Printmaking 101:: Relief Printmaking without a Press | Cookie Redding | Skillshare

Printmaking 101:: Relief Printmaking without a Press

Cookie Redding, Artist, Designer, Teacher

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16 Lessons (41m)
    • 1. Introduction

      0:33
    • 2. What is Printmaking?

      3:42
    • 3. The Supplies

      0:48
    • 4. Printing with Foam

      2:40
    • 5. A Note on the Cutter

      0:53
    • 6. Lineoleum

      4:03
    • 7. How to transfer your drawing

      2:24
    • 8. A Note on Words

      1:32
    • 9. EZ Cut

      4:10
    • 10. Lineoleum Carving Timelapse

      3:54
    • 11. Inking Techniques Part I

      6:20
    • 12. Inking Techniques Part II

      2:33
    • 13. Registering your prints

      5:30
    • 14. Signing Your Work

      0:58
    • 15. Our Class Project

      0:51
    • 16. Conclusion

      0:29

About This Class

Learn the tools and techniques of relief printmaking in this Skillshare class! You will explore lineoleum block carving, experimental foam techniques and e-z cut block printing. With these 3 easy to use materials, you will be up and running in no time with your printmaking ideas! Ideal for beginners or those interested in learning the basics of Printmaking.

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Transcripts

1. Introduction: Hello. Welcome to beginning printmaking In this class. You're going to learn how to do relief carvings. Printmaking as a really exciting form of art where you're able to create something unique and individual and create a Siri's. Or in addition of it and this class, we're going to learn how to work with foam. We're gonna learn how to cut linoleum and as well how to work. With easy cut, you'll be able to create a Siri's or in addition of your print and be able to share with all your friends and family. I hope you enjoy the class. 2. What is Printmaking?: all right. First things first. What exactly is printmaking? Unlike painting and drawling, where you only are creating one piece, printmaking is a system of art that's going to allow you to create multiples of one piece. You're going to use a matrix of some sort. This is in this place for this class, the linoleum or the piece of foam or the easy cut. You will get your design transferred onto it. What you carve away becomes the white of the paper. What stays gets the ink, and then you get to think that plate and then you get to create multiples. Based on this, it's a nice way to create a more economical form of art so that anyone can enjoy it and purchase it. The costs are typically lower if you are in the printmaking buying market, so instead of having a one off you're able to create in addition or a series of your prints , all right, how do we get our drawling if we're working from our own drawling or an image onto our plate with printmaking and especially this relief style, whatever you create? If you drawl it, how it's supposed to be what is natural, it will actually print backwards. So what you create on your linoleum has to be backwards. So here's our drawling, and what we need to do is get the reverse of that. So what I did You can use a light box if you have it. Or you can put this to a window and go ahead and just trace around it, which is what I've already done. So this is actually what we're going to be transferring onto our linoleum. If you have graph it paper, you can lay that down. If you don't have Rafay paper, you can go ahead and create your own by scrubbing your pencil over this. And this was the right side. So also, I should say, if you are working off oven original drawing, you might want to photocopy it. If you're feeling precious with it that what you're not destroying or graph fighting over your actual drawing, it's going to depend on how you are with your work style. Go ahead late your drawling the backwards version on your plate or your linoleum in this case, and go ahead and redraw lit. So what's gonna end up happening? And I'm putting pretty solid pressure on this. Just a heads up so that I know it's transferring properly. Um, what's ending up happen is that graphite that we've rubbed on it is going on to our linoleum, and from here you will have your backwards proof. So when it prints, it will look normal. But you're going to be working backwards the next days. You need to figure out what is going to stay the white of the paper, which is going to get the ink. So the ink, you don't touch that you don't carve that you're carving away that which is the white of the paper. So if I wanted the hand portion to be inked, but the rest I wanted carved out, and that's going to sort of sketch over it so I can keep track of it. That is the parts that I have sort of scrubbed out those air going to get carved and the rest is going to stay as is, and that will get the ink surface 3. The Supplies: All right, let's get started. With what supplies will you need for this class? For this, you're gonna need something to ink on. Now. You could go out and buy an ink in Trey if you are so inclined or if you have something like a sheet of plexiglass around that would work Also, you'll also need a rare to apply your in quick and, of course, some ink. I just use the Dick Blick block printing ink for this one. I also show you how to use Barron's, which is going to smooth ink onto the paper. If you don't have these, you can also use a wooden spoon. And, of course, you're gonna need linoleum. And in this class explained the different types that you can use for this as well. And you're going to need your carving tools, which usually come in a kit. All of these are linked below for you 4. Printing with Foam: I love to start my students and printmaking using phone. It's such an easy to find material and you can repurpose it from pretty much any facet that you can find it, such as meat trays, etcetera. Now, these were pre purchased in the foam sheets. Now, if you use the cleaned up meat trays, you're gonna have a nicer, deeper impression. But these work just as well. They just will skim the surface a little bit later than the others. For this, you can cut it down to size. I just use the ruler in the pencil. If you have a, you know, utility blade, you can use that. Now, remember, though anything that you press down on it is going to make an impression. So make sure you don't put pressure on to the phone while you are cutting. You can start with the basics and just grab a pencil. So for this one, I'm just going to show just basic. I'm gonna call them doodles so that you can see how these work. You can just apply normal pressure, and what ends up happening is the ink is going Teoh float on the surface of these on that which you are pushing into is not going to get ain't so for the most part, Whenever you get to the thinking stage, this is going to be a darker print, and then you're whatever impressions you're putting into it. That's where your lighter values are going to be, so you can draw on this in your normal art drawling style. But you can also get creative with the materials you use and make more of the FRA Taj style impressions with them so you can stippled with them. If you want to get that texture, you can take various natural objects outside and go ahead and put that onto there. You can use the ends of your brushes pretty much anything that you have around your house. It's going to make a texture. Go ahead and try it. Some of my students of human pressed into like, you know, wall textures and brick etcetera, and they've got some really amazing results from that, so anything that makes a mark will work. And, like with this sticking, go ahead and press it in and sort of roll it back and forth and actually make stick print whenever you get to that stage and you guessed it. Even the texture of our in container will create a nice repeat pattern with us. So have fun and experiment and see what textures air laying around your house so that you can see what they do, what values they create. How do they Inc have fun? 5. A Note on the Cutter: all right. Just an aside on our cutters. Whenever you get your box and you open it up, you're just going to actually see the handle and you'll notice that it has, you know, multiple blades in it. So what they dio is when you unscrew the one side all of the blades gets stored with in this something going to screw this back going. I'm just going to grab a normal cutter. It looks like the size to which it is You're gonna take the top on, loosen it. You know, listen up just a little bit and you're gonna notice there's, like, this little ball bearing in there and what you're going to want to do. Make sure you have the right side. Of course. Is slide that in there and I'll be careful. Of course, that end is tight. Tighten it up, and this is the tool that we're going to use whenever we do our linoleum cutting 6. Lineoleum: All right, let's take a look at our basics of linoleum. For this. I have two types. We have the battleship gray on our left, and this was gonna come mounted on the block. You can get it mounted or on mounted. Or we could have the golden The golden is a little bit harder inconsistency. So if you are someone who really loves details, you might want to get a piece of this to experiment with. But with the battleship gray, it's a little bit softer and you can get a fair amount of detail with it. We're mine. I'm just going for this first part show you you can draw all right on it so you can draw three straight out of your head Andan for these. I'm just going to be creating this hand Siri's that I've been working on. So I was gonna draw directly on this and then just to have the side by side, you can draw all in the areas, and so I shave them in a little bit. That says, this is where I'm going to be cutting. This helps you keep track of things whenever you're working, because sometimes it can get out of control and then you end up carving the wrong part. Some people also put an ink wash over it so that when they're carving, uh, that ink portion that stays is what would actually be inked in the piece. And then what? What they're carving away is the white of the paper s Oh, that's going to be up to you. If you don't like graphite, you can also just hand draw those lines and with a permanent marker so you can use the graphite sister. If it's sort of simple, like the's, you could put the ink over it if you want or try a Sharpie market marker depending on your A system. Uh, so for this, this is what it's gonna look like when it's done. I do have a time lapse coming up. Uh, that surface, which is raised, that what you did not carve. That's where the ink will be that what you carve, there will be no a. So, like I said, with this golden Linda lamb, it's a little bit harder of a surface. You could warm it up just slightly with an iron, you know, put a piece of newspaper over it and just lightly and quickly iron over it. Not too long, because it will burn because this is reverie, uh, or as well. And be very careful with this. You can put in the microwave from literally two seconds and see if that softens it a little bit. When you carve, just make sure your hand that is holding the block stays behind at all times. Is this super important? You do not want to cut yourself with this, Just you can see a comparison when the same system on the mounted battleship gray and you can Like I said not. It doesn't have to be mounted. This know that this auction is out there, same system. I'm just going to draw on top of it. You can put your marks in it if you so desire and other to dis clean things up a little bit so that you can have it. So do you want that part to be the ink part, or do you want it to be the carved away part? It's going to depend on, you know which you're looking for? Just find your system and stick to it. Hand behind what you're carving, and that will take the longest to get used to. Because if you slipped that knife, that gal is going to go into your flesh. That would be bad. Uh, should go ahead and carve it. I do. Like I said, have a time lapse because this part can take a while. Just keep that hand behind and keep carbon. But you can see it's a lot easier than the golden. So if you haven't done this before no, I would recommend using the battleship grey linoleum first and then segue laying into the gold is gonna depend on your work style. So for these two systems, this is just me drawling on top of it. But our next one is how do you get your drawling transferred onto this? 7. How to transfer your drawing: all right. How do we get our drawling if we're working from our own drawling or an image onto our plate with printmaking and especially this relief style, whatever you create, If you drawl it, how it's supposed to be what is natural, it will actually print backwards. So what you create on your linoleum has to be backwards. So here's our drawling, and what we need to do is get the reverse of that. So what I did you can use a light box if you have it. Or you can put this up to a window and go ahead and just trace around it, which is what I've already done. So this is actually what we're going to be transferring onto our linoleum. If you have graph it paper, you can lay that down. If you don't have Rafay paper, you can go ahead and create your own by scrubbing your pencil over this and this was the right side. So also, I should say, If you are working off oven original drawing, you might want to photocopy it. If you're feeling precious with it that, well, you're not destroying or graph fighting over your actual drawing, it's going to depend on how you are with your work style. Go ahead late your drawling the backwards version on your plate or your linoleum in this case, and go ahead and redraw lit. So what's gonna end up happening? And I'm putting pretty solid pressure on this. Just a heads up so that I know it's transferring properly. Um, what's ending up happen is that graphite that we've rubbed on it is going on to our linoleum, and from here you will have your backwards proof. So when it prints, it will look normal. But you're going to be working backwards the next days. You need to figure out what is going to stay the white of the paper, which is going to get the ink. So the ink you don't touch that you don't carve that you're carving away that which is the white of the paper. So if I wanted the hand portion to be inked, but the rest I wanted carved out, and that's going to sort of sketch over it so I can keep track of it. That is the parts that I have sort of scrubbed out those air going to get carved and the rest is going to stay as is, and that will get the ink surface 8. A Note on Words: I just wanted to talk briefly about words. If you add words into your piece, were used to say just writing our word. But when we print it with this technique, it's actually going to reverse award. So we need it to be backwards. So how do we get the backwards transfer with words? So what I'd recommend describe that sheet of paper, write whatever you want on it, or draw whatever you want on it. And I like to you'll be able to see through this, by the way, because it's permanent marker when you're working, trace back over it so you can see the word or the image in reverse. That way you know how to make that translation possible. Grab a pencil. Well, on the other side. Go ahead. Rub the graphite all over it because we're gonna make a graphite transfer with it. If you do have graphite paper, you can go ahead and just skip this step and use your graphite paper. But not all of us have that laying around our house. Grab your linoleum and go ahead and make this transfer. I'm just gonna eyeball this one for demo sake. But applying pretty decent pressure. Go ahead, trace over what you have drawn backwards. And it does always check to make sure Ah, you will be able to see the word in reverse. And you can go ahead and reinforce that line if you so desire. And let's just do it in print. Also, Go ahead, trace this so that we have the transfer. And when you're finished, you can reinforce it if you so desire. 9. EZ Cut: All right, let's take a look at the easy cut. Easy cut is a two sided blocking their different styles out there. Speedball makes one that come and think you can buy those that Michael's these are purchased through Dick Blick are linked below. Um, I already have to put a drawling on this so that it made a little bit speedier for our demo portion. But what you're going to notice versus linoleum is easy. Cut lives up to its name. It is really easy to cut with this. I'm applying almost no pressure with this, and it's almost akin to what I would imagine. It's like to carve butter because it is so effortless, so typically, and my on ground classes. If you ever have me for printmaking, I like to start with the phone and before I transition you into the linoleum, which are a little bit more of a challenge to use. I like to start you with the easy cut. That way, you can get comfortable with the tools you can get comfortable with the mechanisms with how your hands should be positioned, and it takes some of that worry and stress away. So for this, you can see already right off the bat how much easier it is to carve. So, um, it's also nice if you do have some more physical challenges, say so. If you do, try the easy cut first, just to see how it functions, because I think you'll find it's a really nice stepping stone into a 1,000,000 0 Liam. One of the negatives is that you're not going to get the same level of details. If you are more detailed of Worker would recommend Blundell William over this so I would keep on carving this. But let's transition into another concept where you can actually take the easy cut and use them more as a stamper, which will see lost dampers. Use this as their material. Now thick book is a little bit thicker, So if you're more interested in using this system for more of a stamp based relief printing , try to get one. That's a little bit then are like this speedball so you can see for this the nice thing with this. If you don't like what you were doing, just flip it over and keep going on the other side. I didn't want to have any excess. So I did turn it over to try to maximize the amount of space on this. So I'm going to make a leaf with this, so it has not as much waste to it. So if you're into not having waste maximize, you know, the square inches that you have to be dealt with, Miami's gonna reinforce those lines. Can I could see them. You can use and utility blade if you have, you know, cutting system underneath of you. Uh, but in my case, I'm just gonna go ahead and use some scissors. So as well as being easy to carpets also, as you can see it pretty easy to cut. I will say that the utility blade for something that's more dense like this would have made a nicer cleaner cut. But it does the job nonetheless gonna go ahead, trim the extra bits off, and this will also help clean up some of the little bit of ragged rubber that's coming off with it. You can sort of file some of that off with your hand and the scissor. Um, just clean up a little bit just to make sure those edges are nice. and neat, And you can also afterwards take your carving tool and gets rid of it, some of it as well. And I like to taper these a little bit so that it will make a nice, clinging edge whenever you do the prince. All right, you guessed it. I want oh, clean up a little bit and get the impression of leaf part in the middle. So I'm gonna go ahead, carved that a little bit out, and then that way we could have a dimensional shaped print instead of something that's more rectal into your based. So this also will give you a little bit more flexibility with your design, you could have a little bit more fluidity with your actual and product. So I do recommend if you like the soft cut, go ahead and try this version as well. 10. Lineoleum Carving Timelapse: This next section is a time lapse for the carving process, since it can take a bit of time depending on the details and intensity of your project, I wanted to give you a glimpse of it from start to finish. 11. Inking Techniques Part I: Alright, it's time to get thinking for this. You're going to need the following. I have Dick Blick Water soluble ink. That way it's easier for our clean up. We have a Breyer to actually spread the ink onto our plates. We have a printing plate so you can use the meta one that's a little bit more cool and official if you're into that sort of thing. But I have found plexiglass works. Justus. Well, it's a lot cheaper to get a hold off, and as well I have are burns that we can do our rubbings with. I have the sort of contemporary versions in the traditional version, and you're going to need, of course, your relief print itself and a spoon. If you do not have the burns, you could just go ahead and use a wooden spoon. This one is for our Inc. This one's the meta one, but if you don't have access to those a nice wooden spoon from the kitchen work, make sure it's as flat as possible, and I'm talking about this part of the spoon being flat. Ah, once, of course, these leave your kitchen, they never go back to your kitchen, so make sure you're okay with it. Staying in your studio. All right, let's get started. So we need to get our Inc prepared. So it's go ahead and open this and for thinking it is easier to have less than more. If you have too much ink, you're going to have to scrape some of it off and put it back into your container. So it is better to err on the side of caution with this and use a little bit less than what you think. Uh, gonna just take a little bit of this and that's going to be way too much. Just tap it out over our surface. So that's about roughly the same width as our Breyer. Now I like to keep the lid on. I'll scoot the society. You can see. I like to keep the lid of the in candy so I can just lay the spoon inside. So if I need to add more, it's always there at already. All right, so now it's time to actually start putting the Breyer to the take a note on this. When we first start learning, we have a tendency to want to just rock it back and forth like this. What you really need to do is do full rotations, lift full rotations and lift that way. That ink is applied in a more steady, even and consistent manner. If we just rock back and forth, you can even see it from here. It's just doing roughly half of the surface. We need a full rotation and a lift, so let's go ahead and start putting the ankle on. So I'm gonna rotate it lift, and then you can see what happens is it starts because we're doing that lift and it rotates . It's taking the ink, and it's spreading it out much more evenly. You might need to go sideways with it, do the same motions. That way, the edges are nice and even as well and sheep charging the ANC until you have a nice, consistent look to it. So there's two things two things that you're going to want to be paying attention to the sound. So when you are charging the ANC, the theory once upon a time was is because we charge think that sounds like an actual static charged. If you listen to it, it sounds like static shuffling sort of passed like that white noise on the TV. Once you have that sound, you're in the right area. The second thing that you want to do is look at it and it needs to look like the consistency of velvet. So if it looks like velvet and has a static charge, your ink is ready. If you hear making the source slurpy slurp the noise and you see peaks and valleys with your rank You have way too much ink. Scrape some of the off, dump it back in and get it to the velvet consistency with the staticky sound. So I'm gonna charge it one last time, So I push this out of the side. I typically do stand during this stage. I stand most of time. When I work with is easier for demos for me to be sitting so stand if you need to stand what you need to do grab a piece of scrap paper or newspaper or newsprint something that you don't mind getting a little bit of England so it saves your desk surface and go ahead and rule the ink onto it. If you need more, add it. Get a nice even coating on it. And I missed a little right there. All right, setting our scrap paper side. This is considered the artist's proof. So I'm going to register in our next section for this. I'm just going to take some pre cut paper and I'm just gonna make sure everything looks alright. Artist proof is just us checking it out. Making short looks. OK, make sure you have the correct side of your paper. One side is going to be smooth. One side is going to be a little bit rough. You want to use the rough? All right, Really Down. I'll use the traditional one first. You want to do circular motions over it so that you get the whole surface in contact with this in ink. So it does transfer. I'll show you this one as well. This is the plastic one. Same thing. Circular motions. Make sure you're covering the whole surface. If you're printing with the traditional rice paper, the ink is actually going to bleed through. That is a Okay. That's exactly what you want. If you are using the rice paper with this, you would get some of the textures and some of the ink transferred. When you are ready, cool the print, and then you can check it out and make sure everything looks like how you want to look. I like to leave some of the textures of linoleum, so it sort of is an aesthetic reinforcement of the material. So I like the extra lives If you feel like there's too many carbs, some of them away. Maybe you just wanted, you know, the main object itself. This is your time to look at it and sort of see what? You would change anything. And if you're a okay, you're ready to set up a registration. 12. Inking Techniques Part II: All right, so now it's time. Since we have our ink set up, Teoh also print out our foam and are easy cuts. We conceive what they look like. I'm just gonna add a little bit more ink into our tray and go ahead and charge up that a you'll hear that nice sort of static charge sound. And that's what you're looking for for the consistency. Go ahead, apply it on your plates. This case I'm just going to go for it without a proof paper underneath, Since this is just a demo, um, inking also, you know, just keep in mind it shouldn't be too much ink because you're gonna lose the detail. It should look like the consistency of velvet so velvet, and it has a sort of staticky charged to it. Four phone. I actually do prefer the bamboo because it will pick up a lot. You know, smoother details the surface quality. And also, when you're doing this, watch your fingers. Because if you have your fingers over the phone, it's going to make a heavy mark there. So you don't want that so you can see versus the linoleum. It's going to be ah lot darker of a print, so you can have a lot of fun with this sort of negative positive relationship versus, you know, having a more positive focused within your design. All right, so for our next one, let's take our easy cuteness is going to be the more I'll say robbery stamps style. Now you can use rubber stamp ink if you so desire, but I like the velvet consistency off the actual printing ink. So I always use my block printing ink for this technique. Go ahead, load onto the leaf. And on this I'm actually gonna press down just like I would've Stamper. I'm gonna fly pretty solid pressure to that. It gets transferred to the system. The fun sort of aspect of this is this technique will allow you to have a lot more fluid and flexible of a design. So maybe you had a watercolor that you weren't quite happy with. Well, what happens if you put some of these sort of cut blocks on top of it? You can create really interesting patterns and shapes with it. You can also create a rape eat motif with it, so you will have a lot more flexibility with this, but you won't be able to run. In addition, these would be considered artist Prince, because they aren't going to be registered and perfect every time. But that is this sort of charm with this. 13. Registering your prints: All right, let's get set to do a series. So for this, we're going to need to register as well get our paper prepared. You can buy the paper pre size, but if you don't have that or a cutter, you could also just go ahead and cut your paper using a ruler. Just a side note on this. You will get a Dackell edge with that. So if you don't want a Dekel edge, I'm gonna recommend you get, you know, a gel mat and a utility blade and cut it that way. If you like that, that will go ahead and use this system to cut your paper. So for this, we're going to be able to register our plate and our paper so that when we make our Siri's , everything's going to be in the same place. First up, let's go ahead and get our Inc prepared. All right for this, I am going to be using the plexiglass, and we're going to go ahead and get our printing ink set up, just like in our printing demo of the class. Go ahead, spoon a little bit of that ink out, and I like to use the lid eso that it keeps the ink off of the table. And remember, when you're using your Breyer, make full broad strokes. Don't go back and forth because if you go back and forth, you're going to get uneven thinking, all right, once you're ready. And this is just for, you know, testing there is our print. With the ink on it, you'll notice we don't have our registration set up yet. This is just sort of the artist's proof to make sure everything is going to be a okay. All right, let's go ahead. Grab that paper. Make sure you have the right side. This paper does have a little bit of tooth to it that I recommend it and grab whichever burned that you're comfortable with. Or spoon. If you don't have one of those wooden spoons will work best for this. Make sure there is flat as possible. Go ahead, apply even pressure the whole way around. I like to go over a couple times just to make sure hit everything. You can peel a little bit back to make sure, but in this case, we're just gonna go for it and see how it looks. If you're happy with it, then you'll be ready to set the registration for this. All right, let's up the registration. I like to use whatever tape I have available. Do prefer the blue painter's tape. You can use masking tape. You can use duct tape. Or, in this case, you can use washi tape because that's what I had laying around. We're going to take our piece of paper and put this tape just little bit by little bit on one of the corners to start so that whenever we would lay the piece of paper down, we know it's going to, you know, start in these corners, get the one corner done and you guessed it. Let's go ahead and get to that other corner. Make sure when you're working, it doesn't shift at all because sometimes it will wiggle around a little bit. So make sure it's in place before you put that tape down because you don't wanna have this part crooked at all, because the little bit of in discrepancy in that shift will throw off the registration and then you won't have nice uniform prints. All right, let's go ahead, get that next corner going and you guess that we're going to do all four corners so that when we lay our paper down, everything's going toe line up nice. The one thing I will say that I do like about the washing tape. If you do have a nicer work surface that you're working on, it will not stick to it. The duct tape and masking tape might stick to it. The Blue Painter's tape will be fine when you have all four done. Lift that paper and position your linoleum block on it and you guessed it. Grab that Washington. We're going to do the exact same thing to this block so that we know that it's always going to stay within this position. Of course, there are fancier systems out there for this, but I have found for the home studio this one is the easiest and the most economical version. If you get into it, they do have registration systems that you can purchase and pins. So that is something. If you're interested, grow into that one. But start with this one and get comfy. Trouble with it as ever. You know how I am in these classes. Explore and experiment find which system works best for you. All right, for this one, I am gonna add a little bit more tape just to make sure you know it's a little bit easier to see. I'm not gonna worry about the other parts. You can put the top one if you want to go ahead and get up. Gonna be a lot easier. The layer paper down. As usual, Make sure that you have the right side. Always double checks. And it has the right side with tooth and will be able to hover it over top. And every time that you do this, you're going to be able to lay it down the place and get each print in the exact same location. Grab you burn. You guessed it. Go ahead, smoothed out. Do it over a couple times. Keep nice, even pressure, so that your prints are consistent there, out your Siri's. And whenever you are finished, you're just going to be repeating the process. So same thing, Inc. It again. Lay the paper down again. Pull the next friend ink, paper, pool. That way everything is in the same position. When I get up, make sure is straight. You can go on to the next 14. Signing Your Work: all right, a note on signing. So this is a little bit different than our paintings or drawings where it's just a unique one you're going to be creating. In addition, so in addition needs to be signed in the order at which it was created. This is our artists proof. So this is the one you're going to start with. When you sign these, you will title it in some manner. I will call this moon the next part's It's Left Middle, right. Whenever you're doing, you're signing A P stands for artists proof that way it demarcates Which one was the one you were checking out and on the right side you do your signing if you're addition was 10 which is what our class project will be advised at the next. When you pull is one of 10 2 of 10 3 of 10 all the way up till they're all finished. So you will sign them in the order with which they were created. And this what you have a proper print edition 15. Our Class Project: all right. Time for the class project for this class, you're going to choose which of the three materials you wish to explore most. So if you found the film to be intriguing, try that. If you like the idea of the either gold or the gray battleship grey linoleum, give that a shot or as well, try some experiments with the easy cut. Choose one choose three. It's going to be up to you, and you're going to run an addition of 10 so you'll have to register your paper and as well created consistency throughout all 10 pieces. When you're finished, sign each of them like we did in our demo and poster results on skill share. You could snap photos of the entire process, or you could just show us what the end result. Waas. It's great to see what everyone works on, so be sure to share it 16. Conclusion: I hope you enjoyed this class. This class you got to experiment with the beginning steps of relief. Printmaking. It got to see what was like to work with foam. You got to work with linoleum, two different types of that and is well, you got to see what easy cut blocks could dio. The versatility of all these can only be limited by your own imaginations to the products that you make out of them are absolutely endless. I can't wait to see what you've created and I hope you've enjoyed the class.