Portrait Drawing: How to Get A Likeness part 2 | Chris Petrocchi | Skillshare

Portrait Drawing: How to Get A Likeness part 2

Chris Petrocchi, I help artists grow on their journey

Portrait Drawing: How to Get A Likeness part 2

Chris Petrocchi, I help artists grow on their journey

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5 Lessons (25m)
    • 1. Intoduction

      1:23
    • 2. 1 Silhouette of the Head

      4:51
    • 3. 2 Shape of face and hair mass

      11:26
    • 4. 3 shape of jaw

      2:42
    • 5. 4 parallel lines

      5:00
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About This Class

To help my students in my online course Mastering the Art of the Portrait I took a poll and found their most common pain points. Getting a likeness was the #1 struggle they had by far.

In this second of three foundational videos I give 5 more clear and attainable steps to take to make it easier to get a likeness in your portrait drawing. I will demonstrate those keys while drawing over my students portrait to correct it.

The 5 Keys are:

1. The silhouette

2. The shape of the face

3. The shape of the hair mass

4. The 3 parts of the jaw

5. Parallel lines line up

These tips will automatically give it a likeness with your portrait drawings and paintings. It's not magic it's just process!

With respect to portraiture you can bet that one of the more challenging in portraiture as achieving a likeness  John Singer Sargent: "a portrait is a picture where there is Just a tiny little something not quite right about the mouth".  He also said: Every time I paint a portrait I lose a close friend." Honest words with some humor sprinkled in. 

But When drawing a face you don't always have to achieve a likeness. It depends on the goal for the drawing. 'It may just be that you want a beautiful drawing that reflects your creative vision' and so moving all the elements into the exact position to achieve a likeness may compromise your unique artistic vision and overall goal.

But you may want to go further than just getting your portrait to look human. You may want to go through the demanding task of getting it to look like someone specific. It might be because you want to challenge yourself and see if your skills are up to the task or it may be that you have a commission by a client to paint their friend or relative.

So, how do we do it?

To get a likeness you have structural and proportional knowledge of the head. If you know then you are not married to copying.

The temptation is to try to draw the specific features right out of the gate. However, the first thing you must do is lay a good foundation. Mapping out the proportions and placement of the forms and features is essential for this task.

Sound good? Let's get started!!

Visit More Classes To Improve Your Drawing

Draw Portraits Better Than Anyone Else

Draw The Head Fast With One Simple Shape

Draw The Front Planes of the Head Made Easy

Easy Way To Draw The Face Using Shapes

10 Minutes To Better Portrait Painting

Also, feel free to join the Facebook Group  and request to join to show your work, get feedback and encourage others

Thanks for your support! If you want to know more please visit/follow me online here:

https://www.instagram.com/drawjuice/

www.youtube.com/c/chrispetrocchi

Chris Petrocchi | Draw Jucie Studio

P.S. I want to share with YOU my personal favorite tools that I love drawing with to help you get started. Links for each tool online included! Find the FREE LIST here: https://bit.ly/2Jm12Dy

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I help artists grow on their journey

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Transcripts

1. Intoduction: Hey there. I'm Crispy Truckee, professional artist and owner of Draw Juice Art Studio, as well as creator of Mastering the Art of the Portrait Online drawing course. You may have seen my art on the cover of books concept art, storyboards for games, TV as well as fine art portraiture. After a lifetime of drawing and 10 years of teaching, I Want to help You, which he won scale in portraiture that everybody waas but is the hardest achieved, and that is getting likeness now. Could you imagine what could happen if you got a handle on this coveted skill and how it could transform your ark in this introductory course? I'm gonna give you seven easy to understand keys to getting a likeness that, if practice consistently, will solve some of your problems and make you much more proficient in this area Instantly, you can begin putting these concepts into practice today and start getting results. This course is geared for both the beginner and intermediate student who wants to go beyond just making her portrait's look human and make them look more like someone recognizable. These skills could be applied to Porter joining portrait painting, sculpture, caricature and character design, So let's jump in 2. 1 Silhouette of the Head: All right. Welcome to round two of achieving a likeness with your portrait. We took a poll inside my course mastering the art of the portrait and the number one thing that people were struggling with by far Waas achieving a likeness. So I'm gonna give you five tips today on how to improve on that and a student in the course . Sam PICO, friend, just Skokie is kind enough to let me critique the artwork. So the first thing we're gonna look at is the overall silhouette of the head. And when you're doing a block in the overall silhouette of the head is crucial. So let's take a look at that. So if we look at the photo reference and we envelope right, we take the broad average angles. We straightened things out. We don't draw the curves straight out of the gate, right? We envelope it with straight lines because drawing the curves right off the bat is just too hard. So we do what's called enveloping the form. And so we're gonna look at the overall silhouette of this person's hit. Okay, This helps us get it on the paper very quickly and silhouette and proportion are basically the number one things we think about or that help us recognize things that we see in the real world, especially people. So I could see you in a dark alley. And if I knew you and your silhouettes, I'd be able to without seeing any details. But just your silhouette, I'd be able to tell it was you. Okay, so it's the one of those things is the overall shape of the head itself. So that's what we get when we look at the photo reference. If we bring it over the drawing, we've got a little problem. Okay, so let's check it out. Sam PICO, you did a great job on your drawing. It looks really good. It's really close. Let's see if we can give you some helpful tips today so that you can take those and do it again and see if you can improve your drawing. So if we do the same thing on the drawing and won't compare right straight lines, no real curves yet. We can do that later. It's much faster, easier. Okay, so there we go. We can tell. It's it's a little bit long, right? Just a little bit too long than it is wide. So silhouette and proportion by proportion, I mean the comparative relation between things such as the height with and depth so that they are improper relationship. So we can quickly spot mistakes this way. Okay, we've quickly found problem number one by the silhouette and the proportion the silhouette shows us clearly. That proportion is off. How is it off? Let's measure the height of the head of the photo reference. Ahead is typically going to be three units tall by two units, wide or three to do ratio. And if we take that, divide it into thirds and then look at it horizontally, we can see that it's 3 to 2. We do the same thing on the drawing. We have kind of, Ah, 3 to 1.85 It's a little too narrow, so something's going on. The head is stretched vertically a bit too much. All right, let's move on to the next two keys that help us achieve a likeness 3. 2 Shape of face and hair mass: now, in terms of shapes, let's break it down to the next biggest silhouette. And that would be the shape of the face, right? So we could look at the shape of the face itself and we would have a certain shape that comes out of that with certain proportions, all right. And we would do the same thing on the photo reference and see and compare. And the drawing is already we've already established. It's too long vertically, but it's the shape of the face, okay? And the shape of the hair mass itself. Okay, so those are the next two kind of biggest shapes that we would be looking for. So we go from the general to the specific, right? We went from the shape of the overall head, and then we went for the shape of the face, and we broke down the shape of the hair mass. The shape of the hair or the length of the hair has a lot to do with how someone looks. You've probably ran into this where someone you know gets their hair buzzed completely cut off, and they come home and you're shocked and you go, Oh, my God. I didn't even recognize you or you don't look like for you. I know. And it's a little disturbing, right? So the shape of the hair is really important to get that. Now you got the shape of the hair pretty well, Tampico. But I'd say this distance right here, you missed. It's a little bit too long. And the peak on the photo reference is out here, the peak of the hair. Right. So that point is out over here, and you've got it over here, right? So it's that basic shape that you missed. So we're looking for peaks, Valleys cuts, right. You got it really good here and down to the ear. This stuff looks pretty good. Very good. That all looks really nice. So it's just shifting this part over a little bit, and that would make it look a little bit more characteristic of the photo. Okay, this stuff is all good. So I'm looking for you know the change in direction from here to here. Where is that peak? I'm looking for thicknesses. The thickness of the sideburn thickness of the front part of the hair, the thickness on the side near the temple that stuff you got really good. As far as the shape of the base goes. This distance here, from the hairline to the brow, let's measure the distance from the hairline to the brow. Move it over and you miss that one quite significantly. So. The size of the forehead, the proportion of the forehead. I think you got the width correct, right, so that with we can just move it over and you got that correct. So it's the height toe with proportion that you missed in the vertical direction. No, if we look at on the model, whether his face works well in thirds from the hairline to the brow, from the brow to the bottom of the nose, that's about 1/3 and then bottom of the nose to bottom of the chin. It's close to 1/3. It's a little longer than 1/3. Yours is if we take your dimension from brown to nose, let's take that. Okay, it's a lot longer right, so from the hairline to the brow, your brow intrudes a lot further into the hair than it should. And then we have 1/3 from brown of bottom of the nose and then bottom of the nose to the chin is much longer. Okay, so we have in the area. The two problem areas are basically forehead, too short of a distance vertically and in the muzzle of the mouth, right? It's too low. It's too long this way. We have too much space in here. Too much space between bottom of the nose and the top of the lip and too much space between the bottom lip and the chin itself. So it's the proportion of the features themselves, the spaces in between each thing. And so I would, you know, move this hair line up. You know, I could take that distance and just move it up here. And that would tell me I'm just gonna eyeball it. Kind of where that should be. Let's do that again. Okay. This distance here, if I move it up because they're about the same on the model, you know, I would start my hairline here. So the picture of this person has, you know, he's got a big forehead, bigger forehead. Then I would kind of move everything else up a little bit to accommodate for that, okay? And then this part's OK. And if I took this distance here, right, I just moved it down to here. You know, if we look at, we measured the distance in thirds of the face one. You guys, I'll know this, but 1/3. 1/3. I went there, right? I'm looking at this, looking at this, looking at that, I can just measure with my fingers on the computer screen, okay? And I can also look at the silhouette and judge distances like where the jaw is, and that would give me a better sense of how long the head is. So I'd have to move things up right and have to move the mouth up quite a bit. And the nose would have to come up a little bit, too. And that would correct much of this because the parts look great. The eyes look great. The nose look great, but the parts are not connected really to the whole structure. So, Tampico, you've done a super job rendering and finishing. But we got to get the parts to connect to the hole so it looks integrated and believable. So let's look at the jaw again really quick because it's the shape of the jaw that makes people look the way they do. It contributes to what makes someone look different from someone else. And we want to get that into our drawings. So there are three parts to the chin and job there very distinctive. And I want to point this out. The first part is the front of the chin. Second is a trans verse part of the mandible or jaw going back. And the third part is the A sending part of the jaw up to the ear. Now, those have specific points Here, here, here, in here. Those help us if we line up these points correctly, they're like parts of a box and they work in perspective. They tell us what the tilt is. If we get these points in relation to one another, correct, we'll get the tilt of the head that will help with the tilt of the head. Right. If we have a lot of structure in this jaw, right, a lot of distinct changes in direction and corners, it's gonna look more masculine. If these corners are rounded right, it's gonna look a little more feminine, right? So with your drawing, you got this angle right? But the back part of the job goes too long. It's too tall this way. This angle looks correct. This angle right here, you got that correct. And then we go to the front part of the chin. Now your chin is a little bit rounded. It doesn't have those corners that are here, right? Those points years is rounded, so it looks a little softer, a little less masculine than the photo reference. And this angle here is a little bit off. And then this angle yours goes this way and it's a little too far out to the right. And it should be like this. It's also this distance is a little too a little too long compared to the photo reference. You got the tilt right. These points are lined up. And so that tilt is correct. Excellent job on that. Your jaws just too long. That's where the main problem is. Shorten it up and it's gonna look more like the person that you're trying to achieve the lightness off. All right, let's move on to the next point. 4. 3 shape of jaw: So let's look at the jaw again really quick because it's the shape of the jaw that makes people look the way they do. It contributes to what makes someone look different from someone else. And we want to get that into our drawings. So there are three parts to the chin and job there very distinctive. And I want to point this out. The first part is the front of the chin. Second is a trans verse part of the mandible or jaw going back. And the third part is the A sending part of the jaw up to the ear. Now, those have specific points here, here, here, in here. Those help us if we line up these points correctly, they're like parts of a box and they work in perspective. They tell us what the tilt is. If we get these points in relation to one another, correct, we'll get the tilt of the head that'll help with the tilt of the head. Right. If we have a lot of structure in this jaw, right, a lot of distinct changes in direction and corners, it's gonna look more masculine. If these corners are rounded right, it's gonna look a little more feminine, right? So with your drawing, you got this angle, right? But the back part of the job goes too long. It's too tall this way. This angle looks correct. This angle right here, you got that? Correct. And then we go to the front part of the chin. Now your chin is a little bit rounded. It doesn't have those corners that are here, right? Those points, yours is rounded, so it looks a little softer, a little less masculine than the photo reference. And this angle here is a little bit off. And then this angle years goes this way, and it's a little too far out to the right. And it should be like this. It's also this distance is a little too a little too long compared to the photo reference. You got the tilt right? These points are lined up. And so that tilt is correct. Excellent job on that. Your jaws just too long. That's where the main problem is. Shorten it up and it's gonna look more like the person that you're trying to achieve the lightness off. All right, let's move on to the next point. 5. 4 parallel lines: The next thing I wanted to talk to you is about parallel lines and lining up the features along peril. It lines vertically. So if we have a center line and this is a little review from the last lesson, we have to place the features somewhere along that line vertically, right to space and place them if we line up the eyes. Okay, let's do it over here. We line up the eyes from corner to corner, the nose bottom of the nose, lips, chin right, eyebrows, even the bottom of ears, top of the ears. All that stuff there are gonna be parallel right. It's like we're looking at a box that's front. It's facing us perpendicular, tli. There's no angle to it, really? So on your drawing, let's kind of do that. So when you're drawing, if we line up the eyes and try to get it exactly like the photo we noticed, we noticed some things are are off in terms of that lineup. So you're years are kind of your eyes air drifting up a little bit right are drifting, actually drifting down slightly compared to the reference photo. Okay, so that's going down the nose, mouth, chin. Those all seem to be right on. Okay, so you're in the ballpark there. So it's those eyes that are a little bit drifting down. And you want to correct that so that it's parallel, right? All these things are parallel. That's pretty simple to do. And to check your drawing with that. So just make sure the line up the features make sure there parallel. All right. Sam PICO, you did a great job. It looks beautiful. Let's recap what we covered today. Point number one. You know, we went from general to specific, right? So working from big to small. And that first thing was the the silhouette of the head, the silhouette and proportion of the heads so important. If you can nail that, you're really in the ballpark right away. But if you don't Ah, a little small error or a big air like that gets bigger and bigger. Okay, so silhouette and proportion, the overall shape of the head. Then we went to the next, um, smallest refining facet, and that was the shape of the face itself. And then we went for the shape of the hair mass, and we talked about how much hair the length of the shortness of hair has to do with how someone appears. You wouldn't think so, but it is very true. And then we talked about the three parts of the jaw that makes someone look like who they are. And point number five waas lining up the features with parallel lines. Right? So that not only helps us get the relationship between the features, but it also gets helps us get the tilt of the head by lining up the points of the jaw. Right, So there, everything's related here. All right, so that's it. I hope you enjoyed this video. Uh, I really think it's gonna help you get a likeness with your portrait. It's and just let me know in the comments What you think. Take care. Bye bye.