make your line look more jittery. Fall off is a really good setting if you're using a more painterly brush if you're painting illustrations, and if you want to mimic the effect of your brush running out of paint, that's when you would apply a fall off effect. If I increase this, you can see that my stroke starts disappearing after a ways. If I bring this down to 15 and I start painting, it's going to start going away. As I continue painting with the same stroke, you can see it's getting lighter and then eventually, it goes away. Sometimes this pops around a little bit. It's just part of the preview area that always happens. You could see that it's starting to fall off; that's what fall off is all about. The last two settings that I want to talk to you about go together so they're your size and your opacity based on the amount of pressure that you're putting on your stylus. The 1st place I want you to go is into Properties down here. Let me clear this out. Properties, because this is a monoweight brush, I never wanted the size of the brush to change based on pressure. It's always going to remain the exact same weight, but if I change my mind and I want it to be varied based on pressure, say I want to transform this into a lettering brush instead of a monoweight brush that's typically used for drawing, then I want it to be altered so whenever I'm putting extra pressure on my downstrokes for lettering, I want those to be thicker than my upstrokes, which are a lighter pressure. Right here, you can see I have my maximum size of my brush at 100. That means it will get as large as Procreate allows me to make it and zero for the minimum size so it can get as small as Procreate will allow me to make it. If I wanted my minimum size to be larger so I could tell procreate, "Don't ever let my brush appear smaller than this size," that's when you would change this to a different setting. I like having the ability to go at max size and a minimum size, so I'm just going to leave that. As far as opacity, this brush, I do not allow you to change opacity with it because it's meant as a drawing or an outlining brush, but if I want to change this so I can change the opacity based on the amount of pressure I'm putting on my brush, then I need to alter the minimum opacity because right now, I'm saying it's always going to be opaque, meaning it's going to be at max opacity all the time, even the minimum amount is at max. If I want my minimum amount to be much lighter, possibly five percent, so it's super light at its minimum and it can be fully opaque at its maximum, that's what I would change right here. You want to make sure that these ones are set before you go into the Apple Pencil settings, and this is where you're going to determine how large you're allowing it to get with pressure. How much of a size difference you're allowing for when it comes to pressure? I'm going to draw two lines here. The 1st line is going to be no pressure at all. I'm just gliding my Apple Pencil across the screen, and then the 2nd line is going to be max pressure. I'm putting a ton of pressure on here; you just can't tell it yet. Now, I'm going to say with this brush, I want the size to be able to change with the amount of pressure. Right now, I'm seeing there's no change in size when I'm applying pressure. Now, I'm going to say that I'm going to allow for 40 percent change. You can always put in the exact amount if you want to write it in there too. You can do that in this, which can be nice, but sometimes it can pick up stray little marks, so just be aware of that. However large this percentage is will determine the contrast, the difference between these two, how great of a difference in size it will be. If I bring this all the way up, you can see there's a gigantic difference between the two and if you're hand lettering, you may not want a word to look like this. So I usually have mine closer to 30 or 40 at most here because I don't want too extreme of a difference. Let's clear this out. Now, let's also say that I want to make a change in my opacity when I'm drawing too. I'm going to change this one right here up to 40 percent. The other thing that you need to be aware of, if you are changing opacity, you have to have a change in your Properties so you have to make sure your minimum opacity is beneath max. If it's up to max, it'll never change opacity. You have to have this setting changed under pressure so you let it know that you want the opacity to change based on pressure. Then under Rendering, you want to make sure that you're using Light Glaze; it won't work if you're under Intense Glaze. I'm just going to tap on Light Glaze. Now, if I write, you can see that I have a difference in opacity when I'm writing. Let's look at this in color on my screen. I'm going to choose this medium teal color from our 2nd project. Let me make this bigger so we can see it better. You can see that we've got an opacity change happening right here. We've got full opacity here and less opacity right here, and if we change the background color, we'll see it even better. I can choose black. Now, you can really see that difference. Let's write it out in white as well. That can be really fun, especially for lettering brushes if you want to change up your opacity. That is how to make really minor basic changes to your brush settings in Procreate. 28. Custom Brushes: Beyond the Basics: Okay, we're going to pick up right where we left off, and we're going to talk about adding even more adjustments to existing brushes. Or if you're creating brand new brushes from scratch, just some settings to be aware of if you want to add in some really cool effects. The first thing I want to talk about, this time we're going to use our smooth pencil brush, so make a duplicate of that one. Let's also clear this out, we have a brand new canvas to work with. I just have my background set to black, which will be fun with some of the colors we're going to apply here. Okay. So coming back to my brush, my copy of my smooth pencil brush, I'm just going to tap on this, we've already talked about this panel for the most part. The next thing I want to talk to you about is how a brush is created and how it works. It's based on two things, it's based on the shape and the grain. The shape is the tip of your stylus or the brush. So it's whatever shape the brush is, if you're using a round brush for example, it could just be a circle for this one because it's a pencil, it's a little more scribbly, I guess. This is a custom brush, I made this brush from scratch. This is the brush tip that I have or the pencil tip. If you were only to tap the screen once, that is that shape right there, that is the tip of the brush and then the green is the texture that the brush has. Even though there's a bit of texture in the shape, it's the grain that determines how textured the brush will appear and I wanted this to be a graphite texture, so that's why this texture is rougher to mimic the same type of texture that you would see when you're drawing with a graphite pencil. When we draw it out, this one also has some pressure settings apply to it, so you can see that the size changes with pressure. Under here this is how your textures behaving and you can play around with these. This is more advanced for sure, and same thing under Shape, you can apply different settings down here. There's really so many options when it comes to creating brushes that you can go pretty crazy with how many customizations you want to apply to a brush. If you want to get into custom brush making, I would just encourage you to play around with different settings and see how it affects your brush. It's really nice that you have the drawing pad right here and don't forget that you can also change the color and you can clear it whenever you want, just by hitting "Clear" ''Drawing Pad'' and then just choosing a different color if you want to play around with colors. I'm going to grab the blue right now because we're going to start talking about applying color dynamics to your brush, which is a really fun feature that Procreate has recently added in. When I talk to you about how that works, if we come over here to color dynamics, you can see we've got three categories of color dynamics, we have a stamp-colored jitter, a stroke color jitter, and a color pressure. So Stamp-colored jitter is mostly, let's just turn up the hue right here. If I just stamp here and there, it's going to be a different color every time I stamp it. If we clear this out, we can do a stroke color jitter now. So if I change the hue, this is just how much the hue is going to vary since we're starting with blue, we're going to change it by 50 percent with each new stroke. If I have the word 'Hi', this is a stroke and it continues, and now I lifted up my stylus and when I draw a new stroke, that color is going to change by 50 percent. You can see that's a change, this is a change. Every time I draw a new stroke, it's going to change color by 50 percent. If I want a more reduced change to this, let's clear this out. I'll have to do is reduce the amount of hue jitter right here, and you can see that it's not going to change quite as much. So the next thing is my favorite and that is color pressure, let's disable this by bringing it down and we're going to clear our drawing pad. Color pressure is based on the amount of pressure that you're putting on your brush. So if I increase my hue, and now I'm just going to write this out as a script. Lots of pressure, a little pressure, lots of pressure, little pressure and you can see the differences in colors that I'm getting. I don't know why the drawing pad does that but it does. You can see whenever I have a lot of pressure on my downstroke, I'm getting red and light pressure is giving me blue right here, and you can change this amount and you can preview it in real-time if you want to see how crazy it can get. Like if you turn this all the way up to max, you're going to get these rainbow effects. It can get pretty nuts depending on how much pressure you're putting on it, so that's a really fun one to play around with. I did want to mention there is an extra category down here, the color tilt, that's based on how your stylus, how you're holding your stylus if you're holding it pretty tilted as you're drawing, it's going to appear differently than if it's straight up and down. So you can adjust these settings as well, let me change that and bring this down so you can see the difference. Let me show you an example of this. If I just draw with heavy pressure and light pressure and keep my Apple Pencil in the same position, you can see that my my size is changing, but as soon as I tilt my stylus, you can see that that changes too depending on my tilt. So that is also another feature I don't tend to write like this, unless you're drawing or shading things, then you might want that feature turned on, but I don't generally use that one. All right. The other thing, let me clear this. I want to talk more about color pressure and we will talk about all these different settings which can apply to all these other settings too, I just am going to use this one as the example. But all these settings will be the same type of effects that you're applying to these other categories. Okay. For Hue, let's turn this one up and I'm just going to write 'hello' with varying pressure. We've got our word and if I want to change the saturation, we can just make the colors more saturated by coming up or less saturated and dull if we come down as desaturating, just going to leave that on, maybe just a little more saturated, brightness is the amount of white that you're having in here. We can have it super bright or super dark it's going to leave that normal and secondary color. This one you can really only preview if you are in your regular screen, so let's look at it the way it is right now. You can see we've got two colors up here, we've got our primary color and our secondary color. We're going to make our primary color the light blue, and we're going to make our secondary color the yellow, so we can see things really well with things the way they are. I've got my blue selected right here and I can write out, let me make this big so we can see it. That's what it looks like without a secondary color applied. But if I come down here and I change this and toggle it up, we're going to go up to like 40 percent. It can be really obvious, done, and now I'm going to write it just the same. So this is actually integrating the blue and the yellow right here. But I have a 40 percent difference, so it's going to alter the color just slightly. If we come back, turn this all the way off, come back here, you'll see we have the same colors as we did originally. So that is what secondary is, it's pulling in whatever you have set for a secondary color here. If it's turned off, it's only going to focus on the color changes that it implements based on your primary color. Just keep that in mind, I don't really use the secondary color option very much, but it's something else that you can play around with and you can see we've got the secondary color option for all of these categories as well. I'm just going to keep this one off. So those are some of the more advanced settings that you can play around with if you want to see immediate differences right away, change up your shape or your grains, so your brush tip or the texture and that will make a huge difference if you do want to mess around with shape or grain right here. Procreate actually has a library that you can choose from that you can play around with right away. One thing you should know is that the grain source always has to be a seamless texture, so it can repeat or tile, that way you don't see breaks and the texture when you're drawing with it. This is a seamless pattern tile right here. If you're familiar with seamless patterned tiles, then you're already all set to create your own. If you'd like to borrow some from Procreate's library, you can do that by hitting "Edit" and then hit "Import" and source source library and then you can toggle through it. All of these ones are seamless so you can try out a new texture if you want, like if we chose this one, and then you want to hit done. Now, you can see that texture got applied right away. Now, it's going to make a huge difference when I'm writing with my brush, so that can be really fun. They also have a large library for Shapes. So you can do the same exact thing under hit "Shape", hit "Edit" right up here, and then hit ''Import Source Library'', and you can see all the different shapes that you can choose from. So let's try this blotch one and then hit "Done". Now, you can see we have a totally different brush now than what we started with. There's definitely a lot that you can play with once you start getting familiar with just a few of those settings. 29. Proj 3: Creating 3D Lettering: Welcome to project number 3. In this project, we're going to be creating some 3D lettering, and then we're going to be embellishing it with some texture and really basic background doodle elements. What you see on screen is exactly what we are going to be creating together. I'm going to create a brand new canvas that's 1,500 pixels by 1,500 pixels at 300 DPI, using the display P3 color profile. Same thing that we've been doing so far with all of our projects, we're just going to continue using the same settings moving forward. I've got my canvas in there and hopefully, you've already loaded in your color palette. There's actually only four colors for this project, so super simple. We're going to start by setting our background color, so just come to your layers, hit "Background Color", and it's going to be the third one right here out of these four. Then we're going to come back to our layers palette, and now we're automatically on layer number 1. We're going to name this one hey. We're going to use our lightest color for our lettering, and we're going to grab our signature brush for this one. With the signature brush, it has that built-in size variation based on pressure. Lots of pressure and little pressure are going to look different. You can use any brush that you'd like, I like having a little bit of variation because this is a lettering project. But if you'd prefer to use a font, you can definitely do that too, you already know how to set text. So either way is perfectly fine, so I'm just going to write out the word hey. Once you have your lettering, I'm just going to move this so it's centered on my canvas, and there we go. Now we're going to start applying our 3D lettering effects, which this part is really fun and we're going to be using some new tools that we haven't used yet. The first thing we want to do is make a copy of our lettering. So slide it to the left and choose "Duplicate". On this bottom version, we're going to rename this one, extrusion. We need to change the color of this one too. So we're going to come over and choose the second color right here. We're going to temporarily turn off our top layer, that we can only see the copied one because that's the one we want to change the color of. With the forefinger tap, if you have it set up just like I showed at the beginning or whatever your quick gesture was that you set up, I'm going to hit four fingers and choose "Recolor". We're going to toggle our little crosshairs over our lettering and because we've already selected the color we want it to change to, it will automatically change to that color. Then all we have to do is hit our magic wand up here twice and that will deselect it. Now we can turn our top lettering back on, and because it's a copy, you're not going to be able to see this version anymore because it's right underneath our top copy. With this bottom one selected, we're going to apply a motion blur, and the motion blur is going to allow us to have this look 3D automatically. This part it's really exciting. With your extrusion layer selected, you're going to come over to your magic wand. You're going to hit "Motion Blur" and then hit "Layer". Now we're going to stretch our extrusion layer from left to right at a diagonal. You're going to be able to see it showing up just slightly. You can see it right there. I'm coming up, you can see up here at the top, the percentage, I'm going to come up to 20 percent or as close to that as I can get, looks pretty good. Then you're just going to hit your magic wand to deselect. Now you can faintly see it back there, but it's there, and we want to darken this up a little bit. Right now it's really soft because we stretch that lettering at a diagonal. In order to fill it out a little bit, you're going to come to your Extrusion tap in the layer thumbnail and choose "Select". Come back to the same layer, tap on the layer thumbnail, and choose "Fill". What we're doing is saying procreate, select everything on this letter, and now fill it in again with this color, and that will harden up some of these really soft edges. We want these edges to be harder edges because the way they are nice and soft right now, they're not going to look believable as a true extrusion. We're going to repeat this process two more times. So tap the layer thumbnail, hit "Select", you've got to come back into your layers, tap on the layer thumbnail, and choose "Fill Layer". We going to do it one more time. Tap on the layer thumbnail and choose "Select". Come back to your layers, tap on the layer thumbnail, and choose "Fill Layer". You can see each time that we did that, it got darker and darker, and now we can really see this extrusion. The next thing we want to do is just do one final pass in order to ensure that these edges are going to be extra crisp because they're still pretty soft right here. You can see by soft, I mean, they're a little bit blurrier. So in order to make those a harder edge, what you want to do is first come to your brushes. We're going to choose our monoweight brush and we're going to make this at max size, so bring it all the way up to the max. Now you want to tap on the layer thumbnail and choose "Select". We're just telling procreate we want to just select our extrusion, and by brushing in the remainder of our color, it's going to make those edges even harder. You could continue just hitting "Select" and then "Fill Layer", "Select" and "Fill Layer". I like doing that a few times to harden up the edge, this makes that process go much faster. So I do that a few times and then just a few passes with the brush, and then I'm all good to go. That's why I also incorporate this into my process. I still have my monoweight brush selected and because we made it max size, now all I have to do is start painting along the edge. You can see, as I paint along the edge, it's making it darker and thicker. I'll just paint over this a few times. Now it's very opaque, and if I deselect just by tapping on my selection icon up here, now if I come down here, it's a much harder edge than it was before. It's very defined, I can see exactly where the edge is, instead of it fading from full opacity to full transparency. Now you can see it does not feel 3D at all the way it is, and all we need to do is move this one over to the right in the same direction that we made this original motion blur. I still have my extrusion layer selected, and now I'm going to grab my cursor. What I want to happen is this edge right here, I want to align it directly with my lettering edge. I'm just going to drag it manually, and you can see how they line up, and now I've got this beautiful extrusion right there. I just want to make sure that I don't have any edges showing. Sometimes I'll just tap at an extra time just to make sure. Now that that's all done, the last thing we have to do to make this the most believable is to add a shadow. Generally, your shadow will go in the opposite direction of your extrusion. Since we extruded going from upper left to bottom right, now we're going to go from upper right to bottom left. What we want to do is we're going to copy our extrusion, so slide it to the left and choose "Duplicate", and now this bottom one is going to become our shadow. Tap on the layer thumbnail, hit "Rename", and we're going to call this one shadow. So now that we have our shadow, we need to recolor it, and the only way we're going to be able to see this one the same way we did before is by turning off our top layers. With those turned off now, we can see this is going g to be our shadow layer, and our shadow color is going to be this one right here at the very end. With that selected, we're going to do the same thing we did before. We're going to recolor it. Forefinger tap or whatever gesture you defined your recolor for, for your quick menu, I'm going to hit "Recolor", and then drag my crosshairs over the lettering, and they'll change to that color that I just defined. Now I can hit the magic wand and deselect it. Now we need to apply motion blur again, only we're going to go in the opposite direction. Let's turn on our other layers, but now that this is a darker color, we're going to be able to see it better. We're going to come up, make sure shadow is selected over here near layers palette, tap on the magic wand, and choose "Motion Blur", "Layer", and this time we're going to stretch from upper right, to bottom left. So I'm just going to tap and pull, and you can see it pulling out right there, and I'm going to do another 20 percent blur on this. Once you have that, you're just going to hit your magic wand to deselect it. Now we need to do exact same thing that we did before, except we're going to exclude the part where we painted it. Because it's a shadow, we want it to be just a little bit softer. This extrusion, we need it to be a hard edge because it's 3D text, so it's solid, whereas the shadow being cast is not solid, it's soft. But we do want it to be a little more obvious than it is right now. I'm going to come to my layers, tap in the shadow layer, hit "Select", come back to it, tap on the layer thumbnail, hit "Fill layer". We're going to do that one more time, so tap on it, select, come to the layer, tap on it, "Fill Layer". We're also going to apply a multiply blend mode. That way it's interacting with our background color and a dark way to simulate a shadow. So we're just going to tap on the little N, drag this up to Multiply, and we're going to reduce the opacity because this is really heavy right now. I'm going to reduce the opacity down to about 55 percent, and that looks good. Now the last thing we need to do is just align this. What I want to happen is this top edge of the shadow, I want to align with this top edge of my lettering. So I can grab my cursor and just drag it down at an angle until everything lines up, and that looks pretty good. Deselect, and now if I zoom out, you can see I've got some really nice 3D lettering right there. 30. Proj 3: Applying Depth with Texture: In this video, we're going to apply some extra details to our lettering to make it seem even more 3D. We're going to add some really subtle shadow details using default brushes in Procreate. What we're going to do, is apply extra shading to the extrusion layer. This extrusion layer is this lighter pink layer right here, that's making it look 3D. Anywhere that there's a bottom side. By that, I mean, right underneath the stroke of the y, this exit stem, we're going to make this one darker. Same thing down here. All of these strokes, on the bottom side, I'm going to make darker to show that the light is hitting the top part, but it's not hitting the bottom part. That will just make it jump off the page. That much more. We're going to go and use a default texture brush in Procreate. Tap on your brushes, and then come to "Charcoals," and you're going to select the "2B Compressed" brush, right up at the top. We're going to come to our extrusion layer and create a brand new layer right above it, because this needs to sit on top of the extrusion layer, but underneath the regular lettering layer. Create a brand new layer. This one's going to be called extrusion details. The color we're going to choose is going to be the exact same pink color as this, so that is the second color right here, but we're going to change it to multiply blend mode. That way it appears darker on top of it. Change that to Multiply. Then we're going to apply a clipping mask, so whatever we paint on this layer is going to be locked into our extrusion shape. Tap on the layer thumbnail and choose "Clipping Mask," and now when we paint, it's going to show up right within that layer. That's too big, so we're going to reduce the size down to, go down to three percent, and we can just paint right in here. I want some texture right there, I also want some texture on the bottom side of this, down here. If I want to add even more dynamics, I can make it really dense with the texture at the bottom, but then reduce my amount of pressure on my brush, as I come up, and that will give it a nice transition, into full transparency. I can add a little bit up here. Just nice and soft. Then make this lighter as it comes up. Nice and dense down here where it's darkest. Then the e. I'm going to do one additional thing. Here you can see how cool that's looking. This is feeling a little too intense, which it feels just a little intense for me. I'm going to reduce the opacity of it, just a little bit. Tap on the m, and I'm going to bring this down to, let's see, like maybe 75. If you want to add on an additional skill that we've talked about in this class, we can actually apply a layer mask to a clipping mask. Don't let that blow your mind too much, but you can definitely do that. You can apply a layer mask to any type of layer. It doesn't matter if it's a clipping mask or not. We're definitely making things a little bit more complex as we're moving throughout the class, but I want you to be equipped with all of these skills as you move forward with your own artwork in Procreate. The way that you apply a layer mask to a clipping mask, it's just tap on the layer thumbnail, and choose, "Mask." Now you can see we've got a layer mask attached to our clipping mask because we've got the little arrow right here. But whatever we do on our layer mask, is only going to affect our extrusion details. It's not going to have an effect on anything else. Once again, we're going to paint in black on this layer just to hide portions of our extrusion details. The places that I want to do that are places where I want a harder edge, like right here. I might want to go back and have it be softer later on, which is why I am not just erasing it. If I mess up while I'm erasing it, then I don't want to have to recreate these. It's insurance for me that I can go through, do it however I like and I don't have the pressure of having to recreate something if I change my mind later on. I'm going to paint them black. Double-tap the black as to get true black. But for this brush, I'm going to use a hard brush. We're not going to use our textured brush anymore. We're going to come back up to our starter pack, and use our monoweight brush. I'm going to reduce the size of this down to three percent. I'm just going to paint. Make sure you're on your layer mask layer. I'm going to make this a harder edge right here, so it's more defined. I have better contrast now. When I zoom out, you can see that crisp edge is defining that that's where the shadow is. I can do that, right here with the e too. I just want some of these areas where I have this extreme angle where it changes direction, almost 90 degrees, that's why I'm putting these harder lines. Let me do the same thing for the h. I just don't want a soft area right there. I think that's it. All the other places look fine. Just gives me more definition in those three areas to really make that texture stand out. That's part of the shading. If I zoom out, you can see how nice that looks for those harder edges. 31. Proj 3: Background + Final Details: Okay. In this video, we're going to finish off our project number three, with just adding in some background details. So one little trick that I like to use every now and then it's adding some texture right behind my lettering. That can really help to define some hierarchy within your composition by having a background element very clearly separated from your foreground elements. So we're going to do that with just a little bit of subtle texture with a default procreate brush. So what we're going to do is in our layers palette, this layer needs to be right right our background color layer. If you tap on your background color layer, it's going to just bring you right into changing the background color, which we don't want to do. So what we typically do by just selecting the layer we want and then creating a layer right above it. You can't do that when it comes to the background color. So what I do is I just select the layer that's right above it, create a new layer, and then just drag this underneath that layer. Now I've got it in the position that I need it. So this one's just going to be background texture, and for this background texture, we're going to return to our lightest color and we're going to use a default procreate brush. The default procreate brush is found in your spray paints. It's the medium nozzle brush, right there. All you want to do is come over the middle of your layout. The size of this is at max and I'm just going to tap it once. You can even use your finger for this. So I'm just going to tap it pretty aggressively once and you can see I've got that spray paint now. It takes up quite a bit of space. So the larger part just feels a little bit more centered than before. That feels good. I liked the opacity on that. If you want it to be darker, a really handy trick is you just duplicate your layer and it will duplicate the opacity. If that seems too light, just slide this over to the left, choose duplicate and you can see it gets a little bit darker, but I like the lightness of it. So I'm going to delete this, but in case you want yours a little bit darker, that's a really easy trick on how to make it twice as opaque. So now that we have that texture in there, you can put in some doodles of any kind. I'm just going to add in some additional details. So I'm just going to create a brand new layer right above my background textural layer and just label this one, details. I'm going to keep my lightest color selected. I'm going to return back to my starter pack and select the original smooth pencil down here. All I'm going to do, let's see what size this is. I'm using an 8 percent size and I'm just going to put some plus marks around and vary up the pressure on these. Okay. Then I'm just going to drop in some dots of different sizes too. So I've got different stroke weights and different sizes. So that completes project number three. If you'd like to learn more about 3D lettering and procreate, I actually have an intro course right here on Skillshare. So if you hit my profile image, you can find it listed with my other courses. Or I will also leave a direct link on screen to that course as well. 32. Animation Basics: Animation Assist Palette Options: In this module, we're going to talk about animation basics. Animation is something Procreate has improved a lot in recent versions and now they also have an animation assists palette, which makes animations way easier than they ever were before. I'm really excited to add this module into this course and just give you a basic overview, and by the end of it you'll be familiar with and be able to create your own simple animations directly in procreate. To start off, I want to give you an overview of how it works and then we'll create a really simple animation together and then in project four, we will add a lot more complexity and finish the course off with our final project. The first thing we need to do is open up our animation assist pallet. You're going to come to the wrench, you're going to go to Canvas and Animation Assist is found right here. You just want to toggle that on and you'll see, you'll get a little palette at the very bottom of your screen and that's all you need to operate animations and procreate. I'm just going to tap, so this menu will go away. Right here, this is always going to correspond to your layers palette. Since I have one layer right here, I have one frame down here. The speed that your animation plays at is referred to frames per second, so it's the number of these little frames or layers, if you want to relate it directly back to your layers, it's the number of these that it cycles through per second. Industry standard is 24 but you have the freedom to do whatever frame rate that you would like, it's your animation. But you'll have to keep in mind that if you plan on posting this animation to social media like Instagram, it has to be at least three seconds long in order to play on Instagram. The settings can be found right here and this is where you will adjust your frames per second, so this will be your speed. It defaults at 15 but you can drag it however you'd like. You can choose to have your animation loop, so it will cycle through your animation and then it will start again and cycle through endlessly an infinite number of times. You can choose ping-pong which means that it will cycle through your animation, and then it will go backwards through your animation and go back and forth. Then one shot means that it's just going to cycle through your animation once and then there'll be done, it won't repeat ever again. Onion skin frames refers to the ability to see your past layers so you can make decisions for your next layers, as you move along. If you want the ability to see all of your different frames that you've done previously, you'll want this up at max. You can also define the max number that you would like to see at a time. Onion skin opacity is you deciding how transparent those previous layers will be. If they are too opaque it could be a little confusing or difficult to create your brand new layers, if it's interfering with your past layers. A couple more things to keep in mind, you can define a background to your animation. If I create a bunch of background elements and I want those to always be a part of my animation, I never want these to move or change. They're just static elements that will forever exist to my animation. Instead of having to add these to every single frame that you make, you can just define these as your background. What you want to do is keep those on the layer right above your background color layer. It has to be on this layer, and then down here on the frame you'll just tap on it and choose Background. Now you can see it's got a little blue tab on it, now this will always be a part of your animation no matter what's animating within it, this will always be a part of that animation. Then as you add different frames or layers you can see we've got a bunch of layers and every time I add a layer I get a new frame per minute. You can draw a different artwork on all of these frames and you can see when I toggle on a layer, it hops to that on my palate down here, so you can always see where you're at in your animation down here. The other thing to know is that you can group layers together and whenever you group layers together it's considered one frame. If I have some artwork on this layer, and then I have some artwork on this layer but I definitely want them to remain on separate layers, but I want them to animate at the exact same time I can group them together. You can see that onion skin is already appearing right here because it's previous artwork that I have, so that's why that's more transparent right now. But as soon as I group these together, they will be considered one frame, so they will maintain the same transparency as I'm working. All I'm going to do is slide this over, choose group and now you can see now they're considered one frame down here. Now I have two frames down here because it's the one group and then that additional frame, and then this one is our background right here. That's something to practice with and just get familiar with. The same way that we have a background established you can also establish a foreground and your foreground will always be on the uppermost layer of your animation and this is if you have something at the very top, on top of like I have this overlapping this part of my background, but I definitely want it to appear on top and not behind it, then I would establish this as a foreground and these are pieces that I always want as part of my animation. All I have to do is down here where this one is, tap on it, and choose foreground and now that will forever be a part of my animation no matter what's going on in between these background and foreground. You do not need to establish a background or foreground for all of your animations, it's just an extra option that's available to you. None of that is required. The last thing that I want to tell you about is if you have some artwork on a frame, so let's create a new frame underneath our foreground frame, and say I have this piece of artwork and I like how my animation is going, but I want this piece of artwork to stay that way for longer than one frame, so it just stretches out a little bit longer, and we will do this with our drawn in lettering and our fourth project. But I will draw out the lettering and then I'll want it to stay in that lettering so you see the final outcome before it goes back through and recycles through the animation. It builds the animation, then it stops at the end, so you can see the final result just for a little bit longer than our regular frames, and then it begins again. If you want a frame to last a little bit longer than just one frame length of time, then you can stretch it out further. You can either duplicate this and just say I want this to last for three frames and look exactly the same. Down here you can see I've got these three separate frames now, so it'll just last a little bit longer, or now with the animation assist palette I can just tap on this frame and say hold it for three frames. Then once I do that, you can see there are shadow frames right here and that just means that they're duplicated but I'm not muddying up my layers palette because you're limited by how many layers you can create based on your canvas size and resolution. In this way, I can save on layers over here but still stretch it out longer down here. These are all really fun tricks. I don't want to overwhelm you too much with this, so in the next video we're going to create an animation together, and hopefully this will all start making sense and clicking. I'll just encourage you to watch this through and then practice it yourself and you'll see how easy this is once you really get going. 33. Animation Basics: Simple Beating Heart: I have a brand new canvas. It's 1500 pixels by 1500 pixels at 300 DPI, and I'm using Display P3 again. Everything that we've been doing for new canvases so far. I'm starting from scratch so you can see this process from beginning to end. We're going to turn on our animation assist palette so we can tell Procreate we're working on an animation. I'm just going to hit the wrench and choose Animation Assist. I have my little palette down here. You can see that that one frame corresponds to the one layer that I have. The next thing I'm going to do is draw some artwork on this layer. I'm going to keep things really basic. I'm just going to grab a red color and draw a heart. Let me grab my monoweight brush for this so I can fill it in really easily. I have my heart right here. You can see the heart is appearing on this first frame as a little thumbnail. I want this heart to always be a part of my animation. I never want this heart to go away in my animation. So I need to define this as a background element. I'm going to tap on this little frame and choose Background right here. Now it's considered a background element. Now I'm going to start creating my animation. My goal for this is to have a little heart in here that expands. It gets bigger and then it comes down. Almost looks like there's a heart beating inside of this heart. I'm going to grab a different color. I'm just going to grab this pink color. I'm going to create a brand new layer right above this and draw this little heart in here. I also want to talk about the smudge tool because we haven't gotten to that yet in this class, and that way we will complete talking about all of these tools. We are going to use the smudge tool for this. When you use the smudge tool, you can use any brush with your smudge tool and it will have different effects. With the smudge tool, I'm just going to use a smooth pencil brush from the starter pack. Because it's got a little bit of texture when we smudge with it, you will see that texture too. It's something to keep in mind when you're choosing different smudge brushes. I've got my smooth pencil and I've got this set of pretty large size over here. Almost to max, I'm at 15 percent. With the smudge you're just going to tap and push, and use it just like a traditional smudger. I can push this color when I'm doing that. Let me make this bigger so it's more obvious on screen. I'm going to push this out. That's our first frame, it's like a fuzzy heart in here. The next thing I want to do is work off of what I already have. Since I've already created this heart, I just want to push it and make it larger as my animation moves on. I need to reuse the same element, because every single time I'm going to use what I've done and just make it larger. I'm going to duplicate this. Slide it to the left and choose Duplicate. You can see I've got that duplicated version right down here. Now I'm just going to push this one out. Making it a little bit bigger. I want to give you a preview of what I'm going for right here. Under settings I'm going to reduce the frames per second, otherwise it's going to go way too fast and you won't be able to keep up with it. I'm going to bring this down to five. I'm going to do ping-pong, because I want the heart to get big and then get small, get big and get small. I'm going to choose ping-pong and then in order to preview this, all I have to do is hit "Play ". You can see it's beating now back and forth because I have a small heart and a large heart and it's cycling back and forth between those two. Because I've defined the big heart as a background element, it's always present in my animation even though it's not being animated. That's a little preview of it, and we're just going to continue building on top of this with expanding the size of that inner heart. We're going to hit "Pause". You can see it stopped on this one, but even if it stopped on this one, you can just tap on it to bring it to the end and it will correspond to this layer. Now that this is a larger heart, I'm building on top of this one, so I need to duplicate this one. Slide it to the left, choose Duplicate. Make sure you're on that layer before you begin smudging again. I've got my smudge tool selected and I'm just going to push this color out one more time. You can stop and check it out and make sure that this was enough of a difference to go from this frame to this frame. I can just hit "Play" and check that. It is getting bigger so I can hit "Pause". I can come back to my last frame, duplicate that one, and continue working. I'm just going to keep doing this. Make this inner heart larger by smudging in. Once I'm done with that, duplicate that layer, and continue doing that until I fill in this heart. I'll speed up the video. I've finished this off and it's to a place where I'm pretty happy. Now let's preview that animation just by playing it. You can see it's coming back down once it gets to the top. If this is playing too slow, you can come into Settings and increase the frames per second. When I do that, you can see it's more natural now because it's moving a little bit faster. You can cycle through and see how fast you really want this to go. That's pretty fun to do and play around with. I'm going to come back down to 15. If we wanted to post this on Instagram it would have to be at least three seconds long, which it definitely isn't right now. There are a few ways that you can extend the length of your animation. You can either reduce the frames per second, so it's slower animation, therefore lasting longer. You can add additional frames down here. Maybe I want from this size to this size a little too quick. I can add a frame in between. That will extend it. The more frames you have down here, the longer your animation will be. You can also just extend the length of each frame, how long they're going to last. I can have some that lasts a little bit longer than other ones. Maybe I'd want this one to last for two frames and then I'm going to make this one last for two frames. This isn't entirely appropriate for this type of animation, but if you have another animation where you could stretch out the length of some actions taking place that will extend the length of your animation as well. I'm going to come back down with these ones because I think it'll look weird if I do that here. Then, also, for this last frame, I could just hold it at full size right here a little bit longer. This one I could hold longer. Maybe this one I want to last for five frames and that will definitely make it last longer. Now when I play, it's going to come all the way to the end. You can see how the largest heart lasts longer than these smaller frames, that only last a frame in length. You can see how that feels. If you're comfortable having that a little bit longer, that could also get you up to the three seconds that you need to have if you're posting to Instagram. Those are all little tricks. I'm getting that length right, especially for social media. In the next video, I'm going to show you how to export this animation. 34. Animation Basics: Exporting Animations: We've finished up our animation, and now we're ready to export it and use it, either on social media to send to a friend. However we want to use this, it's ready to go. When you get to a point where you're ready to export it, you want to come up to your wrench. You want to hit "Share", and down here are the options you'll want to pay attention to. If you're just posting this on a website, then you'll want an animated GIF, but if you're posting to Instagram, it has to be an MP4. If you export this as an animated GIF for Instagram, it'll just be a static image, because GIF is another file format for a static image, like JPEGs. An MP4 tells Instagram this is a video, you're going to have to play this. Let's pretend that's what we're doing. I'm going to hit "Animated MP4" and you'll get your animation right here, and it will give you a preview of it. You can adjust the frames per second here if you want to change them at all before you export, just keep in mind if you increase the frames per second, you're going to reduce the length of time that the animation plays. Because I need this to be a lengthier animation, I'm going to come down a little bit. Unfortunately, it doesn't tell you anywhere the total length of time that your animation is going to play, so this is how I also preview how long my animation is. You could also do a web-ready version, but in my experience it degrades the quality of your image, and max resolution always cooperates with Instagram, so I don't really see any need to go to web-ready, unless you're posting on the web and you need to reduce the size, but we're perfectly fine here. Then all you have to do is hit "Export". Once you hit export, you can either email it to yourself to post directly to Instagram if you know that it's long enough, but if you want to see how long your video is, just hit "Save Video", and that'll save it to your camera roll. I am in my camera roll and I've added it to the album that I want it to exist in. You can see right here, there's a little notation of the length of time that the animation exist for. You can see mine's at three seconds right here, so it would be okay for me to use this and post it to Instagram. But that's how I'm able to tell how long my animation plays for, is I just add it to my camera roll, and then I look and see if it's long enough, then I can just post to Instagram from there, or I will go back to Procreate, reduce my frame rate, or do some of those other options that we talked about, to lengthen the time, export it again, and once I get up to that three seconds, then I know I'm ready to go. If you have an iPhone, this will already appear in your camera roll on your phone, so you can post directly to Instagram from there. If you're on a different type of phone, then you can just email it to yourself, save it to your phone, and then upload it directly to Instagram. That's how easy it is to export animations out of Procreate. 35. Proj 4: Project Overview: Welcome to project number 4 and the very last project of this course. This one I threw in as a challenge an advanced project, but we are using everything that we've talked about, everything that we've learned in the course so far is incorporated in this project. You should be really proud of yourself that you've gotten this far, and also if you complete this project because this one is definitely more advanced. I just want to dissect this a little bit to prepare you for what we're going to do, so you have some things in mind as we're working, and it will all come together and make sense as we work through it. Right here, let me play this animation. This is what we're creating together. It's a drawn-in lettering effect, and this is one of my favorite things to do with animation in Procreate. It's just drawing the word over and over. This is looping because it doesn't draw it backwards. That would be ping-pong. If I come into Settings and change it to Ping-Pong, now you'll see that it's going to draw it out, and then it's going to reverse it, so that's going to come back. You could also do that. It looks pretty cool like that too, but I've got mine set at just looping. We'll change that over and play it again. We've got some background elements. You can see the foliage behind the lettering. It just stays there the entire time. We'll draw all of that together and define that as a background element, just like we talked about with the heart, where the red heart just stayed present the entire time. It wasn't animated, it didn't do anything. It just needed to exist as part of every single frame. The lettering we will use as a foreground, that way we can draw over it seamlessly and we'll be able to follow the path of that lettering and you'll see what that looks like. Then what we're doing in order to reveal the lettering that you see is we're using a layer mass, so we're hiding the entire lettering and then were solely revealing it. We'll paint over it entirely in black. Then we'll start painting over it in white on the layer mask and it will reveal different parts of that lettering. You'll see exactly what that looks like as well. Then the last thing that's part of this animation is once it's already drawn out at the very end, it's going to pause briefly. We're holding those frames just a little bit longer, and then it will start over because once you draw it all out, you want the viewer to take it in for a moment to see what the final outcome looks like before it starts drawing again. It can be pretty abrupt if it just finishes drawing and then starts over again. There's a brief pause at the very end. Now that you have everything in mind, make sure you've downloaded and installed the color palette for this project. If you haven't yet, just make sure to refer to the video at the beginning of the course called Downloading and Installing Class Freebies. I'm going to create a brand new Canvas that's 1500 pixels by 1500 pixels at 300 DPI using the display P3 color profile. 36. Proj 4: Creating the Artwork: In this video, we're going to create all those Background elements first and then we will begin Animating in the videos to come. This one can take you as long as you'd like or as short as you'd like. You can put in any elements around your Lettering. It just helps to define the composition and make everything feel a little bit more balanced. You can repeat the same elements that you see me creating or you can add in your own elements here. These are just static Background elements, so it's whatever you want behind the lettering to embellish it. I am just going to be using my Monoweight Brush for all those background elements, but for the Lettering itself, I'm going to be using my Signature brush, so just come over here, we're going to draw the Lettering first because I create all of my elements around the Lettering, so once I have the Lettering the way I like it in the position that I want it to be in, then I draw everything around it. I'm going to select my Signature Brush, I'm going to make this Blue color, and then I want to make sure that the Lettering itself is on its own layer. I'm going to make sure I'm using Multiple Layers just because it's a really good practice, but once we define all those static elements as a Background element, we'll just make sure they're grouped together and you'll see exactly what I mean. On this Layer we're only going to put our Lettering so I'm going to label this one Lettering. Once again, I have my Signature Brush, the Size of my Signature Brush is about 25 percent, and what I want to happen is I want it to come from one side and then finish on the other side. You can write any word that you would like right here, but my recommendation is to just keep it on the shorter side because it can get really tedious the longer your word is. This one's four letters, which is really easy, but I wouldn't go more than eight letters, that just makes it really, really long if you have a lot. I've got my word all set and I just want to Toggle it down a little bit, it's feeling a little high on my canvas. That feels good. Once you have your Lettering all set now we can begin putting in all of our Background elements. I'm going to define a Background Color now, so come to your Layers, tap on your "Background Color" and the Background Color is going to be this middle color right here. I'm going to create a brand new Layer above my Lettering Layer and this one will just be Foliage, and I'm going to switch over to my Monoweight Brush now and reduce the Size down to about five percent, and I'm going to select my Darkest Color right here. What I'm going to do, I want things to move in this motion around it and then this motion around. I'm giving it a lot of energy and you can put in a sketching layer if you want to be able to follow that around or you can eyeball it, and then we'll add in some extra Teardrop elements just to change it up a little bit so it doesn't become too overwhelming. I'm going to move basically in this direction, so it's a big S right here, and I'm going to leave a little space right here and a little space up here to put in those Teardrop elements. That's my game plan. I'm going to Undo these, and what I'm going to do is just draw a whole bunch of Branches that look a little bit like this, and I'm going to change up their Size, their Angle and their Position. I can either Color them in or Color Drop into here, so this is the longest part of this process. If you decide to do these same elements, expect to be doodling these for a while because it's definitely time-consuming, but I love the look of it and the effect that it gives you. I'm going to be doodling these for a little while, so I'll speed up the video and I'll be back once these are done. Once you have all these Leaves drawn in now, we're going to add in those Teardrops just to add a little bit of complexity to our Background. I'm going to create a brand new Layer, I'm going to label this one Teardrops, I'm going to select my Lightest Color right here, and these ones are just going to fill in right along here and they're just going to be these Teardrop Shapes. I'm just repeating this kind of interlocking shape with them and bringing them all the way around. Then do the same thing down here. After you have your Teardrops drawn in, now we're just going to use the same color and add in some Dots around our Foliage, so I'm going to create a brand new Layer Label, this one Dots, this one, I'm just going to Stamp in, my brush size is 10 percent and I can either use my finger or my Stylus and I'm just going to add in some Dots around this Foliage just to tie the two colors together and make everything feel more balanced. I'm going to add in one last final detail to these Background elements, so I'm going to come to my Foliage Layer, and I'm just going to create a brand new Layer right above it and label this one Foliage Outline. I'm going to grab my blue color for this and I'm going to reduce my Brush Size down to two percent. I just want to add a little bit of extra detail to some of these Foliage elements, so I'm going to roughly put an Outline around them, I purposely want the Foliage to extend beyond my Outline just to give it that really hand-drawn feel. I follow the stem up and then Trace around each Leaf. Now, that we have our Background all set, let's group these elements together, so I'm grouping everything except for the lettering, so Slide it to the right until they're all Blue, hit "Group", we're going to rename this one Background, and then I'm going to take this Lettering Layer and drag it above the Background Layer. Now, we've got everything prepared and ready to go and in the next video, we will begin Animating. 37. Proj 4: Animating 'Drawn In' Lettering: This is where things get fun because we're going to start animating the lettering that we originally drew in, and in an order to begin animating, we have to open up our animation assist palette. Once again, just tap on the wrench up here and then you're going to come to Canvas and toggle on Animation Assist, and now you can see we've got our two frames down here which correspond with our background group that we created in the last video, and then our lettering layer right here. We already talked about how our background layer is just going to stay there all the time, it's not going to animate, but we need it present for every single frame that this cycles through. So we're going to define these background elements as background elements. You're just going to tap on the frame that has those elements and toggle on Background. Now you can see the transparency increase because we're going to see this at full color all the time because it's always going to exist on every single frame, now we have our lettering layer and the lettering layer is where all the magic is going to happen. I'm going to duplicate this layer. I'll have two of these and you'll see why in just a minute. We need to define one of these as our foreground layer because it's really going to come in handy when we begin masking and revealing this so it creates that drawn in effect. I'm just going to toggle this off just for a second and you can see when I toggle off the visibility, the frame disappears down here. It's as if this doesn't even exist. FYI about that. So back to our lettering layer. I mentioned before that we're going to be using layer masking for this as a way to reveal the lettering without permanently deleting it at all. This makes everything way, way easier for this type of effect. In order to do this, we're just going to tap on the layer thumbnail and choose "Mask" and you can see our layer mask is white because it's revealing or showing everything that it's tied to in the layer directly beneath it. So because our lettering layer is directly beneath it, that means everything on this layer is right now being shown. We need to hide it all because we are going to slowly reveal it. In order to do that, we need to fill this layer mask with black. I'm going to come over to my color dot, I'm going to double-tap where black is just to make sure I have true black selected, and then I'm just going to drag this in and you can see it's going to hide it temporarily. You can see right here, I've got all black on my layer mask right now. This is entirely hidden and I can group these two together, which will be very helpful as I continue moving through this process. In order to do that, you need to tap on your lettering layer first, and then you need to select your layer mass. Slide it over to the right and then slide it over to the right again, and now I can get the option to group them. I like doing this. It just makes everything a lot easier. I'm going to hit "Group" and then I can toggle this up. With this reveal, I want it to begin with nothing, and then I want it to start revealing it. I have to have a group here that literally has nothing on it. So you don't see the lettering at all and then we begin revealing it in the second frame. It'll just be a more seamless animation if you have this frame right here that doesn't have anything on it to start with. Now we're going to duplicate this, we're going to continue working with, just like in the heart animation, how we duplicated the heart every time we adjusted it, you duplicated the adjustment and then you added more adjustments to it, we're going to do the exact same thing here so it looks like we're building onto it with every single frame. I'm going to toggle this to the left and just like with the heart animation, I'm going to duplicate this. Only this time, we're going to begin revealing our lettering and in order to reveal it, we need to know where it is on the Canvas because we just want to reveal a little bit at a time. That's where our foreground layer comes in. I'm going to turn this on and now I can see what my lettering looks like without it being part of this group right here, which makes everything much quicker and easier. We need to define this as a foreground layer. I'm just going to tap on this, I'm going to come down here, tap on this, and choose "Foreground." Now, that is considered a foreground element. I can also reduce the opacity of it because it will show it full opacity the way it is and I can just bring this down so I can still see what's going on, but now I can see the difference between my foreground layer and the actual animation layer. This is our animation layer. I'm just going to toggle this down and we're going to come to our layer mask and we're going to begin revealing our lettering, on a layer mass. I need to grab white in order to do that. Come to your color dot double-tap were white is, and now we have white selected. Make sure you're on the layer mask layer in the second group. This one is the brighter blue color and what you're going to do, I'm going to make sure my monoweight brush is still selected, I'm going to come over here to this corner and I'm just going to reveal a little bit of it. I like working at a larger size for this. I'm going to come up to eight percent so I can just paint this in and I like having a ragged end right here because when it starts animating, it'll look like it's like a marker that's being scribbled in as it's drawing it. So I like leaving mine a little ragged,. If you want a clean line right here, you can do whatever you prefer right there. That's all I'm going to do on this layer. I'm going to toggle this up, slide it to the left, and choose "Duplicate." I'm going to toggle it down, return to my layer mask, I still have white selected up here, come in here, and we're going to reveal just a little bit more. You can choose however much or however little you want to be revealed each time. It's totally up to you. If you have bits that are really long, it will affect how your animation is seen and if you have bits that are a lot shorter, that's a nice way to play with animation speed. It's totally up to you. I would just recommend playing around with it and seeing what you like. I tend to have a pretty similar length throughout just so everything stays really consistent. But if you want to play with speed, that's a really easy way to play around with how your animation plays. I'm going to do a couple more of these so you can see the effect that this is going to have. I'm going to toggle this up, drag it to the left, hit "Duplicate." This is going to be the process for this entire word as we come through it. This is how it's going to go. You're just going to paint a little bit more in. I'm going to go a little further on that one. Then close it up, toggle it over, duplicate, toggle it down, return to the layer mask, and draw it up. I'm going to have this one come right into my word right here. As I normally would when I'm drawing, I have the entry stem come into the lettering and then I draw over top of it, so I can even have this one come in a little bit further. I don't like how this one is extending just a little bit further beyond it, so because we're working in a layer mask, we can fix that really easily. All I have to do a switch back over to black right here and just paint that in and now that line is a little bit cleaner. Return back to white and I'm ready to go again. I'm going to toggle this up, drag it over to the left, hit "Duplicate," come back up here, make sure I am still on this layer mask, and I'm going to start painting this in exactly as I normally letter, this letter, the lowercase d. I'm going to come around, toggle it up, duplicate, toggle it down, layer mask, and make sure you're getting all the edges in the section that you're revealing. You don't want any spots because it'll show up as your animation is playing and we want everything to be nice and clean. Duplicate that group again, it's the exact same thing and then just paint another section. There's a lot of repetition here, you will definitely have this down by the time you finish this word. Slide it over, duplicate, toggle it down layer mask and right after this one. I'm going to show you how it's looking. I'm going to come all the way up to the stroke because this is how I draw this lowercase d. Actually, let's finish this d before I show you what it looks like. So I've got my full lowercase d revealed now in it is a very good habit to preview your animation as you're working just to see how everything's working out. That way, you don't get too far ahead before you realize you need to change something or fix something. Let's see how this looks. I'm just going to hit "Play" and you can see it's drawing it in, and remember all I have to do is come over here to my settings and I can reduce my frames per second speed, since I don't have a lot of frames yet, it's going really fast. I can slow it down just to get a better idea of how things look and that's looking good so far. I can also ping-pong it if I want to see how that looks, if I want to draw it backwards as part to the animation. I'm going to keep mine looping. That's looking exactly how I want it to look. This is the process that we're just going to continue using. I can just tap right on my screen and I can just make sure that I'm on the last frame that I created, so I can just tap on it. This one's my foreground frame and if you ever want to preview it without the foreground, remember, all you have to do is uncheck the visibility and then it disappears, it's not part of your animation anymore. I'm just going to check that on and we can continue working, I'm just going to speed up the video, complete this animation, we will preview it, and then we'll take care of exporting it, and then this one will be all done. I've just completed putting all of that together, revealing it all. Now let's turn off our foreground layer because we don't need that anymore. We've got everything all revealed. I'll toggle that one up and let's see how it plays. I'm going to move it over to the left a little bit. That way, I can adjust the frame rate over here. I'm going to hit "Play" and it's drawing it in, and that looks good. Now let's play around with the speed. I'm going to increase my frames per second up to 15 and see how that feels. You can see when it gets to the very end, because that last frame only lasts for a frame, it's really abrupt, it goes really quickly from being all drawn in straight to drawing it in all over again, and I don't like how fast that happens. I want you to have a second to take it all in and to see it. So we're going to add in that extra hold duration that we talked about before. I'm just going to tap on the screen, come to my last frame, which is right here, tap on it, and extend this hold duration. I think I'm going to go for like five frames. You can see this is our original foreground element right here, we can just delete that now. I can slide it over to the left and hit "Delete," and now that is no longer there at all. We don't have to have that taking up space. Now let's play it again and see that whole duration at the end. Now at least you're able to see the word a little bit longer before it goes all the way back to the beginning again. I think it's still a little too short. I'm going to extend it even longer. So just tap on it again and let's extend it up to 10 frames and see how that feels. Hit "Play." That one felt just a little bit long. This is where you can get really nit-picky with things because you want to take care of all of this before you export it. These are the finishing touches. I'm going to bring this down to eight. I just thought it felt just a little bit too long. That feels a lot better and it does feel like it's at least three seconds if I do like one Mississippi, two, Mississippi, three Mississippi. It feels right around there. I'm going to take my chances and export this. I'm going to hit "Pause" on this. I can bring it all the way to the last frame so it looks all nice and in the next video, we're going to export it. 38. Proj 4: Exporting the Animation: Now it's time to explore our animation, and we're going to do the exact same thing that we did for the beating heart animation. We're just going to reinforce everything with this project. Once again, you're going to come up to your Wrench. You're going to come to Share, and you can see down here, these are our options, these animated options. If we're posting this to Instagram, we definitely want to choose Animated MP4. Once again, we want to make sure that the animation is at least three seconds long. If you choose Animated GIF for use on a website, just keep in mind that animations like this will be much larger than an Animated MP4. If you can make an Animated MP4 work, that's usually the best file format for this type of animation. I'm going to choose that over here, and immediately we're going to see a preview of our animation on the right. We can readjust our frames per second, which I'm going to keep at 15 for this because I think I can get away with three seconds in length, and we definitely want to keep max resolution. I'm going to hit "Export" and then down here, I'm just going to hit "Save Video". Now that video is saved directly to my Camera Roll. I'm going to hop over to my Camera Roll right now to check it out. You can see my animation is right over here, and we actually ended up at four seconds in length. It's definitely suited for Instagram, so we can tap on it and preview the animation, and see it play all the way through. When you preview it in your Camera Roll, it's only going to cycle through once. But just keep in mind, when you post it to Instagram, it will be on a loop, it will cycle through continuously, so don't be alarmed if you preview it in your Camera Roll and it only plays that one time through. But we can get an idea of how it looks right away with that one time through. You can see with those ragged edges, how it gives that little effect that it's markery as it's drawing it out. That's just an extra little detail that I like to add in. That is all set to go from here because it's already in our Camera Roll. If you're on an iPhone, you can directly post it to Instagram. If you have a different type of phone, just email it to yourself, and you'll be good to go. 39. Thank You + Next Steps: That completes Procreate 5X for beginners. Before you go, I want to give you some next steps so you'll be totally prepared as you move forward with using Procreate from here on out. First of all, experiment. Give yourself the freedom to experiment using the tools that you're now familiar with. The more that you practice with them, the faster and better you'll get, the better you'll remember where things are whenever you may need them in the future. You want to make sure that you're continuing to challenge yourself, and a really fun exercise for this would be to go back to our projects and recreate each one without watching the videos. Just look at the final outcome and then try and recreate it from scratch. Then I would love it if you shared your work. Share what you've made with others in the class by using the #Procreateit on Instagram, my handle is @everytuesday. I try and comment or like every single piece that I'm tagged on, I love seeing the work that comes out of this class, so please tag me. You can also find free tutorials every single Tuesday on my YouTube channel. It's youtube.com/everytues, so it's every Tuesday without the day on it. I put up a brand new tutorial every single Tuesday. It's totally free. they're very much like this class, project-based, and they come in all different skill types, so you can complete some beginner ones, intermediate, and even some advanced ones too. If you are ready for more, I have a few other Procreate courses. The first one is my intro to the 3D lettering in Procreate. You can hit my profile picture and then you can see the direct link on screen if you'd like to hop into that class right away and pick up right where we left off here with the 3D lettering project. If you want to pick up some more 3D methods and techniques, definitely check that class out, it's right here on Skillshare. Another one of my Skillshare classes is intro to watercolor lettering in Procreate. If you want to create realistic watercolor effects within lettering. You don't need to be a hand letterer to take this class, you can use editable text and apply the exact same methods to your favorite font. Whether or not you letter, you can still take this class and produce really beautiful artwork. Once again, you can hit my profile picture, and you can visit my profile, and you'll see the class listed there, or if you want to just go straight to it, that direct link is also on-screen. Finally, my other class is intro to watercolor florals in Procreate. In this class, you'll create realistic digital watercolor florals all within Procreate. It increases in complexity as you move through the course, so if you're just coming off of this course, you'll be able to pick right up, it won't be over your head, I promise, it's extremely beginner friendly. Once again, you can get to that from my profile here in Skillshare, or you can head directly to that link and you can start it right away. That's it for me. Thank you so much for being a part of this class, for trusting me to share my knowledge of Procreate with you. I can't wait to see what you make.